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Service and regulatory announcements

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Service and regulatory announcements
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Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
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Serv. regul. announc. - U. S., Plant Quar. Control Adm.
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United States -- Plant Quarantine and Control Administration
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Washington, D.C.
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U.S. G.P.O.
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16 v. : ; 23 cm.

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Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
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serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

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S.R.A.--P.Q.C.A. no. 96 (July/Sept. 1928)-S.R.A.--P.Q.C.A. no. 111 (Apr./June 1932).
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Title from caption.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
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030288967 ( ALEPH )
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sn 86014227 ( LCCN )
0888-7608 ( ISSN )
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351 ( ddc )

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S. R. A.-P. Q. C. A. No. 99 Issued December, 1929


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMNISTRATION



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE, 1929



CONTENTS

Record of current work, April 1 to June 30, 1929: Page
Mediterranean fruit fly-------------------------------------------------------------- 10
Extent of infestation--------------------------------------------------------------- 50
Quarantine action ----------------------------------------------------------------- 51
Destruction of fruit---------------------------------------------------------------- 51
Spraying------------------------------------------------------------------------- 51
Elimination of summer host fruits------------------------------------------------- 5
Cleaning of railway cars and boats at destination --------------------------------------532
Road station operation------------------------------------------------------------- 53
Prevention of spread of gipsy moth------------------------------------------------------ 53
European corn-borer-quarantine enforcement---------------------------------------------5 4
Local eradication measures: ------------------------------------------------------- 3
State legislation------------------------------------------------------------------- 53
Extent of regulated areas --------------------------------------------------------- 5
Mexican fruit-worm eradication -------------------------------------------------------- 56
Reappearance of the fruit worm in Texas--------------------------------------------- 56
Enforcement of a nonhost or starvation period ---------------------------------------- 56
Fruit movement ------------------------------------------------------------------ 56
Japanese-beetle control ---------------------------------------------------------------- 57
Trapping adult beetles------------------------------------------------------------- 57
Soil treatment and spraying -------------------------------------------------------- 3_1
Inspection, treatment, and certification of restricted articles----------------------------- 53
Quarantine violations ------------------------------------------------------------ 5
Prevention of spread of pink bollworm -------------------------------------------------- 59
Parlatorla date-sca~le eradication ------------------------------------------------------- 59
White-pine blister-rust quarantine enforcement------------------------------------------- 60
Pine shipping permits------------------------------------------------------------- 60
New State legislation-------------------------------------------------------------- 60
Transit inspection----------------------------------------------------------------- 60
Quarantine and other official announcements:
Asiatic-beetle quarantine (No. 66)------------------------------------------------------- 62
Instructions to postmasters--------------------------------------------------------- 62
District of Columbia plant regulations --------------------------------------------------6 2
Instructions to postmasters------------------------------------------------------- 6 2
Japanese-beetle quarantine (No. 48)----------------------------------------------------- 62
Instructions to postmasters------------------------------------------------------- 62
Instructions to inspectors on the disinfection of nursery products for the Japanese and Asiatic
beetles (P. Q. C. A. 224)---------------------------------------------------------- 63
Japanese-beetle traps set in areas of light infestation (press notice) ----------------------- 76
Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (No. 68) -------------------------------------------Mediterranean fruit fly discovered in Florida (press notice) --------------------------Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the State of Florida on
account of the Mediterranean fruit fly -------------------------Florida to be quarantined on account of the fruit fly (press notice)-----------------------78S
Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine issued (press notice)---------------------------------,79
Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (effective May 1, 1029) ------------------------------ st
Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine revised (press notice) -------------------------------1
Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine revised (effective ML~ay 10, 1929)-----------------------91j
Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine revised to prohibit reshipmnents of Floridla fruit,; and~
vegetables from Northeastern States to South and W~est (press notice) 1----------- 2
Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine revised (effective June 7, 1929) -1.%
Nursery -stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37)------------------1,N
Entry of narcissus bulbs for propagation in the fall of 1929 (P1. Q. C. A. 223 --_------------ 118
Phony peach-disease quarantine (No. 7)----------- -__- -- --_----- -- I11"
Georgia and Alabama quaran tined on accoun t of thie phony peach dIisease i press nii ) 11's Quarantine on account of the phony peach disease ------------------------------ 110
Pluk-bollworm quarantine (No. 52)----------------------------------------- ------ I '
Pink-bollworin regulated area modified (press notice) ----------------- ------..12'j
Modification of pink-bollwormi quarantine -------------------------------- 121
Woodgate-rust quarantine (No. 6i5)--------------------------- --------- 1'_'.
Instructions to postmasters ---------------------------------------------_------ 1211
Miscellaneous items------------------------------------------------------- 126
Convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act___----------... I 16
Organization of the P'lant Quarantine andl Control Akdmlinistration - - - 2 --80297-30--l







50 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [A.PrU-June,

RECORD OF CURRENT WORK, APRIL 1 TO JUNE 309 1929

MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY

The Mediterranean fruit fly was discovered at Orlando, Fla. on AprH 6, 1929, and the 'identity of the pest confirmed by the specialists of the department at Washington on April 10. A rapid survey of the immediate vicinity resulted in the determination that the fly was thoroughly established in several orchards within the town limits of Orlando and at a few outlying points several miles north and south of that city. Subsequent scouting eventually showed the infestation to. cover a considerable part of central Florida.
The seriousness of the situation and the importance -of completely eradicating the insect, if possible, were at once recognized. Emergency funds of $50,000 were immediately released by the State, and, by transfer, $40,000 was promptly made available by the Department of Agriculture for preliminary work. This was followed by congressional action upon recommendation of the Secretary of Agriculture, making $4,250,000 immediately available for the control and eradication operations.
Lines of work which were undertaken immediately following the discovery of the insect included (1) scouting to determine the extent of the spread in Florida and elsewhere, (2) quarantine action regulating the movement of all products that might carry infestation to other localities, (3) destruction of all fruit in infested and surrounding orchards, and (4) spraying the trees concerned with an attractive poison bait as a substitute for the natural food thus removed.
EXTENT OF INFESTATION

The surveys undertaken to determine the extent of spread confirmed the idea that Orlando was the starting point of the invasion, particularly as n o infestations, of a like nature have been determined elsewhere. Surveys around this -center of infestation first revealed the pest to have been distributed rather extensively throughout Seminole, Orange, and the eastern part of Lake Counties, and into the extreme north end of Osceola County. This -was followed soon by the discovery of fruit-fly infestations along the east coast extending throughout the eastern parts of Brevard and Volusia Counties from Ormond Beach to Merritt Island.
During May infested fruit was discovered in five additional counties, and, by the close of the fiscal year on June 30, 16 counties were known to be involved in the spreadof the pest. Table 1 shows the number and location of properties found infested from the time the fruit fly was discovered until the end of June. Most of the properties listed were town lots and similar locations other than commercial orchards, and, outside of the immediate vicinity -of Orlando, the infestations found in commercial orchards were extremely light and difficult to discover, indicating a very recent establishment of infestation.

TABLn 1.-Number of properties& found and reported infested with the Mediterranean fruit fly from the date of discovery to June 30, 1929

Apr. 6- June 1-30 Total to Apr. 6- June 1-30 Total to
May 31 June 30 May 31 June 30

Brevard I ---------- 59 13 72 Pinellas ------------ 0 9 9
Duval 2 . . . . . . 0 0 Polk --------------- 7 27 34
Flagler ------------- 0 4 4 Putnam ------------ 5 13 18
Hillsborough ------- 0 17 17 St.Johns ----------- 0 8 8
Lake I -------------- 53 35 88 Seminole I ---------- 88 9 97
Levy --------------- 0 1 1 Sumter ------------- 1 0 1
Marion ------------ 3 4 7 Volusia I ----------- 107 37 144
Orange' ----------- 356 44 400
Osceola I ----------- 17 10 27 Total -------- 697 230 927

2 Infestations discovered in these counties before the end of April.
2 The reported infestation at Jacksonville was based on the discovery of Mediterranean fruit flies In a residence, where they had emerged from a box of fruit shipped from Orange County. The flies were killed and no field infestation has been discovered at that point.






19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

The likelihood of carriage of infested fruits into the Cotton Belt States was obvious, and even prior to the taking of Federal quarantine action, the nature of this risk was brought to the attention of the appropriate officials of these States in communications on April 23, in which such officials were urged to have inspections made of all Florida fruits in markets or storage so that any infested shipments could be promptly destroyed. The Federal department assisted in this survey of other States to the extent of supplying some funds and personnel.
This work resulted in the discovery of some 14 shipments of infested fruita good deal of it in carload lots--distributed to 10 localities in the following States: Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, and Texas. The infestation in North Carolina was at Raleigh, and was based on the discovery of adult flies which had emerged in a small grocery store from infested Florida fruit.
Intensive clean-up operations were conducted at this point by the State officials with Federal cooperation. Additional instances of infested fruit were reported from New York and Ohio. Especially extensive field surveys were undertaken in vicinities in which infested fruit was discovered, but their results were all negative and up to the time of the preparation of this report no appearance of the fruit fly has been determined anywhere outside of the central area of Florida-a situation which greatly favors the eradication effort.

QUARANTINE ACTION

The State Plant Board of Florida promulgated on April 15 a State quarantine covering the then known area of infestation, together with a wide protective zone. Federal quarantine action restricting all movement of host fruits and vegetables from all parts of the State of Florida followed as soon as the required legal notices permitted. This quarantine, as issued April 26, became immediately effective as to all areas in that State which had been determined as infested, and was effective throughout the remainder of the State on May 1.
As the surveys revealed new properties involved outside the known infested areas, the State regulations were amended to cover such additional districts. Modifications making additions of this kind were issued by the State plant board on April 27, May 4, May 13, May 28, June 8, and June 17.
Both Federal and State regulations prohibited any movement whatever from groves within 1 mile of infested properties and placed especially severe restrictions as to destination on fruit produced within 9 miles of infested properties In this manner the quarantine restrictions were automatically extended to new territory as rapidly as new infestations were discovered.
The host fruits and vegetables listed in the Federal quarantine regulations as first issued included all wild and cultivated citrus and noncitrus fruits (except watermelons, pineapples, coconuts, and other nuts) and the following kinds of vegetables: Peppers of all kinds, gourds, pumpkins, squashes, tomatoes, beans of all kinds, and eggplants. Later, in August, strawberries, squashes, pumpkins, gourds, and all kinds of beans except Lima beans and broad beans were released from restriction, as the experimental work failed to reveal adequate evidence of their being susceptible to attack.

DESTRUCTION OF FRUIT

The destruction of host fruits on infested pro)erties and properties in the immediate vicinity-that is, within 1 mile-constituted the first point of attack in the eradication effort. By the end 4)f May 33G acres had been cleaned and the equivalent of 563,067 boxes of citrus fruit destroyed. Within this area 77,702 acres had ben covered by the crews the second time an(d were reported as having ben recleaned. During June 33.913 additional acres were cleaned the first time, 62,357 acres recleaned, and the equivalent of 15,433 boxes of citrus fruit destroyed.
SPRAYING

Following the destruction of the infested fruit, the next step was to eliminate the flies remaining in the district to prevent their migrating elsewhere. To accomplish this the infested groves and others within 1 mile thereof as to all points of infestation wer. promptly sprayed with a swecteted poison alit and these sprayings were repeated at frequent intervals-if possible, every week, and, at the beginning in the heavily infested areas, even oftener.






52 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,
- The work of fruit destruction and spraying at the height of the- season
required the services of upwards of 5,000 men, of whom 250 or more were director of workthe rest laborers, and of all available trucks, spraying machinery, etc., secured by loanand- purchase and the establishment 'of a depot of machines and supplies which rivaled war conditions. The progress in both ihe clean-up work and the spraying activities is shown in Table 2.

TABLE 2.-Progress of eradication measure&, April 6 to June 30, 1929

Apr. 6 to June 1 to Total
May 31 30

Clean-up:
CitrusCleaned first time ----------------------------------------- acres 86,336 33,913 120i 20
Cleaned second time --------------------------------------- do ---- 77,702 62,357 140,059
Total citrus cleaned and recleaned -------------------------- do ---- 164,038' 96,270 260,308
Citrus fruit' destroyed ------------------------------------- boxes - 563,067 15,433 578,500
Cultivated noncitrusCleaned first time ----------------------------------------- acres - 10,000 84,527 94,527
Cleaned second time --------------------------------------- do ---- 0 1,458 1 458
Properties cleaned -------------------------------------- number -- ---------- 8,548 -------- I
Properties recleaned ---------------------------------------- do ---- ---------- 2,847 ---------Clean-up personnelInspectors -------------------------------------------------- do ---- 49 52 ---------Foremen ------------------------------------ -------------- do ---- 2654 258 ---------Laborers --------------------------------------------------- do ---- 3,290 2,172 ---------Spraying:
Areasprayed I -------------------------------------------------- acres-- 69,106 293,359 362,665
Materials usedSugar --------------------------------------------------- pounds-- 281, 600 498,603 780,203
Molasses ------------------------------------------------ gallons-- 25,761 27,703 53,464
Lead arsenate ------------------------------------------- pounds-- 32,896 56,490 89,386
Spraying personnelInspectors ---------------------------------------------- number-- 6 14 --------Foremen --------------------------------------------------- do ---- 38 59 ---------Laborers ---------------------------------------------------- do ---- 211 471 --- ------I In this table, an acro sprayed three times, for example, is counted as 3 acres.

ELIMINATION OF SUMMER HOST FRUITS

it was agreed by State and Federal authorities and others in interest that. the program which had been adopted in the case of the Mexican fruit-worm invasion in the lower Rio Grande Valley was essential to eradication of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Florida, namely, the establishment of a summer starvation period within the infested and protective zones during which there'would be a complete elimination of all host fruits and vegetables in a stage of growth attractive to the fly, and, in lieu of such source of normal food, to supply the flies with an attractive substitute in the form of the sweetened poison bait to which reference has already been made. The effectiveness of this method has been fully demonstrated in the work so far, and the hope of eradication is largely centered on its intensification and continuance. It involves, however, cooperation on the part of every citizen of the State, and the acceptance by such citizens of very material sacrifices, in as much as it will mean, if success is ta be achieved, the elimination-grubbing up or cutting down--of the trees or shrubs ripening fruit during the starvation period, as well as the prohibition of the growth of host vegetables during that period. This need of the destruction of plants comes from the impracticability which has been fully demonstrated of the daily or weekly removal of ripening fruits and vegetables from such areas. This giving up, during the period necessary to eradicate the fly, of cherished yard or garden plants and commercial or other plantings of the type indicated in the interest of the major citrus industry is recognized as a hard requirement of the citizens of the State, but one which seems to be absolutely necessary if the fruit fly is to be eliminated.
CLEANING OF RAILWAY CARS AND BOATS AT DESTINATION

Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting restricted articles from Florida are required to be cleaned or disinfected at the point of unloading before being used again in interstate commerce.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

In view of the fact that the Florida situation was not fully known and that there was a possibility of such cars containing infested products, it was apparent that cars loaded with Florida host fruits and vegetables unloaded at northern points and then placed uncleaned on loading tracks in peach-growing districts and other fruit-producing areas might result in the escape of the Mediterraneau fruit fly in such areas and eventually in the general establishment of the pest throughout the United States.
As the shipment of Florida host fruits and vegetables to the Southern and Western States was discontinued on May 16 under department order P. Q. C. A. No. 229 (which is printed in full on p. 101), the destinations involved in the carcleaning requirements throughout the remainder of the spring shipping season were confined to the Northern and Central States.
Between May 16 and June 30, 4.310 carload shipments of restricted material were reported as consigned from Florida to approximately 190 cities and towns scattered throughout such States. By June 30. car-cleaning reports had been received from the railroad companies covering 4.181 cars.
In order to check on the efficiency of car cleaning, empty refrigerator and ventilated cars were inspected in transit at Potomac Yards, Cincinnati. Evansville, St. Louis, and Atlanta, and for briefer periods at Buffalo, Cleveland. Toledo, and Chicago. One hundred thirty-one cars which bore evidence that they had been used in the transportation of Florida products but had not been cleaned at the unloading point were intercepted between the middle of May and the end of the fiscal year. These were either cleaned at the point of interception or traced and cleaned later. The figure given is in addition to certain ears found dirty by railroad employees themselves and which were cleaned without reporting the individual number! of the cars concerned to the department.
Supplemental to the Federal requirements. the officers of the States of Arizona and California insisted on the fumigation of all refrigerator cars entering their borders from eastern points, and under those requirements the largest of the refrigerator-car lines operating in the Southwestern States reports having fumigated 295 cars with hydrocyanic-acid gas during May, and 1,174 during June.
ROAD STATION OPERATION

In order to prevent the mnov ment of Florida host fruits and vegetables by truck and other road vehicles, a patrol service was established along the border between that State and Georg'a and Alabama.
There were 22,727 cars inspected on the Georgia-Florida boundary during the period from May 16 to 31: of these 1.167 carried 1.442 lots of contraband fruits and vegetables. During June, 53,872 vehicles were inspected on this line, of which 2.319 carried 2.627 lots of contraband articles.
On the Florida-Alabama line during June. 84.747 vehicles were inspected, of which 5,332 were found to be carrying fruits and vegetables.

PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF GIPSY MOTH

During the 3-month period covered by this report the principal work concerns forest scouting in the barrier zone and in New Jersey to determine any points of infestation, together with the creosoting of all egg masses found at any such points. In June, spraying begins in all districts which have been determined to be infested by the prnce(ling scouting work of fall and winter.
As to New Jersey the outstanding feature was the finding of but a single point of infestation during the fiscal year. This consisted of a number of egg clusters found in the western extreme of Piscataway Township in Middle;ex County. All of the egg clusters had hatched and small gipsy-moth larvae were found feeding on shrubbery and young fruit trees inll the imlnediate vicinity. The vegetation in and surrounding the area determined as infested was sprayed during the period between May 10 and June 10 and was closely guarded to prevent the removal from the vicinity of any trees, shrubs, or portions thereof.
Spraying work in the barrier-zone area in western New England w'as started on June 3 and finished shortly after the end of the month. Infested localities were sprayed in the towns of Poultney, Vt., Egremont. New Malrlboro. Otis, Sandisfield, Sheffield, and Tyringham, Mass., and Canaan, Cornwall, Goshen, Norfolk, North Canaan, Salisbury, Wallingford, and Warren, Conn. An in-






54 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

festation of a single egg cluster in Fai 'rfield, Conn., and of two egg clusters in Lee, Mass., were treated, but spraying in those towns was not considered necessary. In the- New York sect ion of the barrier-zone similar spraying operations were carried out by the State department of conservation.
The inspection carried out in connection with quarantine enforcement continues to show. some infestation of forest products and stone and quarry products offered for interstate shipment, but no infestations have been discovered on such shipments of nursery stock and other evergreens. The details of this work for the period from January 1 to June 30, 1929, are shown in Table 3.

TABLE~ 3.-Inspections under Federal gipsy-moth, quarantine, January 1 to June 30, 1929


Forest products Stone and quarry Nursery stock Other evergreens
products

Month Ship- Ship- Larvae ship- Ship- Ship- Ship- Ship- Shipmenits ments oregmerits merits Egg merits merits Egg merits merits Egg
in- .in- masesg in- in- masses in- in- masses in- in- masses
spected fested massspected fested spected fested spected fested

INumber Number Number Number
January--- 1,690 2 27 10,535 4 4 311 0 0 287 0 0
February--. 2,392 1 6 11,651 9 11 440 0 0 280 00
March ---- 2,086 2 14 18,353 1 1 2,572 0 0 1,137 00
April -------854 7 204 29,633 19 27 14,051 0 0 861 0 0
May -----2,079 3 6 34,352 1 1 9,175 0 0 838 0 0
June ------ 2,149 2 213 39,540 3 254 956 0 0 961 0 0
Total... 11,250 17 260 144,064 37 398 27,505 0 0 3,499 0 0

I Not including seven egg clusters found on boards which were to be used for car doors.
2 Larvae.
8 Not including 32 egg clusters found on car stakes and materials to be used in crating granite.

EUROPEAN CORN-BORER-QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT

Active permit and inspection operations for the season started during June when the market inspection of vegetables was begun at Boston, and the New, York City office opened for the issuance of permits for the redistribution 'Of green corn grown outside the regulated area. Beets grown in eastern Massachusetts arrived rather badly infested and borers were also found in cut gladiolus flowers. Slight infestation was reported in New England-grown beans. The infestation in the market-garden areas is most pronounced in the vicinity of Woburn, Arlington, Winchester, Dighton, and Somerset, Mass., and Newport and Bristol Counties, R. I.
The products certified during the 6-month period from January 1 to June 30, 1929, are shown in Tables 4 and 5, respectively.

TABLE 4.-S1ielled corn certified under the Euro pean corn-borer quarantine, January 1 to June 30, 1929

MnhCentral Western Mot Central Western
Motharea area M tharea 1 area

Bushels Bushels Bush&els Bushels
January ------------------- 189, 539 503, 768 May ---------------------- 83,444 233, 320Y
February -----------------1327 3094Jn ------------- 147,046 196,662
March---------------------- 91,442 382, 104
April---------------------- 105, 781 244, 677 Total ---------------- 770,489 1,941,525

That part of the 1-generation area east of the western border of Pennsylvania; this area was listed as "eastern area"' in Trable 2, p. 98, S. R. A. No. 97.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55

TABJ 5.-Uertification of cut flow-ers and plants in 2-generation area (eastern
New England), January 1 to June 30, 1929

Cut Beans, Cut Beans,
flowers celery flowers
Month and entire eeand Month and entire celery,
plants rhubarb I plants rhubarb
certified certified

Number Bushels Number Bushels
January ------------------- 5,124 0 May -----------------------20,548 0
February. ------------------- 25, 800 0 June --------------------- 19,194 24,560
March ----------------------- 17,937 0
April ------------------------ 20,203 0 Total ----------------108,806 24,560

I Not restricted Jan. 1 to May 31, inclusive.
I In addition to 2,632 celery plants, and 23 rhubarb plants.

LOCAL ERADICATION MEASURES

Last season isolated European corn-borer infestations were discovered at two or three points in western New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania. In order to delay the spread of the borers into these localities, the extension of the regulated area was limited in such a manner as to prevent the movement of infested products to those points, and an effort has been made to eradicate the infestation completely from these localities by means of burning over the infested fields with fuel oil. The burning operations were begun in New Jersey on April 17 and completed during May. Prior to that time, similar work had been carried out in the outskirts of Brooklyn and on Staten Island, N. Y., as control measures to prevent spread into New Jersey.

STATE LEGISLATION

The Legislature of Michigan, on April 23, 1929, repealed the State corn borer enforcement act in the belief that farmers are now able to carry out effective control measures without State aid.

EXTENT OF REGULATED AREAS

Recent calculations as to the amount of territory now infested by the European corn borer in the United States shows that more than 175,000 square miles in 13 States are involved in infestations. The regulated area totals 194,580.94 square miles, practically all of which has been reached by the borer with the exception of most of the Upper and about one-third of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. (See S. R. A. No. 98.) The areas at present restricted under the Federal quarantine regulations on account of this pest are shown in Table 6.

TAnLE 6.-Areas regulated on account of the European corn borer under the
quarantine aendment approved February 25, 1929

1-generation area: Square miles
New Hampshire ------------------S re I2 00 2gnaine area:--------------------- 1, 62
Vermont -------------------------- 4, 912. 90 New Hampshire ------------------ 4,659.00
Massachusetts -------------------- 2,243.25 Massachusetts ------------- 4,567.92
Connecticut ----------------------- 42. 73 1hode Island --------------------1, 248.00
New Jersey- .........------------------- 71. (onnectiut--------------------,0.
New York -------------------- 49,19. 00 Fishers Island, N. Y ------------- 8.00
Pennsylvania --------------------- 27, 554. 35
Ohio -----------------------2,424.00
Indiana ----------------------- 10, 4. 00
Mlchig --------------------- 57, 9. 00
West Virginia ---------------------- 516.00
Total ---------------------18S1, 4OS. 52 Total --------------------13722
.... 13, 172. 42
Tot l .. ... .. .. ... .. .. .. 1 1, 08 52 ot l .. ...... ... .. ..... .....







56 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

MEXICAN FRUIT-WORM ERADICATION
REAPPEARANCE OF THE FRUIT WORM IN TEXAS

That the Mexican fruit worm had regained foothold in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas was determined in April by the finding of infestation in two local packing houses in which a small quantity of fruit had been stored at the close of the period permitted for the harvesting of the citrus crop. Previous to such reappearance almost two years had elapsed (from June, 1927, to April, 1929) during which nO specimens of the pest had been found in the area. An intensive reexamination disclosed that the premises of 10 growers in Hidalgo County were involved in this reinvasion.
Upon the determination of this infestation all existing permits to ship citrus fruit from the district were canceled and new permits were issued authorizing the movement of fruit held in storage in the quarantined area only to points north of the Cotton Belt. The fruit remaining on the infested properties was destroyed.
As reported in the last issue of the announcements, at the earnest request of growers and shippers, supported by requests from the appropriate State officials,, the time for harvesting the crop of 1928-29 had been extended for the season of 1929 from February 28 to March 30, this action being based upon the lateness of the crop in maturing, the unusually weak demand for citrus fruits throughout most of the season, and the seeming absence of an infestation during this and the preceding crop, together with the apparently complete elimination of 1ifestation in the area. This extension to include what in that section is practically a summer month, March, apparently gave opportunity for the insect to become reestablished from infested fruit reaching the Mexican towns along the border, and as now recognized by all concerned was an error of judgment not to be repeated.
ENFORCEMENT OF A NONHOST OR STARVATION PERIOD

During the 3-month period the elimination of trees and shrubs which produce fruit during the summer season (such as peaches and plums) has reached substantial completion. All but 77 of the 37,293 such trees found have been, destroyed.
On the subject of alternate host trees the Texas regulations relating to the fruit worm were amended by the commissioner of agriculture June 3 by making provision that
in the event any person, firm, or corporation owning such condemned fruit trees shall fail or refuse to destroy such trees immediately after having been instructed to do so by the commissioner of agriculture, * it shall be the duty of said commissioner
* *to forthwith destroy such trees, or otherwise render them not a nuisance.
Under a proclamation issued by the commissioner supplementing this amend-7 ment, dated June 20, 1929, it is ordered that whereas the introduction of host plants into ***control zones constitutes a serious complication to the Mexican fruit-fly eradication work * therefore * n~ such host plants shall be permitted to pass over the said quarantine' lines hereby established at the boundaries of Hidalgo, Cameron, and Willacy Counties, except under special permit by the commissioner of agriculture.
Related to the above action was an order issued by the State Iregulating the storage of host fruits in the valley and requiring that such fruits off ered for sale or held in storage in the control zone * shall be protected from possible infestation by the Mexican fruit worm by being covered with screen not to exceed a sixteenth-inch mesh.
FRUIT MOVEMENT

To a large extent fruit movement ceased at the end of the harvesting period on March 30. The small amounts remaining which were shipped from storage brought the total movement for the season from October 1, 1928, to June 3 '0,1929, to 1,745 carloads by freight, to which should be added the equivalent, of 233 carloads by express, and 445 carloads by truck and auto, or a total of 2,423 carloads of fruit.
Highway traffic in fruit having practically ceased at the end of March, the road station at Encino was closed on April 12. Eleven days later it 'Was resumed on account of the discovery of infestation in the valley and since that time traffic moving in both directions has been inspected in order to prevent the entry of Florida fruit which might contain the Mediterranean fruit fly.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEM21ENTS 57

Of the 44,018 vehicles inspected during the period from January 1 to June 30, 1929, 6,911 were found to be carrying host fruit. The fruit in 2,123 passenger cars and 2 trucks proved to be uncertified and was not permitted to proceeds.
JAPANESE-BEETLE CONTROL
TRAPPING ADULT BEETLES

One of the new features of the Japanese-beetle-control project this season has been the utilization of geraniol traps at the isolated points of infestation of 1928, with the purpose of greatly reducing, or possibly, as to some points, eradicating the insect by this means.
Such trapping is particularly useful if started promptly with the first emergence of the beetles, namely, before they have begun to lay eggs in the soil. The geraniol used is a powerful attractant for the Japanese beetle and is in a large degree selective in that it does not attract other insects. In isolated areas the traps can be used without running the risk of attracting beetles from surrounding territory and the total number caught in the traps represented so much gain in beetle reduction and prevention of local multiplication and spread.
Some 15,000 such traps were purchased during the spring of 1929 and arrangements were made during the latter part of May for their distribution, baiting. and tending. At the close of the fiscal year traps were in operation at the sites of last year's infestations at Alexandria, Va.; Washington, D. C.; Baltimore, Hagerstown, Frederick, Cambridge, Delmar, Chesapeake City, Elkton, Perryville, and Perry Point, Md.; Gettysburg, York, Lewistown, and Sayre, Pa.; Delmar, Del.; Springfield and Boston, Mass.; and Hartford and New London, Conn. Japanese beetles had been trapped in all these localities except Frederick, Md., and Sayre, Pa., by the middle of July, 1929. Necessarily the work of this season is experimental, and the reduction of future Japanese-beetle population at these points will be in direct proportion to the efficiency of the method.
SOIL TREATMENT AND SPRAYING

Control measures employed at isolated points of infestation, in addition to trapping and collecting the adult beetles, included soil treatment for the destruction of the larvae, and spraying all foliage in the vicinity of the infestation with arsenate of lead coated with lead oleate, a form of arsenical especially valuable for the destruction of this insect.
As will be seen from Table 7, carbon disulphide was used for the treatment of about 53 acres of soil (2,327,533 square feet), and lead arsenate was employed on about 31/) acres (153,500 square feet). In Maryland, spraying operations were carried out at Cambridge, Delmar, and Chesapeake City.

TABLE 7.-Outline of soil treatment ancL spraying operations to control the
Japanese beetle at isolated points of infestation, fiscal year 1929
SOIL AND TURF TREATMENT

Place Area CS2 used Cost Work Work

square feet Gallon. Dollars
Cambridge, --------------------------- 549,000 1,030 2, 5,. 30 Oct. 22 Nov. 7
Delmar, Md. (fall) --------------------------- 680,133 1, 269 2,898. 64 Nov. 9 Dee. 5
Delmar, Md. (spring) --------------------------- 108,000 250 478.80 Apr. 29 A pr. 30
Delmar, Del --------------------------- 619, 200 1,375 3, 180. 25 Apr. 4 \lay 4
Milford, Del ----------------------------------.. 49, 600 125 398. 28 Apr. 30 May 3
Springfield, Mass.,----------------------------- 187, 200 500 1, 437. 73 Apr. 13 Apr. 27
New London, Conn ----------------------------- 27,200 61 203.42 June 7 June 8
Hartford, Conn --------------------------------- 107, 200 240 54. 32 May 31 June 6
Total ------------------------------------- 2,327,533 4,S50 11,717.74

'This cost was all borne by the States concerned except $531.47, which wA expended by the Federal 0ovrnrment in Connecticut and Massachusetts.
3Additional work included the treatment of 153,500 square feet of soil at Springfleld, M:vs., with arsenate of lead, at a total cost of $422.44.
80297--30------2







58 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

TABLE 7.-Out line of soil treatment and spraying operations to control the
Japanese beetle at isolated points of infestation, fiscal year 1929--Contd.

SPRAYING


Shade Fruit Arsenate, Work Work
Place tes te Shrubs of lead Cost 1
tre re used began ended


Pounds Dollars
Cambridge, Md----------------- 1,890 215 11,055 4,022 2,062. 81 June 6 June 27
Chesapeake City, Md ----------------- ---------- ---------- 1,800 309.67 June 13 June 18
Delmnar, Md. (spring)------------ 360 50 3,400 624 364.80 June 28 July 1
D elm ar, D el -- - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - - - - (8) (8)
Total-------------------- 2,250 265 14,455 6,446 2,737.28 ------- --------I This cost was all borne by the States concerned.
3 Spraying at Delmar, Del., is to be carried on in July.

INSPECTION, TREATMENT, AND CERTIFICATION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES

The details of inspection, treatment, and certification of the various classes of articles whose movement is restricted under the Japanese-beetle quarantine are shown in Tables 8, 9, and 10.

TABLE 8.-Quantities of farm products, out flowers, soil, and similar products
certified under Japanese-beette quarantine, January 1 to June 30, 1929


Month Cut Sand, soil, Peat Compost Fruits and Hay and
flowers earth, etc. and manure vegetables straw

Bores Carloads Carloads Carloads Packages Bates
January--------------------------- 0 409 231 91 0 0
February ------------------------- 0 786 31 113 0 0
March---------------------------- 0 1,472 45 171 0 0
April ----------------------------- 0 779 52 70 0 0
May ----------------------------- 0 4,167 52 80 0 0
June---------------------------- 1,446 2,294 57 64 856, 755 1,379
Total ---------------------- 1,446 9,907 260 589 856,755 1,379


TABLE 9.-Chemical treatment of articles (other than, nursery stock) restricted
under the Japanese-beetle quarantine, January 1 to, June 30, 1929


Carbon disulphide I Arsenate Napthaof lead line
Month ----___ ___ __Potting d Leaf Surface Surface Surface
Soil2 Sand mold Clay soil soil soil

Cu. yds. Cu. yds. Cu. yds. Cu. yds. Sq. yds. Sq. ft. Sqft.X
January------------------------ 23 0 0 0 0 2,110 0
February----------------------- 56 0 0 0 0 0 4,091
March------------------------- 80 0 0 0 418 19,035 0
April -------------------------- 149 0 109 0 61 0 0
May -------------------------- 102 0 160 0 0 0 0
June-------------------------- 218 01 1091 01 0 59,817 0
Total--------------------- 628 0 378 0 4 79 80,962 4,091

I No calcium-cyanide treatments of restricted articles were carried out during the 6-month period.
2 In addition to the figures given above, 6 cubic yards of potting soil were treated with steam In February, 12 In March, and 8 in April.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

TABLE 10.--ertification and treatment of nursery stock under Japanese-beetle, quarantine, January 1 to June 30, 1929


Plants Plants certified after chemical
certified or thermal treatmentith- Total
without
Month chemical .. .. .. .plants
or thermal CS2 Worm- Hot certified treatment I seed oil water

January ---------------------------------------- 5,642,882 0 0 0 5,642,882
February --------------------------------------- 6,244,190 0 0 0 6,244,190
March .---------------------------------------- 8,369,679 1,501 0 7,328 8, 378, 508
April ------------------------------------------- 8,400,560 1,048 0 6, 172 8,407,780
M1 ay -------------------------------------------- 6,816,551 1,512 0 2,080, 6,820,143
June -------------------------------------------- 7,275,286 4 0 0 7,275,290
Total ----------------------------- 42, 749, 148 4,065 0 15,580 1 42,768,793

1 Included in this column are large numbers of plants which were certified after the roots had been washed entirely free from soil and thoroughly examined by an inspector.

QUARANTINE VIOLATIONS

A total of 387 shipments in apparent violation of the Federal or State Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations was intercepted during the first six months of 1929. In the majority of cases, the return of the uncertified material to the shipper was effected. A few of the shipments were permitted to proceed, and in a number of instances the contraband material was destroyed. In every case where practicable an investigation was made by an inspector, which included an interview with the shipper and the agent of the common carrier, and when the circumstances seemed to make it desirable the shippers were prosecuted.
Letters were addressed by the administration to a number of violators warning them of the possible consequences of further violations, and several prosecutions were instituted.

PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF PINK BOLLWORM

The quarter beginning April 1 is the least active period of the year in pinkbollworm-control operations. Temporary employees are laid off during that time and the permanent employees are detailed to bolly inspection, gin and oil mill clean-up work, and the maintenance of road stations.
The examination of bellies is carried out at San Antonio from material collected at various points in the State of Texas. Between the time the fieldscouting season closed and the completion of the work during the latter part of June, 1,557 bushels of follies were examined, including material from practically every cotton-growing county in Texas outside the regulated areas. No Indication of pink-bollworm infestation was found.
The gins and oil mills were closed and the clean-up of the premises practically completed by June 1. In addition to the ginning and fumigation figures for the crop year, given in the table in the last issue of the Service and Regulatory Announcements, 164 bales of lint were ginned during the 3-month period beginning April 1, and 8,742 bales of lint and 4,410 whales of linters were fumigated in Texas; 2,374 bales of lint were ginned and 2,210 bales of lint and 410 bales of linters were fumigated in New Mexico, and 720 bales of lint and 275 bales of linters were fumigated in Arizona. under the supervision of the inspectors of the administration. The total for the season amounted to 257,834 bales (if lint ginned in the regulated area in threO quarantined States and 11,743 bahes ginned in that part of Mexico adjacent to the border; 265,622 bales of lint and 18,360 bales of linters were fumigated under Federal supervision including that which was imported from the adjoining areas i1 Mexico.

PARLATORIA DATE-SCALE ERADICATION

The reconnaissance surveys outside known scalv-infested areas, udertaken as a part of the vigorous Parlatoria-eradication operations now in progress, have largely been completed, and nearly all the available funds and personnel are






60 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

at present assigned to direct scale-extermination -work. The limited surveys still under way have resulted in the addition since January 1, 1929, of 325 palms in the Imperial Valley and 8,305 in the Salt River Valley to the total of 52,785 palms recorded and mapped in these valleys during the last six months of 1928. (See S. R. A. 97, p. 97.)
The virtual completion of the reconnaissance work and the fact that many of the recently -appointed inspectors now have enough experience so that they are able to work independently, have made possible an enlargement of the intensive palm-inspection program. A total of 169,973 palms were thus examined during the first six months of 1929 as compared with 70,630 during the previous half year. Nevertheless, only 362 infested palms were found as compared with 1,228 for the last half o)f 1928. The difference is largely in the Imperial Valley of California where a number of heavily infested properties were discovered in the fall of 1928 and the palms destroyed, or pruned and torched.
An important factor in the improved conditions has been the adoption of the policy of destroying abandoned and uncared-for palm plantings by pulling out the palms with tractors or having laborers dig them out. A total of 16,987 palms were so destroyed during the. 6-month period, consisting in the main of slightly infested seedling gardens without commercial value.
The outline of field activities given in Table 11 indicates the progress in the scale-extermination operations. It will be noted that in the Coachella Valley, 218 palms were found infested. Over half (120) of this number were on one property, newly found infested in April, and almost all the palms in that garden were destroyed.

TABLE 11.-Palm ingpections, date-scale-eradication project, Janu&ary 1 to June 30, 1929

Arizona California
Item
Phoenix Yuma Coachella Imperial
district Idistrict district Vale

Palm inspections ----------------------------------------- 15,198 6,935 144,540 13,300
Infested properties found------------------------------------ 10 0 1 21 57
Infested palms found and treated or destroyed ------------------ 32i 0 218 112
Palms located on reconnaissance survey---------------------- 8,305----------- ---------- 325

'-Of the 21 properties on which infested palms were determined in the Coachella district during the 6-month period, 7 were reported as new infestations.

WHITE-PINE BLIS PER-RUST QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT
PINE SHIPPING PERMITS

Under the revision of the white-pine blister-rust quarantine regulations which became effective August 15, 1928, provision was made for shipping 5-leaf pines from New England or New York or Washington State into certain other infected States when the trees are grown from seed under specified sanitation conditions for protection from the blister rust. One New England applicant for such a permit was found to be growing pines under- those conditions (luring the past six months and a permit was issued to his nursery.

NEW STATE LEGISLATION

The State of Michigan declared the cultivated black currant a public nuisance, under public act No. 313 approved by the governor on May 24, 1929. This act also authorizes the commissioner of agriculture to set aside certain areas for growing white pine, and other areas for tho culture of currants and gooseberries. Minnesota has also enacted new legislation under which the commissioner of forestry and fire prevention is authorized to designate blisterrust-control areas within that State.
TRANSIT INSPECTION
The inspection of nursery stock in transit resulted in the interception of 138 violations of the w'hite-pine blister-rust quarantine during the 6-month period






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

ending June 30, 1929. Of this number, more than 55 per cent were shipped by persons having no previous knowledge of the quarantine restrictions. Sixtytwo per cent of the violations by commercial concerns, and 80 per cent of those by other consignors were moving by parcel post and most of the remainder were shipped by express. Violations by nurserymen decreased from 131 in the spring of 1928 to 61 during the present season, a decrease largely due, in all probability, to the modification of a former regulation which required the labeling of containers to show contents. One shipment of black currants from Canada was found in transit in violation of Federal quarantine No. 7 pertaining to the importation of blister-rust host plants from foreign countries. During the course of inspection, one of the inspectors at Chicago intercepted a shipment of Pinus ponderosa diseased with a rust known as Pcridermium harknessi which is not believed to be established in the eastern United States. The shipment was consigned from a Pacific Coast State into New York.
State Inspectors reported 7 violations of the blister-rust quarantine and 2 of the narcissus-bulb quarantine, while Federal inspectors not regularly engaged in transit inspection found 13 violations of the former quarantine and 1 of the latter.
Table 12 summarizes the violations of the various domestic quarantines intercepted by transit inspectors during the first six months of the calendar year 1929.

TA L 12.-Shipments intercepted by white-pine blister-rust inspectors, January 1 to June 30, 1929

Commer- Noncom- Commer- NoncomQuarantine cial mercial Quarantine cial mercial
shippers shippers shippers shippers

No. 38.-Black stem rust 0 8 No. 66.-Asiatic beetles ------- 4 0
No. 43.-European corn borer. 48 24 Violations of both No. 48 and
No. 45.-Gipsy moth and No. 66 ---------------------- 617
brown-tail moth ------------ 5 17 Violation of both No. 52,
No. 48.-Japanese beetle ------ 3 2 Pink bollworm, and No. 61,
No. 53.-Satin moth.. 0 11 Thurberia weevil ----------- 01
No. 62.-Narcissus bulb ------ 1 37
&o. 63.-White pine blister Total-------------------1I3 244
rust ------------------------ 61 771


In addition to the figures given in Table 12, the transit inspectors at Nev% York City stopped 19 intrastate shipments moving in New York in violation of the Japanese-beetle quarantine established by that State to protect its uninfested areas. Shipments found moving in violation of Federal quarantines are systematically turned back, this practice in itself often constituting no small penalty, at least in the case of commercial shipments. Prosecutions are also instituted when the situation justifies that action.
Table 13 gives the number of shipments inspected at the various stations.

TABLE 13.-Shipments inspected for violations of Federal quarantines, January 1 to June 30, 1929

StationParcel
station post. Express Freight Total

Chicago -------------------------------------------------------- 184,302 2f, 650 1,672 212, G84
Kansas City -------------------------------------------------49, 615 8, 265,5 ,-57, 8
Omaha and Council Bluffs ------ ------------------------7,831 2,717 9 10,7
New York 7.. ...... ................. .,83 42, 717 4 9 1,85 ,
St. Paul ..................York------- -84,426 797 ------- S5, 223
St. Pul------------------------------- ---------- 228 76370 7,4
Denver -------------------------------- --------- 3,244 1,341 7517 5,102
Ogden ----------------------------------------- ---------70 241 311 517 51502
Og en.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ........... ()1 831 N I1, 560
Portland ............------------------ --------- 16, 779 3, 82 120 2,719
Seattle--------------------------------------- 8, 130 1, (7 54 9, 871
Spokane .................................................... I 2 9 402 18,593
Total ------------ -------------------------. 40K,362 5 ( 3, 302 C590







62 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION (April-June,

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ASIATIC-BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 66)
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFrncE DEPARTMENT, THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, May 10, 1929.
POSTMASTER.
My DEAR SIR: There is inclosed for your information and guidance a copy of Quarantine Order No. 66 of the United States Department of Agriculture on account of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle, effective March 15, 1929.
The conditions governing the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers or other portions of plants for ornamental use, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, are clearly set forth in regulation 5 of the order, and all postmasters concerned will be governed in accordance with the instructions contained therein.
Under the provisions of paragraph 1, section 46T, Postal Laws and Regulations, parcels containing any of the articles mentioned in the preceding paragraph may not be accepted for mailing from any of the areas quarantined in the order unless the articles have been inspected, certified, and marked as required.
Sincerely yours,
R. S. RExlAB,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PLANT REGULATIONS
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENEmAL,.
Washington, April 9, 1929.
POSTMASTER,
Wasington, D. 0.
My DEARj SIu: Inclosed herewith are copies of the revised rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products and other quarantined articles into and out of the District of Columbia, which became effective April 1, 1929. The purpose of th's revision is indicated in the press notice attached to the regulations.
Kindly see that all stations of your office receive proper instructions in regard to the enforcement of these revised rules and regulations and furnishi at least one copy to each station of your office.
If additional copies can be used to advantage they will be furnished upon request.
Sincerely yours.
R. S. REGAR,
Third Assistant Postma&ter General.


JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, THIPD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, "Washington, April 10, 1929,.
POSTMASTERZ.
My DEAR Sin: There is inclosed for your information and guidance a copy of notice of qluaranltine No. 48 with regulations (sixth revision), on account of the .Japanese beetle, which became effective February 15, 1929. Your careful attention is invited to the introductory note from which it will be seen that the regulated ,Irea has been considerably enlarged, that the ship-






19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

ment of farm products from New York City is brought under the same certification requirements as apply to the remainder of the main regulated area, and regulations 5, 6, and 7 have been rearranged in the interest of simplification.
You are requested to see that all requirements of the quarantine order are carefully observed at your office. See paragraph 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Sincerely yours,
R. S. REGAr.
Third Assistant Postmaster General.
INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE DISINFECTION OF NURSERY PRODUCTS FOR THE JAPANESE AND ASIATIC BEETLES
P. Q. C. A.-224. APRIL 16, 1929.
At the request of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, the Bureau of Entomology has submitted recommendations on the disinfection methods to be employed for the elimination of the Japanese and Asiatic beetles from nursery stock and other plant materials as well as from sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure. These recommendations have been reviewed by members of the administration staff and found satisfactory as a basis of quarantine enforcement. They are therefore submitted for your guidance in carrying out treatments as a basis for certification under quarantines 48 and 66.
All treatments herein described fall within the methods authorized under the quarantine regulations, except those providing for the temporary disinfection of soil plots, coldframes, hotbeds, etc., with carbon disulphide or naphthalene. These treatments have been authorized by the administration under the emergency existing in certain nurseries in the spring of 1929, but are not to be employed in the future except on specific authorization of the Chief of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
When improvements in the methods described in this paper are developed as a result of experience and experimental work, they will be incorporated in amendments or revisions of these instructions, and are not to be employed as a basis of certification until so authorized by the administration.
C. L. MIARLTT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine arnd Control Administration.

DISINFECTION OF NURSERY PRODUCTS FOR THE JAPANESE AND ASIATIC BEETLES

Prepared by Walter E. Fleming, entomologist, Japanese beetle laboratory,
United States Department of Agriculture, Moorestown, N. J., March, 1929

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
A. Introduction ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 63
2. Disinfection of sofl in the absence of plants ----------------------------------------------------- 64
A. Potting soil --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 64
1. Carbon-disulphide fumigation -------------------------------------------------------64
2. Naphthalene ----------------------------------------------------------- 65
3. Steam ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 65
B. Sand, peat, compost, and manure ..----------------------------------------------------- 65
C. Soil plots, coldframes, hotbeds -------------------------------------------------------------- 66
1. Lead arsenate ------------------------------------------------------------ 66
2. Carbon-disulphide fumigation ---------------------------------------------------------- 66
3. Carbon-disulphide emulsion -----------------------------------------------_-------- 66
4. N aphthalene .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . 67
--.-Nap--th lene---;----------------------------------------------------- 6
3. Disinfection of soil about the roots of plants ----------------------------------. ..- 67
A. Removing infestation by washing with water ----------------------------------------- 67
B. Hot water ....................68
C. Carbon-disulphid-emulsion i------------------------------------ -------D. Carhon-Iisiphide-emulsion field treatment -.--------------------------------........... 69
4. Directions for treating different nurery plants --------------------------------- --......... 1
A P otted green ouse plan ts ---------------------------------------------------------------B. Hardy herbaceous plants------------------------------------------------.
C. Deciduous ornamental shrubs ---------------------------------------------------------4
1). Deciduous ornamental trees ------------------------------E. Broadleaf evergreens ---.-.-.-------------------------------------------- 75
F. Narrowleaf evcrgre(--.- ... ..-------------------- 7

1. INTRODUCTION
The immature stages of the JapaInese beetle, Popillia japon ia Newman, usually cause little economic hage by feeding on the roots of the different varieties of nursery plants. The adult, however, is a reco(gized agricultural







64, PLA-N\T QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

pest. In view of this fact and of the limited distribution of the pest in the: United States, it is desirable to prevent its artificial dispersion as much as' possible. As nursery products Are shipped to distant points, they are among. the most dangerous agencies for dispersing the pest.
Research has been conducted at the Japanese beetle laboratory for over eight years to develop methods for treating nursery products so that they can be shipped into uninfested areas without danger. Most of this work has been done in cooperation with the nurseryman immediately concerned with the product to be shipped. Because of the cooperative nature of the work it has been possible to obtain a large amount of information on some varieties whileit was possible to obtain only a limited amount of data on oth~ers.
This paper is prepared with the object of presenting the latest technical in-. formation on the disinfection of various nursery products infested, with the' immature stages of the Japanese beetle. The term disinfection in this paper means the destruction of the immature stages of the beetle by physical or chemical treatments.
Introduction.-The information is presented, for convenience, under the fol-' lowing headings: 1. Disinfection of soil in the absence of plants. 2. Disinfection of soil about the roots of plants. 3. Directions for treating the different nursery plants.
2. DISINFECTION OF SOIL IN THE ABSENCE OF PLANTS

Infestation may occur in potting soil, in soil plots used for bedding plants, in frames, and on greenhouse benches. The following methods have been dev'eloped for disinfecting soil under these conditions.
A. Disinfection of Potting S~oil

Infested potting soil may be disinfected by fumigation with carbon disulphide or with naphthalene, or by heat treatment. All of these tretments are effective and do not impair the soil fertility when applied as recommended.,

A. 1. Fumigation of potting soil with carbon disulphide

Material.-A technical, C. P., or U. S. P. grade of carbon disulphide should be used to fumigate soil in which plants are to be grown. CAUTION. Carbon disulphide is a dangerous chemical. The vapor is inflammable, and is explosive when mixed with air. At a temperature of 2970 F. it will take fire spontaneously. It should be kept away from fire of all kinds, and from hot objects such as electric light bulbs, heating coils, steam pipes, etc. Lighted cigars, cigarettes, or pipes should never be brought into the same room. These facts must be brought to the attention of a responsible- person at the nursery before the treatment is applied to the soil.
Equipment .-T he fumigation must be done in a tight box or bin, which may be made of metal, wood, concrete, brick, stone, or other material providing the top, sides, and bottom are gas proof. It should be of a size adapted-to the quantity of soil to be treated. Some convenient sizes for treating small quantities of soil are shown in the following table:

TABLE 1

Capacity Depth Length Width Capacity Depth Length Width

Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet
2 cubic yards ----3 6 3 7 cubic yards ----3 9 7
3 cubic yards ----3 9 3 8 cubic yards ----3 12 6
4 cubic yards ----3 9 4 9 cubic yards ---3, 18 4. 5
5 cubic yards ----3 9 5 10 cubic yards ----3 18 5
6 cubic yards ---3 9 6


('oadtion of 8oil.-Soil of any type may be fumigated with carbon disulphide, providing the soil is friable and is thrown loosely into the box. It should be dry or only moist; wet soil must never be treated.
Temnperature.-The effectiveness of treatment with carbon disulphide depenids, to a large extent, upon the temperature of the soil. The higher the






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65

temperature the more readily the vapor diffuses through the soil, and the more easily the immature stages of the beetle are killed by its action. The temperature must be at least 450 F. when the treatment is applied. It must not fall
-below 400 F. during the course of the treatment; otherwise, it will be necessary to treat the soil again to insure destruction of the immature stages of the ,beetle.
Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be used at the rate of 1 pound, or 350 cubic ,centimeters, to 1 cubic yard of soil.
Application to soil.-Any quantity of soil may be fumigated, providing the carbon disulphide is distributed uniformly throughout. One method is to treat the soil while the box is being filled. Place 18 inches of soil loosely in the box; inject carbon disulphide at the rate of 176 cubic centimeters for each square yard of surface, distributing the material uniformly in holes 2 inches deep and 18 inches apart, 44 cubic centimeters to each hole. Fill the holes with soil immediately after the liquid is injected. When the first 18 inches of soil has been treated, put in 18 inches more, and treat it the same as the first. This .can be repeated until the box is filled. Another method is to treat the soil .after the box has been filled. This is done by making holes from the surface to the different levels, so that the carbon disulphide can be applied in the same positions as by the other method. The liquid, in this case, must be poured into the deep holes through a tube .to insure its reaching the proper level.
Period of fumigation.-The box must be sealed, and left undisturbed for .at least 48 hours.
Storage of soil.-The soil must be stored under such conditions as will prevent reinfestation.
A. 2. Treatment of potting soil with naphthalene

Material.-Flake naphthalene free from tar must be used for fumigation. CAUTION. Naphthalene will burn. It must be kept away from fire of all kinds.
Equipment.-It is not necessary to have a special fumigation box in which to treat soil with naphthalene.
Condition of soil.-Dry or moist soil of any type may be treated with naph.thalene. Wet soils can not be treated satisfactorily.
Temperature.-The effectiveness of the treatment depends to a large extent ,upon the temperature of the soil; the higher the temperature the more effective the treatment. The temperature must never be allowed to fall below 50' F.
Dosage.-Five pounds of flake naphthalene must be used to a cubic yard of soil.
Mixing.-The success of the treatment depends to a large extent upon the thoroughness with which the flakes are mixed with the soil. Spread the flakes .on the soil and mix thoroughly by shoveling over at least three times.
Period of fumigation.-Soil must be left undisturbed for a week after .treatment.
Storage of soil.-The soil must be stored under such conditions as will prevent reinfestation.
A. 3. Treatment of potting soil with steam

Equipment.-It is necessary to have a boiler that will generate an ample supply of steam under 70 pounds pressure; and equipment for properly dis-persing the steam throughout the soil.
Condition of soil.-Soll of any type may 1e sterilized with steam, providing it is friable.
Temperaturc.-The soil nimut be heated throughout to a temperature of 130 F.
Period of treatment.-The soil temperature must )e maintained for 30 mii-utes after it has reached 130 F. throughout the mass.
Storage of soil.-After treatment with steam, soil must be stored and handled
-so as to prevent reinfestation.
B. Disinfection of Sand, Soil, Earth, Pcat, Compost and M11anure Shilpn nts
The only disinfection method :uthorized (Q. 48 reg. 7: Q. 6t reg. 0) as a basis for the certification of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure for shipAment outside the regulated areas is carbon disulphlide fumigation. In employing
80297-30---3







66 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

this method, follow the detailed instructions given on a previous page for the fumigation of potting soil with carbon disulphide.

C. Disinfection of Soil in and Around Plots, Coldframes, Hotbeds, etc.

Soil in and surrounding plots, coldframes, hotbeds, etc., which is used for plunging pots or heeling-in plants, must be disinfected by treatment with lead arsenate as prescribed in section C. 1. Under special conditions on specific authorization from the administrator in field charge of the Japanese beetle and Asiatic beetle project, fumigation with carbon disulphide, carbon disulphide emulsion, or naphthalene may be substituted for the temporary elimination of infestation.
C. 1. Treatment with lead arsenate

Material.-Use powdered acid lead arsenate.
Condition of the soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth.
Season.-Treatment must be applied before August 1 if the land is to be used that autumn.
Dosage.-Lead arsenate must be applied at the rate of 1,500 pounds to each acre, or 35 pounds to each 1,000 square feet.
Application.-Plow and harrow the soil until it is in good tilth. Mix the lead arsenate with ten times its volume of dry soil, sand, or other fillers, and apply with a fertilizer drill, or broadcast it by hand. Harrow the soil well, as a thorough mixture is essential.
Period of treatment.-As lead arsenate is a stomach poison which has to be eaten by the larvae, it may take several weeks before all infestation is eliminated. Do not plant, heel in, or plunge plants in soil poisoned with lead arsenate until at least eight weeks after treatment.

C. 2. Fumigation with carbon disulphide

Material.-A technical U. S. P. or C. P. grade of carbon disulphide should be used. Carbon disulphide is explosive; observe the precautions on page 64.
Equipment.-A tarpaulin or other air-proof cover must be provided, to cover the soil after treatment.
Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be treated providing it is friable. Wet soil must not be treated.
Temperature.-The temperature of the soil 6 inches below the surface must be at least 450 F. when the treatment is applied. If the temperature falls below 40' F. before fumigation is complete, the treatment must be repeated.
Weather conditions.:-The ideal conditions for treatment are a warm, humid atmosphere without wind.
Season.-The treatment must not be applied when adult beetles are present. An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.
Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be used at the rate of 6 pounds or 2,100 cubic centimeters to 100 square feet of soil surface.
Application.-Carbon disulphide must be uniformly distributed throughout the upper 6 inches of soil. Apply it in holes 12 inches apart and 1 to 2 inches deep, putting 21 cubic centimeters in each hole. Fill each hole with soil immediately after the liquid is poured in. Complete the treatment as quickly as possible, covering each section with tarpaulin as soon as it is treated.
Period of fumigation.-The soil must remain covered for at least 48 hours.

C. 3. Treatment with carbon disulphide emulsion

Matcrial.-Only 35 per cent miscible carbon disulphide is to be used for this treatment. This must be prepared according to the formula recommended by the Japanese beetle laboratory and published in the Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, volume 20, ):lges 849-850, August, 1928. Miscible carbon disulphide when diluted with water forms an emulsion. CAuTIoN. Miscible carbon disulphide and carbon disulphide emulsion are inflammable. See caution on page 64.
Equipm en t.-Twe nty -fou r-gage galvanize1-i ron coll vs 10 inches wide and not more than 4 feet square are needed for applying the emulsion. Suitable tanks, i)arre!s, or tubs for preparing tlhe solution should be provided.
Condition of soil.-Any type of soil may be treated by this method. The surface must be level and not disturbed by recent cultiv',;tion. The drainage






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

conditions of the soil are important. The solution must not dsuppear from the surface in less than 10 minutes, and must be absorbed by the soil within 5 hours.
Temperature.-The temperature of the soil 6 inches below the surface must be at least 450 F. when the treatment is applied. If the temperature falls below 400 F. before the treatment is finished, the soil must be treated again.
Beason.-Treatment must not be applied when adult beetles are present. An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.
Dosage.-Miscible carbon d(isulphide must be used at the rate of T97 cubic centimeters, diluted in 10 gallons of water. Two and a half gallons of the dilute emulsion must be applied to each square foot of soil.
Application.-Level the surface of the ground, removing weeds and d6hris. Force a galvanized-iron collar 3 inches into the soil, and firm the soil against the metal. Place another collar next to the first, and so on. When enough collars are in place, pour the dilute carbon disulphide into the basins formed within the collars. As soon as the liquid has disappeared from the surface, the collar may be lifted and set in another position.
Period of treatmnent.-The soil must not he disturbed for 48 hours, after treatment.
C. 4. Treatment with naphthalene

Material.-Flake naphthalene. CAUTIoN. Fire should be kept away from naphthalene.
Equipment.-The equipment used in mixing fertilizer with soil can be used for naphthalene, providing the chemical is first mixed with about ten times its volume of dry soil.
Condition of soil.-Any type of soil may be treated with naphthalene providing it is friable. It must not be wet or soggy. The success of the treatment depends, to a large extent, upon the condition of the soil.
Season.-The treatment must not be applied when adult beetles are present.
Temperature.-To be effective the temperature of the soil at a depth of 6 inches must not be less than 500 F. for a week after treatment.
Dosage.-Naphthalene must be used at the rate of 1,000 pounds per acre, or 23 pounds per 1,000 square feet.
Application.-Plow and harrow the soil until it is in goodl tilth. Mix naphthalene with 10 times its volume of dry soil, broadcast over the surface, and harrow in to a depth of 4 inches. Cross harrow several times, until the naphthalene is intimatelynixed with the soil.
Period of troatment.-The land must not be disturbed for one week after treatment.
3. DISINFECTION OF SOIL ABOUT THE ROOTS OF PLANTS
The following methods have been found satisfactory for disinfecting soil about the roots of plants. For lists of plants to which the various methods of treatment may be applied see pages 72-76.

A. Renmving Infestation by WVashin l with Water
Washing all soil from the roots of the plants with water is probably one of the most simple methods for removing the infestation from certain varieties of plants. The method has certain disadvantages in that it is depemldent for its effectiveness almost entirely upon the vigilance and the determination of the inspector in making sure that all soil is washed from the roots and that no tangled mass of .roots ,r cavity hides a lrva.
Condition of plant.--Plants in a do(rianlt or semldmniant condition are usually most resistant to the actioll of w;ter oi their rtots. Activly growing plants Iay be seriously ilnjiled. It is therefo recolilmmeind 11that the treatment be applied wNile h plalts are in a dormant11o CoIdition.
Application of tratinent.--The large clumps must be divided 1and te roots pruned to reduce lhe size of the plant as much as possible. All soil must be washed from the r)ots. Then with knife ald wire examine iall cavities and cievices in the roots to make certain that no larvae are left.
Care of plants after trat. I t.-Precautions must be taken after treatment to prevent reinfestation. If 11the plants are to be potted, set thn in dishifected soil as soon as possible. If they are to be placed in storage or shipped, the method of handling will depend upon the variety. Bulbs and tubers should be dried thoroughly before packing. It is often beneficial to puIdlle the roots of deciduous stock after washimg all the soil from the roots.







68 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Aprfl-June,

B. Treatment with Hot Water.

Immersion of the roots in hot water is a simple, quick, and effective method for destroying infestations in the roots of certain nursery plants.
Equipment.-It is necessary to have a water tank equipped with a suitable heating device, and a system for circulating the water in order to maintain a uniform temperature. Equipment for drying certain plants after treatment may be required.
Condition of plants.-Plants are usually most resistant to hot water when they are dormant, and most susceptible when they are growing vigorously. It is therefore recommended that treatment be applied only when the plants are dormant or semidormant.
Temp erat'ure.-The water must be maintained at a temperature of 1120 F. for the entire period of treatment. If the temperature falls blow 111.50 the infestation may not be destroyed; if it rises above 112.50 the plants may be injured.
Period of treatmnent.-The treatment must be continued for 70 minutes after the root masses are heated throughout to 1120 F.
Preparation for treatment.-A large proportion of the varieties which arie treated with hot water have roots nearly free from soil. All excess soil must be removed, the roots pruned, and large clumps divided as much as possible without injuring the plants. Small plants. bulbs, and root stocks may be packed loosely in wire baskets or in other containers providing water can circulate through the masses. Large plants must be placed individually in the water. Before the plants are immersed,, thermometers must be inserted with the mercury bulbs in the centers of at least three of the largest clumps, baskets, or root masses of each variety, and must be left until the end of the treatment.
Application.-The roots must be immersed completely. The temperature of the water may drop for a few minutes after the plants are immersed, but it should soon come back to the required degree. A record of the temperature of the masses of plants and of the water must be made every five minutes as long as the plants are in the water. After the masses are heated to 1120 F. the temperature must be maintained for 70 minutes.
Care of plants after treatment.-The insecticidal action of hot water is complete when the plants are removed from the tank. The way plants are handled after treatment may seriously affect subsequent growth. Bulbs and tubers should be dry when packed for Ishipment. Plajts should be cooled slowly to room temperatures. Plants should not be removed from the hot water and heeled in cold soil. Pot the plants, or set them in the ground as soon as possible after cooling to room temperature.

C. Carbon-Disulphide-Emulsion Dip

Mat erial .-Use 35 per cent miscible carbon disulphide. See page 66. CAuTmON. Miscible carbon disulphide and carbon disulphide emulsion are inflammable, and the same care should be exercised in handling them as in handling carbon disulphide.
Equipm ent.-Metal or wooden tanks or tubs in which the plants can be treated at a temperature of 700 F. should be provided.
Condition of the plants.-Dilute carbon disulphide emulsion is least injurious to roots when they are dormant or semidormant. Treatment should be applied during the dormant period of the variety to be disinfected.
Temnpera ture.-The temperature of the dilute emulsion must be maintained at approximately 700 F. If the temperature falls below 650 F. the treatment may not be effective; if it rises above 700 F. the plants may be injured.
Dosage.-Miscihle carbon disulphide must be mixed with water at the rate of 65 cubic centimeters to 10 gallons.
Period of treatn'zent.-The roots must be immersed for 24 hours.
Preparation of treating bath.-Measure the tank, taking the distance from the bottom to the surface of the water as the depth. Determine the capacity from Table 2 or 3, and measure out 65 cubic centimeters of miscible carbon disulphide for each 10 gallons. Pour this into the tank, and stir until mixed. Do not mix with a mechanical agitator or stir too violently, as this causes losses of carbon disulphide. Mix just before using, and do not make up less than 10 gallons at a time.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

TABLE 2.-Capacity of rectangular tanks


Capacity in gallons if- Capacity in gallons ifLength Width -- - Length Width
(feet) (feet) 1 foot 2 feet 3 feet (feet) (fee 1 foot 2 feet 3 feet deep deep deep deep deep deep

2 2 30 60 90 7 Y 71 421 842 1, 63
2% 2/2 47 94 141 8 8 479 958 1,437
3 3 67 134 201 8 2 340 1,080 1,610
3% 3/ 92 184 276 9 9 606 1,212 1,81S
4 4 120 240 360 9Y 9% 675 1,350 2,025
4% 42 151 302 453 10 10 748 1, 46 2,244
5 5 187 374 561 10,i 10 825 1, 630 2, 475
5M 5 Y 226 452 678 11 11 905 1,810 2,715
6 6 269 538 807 11%/2 11A 989 1, 978 2, 967
6 L 6% 316 632 948 12 12 1,077 2,154 3,231
7 7 367 734 1, 101


TABLE 3.-Capacity of cylindrical tanks

Capacity in gallons if- Capacity in gallons ifDiameter Diameter
(feet) 1 foot 2 feet 3 feet (feet) 1 foot 2 feet 3 feet
deep deep deep deep deep deep

2 24 48 72 72 330 660 990
2 37 74 i111 8 376 752 1, 128
3 53 106 159 8" 424 848 1,272
3% 72 144 216 9 476 952 1,428
4 94 188 282 9A 530 1,060 1, 590
4% 119 238 357 10 588 1,176 1,764
5 147 294 441 10Y2 648 1,296 1, 944
5M 178 356 534 11 711 1,422 2, 133
6 211 422 633 11 777 1, 554 2,331
6M 248 496 744 12 846 1,692 2,538
7 288 576 864


Preparation of plants.-This treatment is not effective when the soil about the roots is too wet or compact, or when the diameter of the ball is more than 6 inches. The temperature of the plants should be at least 60* F. at the beginning of the treatment. Shake off the loose soil, and prune the roots as much as possible without injuring the plants..
Application.-The roots must be immersed completely.
Care of plants after treatmenwnt.-The insecticidal action is complete when the plants are removed from the solution. The suggestions made on lie68
for handling plants after the hot-water treatment should be followed.

D. Carbon-disulphide-e(ulsion field treatment
Material.-Use 35 per cent miscible carbon disulphide. See page G6. ('.CLioN.
Miscible carbon disulphide and carbon disulphide emulsion are 'inflamiunnable, and the same care should be exercised in handling them as in handling carbon
disulphide.
Equiptnnt.-Strips of 24-gage galvanized-iron 10 inches wide and of the
proper length are required. (See Table 4.)

TABLE 4.-Size of collar

Da tohd I olameter Length Diameter of hall to be dug )iameter length
of collar of collar of collar of cllar

Inches Fed I.nh I. 12 inches or less- I 24 inches .................10
14 inches-..................... 21 25--27 inches ................ ; 1
18 inches ----................. 27 8 -30 inch.............. 42 12
20 inches ...---------------.... 30 9 33 inch es..................... 4 13
22inches-- -------.- 33 36 inches ................... 4 14
33 36 il h- - - -







70 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

Uodition of plants.--Dilute carbon disulphide is least injurious to roots when the plants are dormant or semidormant, and treatment should be applied at that time.
Dosage.-The dilution depends upon the temperature of the soil during the 48 hours following application, and may be determined from Table 5.

TABLE 5


Minimum Miscible
soil tern- carbon
perature 6 disulphide
inches be- per 10 gallow the lons of
surface water

OF. C. c.
40-50 97
50-60 81
60-70 65


The concentration of the emulsion must not be greater than is necessary, as this may injure the plants.
The dosages which must be applied under different conditions are given in Table 6 or 7.
TABLE 6.-Dosage for circular collars


Miscible carbon disul- Miscible carbon disulDiam- phide Diam- phide
eter of Water eter of Water
collar 40-500 50-600 60_700 collar 40-500 50-600 60-700
F. F. F. F. F. F.

Inches Gallons C. c. C. c. C. c. Inches Gallons C. c. C. c. C. c.
12 2.0 19 16 13 33 15.0 146 122 97
15 3.0 29 24 20 36 17.5 170 142 115
18 4.5 44 36 29 39 21.0 204 172 137
21 6.0 58 49 39 42 24.0 233 195 156
24 1 8.0 78 65 52 45 27.5 267 233 179
27 10.0 97 81 65 48 31.5 305 255 205
30 12.0 116 97 78


TABLE 7.-Dosage for square collars


Miscible carbon disul- Miscible carbon disulLength phide Length phide
of side Water of side Water
of of
collar 40-500 50-600 60-700 collar 40-500 50-600 60-700
F. F. F. F. F. F.

Inches Gallons C. c. C. c. C. c. Inches Gallons C. c. C. c. C. c.
12 2.5 24 20 16 33 19.0 184 154 124
15 4.0 39 32 26 36 22.5 218 182 146
18 5.5 53 44 36 39 26.0 252 210 168
21 7.5 73 62 49 42 30.5 296 247 198
24 10. 0 97 81 65 45 35. 0 340 284 228
27 12.5 121 101 81 48 40.0 388 324 260
30 15.5 150 126 101


Temperature of the soil.-Begin treating in the spring when the minimum soil temperature at a depth of 6 inches remains above 400 F. using 97 c. c. of miscible carbon disulphide to 10 gallons of water. When the minimum soil
temperature at this depth remains above 50' F. decrease the concentration to 81 c. c. to 10 gallons. When the minimum soil temperature remains above
60 F. decrease the concentration to 65 c. c. to 10 gallons. In the autumn, as the minimum temperature of the soil decreases, it is necessary to increase the concentration in the opposite order. Treatment must be discontinued
when the minimum soil temperature at the 6-inch depth is below 400 F.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71

For the treatment to be successful the temperature of the soil during the 48-hour period of treatment should never fall below the minimum temperature for the dosage being used, as shown in Tables 6 and 7. A map has been prepared of the different townships of the Northern and Middle Atlantic seaboard States, based upon data from the United States Weather Bureau, and which indicates the probable dates when the soil temperature at a depth of 6 inches will not fall below 400 F. The inspector should obtain from the Camden office information on this point with respect to the area in which he is working. The dates for the minimum temperature are shown in Table 8. Treatment may be started on the date given in the first column, and the dosage should be changed accordingly.

TABLE 8.-Minimum temperature dates

Spring temperatures Autumn temperatures Zone No.
400 F. 500 F. 600 F. 600 F. 500 F. 400 F.

1 --------------.................. Mar. 4 Apr. 19 May 19 Oct. 11 Nov. 4 Dec. 11
2. --------------Mar. 11 do --.... ---...- do........do----..... --...do..... Do.
3 --------------.................. Mar. 19 Apr. 27 May 27 Oct. 4 Oct. 27 Nov. 27
4........ -------------- Mar. 27 .do.... ---do----..... ...do -----. ...-do----- Do.
5.................. --------------Apr. 4 May 4 June 4 Sept. 27 Oct. 19 Nov. 19
6. -------------- Apr. 11 May 11 June 11 ...do----..... --.. do..... Do.
7 -------------- Apr. 19 May 19 June 27 Sept. 19 Oct. 11 Nov. 11
8. -------------- Apr. 27 ..do----..... --.. do---... Sept. 11 Oct. 4 Nov. 4
9.................. --------------May 4 May 27 July 11 Aug. 27 Sept. 27 Oct. 27
10. -------------May 11 June 4 July 19 Aug. 19 ...do-----..... Do.


The inspector must keep an accurate record of the minimum soil temperatures at a depth of 6 inches throughout the season. An accurate thermometer graduated in at least single degrees must be used. The temperatures must be taken between 6 a. m. and 8 a. m. each morning in order to obtain the minimum temperature.. This must be done in the nursery plots or beds from which the plants are being taken. If the soil temperature in the spring has not reached 400 F. by the date in column 1, treatment must be delayed until this point is reached.
Preparation of plant for treatment.-Remove all weeds and dbris from the soil about the plant. Tie low hanging branches so they will not dip into the solution. Level the soil. After the size of the mass of soil to be lifted has been determined, place a galvanized-iron collar about the plant and force it 3 inches into the soil. The size of the collar to be used is shown in Table 4. Firm the soil carefully on each side of the metal.
Application.-1Measure the diameter of the collar, find from Table 6 or 7 the number of gallons of water and the cubic centimeters of miscible caron disulphide required, and mix with a stick. Pour into the collar, avoiding splashing or unnecessary disturbance of the soil.
Period of treatment.-The collar and the soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours. The plant must be d(ug between two and five ays after treatment.
Handling after treatment.c-The plant may be dug and handled according to the usual nursery practice, except that no soil outside of the collar must be taken up with it.
Conditions unfavorable for treatmcnt.-(1) On hillsides having a slope of more than 1 inch to 10 inches it is practically impossible to distribute the solution uniformly over the surface. (2) In stony land it maNy he ilpos'ible to place the collars in the soil. (3) lardpI)an or a high water table may cause the solution to soak too slowly into the ground. If the solution does not penetrate within five hours treatment will probably be ineffective. (4) Excessively free drainage, mole holes, or plants that have heoe recently transplantd may cause abnormally rapid pmnetration of the solution. If the solution disappears within 10 minutes after application the treatment may be unsatisfator y.

4. DIRECTIONS FOR TREATMENT OF DIFFERENT PLA N \T

The disinfection of soil about the roots of nursery plants for the puri~ose of destroying the immature stages of Japanese and Asiatic beetles is very difficult because the insects are in close proximiity to valuable living plants which may








72 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June;.

be easily injured. Several hundred species of deciduous, herbaceous, and evergreen nursery plants have been treated under as varied conditions as possible, to determine the safest methods for disinfecting each species. It has been found' that insecticidal treatments may be applied safely to the roots of nursery plantsonly when the plants are dormant or semidormant. If they are growing vigorously, serious injury may result. Normal. well-nourislied plants usually withstand treatment when weak, poorly developed plants may be killed.

A. Potted greenhouse plants

There is no safe and effective method at the present time for destroying beetle infestation in the soil of potted plants. The infestation may be removed from some plants by washing all soil from the roots and repotting in disinfected soil, but this is not recommended for general practice.
The nurseryman who desires to ship potted plants should take every precaulion to have both soil and plants free of infestation at the time of potting. After potting, the plants should be grown in properly protected frames or houses to prevent infestation.

B. Hardy herbaceous plants

Many hardy herbaceous plants may be disinfected in commercial nurseries. while in storage during the dormant season. These plants may be divided into three groups, according to the method by which they should be treated.
Washing the roots.-Infestations can be removed safely from some species
only by washing all the soil from their roots. Among these species are the
following:

Aconitum californicum --.------------------------------------Monkshood.
Aconitum fischeri................. ...................---------------------------------------- Azure monkshood.
Arenaria balearica................. ...............--------------------------------------- Corsican sandwort.
Arenaria montana................. ..........--------------------------------------- Mountain sandwort..
Aubrietia deltoidea ..................--------------------------------------- Common aubrietia.
Artemisia abrotanum ... ......------------------------------------- Southernwood.
Artemisia vulgaris (lactiflora) ....--------------------------------...... White mugwort.
Bellis perennis............ .....------------------------------------------ English daisy.
Boltonia asteroides .... .....--------------------------------------- White boltonia.
Calimeris incisa .. ..--------------------------- ..------------- Calimeris.
Campanula persicifolia ......------------------------------------ Peachleaf bellflower.
Centaurea dealbata ........--------------------------------------- Persian centaurea.
Centaurea macrocephala .............----------------------------------- Globe centaurea.
Centaurea montana .....--.............. ...... ------------------------------------Mountain-bluet.
Centranthus ruber (Valeriana coccinea; V. rubra) ........----------------- Jupitersbeard.
Chelone qglabra ...................------------------------------------------ White turtlehead.
Chelone lyoni ..............................------------------------------------------- Pink turtlehead.
Chrysanthemum sp.................. ........... ---------------------------------------Chrysanthemum.
Delphinium sp......................... ............------------------------------------------ Larkspur.
Digitalis lanata............. ........----------------------------------------- Grecian foxglove.
Digitalis purpurea ...............---------------------------------------..... Common foxglove.
Erigeron coulteri ....................----------------------------------------- Fleabane.
Festuca glauca ......................................------------------------------------------ Blue fescue.
Gaillardia aristata (grandiflora)...................------------------------------ Common perrennial gaillardia,
Gypsophila paniculata.................... ...............------------------------------------ Babysbreath.
Gypsophila repens........ ..................--------------------------------------- ..Creeping gypsophila.
Hibiscus moscheutos ................. --------------------------------------Common rosemallow.
Hlypericum calycinum .............................------------------------------------- St. Johnswort.
Hypericum moserianum .........................----------------------------------- Goldflower.
Ligularia clivorum (Senecio clivorum)..........................-------------------------- Giant groundsel.
Malva moschata .........................................----------------------------------------- Musk mallow.
Monarda didyma............................................... ---------------------------------------- Oswego beebalm.
Senecio pulcher.............................................. ------------------------------------------ Uruguay groundsel.
Sidalcea candida .......................----------------------------------------- White prairiemallow.
Silene schafta............................................. ------------------------------------------- Schafta catchfly.
Stachys grandiflora ........ ................ ......................--------------------------------------- Big betony.
Stachys lanata....... ...........................------------------------------------------.. Woolly betony.
Statice armeria (Armeria cephalotes)..............................--------------------------- Common thrift.
Statice armeria (Armeria maritima)...............................--------------------------- Common thrift.
Valeriana officinalis..............................................-------------------------------------- Common valerian.

Washing the roots or hot-water treatment.-Some species of herbaceous plants can be treated successfully both by washing the soil from the roots and by submerging, while in a dormant state, in hot water. The species marked with an asterisk can be subjected to the hot-water treatment without danger of injury; the others are less resistant, but may be treated if sufficient care is exercised.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 73

Achillea filipendulina..-.. ... .. ..------------------------------------ Fernleaf yarrow.
Achillea ptarmica..-. .. .. .. ..--------------------------------------- Sneezewort.
Achillea tomentosa ..-. .... ..-------------------------------------- Woolly yarrow.
Ajuga reptans. ... .. .. ..----------------------------------------- Carpet bugle.
Allium achoenoprasum.. .. .....----------------------------------- Chive.
Arnsonia tabernaemontana (salicifolia).. .. ...------------------------W illow amsonia.
Aquilegia chrysantha ..-. .. ...------------------------------------- Golden columbine.
Aquilegia ftabellata ----. .... ..-------------------------------------- Fan columbine.
Aguilegia skinneri --------------------------------------------------- Mexican columbine.
Aquilegia vulgaris. ... .. ....--------------------------------------- European columbine.
Arrhenatherurn bulbosum -. .... .....--------------------------------- Tuber oatgrass.
Aster novae-angliae -.. .......-------------------------------------- New England aster.
Aster subcaeruleus -----...-------------------------------------- India aster.
*Astilbe davidi (arendsi) -. .. .. .. ..----------------------------------- David astilbe.
*Baptisia australia ---..-. ...--------------------------------------- Blue wild-indigo.
Clematis heracleaefolia davidiana. .. .. ....---------------------------- Fragrant tube clematis.
Clematis texensis (coccinea) .. ...-------------------------------- Scarlet clematis.
*Coreopsis lanceolata --. .. ... ....------------------------------------- Lance coreopsis.
*CoreopSis rosea -------.----------------------------------------- Rose coreopsis.
*Dahlia spp -----.. ....-------------------------------------------- Dahlia.
Dianthus barbatus. ----. ..------------------------.-------------- Sweet-william.
Dianthus chinensis --.. .. ..(-------------------------------------- Chinese pink.
Dianthus deltoides .--... ..--------------------------------------- Maiden pink.
Dicentra formosa -. .. ..----------------------------------------W estern bleedingheart.
Echinacea (Rudbeckia) purpurea. ... .. ..---------------------------- Iledgehog-coneflower.
Echinops ritro ----....------------------------------------------ Steel globethistle.
Elymus glaucus ---- ----------------------------------------- Wild-rye.
Eryngium maritinum ------.------------------------------------ Seabolly.
Iuonymus radicans -------.. ...------------------------------------- Wintercreeper.
R'upatoriam urticaefoliun (ageratoides)....------------------------ Snow thoroughwort.
Euphorbia corollata --------------------------------------- Flowering spurge.
*Filipendula (Spiraea) palmata .. .. ..------------------------------ Siberian meadowsweet.
*Filipendula (Spiraea) ulmaria...-.....------------------------------ European meadowsweet.
Geum bulgaricurn -------. ...--------------------------------------- Bulgarian avens.
Geum chiloense coccineumm) ----------------------------------------- Chiloe avens.
Helenium hoopesi --... .....--------------------------------------- Orange sneezeweed.
Heliopsia helianthoides --------------------------------------------- Sunflower heliopsis.
Heliopsis scabra -----...---------------------------------------- Rough heliposis.
*Hosta caerulea (Funkia lanceolata) ---.--------------------------- Blue plantainlily.
Humulus lupulus -. .. .....--------------------------------------- Common hop.
Iberis semperdirenS .. ... ....-------------------------------------- Evergreen candytuft.
*Liatris pycnostachya -----..------------------------------------- Cattail gayfeather.
*Limonium latifolium (Statice latifolia).. .. .. ..------------------------ igleaf sea-lavender.
Ltmonium tataricun (Statice tatarica) --.---------------------------- Tatarian sea-lavender.
Lychnis chalcedonica ---_-- -------------------------------------Maltese cross.
,Lychnis (Agrostemma) coronaria ---------------------------------- Rose campion.
Lythrum salicaria .---. .. ..--------------------------------------- Purple loosestrife.
Mentha rotundifolia --------.. ----------------------------------- Apple mint.
Mentha spicata ---.....----------------------------------------- Spearmint.
Nierembergia rivularis.........-----------------------.------------ Whitecup.
*Pentatemon barbatus...-.. ....------------------------------------- Pentsternon.
*Pentatemon laevigatus digitalis (P. digitalis)...-..--------------------- Foxglove pentstemon.
*Phalaris arundinacea--. ... .. ...------------------------------------ Reed canary grass.
*Phlox arnoena ----.. .. ...------------------------------------------ Amoea phlox.
*Phloz maculata (P. decussata) ---------------------------------- Sweet William phlox.
*Phlox paniculata -----.. ..---------------------------------------- Garden phlox.
Physali francheti --L--------------------------------------- Lantern groundcherry.
1Physostegia virginiana -.. ..------------------------------------ Virginia false-dragonhead.
*Polygonum compactun -.----------------------------------- Fleecellower.
Polygonum cuspidatur (sieboldi)-----..---------------------------- Japanese fleeceflower.
Potentilla spp ------u------------------------------------------ efoil.
Poterium obtusurn. .. .J--------------------------------------Japaee liurnet.
Rudbeckia laciniata -------------------------------------------------C utleaf corielower.
Rudbeckia maxima -------.-------------------------------------- Great cornilower.
Rudbeckia subtomentosa ..------------------------------------- -- Sweet coluelover.
Saponaria ocymoides -----.------------------------------------- Itock sopwirL
Scabiosa causcasica -----. ..--------------------------------------.C.(aucasian s:biosa.
Scabiosa japonica --------------------------------------------- Japanese scab iosa.
*Sedun spectabile --h--------------------------------------- _.Showy stoniecrop.
6Slphum perfoliatum ---. ..(------------------------------------u (p rosinweed.
Solidago altiasin a.'-------------------------------------- all goldenroi.
Solidago bicolor .--....----------------------------------------- White goldenrod.
Solidago shortli _----------------------------------------- Golderod.
*Thalictrurn glaucur ---1------------------------------------- 1)usty neadowrme.
Thalictrurn idermediurn .. .. .. ...----------------------------------.le.. 1d rue.
Thalidcrurn rinus ----------------------------------------------- Low nietdowrue,
Tradescantia coccinea.. ...-.. ..------------------------------------ -piderwort.
*Tradescantia viriniana (montana).-.-...--------------------------- Virginia spiderwort.
Trilorna pft zeri.....- --.- -Tritoum.
Tritonia (Montbrelia) aurantiaca. .. .. ..---------------------------- Triton ia.
Tunica saxifraga ... ..----------------------------------------.S.. .axifrage tnificlower.
Veronica incana.- .... ...-.. ..---------------------------------------- Wolly spewilll.
Veronica longifolia..-.. .. ..--------------------------------------B iech speedwell.
Veronica repens...-----------..--.-..-.............----Creeping speedwell.
Veronica spicata --.. .....---------------------------------------- pike slewell.
Veronica spuria (ametyh!tina)------------------.----------- Bastard speedwell.
Veronica euedum.. ...........-------------------------------------- Hungarian speed well.
80297-30-----4








74 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

Washing, hot water, or carbon disulphide dip.Hemerocallis dumortieri --..----------------------------------- Early daylily.
Hemerocallis fulva.......... ---------------------------------------Tawny daylily.
Hemerocallis citrina-------------------------------------- ................................................ Citron daylily.
Iris cristata --.C...--------------------------------------------Crested iris.
Iris germanica-- ---------------------------------------- German iris.
Iris japonica .......-------------------------------------------.................................................. Fringed iris.
Iris ochroleuca.......................................................------------------------------------------ Yellowband iris.
Iris pseudacorus_ ...----------------------------------------- Yellowflag iris.
Iris sibirica ------------------------------------------------- Siberian iris.
Paeonia spp ------------------------------------------------Peony.
Rheum spp........................................................... --------------------------------------------Rhubarb.

Small fruits

The only small fruit which has been treated is the cultivated blueberry, Vaccintium spp., which can be disinfected by submerging the roots in hot water while the plants are dormant.

C. Deciduous Ornamental Shrubs

The soil about the roots of deciduous shrubs can be disinfected safely only when the plants are dormant. In this state, they can be treated successfully by washing the soil from the roots, by dipping in dilute carbon disulphide emulsion, and by treating with carbon disulphide emulsion in the field. The following species of shrubs may be treated in this manner:

Amygdalus (Prunus) persica F-------------------------------lowering peach.
Azalea mollis ---C-------------------------------------------Chinese azalea.
Azalea pontica ...........------------------------------------------ Pontic azalea.
Berberis thunbergi --------------------------------------- Japanese barberry.
Buddleia davidi ...----------------------------------------- Orange-eye butterflybush.
Callicarpa purpurea .................. -------------------------------------------------- Chinese beautyberry.
Calluna vulgaris .... ----------------------------------------Heather.
Calycanthus floridus..... --------------------------------------Common sweetshrub.
Cercis chinensis (japonica)............... ......--------------------------------- Chinese redbud.
Clethra alnifolia....... ----------------------------------------- Summersweet.
Cornus alba -------------------------------------------- Tartarian dogwood.
Cornus florida ... .........---------------------------------------------- Flowering dogwood.
Cornus stolonifera .......................................---------------------------------------. Red-osier dogwood.
Crataegus oxyacantha.... -------------------------------------English hawthorn.
Cydoniajaponica ....... ---------------------------------------- Flowering quince.
Deutzia gracilis -----------------------------------------Slender deutzia.
Deutzia lemoinei ----------------------------------------Lemoine deutzia.
Deutzia scabra...... ------------------------------------------Fuzzy deutzia.
Elsholtzia stauntoni_ --------------------------------------Elsholtzia.
Euonymus alatus_......................................... ---------------------------------------- Winged euonymus.
Euonymus europeus --------------------------------------European burningbush.
Euonymus japonicus......... -------------------------------------Evergreen burningbush.
Exochorda grandiflora........................ .........------------------------------------- Common pearlbush.
Forsythia suspensa .........--------------------------------------- Weeping forsythia.
Forsythia suspensa fortunei (F. fortunei) _----------------------- Fortune forsythia.
Forsythia viridissima ...........................................--------------------------------------.. Greenstem forsythia.
Halesia tetraptera G----------------------------------------G reat silverbell.
Hamamelis virginiana............. ......................------------------------------------ Common witch-hazel.
Hibiscus syriacus....................... ...............---------------------------------------- Shrub-althea.
Hydrangea arborescens............ ........................------------------------------------ Smooth hydrangea.
Hydrangea opuloides............................ ..............-------------------------------------. House hydrangea.
Hydrangea paniculata ............................................-------------------------------------.. Panicle hydrangea.
Hydrangea quercifolia ---.. --- -- ----------------------------..................... Oakleaf hydrangea.
Hype, icum calycinum ----------------------------------------- St. Johnswort.
Hypericum densiflorum ..............................----------------------------------- St. Johnswort.
Hypericumn patulum ...................................------------------------------------- Japanese hypericum.
Ligustrum ibota....-----------------------------------------.................................................. Ibota privet.
Lespedeza bicolor ...........................................---------------------------------------- Shrub bushclover.
Ligustrum ovalifoli ..um. ---- -l------------------------------------ California privet.
Lonicera fragrantissima ...........................................----------------------------------- Winter honeysuckle.
Lonicera ledebouri ..........---------------------------------------........................................ -Honeysuckle.
Lonicera mtorrowi ...............................................---------------------------------------- Morrow honeysuckle.
Lonicera tatarica ---------------------------------------------- Tatarian honeysuckle.
Malus airosan guinea------------------------------------------- Carmine crab.
Malus floribunda..................................................... ---------------------------------------Japanese flowering crab.
Malus ioensis ------------------------------------------.................................................. Prairie crab.
Malus niedzwetzkyana. ...............................................------------------------------------ Redvein crab.
Malus scheideckeri.................................................... -----------------------------Scheidecker crab.
Mauls spectabilis .............................................----------------------------------------. Chinese flowering crab.
Philadelphzzs corona rius ---------------------------------------- Sweet mockorange.
Philadea phus grandiforus ..........................----------------------------------.....Big scentless mockorange.

Philadelphus nivalis.................................................. --------------------------------------Snowbank mockorange.
Prunus cerasifera................................. ---------------------------------------- Myrobalan plum.
Prunus glandulosa-------------------------------------........................................--- Double pinkflowering almond.
Prunus triloba ...............................------------------------------------------ Flowering plum.








1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 75

Rhodotypos kerroide... .......---------------------------------------- Jetbead.
RAhus typhina.- ... .........------------------------------------------- Staghorn sumac.
Rosa spp.---............---------------------------------------------- Rose.
Sambucus canadensis ------------------------------------------- American elder.
Sainbucus nigra.... ........--------------------E--------------------European elder.
Sambucus pubens ------.---------------------------------------- Scarlet elder.
Spiraea billiardi..............----------------------------------------- Billiard spirea.
Spiraea bumalda. .-...-....------------------------------------------ Bunalda spirea.
Spiraea douglasi ------------------------------------------------ Douglas spirea.
Spiraea japonica .. ......---------------------------------------- Japanese spirea.
Spiraea reevesiana..- ..........------------------------------------ Reeves spirea.
Spiraea semperflorens ---------------------------------------------- Perpetual spirea.
Spiraea vanhouttei .... .. .....--------------------------------------- Vanhoutte spirea.
Styrax japonica --...--_.----------------------------------------- Japanese snowbell.
Symphoricarpos racemoss .. _...--------------------------------- Common snowberry.
Smphoricarpos vulgaria...........----------------- ------------------ Coralberry.
Syringa japonica .. ..----..---------------------------------------- Japanese tree lilac.
Sgringa josikaea..... ... ..----------------------------------------- Hungarian lilac.
Syringa ulgaris ---..----------------------------------------- Common lilac.
Tawmarix gallica indica (T. indica) ...------------------------------ French tanarix.
Tamartx hispida ----------.----------------------------------------- Kashgar tamarix.
Tamarix odessana ...--.---------------------------------------- Odessa tamarix.
Vburnum sop....... ..-....------------------------------------------ Viburnum.
Weigelia (Diervilla) amabilis _------------------------------------ Rose weigelia.
Weigelia (Diervilla) roea -------------------------------------------- Pink weigelia.

D. Deciduou8 ornamental tree

The following -deciduous ornamental trees can be disinfected successfully by the methods recommended for deciduous ornamental shrubs:

Acer daUycarpum. .. .. .. ..---------------------------------------- Silver maple.
Acer japonicum--... ...-.. ..----------------------------------------- Fullmoon maple.
Acer palmatum- ..-. .. ..-. ..----------------------------------------- Japanese maple.
Acer platanoid-es .. ... .. ..----------------------------------------- Norway maple.
AceT rubrum.. .. ...-.-.-..-------------------------------------------R Ied maple.
Acer saccharn .m.. .. .. ... ...----------------------------------------- Sugar Male.
Aesculus hippocastan .m... ........---------------------------------- -lorsechestnut.
Betula alba. ... ...-.. ....-------------------------------------------- European white birch
Catalpa bungei. .. .. .. ..------------------------------------------ Manchurian catalpa
Pagus sylvatica .. .. ..------------------------------------------ European beech.
Fraxinus or.nu. .. ..... ... ..----------------------------------------- Flowering ash.
Liriodendron tulipifer.a.. .. ... ..------------------------------------ Tuliptree.
Magnolia acuminata.-.. ..-.....-------------------------------------- Cucumbertree
Magnolia glauca. .. ..-.. ..-----------------------------------------S weetbay.
Morus alba.. ... ..-. .. ..-------------------------------------------- White mulberry.
Platanu8 orientalie... .. ... ..--------------------------------------- European planetree.
urcus palustris --.. ..-.. ..---------------------------------------- Pin oak.
rcus rubra ---..-..-. ...------------------------------------------ Common red oak.
Robinia hispida.. ..-. .. ....-----------------------------------------R Iose-acacia.
&lix babylonica.. .. .. .. ...----------------------------------------- Babylon weeping willow.
Sorbus aucupara --.. ..---------------------------------------- European nountain-ash.
21lia tomentosa.. .. .. .. ..----------------------------------------- Silver linden.
71lia vulgaris ------------------------------------------------------ Connon linden.
(1amu. americana.. .. ..-. .. ..---------------------------------------- American elm.

E. Broadleaf evergreens

The soil about the roots of the following broadleaf evergreens can be disinfected only by treating with carbon disulphide emulsion in the field. This
should be done in early spring or in the autumn when the minimum soil temperature is between 40* and 500 F. at a depth of 6 inches.

Abelia chinenis. -----------__----------------------------------------- Chinese abelia.
Azalea amoena -... ......------------------------------------------ Auoena azalea.
Azalea hinoedgiri (hinodigiri) --------.-------------------------------- I inodegiri azalea.
Azalea indica---- --------------------------------------- .. Indica azalea.
Azalea obtusa kiusiana ------------------------------------ Kyushu aalea.
Buzus sempervirens--------- -----------------------------.. common box.
Cotoneasier horizontalia -- ..--. .. ..------------------------------------ Rock cotoneaster.
Ier crenata ... ---------------------------------------------- Japanese holly.
Kalmia latifolia------------ -------..-------------------..- Kahnia, mountain-laurel.
Pachysandra terminalis- ----------------------------------- Japanese pachysandra.
Pyracanthe coccinea ------------------------------------ -. scarlett liret horn.
Rhododendron catawbiense--------------- ------------------- Catawbn rhododendron.
Rhododendron maximum -------.----------------------------------- osebay rhododendron.

F. Narrowleaf EveryrccnsN

The following narrowleaf evergreens can be disinfected in the ield only with
carbon disulphide emulsion under the same conditions as stated for broadleaf evergreens.







76 PLANT QUARANTINE- AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

Abies cilicica -------------------------------------------Cilician fir.
Abies concolor -----------------------------------------White fir.
Abies homolepis -----------------------------------------Nikko fir.
Abies nordmanniana ------------- ------------------------Nordmann fir.
Juniperus chinensis --------------------------------------Chinese juniper.
Junmperus communes -------------------------------------Common jumiper.
Juniperus excelsa ----------------------------------------------------- Greek juniper.
Juniperus horizontilis ----------------------------------------------- Creeping juniper.
Juniperus japonica --------------------------------------------------- Japanese juniper.
Juniperus sabina ----------------------------------------------------- Savin.
Juniperus squamata -------------------------------------- Juniper.
Juniperus virginiana -------------------------------------Red cedar.
Picea canadensis ----------------------------------------White spruce.
Picea excelsa ---------------------------------------------------------- Norway spruce.
Picea pungens ------------------------------------------Colorado spruce.
Picea ruhra --------------------------------------------Red spruce.
Pinus contorta ----------------------------------------------Shore pine.
Pinus densiora------------------------------------------ Japanese red pine.
Pinus montana -----------------------------------------Swiss mountain pine.
Pinusnigra --------------------------------------------Austrian pine.
Pinus pungens -----------------------------------------Table mountain pine.
Pinus resinosa ------------------------------------------Red pine.
Pinus strobu ------------------------------------------White pine.
Pinus 87 -------------------------------------------------Scthie
Piussyvestris__--- Scotch pine.
Retinospora filifera ---------------------------------------Thread retinospora.
Retinospora obtusa --------------------------------------- Hinoki cypress.
Retinospora pisifera --------------------------------------Sawara retinospora.
Retinospora plumosa -------------------------------------Plume retinospora.
Taxus baccata ------------------------------------------English yew.
Taxus canadensis ----------------------------------------------------- Canada yew.
Taxus cuspidata ----------------------------------------Japanese yew.
Thuja occidentalis --------------------------------------- American arborvitae.
Thuja orientalis -------------------------------------------------------- Oriental arborvitae.
Thuja plicata --------------------------------------------------------- Giant arborvitae.
Tsuqa canadensis ----------------------------------------------------- Canada hemlock.

JAPANESE-BEETLE TRAPS SET IN AREAS OF LIGHT INFESTATION
[Press notice]

JUNE 19, 1929.
The appearance of small green buckets on iron supports and on trees throughout the District of Columbia and in Arlington County, Va., during recent weeks has aroused much interest. These buckets, placed by the United States Department of Agriculture, are Japanese-beetle traps designed, when properly baited, to attract and catch the beetles as they emerge from the ground in June and July after their transformation from the white-grub stage.
The first capture in these traps occurred June 11, which, according to the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration of the department, is an early record for the occurrence of the beetle. On June 17, 55 beetles were taken in the traps in the Arlington County infested district.
The infestation in Washington and vicinity, as indicated by thq records made during the last two summers, is believed to be of recent beginning and was last year confined substantially to three districts, namely, a scattering infestation extending from the north end of Potomac Park through the Capitol Grounds to a point directly east of the Washington Railway Terminal. The second more heavily infested dstrict was in the extreme northwest in the area near the junction of Wisconsin Avenue and Elliott Street. The third important infested district was southwest of the Potomac Yards Terminal between St. Elmo and Rosemont in Arlington County, Va.
In adlddition to these districts a few other isolated points of infestation were noted last year. Two beetles were found in the White House grounds, 1 beetle near the intersection of New Jersey and Massachusetts Avenues, and 1 beetle
a few blocks south of Brightwood. With the exception of the findings in the Potomac Yards in Arlington County and along Wisconsin Avenue, the numbers of beetles found at any point were from one to a half dozen-in a few instances exceeding that, and at one point east of the Washington Terminal, 15 beetles were taken. About 100 beetles altogether were found last year in the city of Washiiigton and as many more in Arlington County, Va.
The purpose of the traps is to attract and capture as many of the beetles as possible following their emergence, with the object of reducing the spread of the pest or possibly, although that is scarcely to be hoped, to effect its eradication in the Washington section. Such trapping in a new and isolated area of infestation, as in the case of Washington, should be of special value in that there are no beetles in surrounding territory to replace those caught






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

and killed in the traps, and therefore reduction of the future beetle population will be in direct proportion to the efficiency of the method.
Similar trapping will be carried out by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration at a number of other isolated points. For Maryland these include Baltimore, Cambridge City, Frederick, and Hagerstown-a single beetle was found at Hagerstown and two at Frederick. Additional outlying points are Marysville and Sayre, Pa., Hartford and New London, Conn., and Springfeld, Mass.
These traps have been developed as a result of experimentation extending over a number of years conducted in the heavily infested Japanese-beetle areas in New Jersey. In such areas in the period of beetle abundance it is possible to collect a quart or more of beetles in a single night in one trap, anid with many traps in an orchard beetles may be collected in enormous numbers. To have any great benefit in effectively controlling the pest in areas of heavy infestation it would be necessary for all property owners to place traps abundantly, otherwise the few ind.vidual property owners utilizing the traps would by the same means, attract the beetles from adjacent properties and any advantage might thus be more than offset by newcomers. As already indicated, in outlying points such as those mentioned, this objection does not adhere and every beetle killed is a reduction of potential increase in population during the breed.ng season of June, July, and August. The bait used in these traps is geraniol, a manufactured product which is a very powerful attractant to the adult Japanese beetle. So far as known, this bait is not attractive to other insects. The public is urged to respect these traps and give them the full opportunity to do their job of control work.


MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY QUARANTINE (No. 68)

MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY DISCOVERED IN FLORIDA
APRIL 15, 1929.
The Mediterranean fruit fly, an extremely destructive pest of fruits and vegetables, has been discovered in Orange County, Fla., at points in and adjacent to Orlando, according to an announcement issued by the Department of Agriculture to-day.
Immediately on the confirmation of the discovery Doctor Marlatt, chief of the Plant Quarantine and control administration of the department, went to Florida and is working in full cooperation with the State officials.
Growers and packers are cooperating with the State officials and since the discovery no dangerous fruit or products likely to carry the pest have been allowed to move from infested orchards or packing houses. Steps have already been taken to clean up all infested groves and packing plaints.
The Florida State Plant Board is to-day meeting at Gainesville, Fla., and it is anticipated that this meeting will be followed by an announcement of an eradication program.
The Secretary of Agriculture to-day announced a public hearing to be held at 10 a. min., April 22, before the Plant Quarantine and Control Adminiistration and Federal Plant Quarantine Board at 1729 New York Avenue. NW., Washington, D. C., to consider the advisablity of quarantining the State of Florida on account of this pest and of restricting or prohibiting., the movement of peaches, plums, grapefruit, oranges and all other hosts of this insect from that State or from any district therein.
The Mediterranean fruit fly is the most wide(lly distributed and dangerous fruit fly known and occurs in many places in the tropics and subtropics of the New and Old World. Heretofore it has not gained entry into the United States. It attacks a large variety of fruits, including melons, and a restr:cttd number of vegetables.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF QUARANTINING
THE STATE OF FLORIDA ON ACCOUNT OF THE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY

WASINOTON, I). C., April 1. 1192!.
The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the Mediterranean fruit fly (ceratiti capitata), a dangerous insect new to andl not heretofore widely revalent or distributed within and throughout Ilhe United States, has recently been discovered in citrus groves in Orange County, Fla.







78 PLANT QUARANTINE. AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of quarantining the State of Florida and of restricting or prohibiting the movement of peaches, plums, grapefruit, oranges, and all other hosts of this insect, from that State, or from any districts therein.
Notice is, therefore, hereby given that, in accordance with the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), a public hearing will be held before the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration and the Federal Plant Quarantine Board of the United States Department of Agriculture in'the offices of the administration at 1729 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C., at 10 a. m., April 22, 1929, in order that any person interested in the proposed quarantine may appear and be heard either in person or by attorney.
ARTiiuR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

FLORIDA TO BE QUARANTINED ON ACCOUNT OF THE FRUIT FLY
[Press notice]
APRIL 24, 1929'
A Federal quarantine restricting the movement of fruit and certain vegetables from Florida to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly, recently found established in partsof that State, will be issued within a few days, or as soon as the requirements of the plant quarantine act can be complied with, it was announced to-day by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Considering the presence of the pest a serious menace to the entire fruit and vegetable industry of the United States requiring emergency methods of control, the department has asked Congress to, authorize the transfer, for use in fighting the fruit fly, of $4,250,000 from the- unexpended balance of a special appropriation made on account of the pink boll-worm which is available because conditions have prevented its use for the original purpose.
In the meantime, Secretary of Agriculture 11dye has authorized an emergency transfer of $40,000 to provide for the preliminary steps which have been and are nowbeing taken to control the new pest.
The intensity of the infestation, according to the department, indicates that it will be necessary immediately to determine fully and accurately the area infested; to destroy all fruit in the infested area; to clean up infested groves, involving the spraying of the trees to poison the adult flies, and the destruction of pupae in the soil; to trace shipments of fruits which have been- made from the infested area; to determine whether the pest has been distributed to distant points by means of infested fruit; in view of the uncertainty of the extent of spread within the State, to provide for the inspection and certification of all fruits and of all host vegetables moving out of Florida; and as a further precaution approved by the representatives of the citrus industry of the State, to prohibit the movement of culls from all portions of the State-in other Words, to limit shipments to graded and boxed fruit moving in refrigerated cars.
The Mediterranean fruit fly occurs in many tropical and subtropical countries where it causes enormous damage by its attacks on a very wide variety of hosts-both fruits and vegetables-represented by such important commercial crops as oranges, grapefruit, plums, peaches, grapes, melons, squash, beans, etc. In addition to these important crops it also attacks guavas, mangoes, certain cherries, and many other tropical and subtropical fruits and vegetables grown in varying quantities in Florida and other parts of the United States. This pest injures the fruit or vegetable only and does not attack the plant. The eggs are deposited by the adult within the host fruit or vegetable, hatching into maggots which feed on the pulp until full grown. This. pest breeds with enormous rapidity, a single female depositing upwards of 600 eggs, and in warm weather there may be a new generation every month,, or even oftener. In Hawail from 15 to 16 generations occur yearly. This fecundity makes possible within a single season the entire destruction of the crop.
The department has for many years enforced a rigid quarantine against fruits and vegetables from the Territory of Hawaii, and in more recent years has enforced fruit embargoes against several foreign countries in which the, fruit fly was known to be established. Further, fruits and vegetables from all foreign countries are now admitted at ports of entry of the United States, only after Inspection.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEM-ENTS 79

While the Mediterranean fruit fly is largely a subtropical pest, it is (let4iuctively abundant over such range in the Mediterranean region of Eurnpe and in parts of South America, Australia, and South Africa as to indicate the probability that it would thrive with us at least throughout the Cotton Belt and the citrus-producing reg ons of California, Arizona, and New Mexico, as well as Florida.
Immediately upon the discovery of the fruit fly in Florida, C. L. Marlatt, Chief of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, proceeded to that State to get first-hand information of the conditions and to cooperate with the State officials in a plan for a campaign of eradication against this pest. The State of Florida had already begun vigorous action following the discovery of the pest and its determination by State and Federal authorities a few days before. The State plant board has now mobilized its entire personnel-with the exception of its port guardians-in the infested area. Considerable forces of Federal men were immediately called to aid in the work from the Mexican fruit worm and cotton projects in Texas, and experts were placed on the ground to aid in the supervision and determination of infested fruits.
In the matter of funds. the State of Florida, in addition to its current appropriations, released an emergency fund of $50,000, making it immediately available. It is also expected that a further fund totaling at least $1,000,000 will be made available by the State appropriation for regulatory and eradication purposes for the biennium beginning July 1, 1929. At the present time, as a result of the scouting carried out by State and Federal men, the insect has been found in what seems to be merely beginning points of infestation in some seven counties. However, in no case has any intense or general infestation been found at such outlying points.
The State plant board promulgated a quarantine April 15 covering all of Orange and Seminole Counties, and part of Lake County; in other words, the district that was then known to be infested by the pest. Prompt action has been taken, however, with respect to the control of all later determined outlying points of infestation. This quarantine prohibits the movement out of the quarantined area of all hosts and is being enforced by the State militia, a portion of which has been ordered out by the governor at the request of the State plant board.
The concern which the invasion of the Mediterranean fruit fly has aroused throughout the United States was indicated by the large attendance at the public hearing April 22. Representatives of important associations of fruit and vegetable growers of the United States were present, together with members of Congress representing many of the States interested in fruit and vegetable production. Many leading producers and representatives of transportation companies of the southeastern United States were also present. Expressions of concern and requests that the utmost be done by State and Federal agencies to stamp) out this pest were received also by telegram and letter from other States and interested bodies and persons.

MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE ISSUED
[ I'ress notice]
APRIL 2). 192".
The Secretary of Agriculture announced to-day the promulgation of a quarantine to prevent the sl)rad of the recently discovered Mediterranean fruit-fly infestation in Florida.
While the quarantine and regulations bring under restriction the State of Florida as a whole, as to all fruits and a limited number of vegetables which are also attacked by the fly, nevertheless unler these restrictions' most of the fruit of Florida and practically all of the vegetables will be permitted to move out of the State under what are believed to be adequate safe uarts.
The regulations have )ecen discussed with and amended to meet reasonable suggestions of the State Plant Board of Florida and of leading growers and transportation officers of the principal connmon carriers concerned in produ~, movements from Florida.
Pending action by the State plant board to bring the State into alignment. the restrictions under this quarantine bcIiome ininuediately effective as to the areas designated as infested in the quarantine promulgated April 15, 192.1. by that board, and to such addlitional infested points as have been later detcr-






80 PLANT QUARANTINE'AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

mined and are being controlled by. the State plant board. Exe ept as to this provision, the effee tive date of the quarantine is May.1, :1929.
For the purpose of this quarantine the Stdte, Of Florida will fall into three types of zones, namely (1) the infested zones, (2) the protective zones, and
(3) the State as a whole outside of these two types of zones.
Infested zones will include the orchards determined to, have been reached by the fly and surrounding properties to a distance.of a t least 1 mile. Within these zones all fruits and vegetables are to be destroyed or recessed and no more are to be permitted to develop until the zone is released from restriction.
The protective zones will include all properties within 9 miles, Aurrounding the infested zones. These zones are to be adjusted to natural boundaries. Within each protective zone all groves and all plantings of host vegetables will be given intensive inspection but the fruits and vegetables will be allowed to move under certain safeguards and restrictions in interstate commerce. Within this zone, however, there will be maintained- a nonfruit period of at least six months beginning on May 1 each year, during which no fruits or vegetables in a stage to be attacked by the fly will be permitted to remain; in other words, all fruits ripening on orchard trees will be removed before they have reached a stage to be attacked by the fly, and no vegetables are to be planted which will mature during the period. It is anticipated that for the season of 1929 host-free conditions within the protective zones will be complied with in full by the end of May.
This annual nonfruit period prescribed for the protective zones will be subject to such adjustment as may be necessary to meet any seasonal variation and to meet any needs of eradication which may develop. For the spring shipping season of 1929 shipments of citrus fruit will not be allowed to be moved from the protective zone after May 31 nor from the rest of the State after June 15. The green citrus fruit of the new crop- will be permitted to develop on the trees throughout the summer period but is not expected to reach a stage of development susceptible to fruit-fly attack until late fall. This new crop will then be marketed under adequate precautions during the winter months. The protective zone is, therefore, in a sense a buffer zone and will be a material part of the eradication plan.
All -areas in the State outside of these two types of zones will be under restriction merely to the extent of providing for inspection and certification of fruits, and such control of host vegetable crops as may be necessary to fully determine that the fly has not spread to them. All classes of fr ui ts, except watermelons and pineapples, which latter are not known to be subject to attack, are under these restrictions. The restrictions on vegetables relate only to peppers, beans, tomatoes, squashes, gourds, and eggplants.
Certain types of movement, including truck, mail, and bulk shipments, are prohibited altogether for the reason that movements of this kind involve a maximum of risk and can not be adequately safeguarded without great expense.
In addition to covering fruits and vegetables, the Federal quarantine includes special restrictions on the movement of soil, earth, peat compost, and manure, fruit-packing equipment, and nursery stock. It is further provided that railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been- u sled in transporting restricted articles must be thoroughly cleaned at the point of unloading and fumigation may also be required in special cases when necessary.
A state-wide inspection will be made of all citrus groves and other fruit plantings as well as of host vegetables. Such surveys, together with'the inspection and certification requirements of fruits and vegetables, including the supervision of all packing houses and other places handling or processing such fruit, will involve very large forces of men. Of necessity also rather intensive and wide surveys should be undertaken in the neighboring States of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, etc., for the purpose of determining whether there may have been any spread into these States through the agency particularly of the truck fruit from Florida. This work is of such magnitude, it is believed,' as fully to warrant the making available of the $4,250,000 item which is now before Congress for consideration.
Consideration of the joint resolution introduced yesterday by Mr. Wood, chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives, for the transfer of the $4,250,000 item referred toln the previous paragraph was given at an informal meeting of the Appropriations Committee of the House.. this morning and this joint resolution received the approval of the House directly after. It now goes to the Senate, where its prompt consideration is anticipated.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 68
[Approved April 26, 1929; effective May 1, 1929]

I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the State of Florida to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said State of Florida, effective on and after May 1, 1929. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds; (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure;
(3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveying fruits or vegetables; (4) fruit-packing equipment and all other articles, including nursery stock, which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation, or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the said quarantined State of Florida into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and in amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, such limitation shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly 1 to other States and Territories, and when the movement of the restricted articles intrastate from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly therefrom to other parts of the quarantined State and thence into interstate commerce: Provided further, That the restrictions in the regulations supplemental to this quarantine applying to the infested zone shall apply immediately to the infested area designated in the quarantine promulgated on April 15, 1929, by the State Plant Board of Florida and to such alddition;il infested points as have been determined and are being controlled by the said State p:ant board until the State plant board shall have (lesign:ted infested and protective zones as defined in the regulations supplemental hereto.
Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of April, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the Unite(l States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. IIYI)E,
SecrctaUI I/ of Igriculture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. (S
[Approved April 20, 1929; effective May 1, 1929]
REGlt'LATION 1. DEF INITION S

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean
(a) Fruit flies. The insects known as the Mediterraneanl fruit fly (Ccratiti.? oapitata Wied.) in any stage of dvelopmient.
(b) The terms infested," infestation," and the like relate to infestatiotin with the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(c) Quarantined State. Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
The interstate transportation of living Mediterranean fruit flies in ainy stage of devel opment and for any purpose is prohibited under the provisions of the act approved Mar. :13. 1905 (33 Stat. 1269).
80297--30----5







82 PLANT QUARANTINE- AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [AprR-June,

(d) Infested zone. The area included within one mile of any property on or in which infestation has been determined: Provided, That the State Plant Board of Florida, with the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, may include in such infested zone such additional area as may be necessary for accomplishing eradication of this insect.
(e) Protective zones. The area included within 9 miles of the outside boundary of any infested zone: Provided, That the State Plant Board of Florida, with the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, may include in such protective zone such additional area as may be necessary to effect the eradication of this insect.
(f) Restricted articles. Fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds; sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure; railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveying fruits or vegetables; and fruit-packing equipment and all other articles including nursery stock which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, eath, peat, compost, or manure.
(g) Host fruits and vegetables. Fruits, vegetables, and garden and or chard products of all kinds susceptible to infestation by the Mediterranean fruit fly, namely, (1) all wild and cultivated fruits, except watermelons, pineapples, coconuts, and other nuts; and (2) the following kinds of vegetables: Peppers of all kinds, pumpkins, gourds, squashes, tomatoes, beans of all kinds, eggplants; together with any other fruits or vegetables or other garden or orchard products which may later be determined as susceptible and of which due notice will be given.
(h) Host-free period. A period of time during which no host fruits or vegetables in any stage of development are produced Or permitted to exist within any protective zone except fruits or vegetables of such varieties, and 'fruits or vegetables held under such conditions, as, are prescribed in these regulations.
(i) Inspector. An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2. CONDITIONS REQUIRED IN THE QUARANTINED STATE

The interstate movement of restricted articles from any part of the State of Florida will be conditioned on the said State providing for and enforcing the following eradication and control measures in manner and by method batisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture, namely:

(A) Infested zones-eradication measures

(1) Upon determination by the State Plant Board of Florida of a Mediterranean fruit-fly infestation, the area included within 1 mile of any property on or in which such infestation has been determined shall be designated by, said plant board as an infested zone: Provided, That the State Plant Boald of Florida, with the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, may include in such infested zone such additional area as may be necessary to effect the eradication of this insect.
(2) Within every infested zone as prescribed above, all host fruits, wild and cultivated, and all host vegetables, shall be destroyed or processed or treated in a manner satisfactory to. the inspector as soon as possible after the discovery of infestation therein. No host fruits or vegetables shall thereafter be permitted to develop to, susceptible stages of maturity or to remain within such zone, nor -sliall any host vegetables. be planted in such zone, until the State plant board, with the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, shall determine that all infestation in such zone has been eliminated and that the restrictions of this paragraph shall no longer remain in force with respect thereto.
(3) Such treatment as shall be satisfactory to the inspector shall. be ap. plied to the soil of premises in the infested zone and to all railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been -used in conveying fruits or vegetables therefrom, and to all fruit-packing equipment and all other articles which have been associated with the production of, or commerce in, such fruits or vegetables or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure from the said Infested zone.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83

(B) Protective zone; host-free period

(1) Immediately upon the designation of an infested zone, the area included within 9 miles of the outside boundary of said zone shall be designated as a protective zone: Provided, That the State Plant Board of Florida, with the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, may include in such protective zone such additional area as may be necessary to effect the eradication of this insect.
(2) A host-free period shall be maintained each year throughout the protective zones, beginning on May 1 and continuing for six months,' subject to such modification as to duration and dates of commencement and termination as may be authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture on presentation of evidence that such modification is necessary or desirable and does not involve increase of risk of propagating the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(3) Prior to the commencement of such host-free period each year, all ripe or ripening citrus fruits growing within the protective zones shall be removed from the trees for shipment, destruction, or processing.
(4) No host vegetables shall be planted or grown within the protective zones which will mature or reach a stage of development susceptible to infestation during the host-free period.
(5) No host fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be permitted to grow or exist within the protective zones at any time during the host-free period except: Citrus fruit on the trees in such stages of immaturity that in the judgment of the inspector it is not susceptible to infestation; and host fruits and vegetables in storage or on retail sale for immediate consumption, stored, or maintained under such conditions and for such periods of time as shall be approved by the inspector.
(C) Inspection
A system of inspection satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture shall be carried on throughout the year to provide for the efficient enforcement of these regulations and for the prompt discovery of any infestations which may occur.
(D) Intrastate movement

The intrastate movement of all restricted articles within the quarantined State shall be brought under such control as shall be satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture.

(E) Control of production and distribution aun'cies
All groves, orchards, truck gardens, packing plants, and all other places in which fruits or vegetables are produced, packed, processed, manufactured, or otherwise utilized or permitted to remain within the quarantined State shall be operated and maintained under the direct control of the State in such a manner that in the judgment of the inspector fruit flies could not exist therein or be disseminated therefrom.

REGULATION 3. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF CITRUS FRUITS FROM A QUARANTINED STATE

Section A. Control of morcnwcnt
(1) Citrus fruits, except such as have been manufactured or processed in such a manner as in the judgment of the inspector to eliminate danger of carrying the Mediterranean fruit fly, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a quarantined State to or through any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
(2) Citrus fruit in bulk, including culls and drops in any manner, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any part of a quarantined State; nor shall any interstate movement of citrus fruit by mail or by automobile truck be allowed.

'The host-free period in 1929 is expected to approximate five months.







84 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Awn-June,

(3) Citrus fruit may be moved under permit from a quarantined State (except as to fruit produced in an infested zone) only when packed in standard commercial boxes and when transported in refrigerator or ventilated cars or boats equipped for refrigeration, such ears or boats to be iced or screened in manner satisfactory to the inspector. This authorization shall apply both to freight and express movement. Such shipments shall mo ve only in, car lots: Provided, That permittees may ship by express in express cars in less than car lots, citrus fruits produced in approved groves (see see. B, 3 (c) hereof) when such fruit is packed in standard commercial boxes, each of which has a permit tag issued by the United States Department of Agriculture securely attached to the outside thereof: Provided further, That whenever such shipment shall pass through any protective or any infested zone, the car containing such shipment shall be and shall remain securely screened or closed in a manner satisfactory to the inspector throughout the entire time such shipment is within such zones.
(4) For the spring shipping season of 1929' citrus fruits shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any part of a quarantined State after June 15, nor shall any citrus fruits be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a protective zone after May 31.

Section B. Conditions governing the issuance of permits

(1) Infested zone.-No permits for the interstate movement of citrus fruits produced or packed within an infested zone will be issued.
(2) Protective zone.-(a) No permits will be issued for the interstate movement of citrus fruits produced on premises within any protective zone unless the host-free period has been maintained on such premises. (See regulation 2-B.)
(b) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of citrus fruits from a protective zone only to the District of Columbia, including Potomac Yards in Virginia, and to destinations in the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania and States north and east thereof, including shipments via any of such States to foreign countries. Such shipments shall not be subject to diversion en route except to destinations within the territory indicated: Provided, That any packing house outside of the protective zone may be authorized to handle fruit produced within a protective zone, but in such case such packing house and its entire output shall thereafter be subject to the restrictions as to destination indicated in this paragraph.
(3) Shipments of citrus fruits from a quarantined State.-Except as restricted in the preceding paragraphs of this regulation, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of citrus fruits from a quarantined State to points outside thereof upon compliance with the following conditions:
(a) Issuance of permits for interstate movement of citrus from a quarantined State, exclusive of infested zones, shall be conditioned on such district or such grove inspection and such packing house operation as may be required by the inspector.
(b) Packers, shippers, or others intending to move or allow to be moved citrus fruits shall make application for a permit to the office of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Orlando, Fla., as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications shall show the nature and quantity of the fruit it is proposed to move, together with the location at which it is being or will be packed, the name and address of the consignor and a list of all premises from which fruit for packing Will be secured, together with their locations and the names and addresses of the owners.
(c) Each applicant for a permit shall file with his application a signed statement in which he agrees to notify the inspector of all additional premises from which fruit for packing will be secured; to maintain, available for examination by the inspector, a complete list of all consignees, together with the amount. and date of each shipment; not to use nor permit the use of his permit tags on citrus fruits from any premises until he has been issued a notice in writing by the inspector that shipment of fruit from such premises is approved; to discontinue packing and shipping the fruits from any premises on notification by the inspector either of the discovery of an infestation of the

8 Restrictions determined upon for the crop of 1930 and subsequent crops will be later. Issued.,






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

Mediterranean fruit fly on such premises or of failure on the part of the owner or manager of such premises to comply with any other restriction of these regulations.

REGULATION 4. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF NONCITRUS FRUITS

(1) Unrestricted fruit.-No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of watermelons, pineapples, cocoanuts or other nuts, or of fruits which have been manufactured or processed in such manner as in the judgment of the inspector to eliminate danger of carrying the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(2) Permit requirements.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof, noncitrus fruits from a quarantined State shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate to or through any point outside thereof, unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such movement upon the receipt of evidence (tu) that the fruit concerned was not produced in an infested zone, (b) that the premises on which it was produced were operated in compliance with Federal and State quarantine regulations, and (c) that the shipment concerned does not involve risk of spread of infestation.
(3) Prohibited shipments.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof, noncitrus fruits, in bulk shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any part of a quarantined State; nor shall any interstate movement of such fruit by mail or by automobile truck be allowed.
(4) Car lots.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof, noncitrus fruits may be moved under permit from a quarantined State (except as to such fruit produced in an infested zone), only when packed in standard commercial boxes and when transported in refrigerator or ventilated cars or boats equipped for refrigeration, such cars or boats to be iced or screened in manner satisfactory to the inspector. This authorization shall apply both to freight and express movement. Such shipments shall move only in car lots: Provided, That permittees may ship by express in express cars in less than car lots, noncitrus fruits produced outside of infested zones when such fruit is packed in standard commercial boxes, each of which has a permit tag issued by the United States Department of Agriculture securely attached to the outside thereof: Provided further, That whenever such shipment shall pass through any infested zone, the car containing such shipment shall be and shall remain securely screened or closed in a manner satisfactory to the inspector throughout the entire time such shipment is within such zone.
(5) Shipments from a protective zone.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof, noncitrus fruits shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a protective zone to or through any point outside thereof during the host-free period, and no permits authorizing the movement from such I)roteetive zone of fruits ripening during such host-free period will be issued.

REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF VEGETABIILES

(1) Vegetables restricted.-Restrictions on the interstate movement of vegetables shall until further notice relate only to those designated as host vegetables, namely, peppers of all kinds, gourds, squashes, tomatoes, beans of all kinds, and eggplants. (See regulation 1.)
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of host vegetables grown in and moving from any part of a quarantined State outside of a protective zone, except that tomatoes shall be shipped green in standard commercial crates, baskets, or boxes and transported( in refrigerator or ventilated railway cars.
(3) Host vegetables from a protective zone shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. l'ermits may he issued for such movement during other seasons of the year than the host-free period, on the receipt of evidence (a) that the vegetables concerned were produced outside an infested zone, (b) that the premises on which they were produced were operated in compliance with Federal and State quarantine reula ions, and
(v) that the shipment concerned d()oes not involve risk of spread of infestation.
(4) IIHst vegetables in bulk from a protectie zone shall nt be moved )or allowed to be moved interstate nor shall any interstate movement of such vegetables from such zone by mail or by automobile truck be allowed.







86 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

(5) Host vegetables from a protective zone may be moved under permit only when packed in standard commercial containers and when transported in refrigerator or ventilated cars or boats equipped for refrigeration, such cars or boats to be iced or screened in manner satisfactory to the inspector. This authorization shall apply both to freight and express movement. Such shipments shall move only in car lots: Provided, That permittees may ship by express in express cars in less than car lots, host vegetables produced outside of infested zones when such vegetables are packed in standard commercial boxes, each of which has a permit tag issued by the United States Department of Agriculture securely attached to the outside thereof.

REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF SAND, SOIL, RA TH, PEAT, COMPOST, AND MANURE

(1) Soil, earth, compost, and manure of any kind as to either bulk movement or in connection with other articles shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from an infested or a protective zone to or through any point outside thereof: Provided, That this shall not apply to fuller's earth, kaolin clay, phosphatic sand or clay, peat, or muck, and similar mined or dredged products, including sand, when in the judgment of the inspector such movement does not carry any risk of spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost or manure from points in a quarantined State outside protective zones.

REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF RAILWAY CARS
BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS

(1) Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting any article whose movement is restricted by these regulations within or from a quarantined State, shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly cleaned and, if required by the inspector, disinfected, by the destination carrier and/or the consignee at the point of unloading in manner and by method prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

REGULATION 8. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF PACKING EQUIPMENT AND OTHER CONTAMINATED ARTICLES

Fruit-packing equipment and articles which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits and vegetables or are or have been contaminated with soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a quarantined State to or through any point. outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such interstate movement upon determination by the inspector that the said articles have been so cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carrying Mediterranean fruit fly.
REGULATION 9. NURSERY STOCK

Nursery stock, including all kinds of plants and plant roots except portions of plants without roots or soil, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a quarantined State to or through any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such interstate movement upon determination by the inspector either (a) that the nursery in question was so situated and so protected as to eliminate the risk of soil infestation by larvae and pupae of the Mediterranean f rnit fly, or (b) that the said articles have been so cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carrying the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (c) that the said articles have originated outside any protective zone.
REGULATION 10. MARKING REQUIREMENTS

For all shipments in less than car lots, each box, crate, or other container of the articles for which permits are required by these regulations shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and shall bear securely






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87

attached to the outside thereof the permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of car lots, no certification will be required of individual boxes, crates, or other containers, but the permit shall accompany the waybill covering such shipment. All conductor's manifests, memoranda, or bills of lading pertaining to such shipments shall be marked with the number of the permit, and with such instructions with respect to cleaning of said cars as are given in such permit.

REGULATION 11. INSPECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved or offered for movement interstate which contains or may contain articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations shall be subject to inspection by inspectors at any time or place.

REGULATION 12. CANCELLATION OF PERMITS

Any permit issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further permits refused, either upon determination of infestation on the premises on which the articles concerned are or have been located, or for any violation of these regulations, or of the permittee's agreement, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such permits might result in the dissemination of the Mediterranean fruit fly. After any such permit is withdrawn or canceled, the further use of any permit tags issued thereunder is prohibited.

REGULATION 13. SHIPMENTS FOR EXPERIMENTAL OR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate for experimental or scientific purposes in any other manner than under the full restrictions prescribed in these regulations.4
These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after May 1, 1929. Done at the city of Washington this 26th day of April, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
PENALTIES

The plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District of the United States, or from- any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, * or any other article * specified in the notice of quarantine * in manner or method or under conditions other tian those prescrme1d by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that amy lwperson who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or whio shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface. or destroy any certificate urovide(l for ill thIis act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall upon conviction thereof be punished by a line not exceeding $100 or by imprisonment not exceeding one year, or both such tfine and inl)risonment, inll the discretion of the court.
No TICE TO COMMON CARmERS
APRII 2I6, 1929.
SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below. indicating your official title, and return this letter to the Secretary l' Agriculture in tihe inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no polstage.
Notice is hereby given to the tranllsportation company you repreent. as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the not approved August 20, 1912. known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 3151 a amended

4 See also footnote, p. 81.






88 PLANT QUARANTINE. AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has by Notice of Quarantine No. 68, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effective May 1, 1929, ordered that (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds, (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveying fruits or vegetables, (4) fruit-packing equipment and all other articles, including nursery stock, which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a coWmon carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the State of Florida in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 68, and amendments which may hereafter be made thereto.
Very respectfully,
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
Received this notice and copy of quarantine No. 68 mentioned therein this
- --day of ------------- 1929.

(Signature)
(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers within and throughout the United States.]

NOTICE To GENERAL PuB3Lic THROUGH NEwspA&PERS

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated Notice of Quarantine No. 68, with rules and regulations supplemental thereto, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effective May 1, 1929. The effect of this quarantine is to prohibit the interstate movement of (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds; (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveying fruits or vegetables; (4) fruit packing equipment and all other articles, including nursery stock, which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil. earth, peat, compost or manure; from the regulated areas in the. State of Florida to any point outside thereof, in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto. Copies of said quarantine may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of AgriowIture.
[Published in the Sentinel, Orlando, Fla., April 30, 1929.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
W~ashington, April 30, 1929.
POST1MASTiER.
Y~ DEAR SIR: There is inclosed for your information and guidance a copy of Quarantine Order No. 68 of the United States Department of Agriculture, on aceount of thle Mediterranean fruit fly, an extremely destructive pest of fruits aiid vegetables, effective May 1, 1929, quarantining the whole State of Florida.
It will be noted that the order absolutely prohibits the interstate movement by mail of citrus fruits, noncitrus fruits or hostt vegetables," described in the re'glltiofls issued in connection with the order. Therefore, under the pro-. visions of piralgrapli 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regulations, parcels contaiing aniy of the fruits or vegetables mentioned may not be accepted for Iiilimg to pinfts outside the State of Florida.
Sincerely yours,
R. S. REGAR,
Third Assistanit Postmaster Generatl.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.
WTashington, May 3, 1929.
POSTMASTER.
MY DEAR. SIR: With reference to the letter addressed to you by this office on April 30, 1929, transmitting a copy of Quarantine Order No. 68 of the United States Department of Agriculture quarantining the whole State of Florida on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, you are instructed, in view of the emergency existing with respect to this destructive insect pest, not to a-cept for mailing either to points within or outside the State of Florida any of the fruits or host vegetables described in the regulations issued in connection with Quarantine Order No. 68.
Sincerely yours,
R. S. REGAR,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

Florida quarantined on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly

OFFICE OF THE POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, May 9, 1929.
To every postmaster in Florida:
In order to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly, a dangerous insect recently discovered in the State of Florida, the Secretary of Agriculture has promulgated Quarantine Order No. 68 quarantining that State. Under this quarantine order the acceptance for mailing in Florida of citrus fruits, noncitrus fruits, and certain "host" vegetables is absolutely prohibited, both to places in Florida and to points outside that State.
A copy of the order and instructions pertaining thereto have been sent to every postmaster in Florida by the Third Assistant Postmaster General, and all postmasters and other postal employees are directed to cooperate in the enforcement of Quarantine Order No. 68, so that no parcel of fruits or vegetables covered by the order may be accepted for mailing or delivered in violation of the quarantine.
This is a serious emergency: Constant vigilance must be exercised to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
W. IRVING GLoWVE-.
Acting Postmaster Gcn cral.

Attention, all Florida postmnasters!-XNurser'y stock, plants of any kind, and
fruits and "host" vegetables must not be accepted for mailing in Florida

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GNIAL.
Washingtonl, May 25, 1929.
Notwithstanding a copy of Quarantine Order No. (N of the United States Department of Agriculture, account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, wa sent to every postmaster in Florida on April 30 with specific instructions inot to accept for mailing to points within or without that State any citrus fruits, noncitrus fruits, or "host" vegetables enumerated in the quarantine Irder; that supplemental instructions were sent on May 3 to such postmasters, aml a notice headed "Florida Quarantined on Account (of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly" was published in this bulletin on May 10, postmasters in Florida are again cautioned not to accept for mailing fruits and vegetables prohibited by the quarantine order.
The Mediterranean fruit fly is a most destructive pest of fruits and vegetables and, if it is permitted to spread, will cause incalculable damage and loss, not only to the State of Florida but to a large number 't other States.
Millions of dollars are being spent to stamp) out this pest, and all postmasters in Florida are again admonished to exercise constant vigilance to lrtvent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
All postmasters in Florida are therefore directed not to accept for mailing nursery stock or plants of any kind, nor any fruit or "host" vegetables.
1. S. 1AR,
Third Assistant Postmater General.
80297- 06







()o PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

CLEA-NING REFEIGERATOR CARS UNDER MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY QUARANTINE
P. Q. C. A.-226 MAY 8l 1929
DE-kR SiRs: You have doubtless been advised through press reports that the Mediterranean fruit fly, probably the most serious of fruit-attacking insects, has been found over a considerable area in the vicinity of Orlando,. Fla. It is now apparent that infested fruit from this area has been distributed not only by truck and bulk shipments but probably also with packed fruit shipped In refrigerator cars. To prevent spreading infestation to new localities, theiefore, all such cars should be thoroughly cleaned before being placed again in fruitgrowing districts in any part of the United States. This cleaning is for the purpose not only of removing any fruit remaining in the car, but of destroying any larvae or puparia of the fly which might be on the floor or elsewhere within the car.
With respect to this situation your attention is respectfully called to regulation 7 of Notice of Quarantine No. 68, effective May 1, 1929. (See copy herewith.) This regulation is as follows:

REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF RAILWAY CARS,
BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS

Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting any article whose movement is restricted by these regulations within or from a quarantined State, shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly cleaned and, if required by the inspector, disinfected, by the destination carrier and/or the consignee at the point of unloading in manner and by method prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
To carry out the purpose of this regulation, your employees should be instructed (1) to collect all fruit, crates, and trash material from the floor racks, from the floor beneath, and from the tank pan below the ice grates, and (2) to burn all such fruit, crates, trash, and sweepings. Such cleaning should be done either at the point of unloading or at any designated point within the destination terminal.
You are requested also to instruct employees to report, to the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Washington, D. C., the car number, and date of cleaning of all cars to which these restrictions apply. They should be authorized to permit inspectors of the department to examine any car falling under the said regulation 7, either at the unloading point or, after having been unloaded, at any transit point. You are further requested to send copies of instructions, issued on this subject to your employees, to the Plant Quaarntine and Control Administration.
These cleaning requirements will apply not only to all cars used for the transportation of host fruits and vegetables from Florida under Federal permit subsequent to April 30, but also to cars which have been used for the transportation of such fruits and vegetables prior to May 1 and which may be now either at unloading points, or in transit to other fruit-growing areas, or in such areas. The damage which might result from a single infested fruit reaching other fruit-growing areas or from larvae or puparia of the fly remaining in the car and emerging as adults is so great that every precaution should be taken to free "empties" from risk of carrying, this pest.
The foregoing instructions apply to the cleaning of cars covered under regulation 7 of quarantine No. 68. Later, instructions may be issued relative to any required disinfection by steam or other means.
This letter is sent in duplicate with receipt form attached. Please date and sign such receipt on one copy and return the receipted copy in the inclosed penalty envelope which requires no postage.
Yours very truly,
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Coatrol Administration.

Received above communication and copy of Notice of Quarantine referred to therein this ------ day of ------------ 1929.
(Name) ----------------------------------------(Title) -----------------------------------------------






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 91

MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE REVISED
[Press notice]
MAY 9, 1929.
The Secretary of Agriculture to-day announced a revision of the rules and regulations supplemental to the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine. The revision becomes effective May 10.
The changes and additions provide (1) for the holding of citrus f ruit in approved cold-storage plants after June 15; (2) for the shipment of limes from Monroe and Dade Counties subsequent to June 15; (3) for the use of packing houses in lightly infested zones, when other facilities are absent, for the packing of fruit coming from the surrounding protective zones and adjacent points outside thereof; (4) for the interstate movement under permit of host fruits and vegetables in dining cars, and (5) that bulk, mail, and automobile truck movement of host vegetables from any part of a quarantined State is prohibited.
In view of the fact that the regulations under this quarantine which were approved on April 26, regulate the movement of all the fruits and vegetables of the State of Florida, it was anticipated that the first week of operation under the quarantine would reveal the need of certain modifications. This has proven to be the case and the revision is issued in order to make specific provision for the control of certain classes of movement not adequately covered before.
MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. OS
REVISION OF REGUMATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE
[Effective May 10, 1929]
The rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 6S, approved April 26, 1929, in effect regulate the movement of all the fruits and vegetables of the State of Florida. As was anticipated, it has become necessary to revise them as to certain details, and these changes are embodied in this revision. The changes and additions provide (1) for the holding of citrus fruit in approved cold-storage plants after June 15 (see regulation 3, section A-4) ;
(2) for the shipment of limes from Monroe and Dade Counties subsequent to June 15 (see regulation 3, section A-4) ; (3) for the use of packing houses in lightly infested zones, when other facilities are absent, for the packing of fruit coming from the surrounding protective zones and adjacent points outside thereof (see regulation 3, section B-i) ; (4) for the interstate movement under permit of host fruits and vegetables in dining cars (see regulation 3, section B-3 (d) ; regulation 4, paragraph 6; regulation 5, paragraph 6), and (5) that bulk, mail, and automobile-truck movement of host vegetables from any part of a quarantined State is prohibited (see regulation 5, paragraph 2).
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 68
(Approved April 206, 1929; effective May 1, 1929)
I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the State of Florida to prevent the spreal of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Certatitis capitata Wied.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section S of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly giveli the public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said State of Florida, effective on and after May 1, 1929. Hereafter, under thle authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds, (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveying fruits or vegetables, (4) fruitpackdng equipment






92 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATIONJApril-June,

and all other articles including nursery stock which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported moved, or allowed to be moved from the said quarantined State of Florida into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and in amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, such limitation shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly 5 to other States and Territories, and when the movement of the restricted articles intrastate from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly therefrom to other parts of the quarantined State and thence into interstate commerce: Provided further, That the restrictions in the regulations supplemental to this quarantine applying to the infested zone shall apply immediately te, the infested area designated in the quarantine promulgated on April 15, 1929, by the State Plant Board of Florida and to such additional infested points as have been determined and are being controlled by the said State Plant Board until the State Plant Board shall have designated infested and protective zones as defined in the regulations supplemental hereto.
Done at the city of Washington this 26th day of April, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] A.THun M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 68
[Approved May 9, 1929; effective May 10, 1929)

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names., and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Fruit flies: The insects known as the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wled.) in any stage of development.
(b) The terms. infested," infestation," and the like relate to infestation with the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(c) Quarantined State: Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(d) Infested zone: The area included within I mile of any property on or in which infestation has been determined: Provided, That any property of which any part is within 1 mile of an infested property shall in its entirety be ineluded in the infested zone, and that the State Plant Board of Florida, with the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, may include in such infested zone such additional area as may be necessary for accomplishing eradication of this insect.
(e) Protective zone: The area included within 9 miles of the outside boundary of any infested zone: Provided, That any property of which any part is within such distance of an infested zone shall in its entirety be included in the protective zone, and that the State Plant Board of Florida, with the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, may include in such protective zone such additional area as may be necessary to effect the eradication of this insect.
(f) Outer zone: All portions of a quarantined State outside of Infested and protective zones.
(g) Restricted articles: Fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds; sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure; railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveying fruits or

OTbe Interstate transportation of living Mediterranean fruit files In any stage of development and for any'purpose Is prohibited under the provisions of the act approved Mar. 3, 1905 (33 Stat. 1269).






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 93

vegetables; and fruit-packing equipment and all other articles including nursery stock which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits
-or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure.
(h) Host fruits and vegetables: Fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds susceptible to infestation by the Mediterranean fruit fly, namely, (1) all wild and cultivated fruits, except watermelons, pineap)ples, coconuts and other nuts; and (2) the following kinds of vegetables: Peppers of all kinds, gourds, pumpkins, squashes, tomatoes, beans of all kinds, eggplants; together with any other fruits or vegetables or other garden or orchard products which may later be determined as susceptible and of which due notice will be given.
(i) Host-free period: A period of time during which no host fruits or vegetables in any stage of development are produced or permitted to exist within any protective zone except fruits or vegetables of such varieties, and fruits or vegetables held under such conditions, as are prescribed in these regulations.
(j) Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2. CONDITION'S REQUIRED IN THE QUARANTINED STATE

The interstate movement of restricted articles from any part of the State
- of Florida will be conditioned on the said State providing for and enforcing the following eradication and control measures in manner and by method satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture, namely:

(A) Infested Zones; Eradication Measures
(1) Upon determination by the State Plant Board of Florida of a Mediterranean fruit fly infestation, the area included within 1 mile of any property on or in which such infestation has been determined shall be designated by said plant board as an infested zone: Provided, That any property of which any part is within 1 mile of an infested property shall in its entirety be included in the infested zone, and that the State Plant Board of Florida, with the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, may include in such infested zone such additional area as may be necessary to effect the eradication of this insect.
(2) Within every infested zone as prescribed above, all host fruts. wild and cultivated, and all host vegetables, shall be destroyed or processed or treated in a nuner satisfactory to the inspector as soon as possible after the discovery of infestation therein. No host fruits or vegetables shall thereafter be permitted to develop to suceptil)le stages of maturity or to remain within such zone, nor shall any host vegetables be planted in such zone until the State Plant Boardl. with the approval of the United Stat es Department of Agriculture, shall determine that all infestation in such zone has been eliminated and that the restrictions of this paragraph shall no longer remain in force with respect theretio.
(3) Such treatment as shall be satisfactory to the inspector shall he applied to the soil of premises in the infested zone uId to all railway cars. boat<. and other vehicles arnl containers which have berlin used in co"veyin' its or vegetables therefromn, and to all fruit-packing equipmentt and all other articles which have been associated with the production of. or commerce in. such fruits or vegetables or oe conli11am1Inated with s1and1, soil, earth, leat, compost, or manure from the said infested zone.

(I) Protectire Zone; H lost-Frcc Period
(1) Immediately upon the designation of an infested zone, the iren included within 9 miles of the outside hou(lndary of said zsne shall e desieinated as a protective zone: Provided, Tlhat any property of which any 1)art is within such distance of an infested zone shall in its v tirety be imnclud(led i the 1pro(tect ive zone, and that the State Plant Board of Florida, with the ple)'oval of the United States Dep)artment of Agriculture, may includtle in such protecive zone such additional area ais may be ncessa ry to effect the eradicat iot of tiis i nset.
(2) A host-free period shall e maintained each year throulhout the protective zones, beginning on May and continue ing for six mont hs." subject to

The host-free period in 1929 is expected to npproximnte five months.






94 PLANT QUARANTINEAND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [AprU-June,

such modification as to duration and dates of commencement and termination as may be authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture on presentation of evidence that such modification is necessary Or desirable and does not involve increase of risk of propagating the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(3) Prior to the commencement of such host-free period each year-, all ripe or ripening citrus fruits growing within the protective, zones shall be removed from the trees'for shipment, destruction, or processing.
(4) No host vegetables, shall he planted or grown within the protective zones which will mature or reach a stage of development susceptible to( infestation during the host-free period.
(5) No host fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be permitted to grow Or exist within the protective zones at any time during the host-free period except citrus fruit on the trees in such stages! of immaturity that in the judgment of the inspector it is not susceptible to, infestation, and host fruits and vegetables in storage or on retail sale for immediate consumption, stored or maintained under such conditions and for such periods of time as shall be approved by the inspector.
(C) Inspection
A system of inspection satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture shall be carried on throughout the year to provide for the eflcient enforcement of these regulations, and for the prompt discovery of any infestations which may occur.
(D) Intrastate Movement
The intrastate movement of all restricted articles within the quarantined State shall be brought under such control as shall be satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture.

(B) Control of Production and Distribution Agenoleg

All groves, orchards, truck gardens, packing plants, and all other places in which fruits or vegetables are produced, packed, processed, manufactured, or otherwise utilized or permitted to remain within the quarantined State shall be operated and maintained under the direct control of the State in such a manner. that in the judgment of the inspector fruit flies could not exist therein or be disseminated therefrom.

REGULATION 3. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF CITRUS FRUITS FROM A QUARANTINED STATE

Section A. Control of Movement

(1) Citrus fruits, except such as have been manufactured or processed in such a manner as in the judgment of the inspector to eliminate danger of carrying the Mediterranean fruit fly, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a quarantined State to or through any point outside- thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
(2) Citrus fruit in bulk, including culls and drops in any manner, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any part of a quarantined State; nor shall any interstate movement of citrus fruit by mail or by automobile truck be allowed.(3) Citrus fruit may be moved under permit from a quarantined State (except as to fruit produced in an infested zone), only when packed in standard commercial boxes and when transported in refrigerator or ventilated cars or boats equipped for refrigeration, such cars or boats to be iced or screened in manner satisfactory to the inspector. This authorization shall apply, both to freight and express movement. Rail shipments shall move only in car lots: Provided, That permittees may ship by express in refrigerator or ventilated express cars in less than car lots citrus fruits produced in approved groves (see section B, 3 (c) hereof), when such fruit is packed in standard commercial boxes, each of which has a permit tag issued by the United States Department of Agriculture securely attached to the outside thereof: Provided further, That'whenever such shipment shall pass through any protective or any infested zone the car containing such shipment shall be and shall remain securely screened or closedin a manner satisfactory to the inspector throughout the entire time such ship-






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 95

ment is within such zones: Provided further, That the requirements of this paragraph shall not apply to citrus fruit moved interstate in dining cars in compliance with Section B (3) (d) of this regulation.
(4) For the spring shipping of 1929 citrus fruits t shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any part of a quarantined State after June 15, nor shall any citrus fruits be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a protective zone after May 31: Provided, That such fruit may be shipped under permit subsequent to June 15 from approved cold-storage plants under such conditions of storage and movement as shall be prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration: Provided further, That this paragraph shall not apply to the shipment of limes from Monroe and Dade Counties, Florida.
Section B. Conditions Governing the Issuance of Permits

(1) Infested zone.-No permits for the interstate movement of citrus fruits produced or packed within an infested zone will be issued: Provided, That to meet emergency conditions, in the absence of other facilities, the use of packing houses in lightly infested zones may be authorized for the packing and shipment of fruit coming from the surrounding protective zones and adjacent points outside thereof. Such authorizations shall be conditioned on completion of the cleanup of all citrus fruits and the repeated spraying of all trees in the infested zone involved, at least seven days, or more if required by the inspector, prior to the use of such packing houses. All fruit packed in such authorized houses shall be subject to the same restrictions as fruit produced in a protective zone. (See paragraph 2 (b) of this section.)
(2) Protective zone.-(a) No permits will be issued for the interstate movement of citrus fruits produced on premises within any protective zone unless the host-free period has been maintained on such premises. (See regulation 2-B.)
(b) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of citrus fruits from a protective zone only to the District of Columbia, including Potomac Yards in Virginia, and to destinations in the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania and States north and east thereof, including shipments via any of such States to foreign countries." Such shipments shall not be subject to diversion en route except to destinations within the territory indicated: Provided, That any packing house outside of the protective zone may be authorized to handle fruit produced within a protective zone, but in such case such packing house and its entire output shall thereafter be subject to the restrictions as to destination indicated in this paragraph.
(3) Shipments of citrus fruits from a quarantined State.-Except as restricted in the preceding paragraphs of this regulation, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of citrus fruits from a quarantined State to points outside thereof upon compliance with the following conditions:
(a) Issuance of permits for interstate movement of citrus from a quarantined State, exclusive of infested zones, shill be conditioned on such district or such give inspection iland such packing-house operation as may be required by the inspector.
(b) Packers, shippers, oi others intending to move or allow to be movll citrus fruits shall make application for a permit to the otflie of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Orlando, Fla., as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications shall show thle nature and quantity of the fruit it is proposed to move, together with the loe:tion at which it is being or will be packed, the name and address of the consignor and a list of all premises from which fruit for packing will be secured, together with their locations and the ames and addresses of the owners.
(c) Each applicant for a permit shll file with his aipplitin a signed stateImenit in which lie grees To notify the inspector of all additional premises from which fruit for packing will be secured; to maintain, available for examination by the illnspector, a coiplete list of all consignees, together wiih the 1111mountlil and date of leach shlipmelt : 1t to use nor permit the use of his permit tgs on lls fruits from any i)rmises until he has becnl issued a notice ill wvritinlg hby the

SRestrictions determined upon for crop of 1930 and subsequent crops will be Issued Iter. SThe restrictions of this quarantine on the movement of fruits and vegtlies do not apply to the export of such articles from Florida ports direct to foreign countries For restrictions on intrastate movement for the purpose of export to a foreign country consult the State Plant Board of Florida, Orlando.







96 PLANT QUARANTINE, AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

inspector that shipment of fruit from such premises is approved; to discontinue packing and shipping the fruits from any premises on notification by the inspector either of the discovery of an infestation of the Mediterranean fruit fly cn such premises or of failure on the part of the owner or manager of such premises to comply with any other restriction of these regulations.
(d) Permits may be issued by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration to railroad companies authorizing them to serve citrus fruit on dining cars and to transport such fruit in the refrigerators of such cars en route from a quarantined State to points outside thereof upon the receipt of evidence that the fruit concerned was obtained outside a quarantined State at points approved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, that such fruit was not produced in an infested or a protective zone, and that the fruit concerned does not involve risk of spread of infestation. Furthermore, the railroad concerned shall file an agreement with the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration to comply with these conditions and to retain garbage containing such fruit or portions thereof and dispose of it only at such points as may be approved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

REGULATION 4. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF NOINCITRUS FRUITS

(1) Unrestricted fruit.-No restrictions are placed on the interstate movements of watermelons, pineapples, coconuts or other nuts, or of fruits which have been manufactured or processed in such a manner as in the judgment of the inspector to eliminate danger of carrying the M~editerranean fruit fly.
(2) Permit requirements.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof, noncitrus fruits from a quarantined State shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate to or through any point outside thereof, unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such movement upon the receipt of evidence (a) that the fruit concerned was not produced in an infested zone, (b) that the premises on which it was produced were operated in compliance with Federal and State quarantine regulations, and (c) that the shipment concerned doep not involve risk of spread of infestation.
(3) Prohibited shipments.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof, noncitrus fruits in bulk shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any part of a quarantined State; nor shall any interstate movement of such fruit by mail or by automobile truck be allowed.
(4) Rail and boat shipments.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof, noncitrus fruits may be moved under permit from a quarantined State (except as to such fruit produced in an infested zone), only when packed in standard commercial boxes and when transported in refrigerator or ventilated cars or boats equipped for refrigeration, such cars or boats to be iced or screened in manner satisfactory to the inspector. This authorization shall apply both to freight and express movement. Rail shipments shall move only in car lots: Provided, That permittees may ship by express in refrigerator or ventilated express cars in less than car lots, noncitrus fruits produced outside of infested zones when such fruit is packed in standard commercial boxes, each-of which has a permit tag issued by the United States Department of Agriculture securely attached to the outside thereof: Pro vided furtli er, That whenever such shipment shall pass through any infested zone, the car containing such shipment shall be and shall remain securely screened or closed in a manner satisfactory to the inspector throughout the entire time such shipment is within such zone: Provided further, That the requirements of this paragraph shall not apply to noncitrus fruit moved interstate in dining cars in compliance with paragraph 6 of this regulation.
(5) Shipments from a protective zone.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof, noncitrus, fruits shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a protective zone to or through any point outside thereof during the host-free period, and no permits authorizing the movement from such protective zone of fruits ripening during such host-free period will be issued.
(6) Dining car movement.-Permits may be issued by the Plant Quarantine and Control Admninistration to the railroads authorizing them to serve noncitrus fruit on dining cars and to transport such fruit -in the refrigerators of such cars en route from a quarantined State to points outside thereof upon the receipt of evidence that the fruit concerned was obtained outside a quarantined State at points approved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration,







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 97

that such fruit was not produced in an infested or protective zone, and that the fruit concerned does not involve risk of spread of infestation. Furthermore, the railroad concerned shall file an agreement with the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration to comply with these conditions and to retain garbage containing such fruit or portions thereof and dispose of it only at such points as may be approved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF VEGETABLES

(1) Vegetables restricted.-Restrictions on the interstate movement of vegetables shall until further notice relate only to those designated as host vegetables, namely, peppers of all kinds, gourds. pumpkins, squashes, tomatoes, beans of all kinds, and ezgplants. (See regulation 1.)
(2) Prohibited shipments.-Host vegetables in bulk from a quarantined State shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate nor shall any interstate movement of such vegetables by mail or by automobile truck be allowed, nor shall tomatoes be so moved except when green.
(3) Rail and boat shipments.-Host vegetables from a quarantined State may be moved interstate only when packed in standard commercial containers and when transported in refrigerator or ventilated cars or boats equipped for refrigeration, such cars or boats to be iced or screened in manner satisfactory to the inspector. This restriction shall apply both to freight and express movement. Rail shipments shall move only in car lots: Prorided, That permittees may ship by express in refrigerator or ventilated express cars in less than car lots, host vegetables produced outside of infested zones when such vegetables are packed in standard commercial containers, each of which has a permit tag issued by the United States Department of Agriculture securely attached to the outside thereof: Prorided further, That whenever such shipment shall pass through any infested zone, the car containing such shipment shall be and shall remain securely screened or closed in a manner satisfactory to the inspector throughout the entire time such shipment is within such zone: Provided further, That the requirements of this paragraph shall not apply to host vegetables moved interstate in dining cars in compliance with paragraph 6 of this regulation.
(4) Permit requirements--protective zone.-Host vegetables from a protective zone shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such movement during other seasons of the year than the host-free period, on the receipt of evidence (a) that the vegetables concerned were produced outside an infested zone. (b) that the premises on which they were pro(lduced were operated in compliance with Federal and State quarantine regulations, and (c) that the shipment concerned does not involve risk of spread of infestation.
(5) Permit requirements-outer zone.-'No permits are required for the interstate movement of ear-lot shipments of host vegetables grown in and moving from any part of a quarantined State outside of a protective zone, when such shipments are moving in compliance with paragraphs (2), (3), (4), and (0) hereof: Provided, That the inspector may require that permits be secured und(ler the conditions prescribed above for the interstate shipment of host veetables from points outside of protective zones when in his judgment uncontrolled movement (a) from any such pidnt, or (b) of any designated class of vegetables, would involve risk of spread of the Med iterranean fruit fly.
(6) Dining car movement.-I-'ermits may he issued to railroad companies authorizing them to serve host vegetables on dining ca rs and to transport such vegetables in the refrigerators of such cars en route from a quarantined State to points outside thereof upon receipt of evidence that the vegetables concerned were obtained outside a quarantined State at points approved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration and that such vegetables were not produced in an infested or protective zone and that the vegetables concerned do not involve risk of spread of infestation. Furthermore, the railroad concerned shall file an agreement with the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration to comply with these conditions and to retain garbage containing such vegetables or portions thereof and to dispose of it only at such points as may be approved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.







98 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF SAND, SOIL, EARTH PEATt COMPOST, AND MANURE

(1) Soil, earth, compost, and manure of any kind as to either bulk movement or in connection with other articles shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from an infested or a protective zone to or through any point outside thereof: Provided, That this shall not apply to Fuller's earth, kaolin clay, phosphatic sand or clay, peat, or muck, and similar mined or dredged products, including sand, when in the judgment of the inspector such movement does not carry any risk of spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure from points in a quarantined State outside protective zones.

REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF RAILWAY CARS,
BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS

Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting any article whose movement is restricted by these regulations within or from a quarantined State shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly cleaned and, if required by the inspector, disinfected, by the destination carrier and/or the consignee at the point of unloading in manner and by method prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

REGULATION 8. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF PACKING EQUIPMENT AND OTHER CONTAMINATED ARTICLES

Fruit-packing equipment and articles which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits and vegetables or are or have been contaminated with soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a quarantined State to or through any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such interstate movement upon determination by the inspector that the said articles have been so cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carrying Mediterranean fruit fly.

REGULATION 9. NURSERY STOCK

Nursery stock, including all kinds of plants and plant roots except portions of plants without roots or soil, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a quarantined State to or through any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such interstate movement upon determination by the inspector either (a) that the nursery in question was so situated and so protected as to eliminate the risk of soil infestation by larvae and pupae of the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (b) that the said articles have' been so cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carrying the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (c) that the said articles have originated outside any protective zone.
REGULATION 10. MARKING REQUIREMENTS

For all express shipments in other than car lots, each box, crate, or other container of the articles for which permits are required by these, regulations shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and shall bear securely attached to the outside thereof the permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of car lot and boat shipments no, certification win be required of individual boxes, crates, or other containers, but the permit shall accompany the waybill covering such shipment. All conductor's manifests, memoranda, or bills of lading pertaining to such shipments shall be 'marked with the number of the permit, and with such instructions with respect to cleaning of said cars as are given in such permit.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 99

REGULATION 11. INSPECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved or offered for movement interstate which contains or may contain articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations shall be subject to inspection by inspectors at any time or place.

REGULATION 12. CANCELLATION OF PERMITS

Any permit issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further permits refused, either upon determination of infestation on the premises on which the articles concerned are or have been located, or for any violation of these regulations, or of the permittee's agreement, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such permits might result in the dissemination of the Mediterranean fruit fly. After any such permit is withdrawn or canceled, the further use of any permit tags issued thereunder is prohibited.

REGULATION 13. SHIPMENTS FOR EXPERIMENTAL OR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate for experimental or scentific purposes in any other manner than under the full restrictions prescribed in these regulations.9
These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after May 10, 1929, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated April 26, 1929.
Done at the city of Washington this 9th day of May, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
PENALTIES

The plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport. nor shall any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, * or any other articles * specified in the notice of quarantine * in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act. or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor. and shall upon conviction thereof be punished by a fine not exceeding $500 or by iinmjpr sonment not exceeding one year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in tie discretion of the court.
NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERS
MAY 10, 1929.
SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return th:s letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134. 1165), has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine No. 08, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effective May 10, 1929, and has ordered that (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds, (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveying fruits or vegetables, (4) fruit-packing equipment and all other

SSee also footnote, p. 92.







100 PLANT QUARtANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

articles including nursery stock which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with. sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by common carrier, or carried, transported, moved or allowed to be moved from. the State of Florida into or through any other State or Territory -or District of the United States, in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in such rules and regulations and amendments thereto.
A copy of the quarantine and of the revised rules and regulations is inclosedV~er.y respectfully,
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
~Secretary of Agriculture.
(Inclosures.)

[Do not detach this receipt]
Received this notice and the copy of quarantine No. 68 with revised rules and regulations mentioned therein this ------ day of ------------ 1929.
(Signature)

(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the State of Florida. 1,

NOTICE To GENERAL PUiBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

MAY 10, 1929.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 68, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effective May 10, 1929. Of especial interest to shippers are changes affecting the shipment of citrus fruits from cold -storage plants and of limes froia Monroe and Dade Counties subsequent to June 15; the use of packing houses in lightly infested zones when other facilities are absent for the packing of fruit coming from the surrounding protective zones and adjacent points out-side thereof ; and the issuance of permits for the interstate movement of host fruits and vegetables in dining cars. A further modification prohibits bulk, mail, and automobile truck movement of host vegetables from any part of thie State of Florida.
Copies of the said quarantine and of the revised rules and regulations may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the Sentinel, Orlando, Fla., May 17, 1929.]

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTUCTIONS RELATIVE TO
ENFORCEMENT OF MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE
MOVEMENT OF TOMATOES AND PEPPERS
[Approved May 11, 1929; effective May 11, 1929]

P. Q. C. A.-228 May 11, 1929.
Pending~ later amendmlent of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 68) the following administrative instructions are issued with respect to the movement of green tomatoes and chili and Cayenne peppers under permit (see regulation 5, par. 4) from the infested zones:
Permits may be issued for the shipment of green tomatoes, chili and Cayenne peppers (bell peppers not included) from infested zones to move interstate, onlyto the District of Columbia including Pot 'omac Yards in Virginia and to destiniations in the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania and States north and east thereof when such fields are so located that in the judgment of the inspector such movement does not involve risk of spreading the fruit-fly and conditioned. further upon the daily destruction of all ripe or ripening tomatoes or, peppers in the field and their disposition in a manner satisfactory to the inspector. Such green tomatoes are to be packed in the field: Proviacae, That all tomatoes,






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 101

crop remnants, and vines, immediately after the movement of the commercial crop is completed, but not later than June 30, shall be cleaned from the fields and destroyed by burying with quicklime and covering with three feet of earth or by burning.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

FLORIDA FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS LIMITED AS TO DESTINATION
[Approved May 16, 1929; effective May 16, 1929]
P. Q. C. A.-229 MAY 16, 1929.
The following additional restrictions shall be enforced with respect to !the movement of all host fruits and vegetables out of the state of Florida. These restrictions shall apply to and be an amendment of regulations 3, 4, and 5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 68, on account of the Mediterranean fruit-fly.
For the crop of 1929. unless otherwise ordered, further permits will not be issued for the movement of host fruits or vegetables from any part of Florida into the States or Territory listed below, and any movement of such host fruits and vegetables from Florida into these States or Territory by rail, express, mail, or other means is prohibited: Washington. Oregon, Idaho, California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas. Porto Rico, Oklahoma, Arkansus. Louisiana, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, and Sou'h Carolina.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agrioulture.

WAR AGAINST THE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY

PROMPT FEDERAL AND STATE ACTION
P. Q. C. A. 230. MAY 20, 1929.
The establishment in Florida of the Mediterranean fruit fly. probably the worst of all fruit pests, was at once recognized by both the State and Federal Governments as a most serious menace to the fruit interests of a considerable portion of the United States. An emergency fund of $50,000 was immediately liberated by Florida and all available State forces were mobilized in efforts looking to eradication. The large and well-developed plant (ilara ntile personnel of the State was thrown into this work and also the extension service and technical leaders from the State experiment station and thie voluntary aid offered by hundreds of citizens. The Federal Government, upon the recommendation of the Secretary of Agriculture, approved by the President and Congress, made $4,250,000 immediately available for the control and eradication work, which had already been started by the Plant Quarantine :Ind Control Administration of the Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with Florida, on a transfer of $40,000 and also personnel from other work of the Administration.
INFESTED FRUIT WIDELY DISTRIBUTED
Prior to the discovery of this post in the vicinity of Orlando. Fla.. o April 0 and the confirmation of its identification in Washington on April 10, between two-thirds and three-fourths of the fruit of that district and (of Florida, had already moved out of the State through the normal channels of distribution and diversion, thus carrying thie risk of establishment of this pest widely in the United States. On account of more favorable climatic conditions it wVas recognized that such movement had a particular menace to the States of the Cotton Belt from Texas and Oklahoma eastward, namely, the States which had been reached during thie winter and spring by fruit movement from Floriaa. Much of such movement to the nearby States of Georgia and Alabama and perhaps Mississippi has been vby :iuto truck and of fruit of lower grade, often







102 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

culls, and therefore especially open, to suspicion of possible infestation. T- he more western of the States indicated have been reached by fruit in bulk rail shipments and by fruit packed and shipped in refrigerator cars. Much of this fruit has been consumed but a considerable portion of it, together, with, fruit shipped from points more recently determined as infested, is still in local markets or in storage in the States of destination.

GRAPEFRUIT THE PRINCIPAL CARRIER

The risk of carriage of infestation by Florida fruit applies at this -time particularly to grapefruit which in Florida so far is the favored host of the fly and is grown largely throughout the area now known to be infested. The orange is also attacked, but even in the center of the invasion in which, in certain orchards, grapefruit was 100 per cent infested, the orange infestation in the same properties has been very slight, rarely exceeding, 5 per cent.

STATE AND FEDERAL QUARANTINE ACTION

State and Federal quarantine action promptly followed the discovery of the fruit fly in Florida. The Florida action followed conferences between officials, of the United States Department of Agriculture and the State Plant Board' of that State at Orlando and later at Gainesville, resulting in the promulgation of a State quarantine on April 15, covering the then known area of infestation together with a wide protective zone. This quarantine stopped the movement of fruit from the then known infested areas and its restrictions were added to new areas as rapidly as these were determined. Federal quarantine action followed as soon as the required legal notices permitted. This quarantine, as issued April 26, covered the entire State of Florida and was immediately effective as to all areas in that State which had been determined as infested, and was effective throughout the State on May 1. The Federal action put a decided check on further movement out of Florida of possibly infested fruit. The very considerable enlargement of known infestation in the central, part of Florida during the first half of May indicated sufficient uncertainty as t1o the extent of the infestation as to warrant even more drastic Federal action, and oil May 16, the quarantine was amended to prohibit movement by any means of host fruits and vegetables from any part of Florida into the cotton States from North Carolina and Tennessee southward and westward including Arkansas, Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and all States south Of these, and also California, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The southwestern and Pacific Coast States named were included on account of the recognized possibility of the fruit fly breeding in all of these States except Idaho, which was included as an additional defense against accidental movement of Florida fruit.
EARLY NOTIFICATION OF STATES

Both the State and Federal quarantines have been amended to include new territory -determined as infested, but it is recognized that there necessarily ha- ; been opportunity in much lessened degree for the movement out of the State of infested fruit. In all of these new areas the infestation was very slight and it is perhaps safe to assume that no badly infested material left the State subsequent to the original State and Federal quarantine action. In addition to the legal quarantine action the central and eastern Cotton Belt States which were under immediate risk were given official advice froin the Department in Washington on April 23-in other words, even prior to the Federal quarantine action-of the fact of the very considerable movement of fruit from Florida either by truck or rail, much of it of low grade and carrying a particular menace of the f ruit fly, and the appropriate State officials were urged to have inspection made of such fruit in markets or storage- so that any infested shipments could be promptly destroyed. Later on as the more widespread character of the infestation in Florida was determined these States were again notified of this risk by the Florida State plant commissioner, Wilmon Newell, and on the same date this situation was confirmed by a telegram from the Department of Agriculture again urging the inspection and the destruction of infested fruit, followed by a thorough cleaning of containers and locations where such fruit was kept. A call was also issued at this time for a conference at Atlanta






1929) SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 103

of quarantine officials concerned in the cotton States from Texas eastward, and at this conference, held on May 15, plans were made for Federal cooperation in clean-up and control work in most of these States.

COTTON BELT STATES MOBILIZED

In many of the States mentioned in the previous paragraph work of inspection and control had already been organized as fully as State funds and personnel permitted. It is recognized, however, that the time factor just now is the important one. In other words in the case of fruit in the hands of dealers the Maggots will probably emerge in a week or 10 days and may go to ripening fruit in the neighborhood, peach or other-the peach being one of the ;most favored host fruits. In cold storage the larvae will be held in whatever sta.e they have reached to complete their development as soon as the fruit is placed in a condition of normal temperature. The necessity of having such fruit examined and of destroying all infested fruit within the shortest possible time led to the request at Atlanta that an effort be made to secure the mobilization of the State extension service in the Cotton Belt States from Texas and 'Oklahoma eastward, to aid in the effort to locate and inspect all such fruits and particularly grapefruit. Such mobilization of the State and Federal extension service in the work of inspection during the next two weeks would seem to be fully warranted because of the impossibility of getting any sufficient number of persons with the general training of such extension agents to meet the immediate necessity, and such aid has been approved by the Director of Extension Work of the Department of Agriculture. Proper notification will be transmitted to the appropriate State and district leaders.

HOUSEKEEPERS AND OTHER PERSONS TO BE INSPECTORS

Every housekeeper in these States can render an important local and public service, and the home demonstration agents of the extension service are being requested to aid in giving wide-spread publicity to this possibility. Most such Florida fruit will ultimately go into homes for consumption and housewives or other persons concerned in the preparation of fiuit for the table as w;ell as the ultimate consumer of such fruit are the most important and wide-spread elements for the discovery of infested fruit. A special effort should be made therefore to bring to the attention of all housekeepers and other persons the necessity of giving particular examination to such fruit and also to( carry out the precautions hereinafter noted with respect to the disIposition (of any fruit which is found to contain worms or maggots at any time. To reach such housekeepers and others, a campaign of publicity should be maintained not only for the short period during which Florida fruit will be under inspection. but also throughout the season with respect to any form of maggots or infestation in peach or other fruits-locally grown or otherwise--which is not easily identifiable as pertaining to older and known fruit pests.

INDICATIONS OF INFESTATION IN FRUIT

The indications of infestation particularly of -rapiefruit will be a softening of the fruit as a whole or in particular spots, such softness being readily determined by the pressure of the fingers at different points of the surf eec. A more pronounced infestation will be characterized by the bleeding of the fruit under slight pressure at exit holes which are made through the rind by the maturing maggots. Sometimes an indication will be a slight har'dening and browning of the skin at the place covering the point in the orange where the maggots are working. This discoloration may be found even when there ha been no noticeable softening at such Ioint. No household fruit, under any suspicion whatever, should be thrown out into the garbage or otherwise, but should be kept in tightly covered metal or glass containers to be turned over promptly to the proper State plant inspector or local officer designated by th, State. In a very slightly infested fruit infestation may be dilicult to find inasmuch as the maggots are very active and are apt to wriggle out of sight into more or less firm tissue, but in all cases of advanced infestation or where the maggots have reached nearly full nowth their finding is not difficult.






104 PLANT QUARANTINE AN!) CONTROL ADMINISTRATION (Apil-Jane.

ALL INFESTED FRUIT TO BE DESTROYED

All fruit found to be infested, whether in homes or in the hands of distributors or in storage, should be destroyed and by that is meant the entire lot of fruit with no effort at selection. The infestation, unless it has gone so far as to sof ten the fruit or cause its decay, can not necessarily be determined by exterior inspection. Fruit containing many maggots of nearly full-grown stage will often give no visible indication of infestation nor can such infestation necessarily be determined by feeling or handling. Therefore, the entire stock determined as infested through the finding of especially advanced examples should be destroyed, in carload lots or larger amounts if necessary.
For the destruction or sterilization of small supplies in households, any method of heating or cooking, or burning in the furnace, will answer. To shorten the time the fruit should be quartered or sliced and brought to thewoiling point in any appropriate vessel. Similarly, baking in an oven, if continued long enough to have the heat penetrate to the center of the fruit, will da the work. It can not be too strongly emphasized, however, that no bad fruit Q-hould be discarded or thrown out or fed to animals. To throw out fruit or garbage of this sort would be furnishing the fly with the very -best facilities for completing its development. In short, cook or otherwise sterilize all infested fruit, reserving only a few maggots for identification. These can be killed in hot water or immediately immersed in 50 per cent alcohol and mailed for determination in a small, carefully packed, stoppered bottle to prevent its being broken, to the proper identifying officer of your State or district.
Probably the simplest method of effectively destroying and safeguarding infested fruit in bulk is to bury it in deep pits so that when partially filled with fruit at least 3 feet of earth can be placed on top and tamped and wetted down. Prior to replacing the earth, however, the fruit and pit should be heavily sprayed with fuel oil or motor oil-the discarded oil from garages* will serve the purpose very well-or a covering of several inches of quicklime should be placed over the top of the mass, the filling up with soil and wetting down to follow.
Where considerable quantities of fruit are involved or where it is not practicable to destroy it at once by simple methods and with the owner's consent, the proper State quarantine officer should be promptly notified of the situation, by telegraph, so that the destruction of the fruit can be effected, if necessary, under State police powers. Samples of the infested fruit should be taken under the precautions indicated above for mailing, and the owner should be advised not to move or disturb the fruit pending action by the State quarantine officer.
ATTACKS MOST FRUITS AND CERTAIN vErx3IABES

It may be noted that the Mediterranean fruit fly attacks, practically all fruits except pineapple and watermelon that are grown in the United State&. and such garden vegetables as ripe tomatoes, bell peppers, eggplants, and beans..

WORMY ]FRUIT NOT POISONOUS IF EATEN

All consumers of grapefruit or oranges should be assured that there is nothing poisonous to human beings in the presence of this fly. Naturally, badly. decayed or rotted fruit would be inedible, but when the larvie are small or the infestation is just beginning, this condition can only be discovered with difficulty. There is no reason why fruit should not be eaten freely. As halved and ordinarily prepared for the table, the fact of infestation should be discovered, and the same is true if the fruit is halved as a means of expressing. juice.
The attached statement, with figures, has been prepared by specialists of the Bureau of Entomology, to aid in Separating the Mediterranean fruit fly larvm from other fly larvee that may be found in fruits and vegetables. This information is more for the use of trained entomologists, and all other persons should transmit material, as instructed above, to the State entomologist or the local officer of the State designated by him. The figures also indicate the adult fly tand DUpariurn.
0. L. MARLATP,
Chief of Admi~nistration,.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 105

HOW TO RECOGNIZE FRUIT FLIES

Larval or Maggots

Look in the fruit for slender, whitish, or pale-colored maggots that are stout behind and taper strongly towards the head end. These may be as little as one twenty-fifth or as much as one-third inch long, according to their age. Larva with legs or with a plainly recognizable head are not fruit-fly larv-. Fruit-fly larve have only two pairs of breathing pores or spiracles, one pair :at the posterior end of the body, each half showing three narrow openings, the
-other pair near the front end. True fruit-fly larve have the posterior spiracles set flush with the end of the body; other larve which may be found in fruit have them set at the ends of protruding cylindrical tubes. These protruding tubes are important in separating fruit-fly maggots from those of scavenger flies.
The drawings show the differences between true fruit-fly larve (No. 1) and
-other fly larve that may be found in fruits and vegetables in the southeastern United States (Nos. 2-5). If you find a maggot which looks like the top picture inside of or near a fruit, send it to your State entomologist for identification.

Pupae or Inactive Stage

Examine the surface of the soil beneath bearing fruit trees and sift the 'top layer of this soil, looking for stout elliptical, brown bodies about one-sixth inch long which resemble in general appearance swollen grains of wheat. Search for these in the bottoms of containers in which fruit has been stored
*or shipped and in the beds of trucks or wagons which have been used in hauling fruit, and on or beneath the floors of buildings used for packing fruit or for storing it in bulk. Such bodies may be the puparia of the Mediterranean fruit fly. If you find anything that resembles such a brown "seed," send it to your State entomologist for identification.

Adults or Flies

The fruit fly adult is a small yellow insect with dark spots about the shape and size of the common house fly, or somewhat smaller (about one-fifth inch long), which runs actively over the surface of the fruit and foliage. It has two thin wings which are not clear but instead show an irregular, colored pattern over most of the surface. The flies are very difficult to find on the trees, but if a suspicious looking specimen is caught, send it to your State entomologist for identification.

REFRIGERATION OF INFESTED FRUIT NOT AN ADEQUATE SA.FEGUARD AG \INST SPREAD OF FRUIT FLY 1o

P. Q. C. A.-231 MAY 22. 1929.
Following the recent discovery of the establishment of the Mediterranean fruit fly in central Florida there has been a large demand for some publi~t,:ion .giving the life history, habits, and mens of control of this pest. he most available publication on this subject is Bulletin 6-10, by Inack :1and(1 Pemberion ol' the Bureau of Entomology, entitled The Mediterranean Fruit Fly," published in 1918 and based on some four years' studies of this pest in IIawaii. To meet the demand for information, this bulletin has been reprinted aid widely distributed.
The possibility of destroying the early stage of the Mediterranean fruit 11ly 'by refrigeration of infested fruit is brielly discussed in this bulletin (p :; 1and this discussion has encouraged the idea that adequate refrigeration coubt Ihe accepted as an alternative for destruction of fruit under suspicion of infestation. These experiments were of a laboratory or small-scale nature-not contIrmed by commercial tests in bulk or under shipping conditions-and were not deemed to be sufficiently convincing to warrant any movement of fruit from llawaii to

10This circular represented the status of information on the subject at the time it was issued. The determination which has more recently been made that fruits :and vewtabhIs can be carried with safety, namely, without freezing, well hobelow 32 F.. has been nmlde the basis of additional experimentation, with the result of developing practicable nimeans
-of killing insect life in fruit, etc., by the utilization of temperatures as low as 28* F.






106 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,. the mainland on the basis of refrigeration. These experiments are, however, of very distinct value in indicating that the immature stages of the Mediterranean fruit fly may be destroyed in considerable percentage at least by holding such. fruit for two or three weeks in storage at temperatures approaching freezing.

True Fruit Fi Larva

c posterior spiracle (1) Ceratifis capitata JWd




posterior end lateral view


Other Larvae in Fruits


(2)Euxests notata Wed
dr~adview


posterior spiracle
posterior end






posterior spiracle

pos5erior end lat eral view


aow'(4) DrosopM sp._ .
- - - - - view


poterior spiracle jr(

posterior end lateral view


s posterior spiracle (5) Calobata lascivasFA






posterior end lateral view o T e /2Z

That refrigeration, even for a period of six weeks, at a temperature of about 340 F. does not furnish a safe basis for shipment of infested fruit would seem to have been very clearly demonstrated by later tests. There is, however, need of further investigation in this field, namely, the determination of whether the





1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 107

CERA TI T15 GA P TA TA WEro.

PUPA



posterior end
dorsal view ventral view
ADULT FLY




~. \




WING OF ADULT FLY



1

',..............







108 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Aprfl-3une,

holding of fruit at still lower temperatures-28' to 320 F. for example-for the necessary period will destroy the early stages of this insect, conditioned, 9f course, on the fruit being able to withstand such temperatures, and even more important, the demonstration that in. c ommercial practice the required degree of temperature can be maintained and equally distributed throughout the mass of stored fruit.
The status of -our present information with respect to refrigeration as a means of eliminating the risk of the carriage of this pest with infested fruit is summarized in the following paragraphs which are taken, with little change, from reports which have been made on this subject in answer to various in,quiries as to the possibility of modifying the restrictions of Quarantine 56 and the entry of fruits and vegetables from countries known to be invaded by the Mediterranean fruit fly:
The possibility of killing fruit-fly eggs, larvae, and pupae in fruit by refrigeration was .discussed at considerable length in connection with the public hearing held in 1923 preliminary- to the promulgation of Quarantine 56, under which restrictions were placed on the entry of fruits and vegetables from all foreign countries known to be generally invaded 'by the Mediterranean or other fruit flies. On account of the known general occurrence of the Mediterranean fruit fly in the Union of South Africa these restrictions were extended to that country, and as a result the authorities of that country undertook a new
-and very careful and technical examination of the subject of control by refrigeration. The results of this examination were communicated to this department in a formal report from the Acting Secretary for Agriculture. A summary of these results was later published by the Department of Agriculture of the Union of South Africa in the journal of that department for October, 1923. These experiments indicated that the fruit-fly larvae may live in cold storage at about 340 F. (approximately 10 C.) for a period of six weeks and still transform to adults when removed from cold storage. This work in South Africa was carried out by persons who are known to this department to be highly trained and entirely reliable. Furthermore, it was to the interest of South Africa to demonstrate that refrigeration was an effective safeguard, with the intention of' making the experiments the basis of an appeal for admission of shipments of restricted fruits to the United :States. It is, therefore, worthy of note that having determined the contrary to be the fact the South African authorities were prompt and frank in communicating this information to this department.
In confirmation of the results obtained in South Africea, and as indicating clearly the failure of refrigeration in a practical shipping test, reference may be made to the arrival
-at the port of New York in 1926 of a large shipment of grapes from South America which, had been kept under refrigeration at a temperature of approximately 340 F. during the period of 1S days en route. These grapes on arrival proved to be generally infested with living fruit-fly larvae (Anastrepha) and were refused admittance.
That commercial refrigeration of fruits and vegetables for storage or in transit Is subject to considerable variation as to uniformity of temperature maintained, as well as to large opportunity for error, has been clearly demonstrated over a considerbale period of experimentation and examination of the subject by this department. No method has been devised which will maintain a uniform temperature in the different, tiers. either in a refrigerated car or compartment. The minimum temperature in the lower tiers must ~be maintained above the freezing point, and under this limitation the upper tiers will average fully 40 warmer than the lowest tier, with a result of losses which it has not been possible to avoid from more rapid ripening or even spoiling of the upper-tiers of the shipment. Such variation in temperatures is apt to be especially marked under refrigeration in ocean transit, and an examination of the refrigeration "1log of vessels engaged in fruit and vegetable carriage clearly indicates such variation. In addition to this variation of temperature for different elevation of tiers is the variation in results, due to nature of packing and the~ arrangements for circulation of air within the refrigerating
-chambers. The variation here discussed is entirely aside from, and supplemental to, the important consideration of the failure so far of refrigeration to kill 100 per cent of fruit-fly larvae and pupae in commercial shipments.
In view of this situation it would seem clear that refrigeration of possibly infested fruit can not for the present be considered as a reliable safeguard .against the Mediterraiean or other fruit flies, and to authorize it prior to a, full demonstration of its complete and thoroughgoing effectiveness in ordinary ,commercial practice might well open to menace the entire fruit industry of the United States.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Q uaranin an d Contirol~ Administration.

M-XEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINEi A MNxED

[Press notice]
MAY 24, 1929.
Two~Y( administrative timiendments to the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine were promulgated yesterday (May 23) by the Secretary of Agriculture and ,became effective immediately.
Oiie of these lprovidlVS for movement interstate of foreign fruits and vegetables
-entering the United States through Florida ports. The other extends the .time for the shipment interstate of noricitrus fruits and host vegetables from






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 109

protective zones in Florida up to and including June 15, with special provision for shipping grapes up to June 30, 1929.
The provision for entry of foreign fruits and vegetables, chiefly bananas, at Florida ports, the Department of Agriculture points out, is to correct an interpretation of the quarantine as prohibiting movement of all fruits out of the State except in accordance with certain restrictions as to destination and date. These restrictions were intended to apply only to fruit of Florida production.
The extension of time for marketing vegetable crops grown in the protective zones of Florida is necessitated by the backward season. Such extension, the department says, is imperative if these crops are to be distributed in commerce. A similar situation exists in the case of the grape crop.
This extension of time, the department explains, applies only to areas in Florida designated as protective zones, namely, zones which are believed, as a result of intensive inspections, not to have been reached by the fruit fly. Such action, it is contended, is further justified by the thorough clean-up in all the infested areas in Florida, and in fact by the cooperation of all interests in the state-wide clean-up.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS
P. Q. C. A.-232 MAY 23, 1929.

INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF IMPORTED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES VIA FLORIDA PORTS
[Approved May 23, 1929; effective May 23, 1929]

Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 68) the following administrative instructions are issued with respective to the movement from the State of Florida, or through that State, of interstate shipments of imported fruits and vegetables:
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of bananas, avocados, or other fruits and for any vegetable entering the United States through Florida ports under the provisions of Quarantine 56 or other quarantines restricting the entry of fruits and vegetables into the United States without respect to the rules and regulations under Quarantine 68 and amendments thereto on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, conditioned upon the observance of such safeguards on the part of the shipper as may be required by the inspector to eliminate risk of spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly.
C. L. MARIATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
ARTiiu M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agrieulture.

ADMINISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS
P. Q. C. A.-233 MAY 23, 1929.

PERIOD OF SHIPMENT OF NONCITRUS FRUITS AND HOST VEGETABLES FROM PROTECTIVE ZONES IN FLORIDA EXTENDED FOR SEASON OF 12 0[Approved May 23, 1929; effective May 23, 1929]
Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 68) the following administrative instructions are issued with respect to the movement of all noncitrus fruits and host vegetables grown In or moving from protective zones:
Permits may be issued up to alnd including June 15, 1929, for the shipment of noncitrus fruits and host vegetables from protective zones to move interstate only to the District of Columbia. including Potomac Yards in Virginia and to destinations in the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania and States north and east thereof when in the judgminent of the inspector such movement does( not involve the risk of spreading the fruit fly, and conditioned further upon compliance with such precautions as to packing, shipping, clean-up, and disposal of culls and unshipped portions of the crops concerned as shall be required by the inspector: Provided, That permits may be issued for the ship-







110 PLANT QJAIRANTINE, AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

ment of grapes as above up to and including June 30 under the conditions herein already indicated.
C. L. MARL-&TT9
Chief, Pla~nt Quarantine and Control Admind~tration.
Approved:
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
PUBImc HEARING ON EXTENSION OF MEDITERRANEAN FREIIT-FLY QUARANTINE TO OTHER STATES TO BE; HELDi JUNE 1
[Press notice]
MAY 28, 1929.
A public hearing to consider the advisability of extending the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine to cover each and every State of the United State will be held in Washington, D. C., at 10 a. in., June 1, 1929, it was announced to-day 'by the Secretary of Agriculture.
The hearing wvill be before the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration and the Federal Plant Quarantine Board of the Department of Agriculture, in the offices of the administration at 1729 New York Avenue NW.
The object of this hearing is to provide a basis for the better enforcement of restrictions under Quarantine 68 and amendments thereto on movement of host fruits and vegetables originating in Florida. The particular object at this time is, by regulation, to prevent any reshipmnents of such Florida fruits and vegetables from the areas of destination and utilization specified in the quarantine and amendments thereto into other sections of the United States. It is intended also to furnish the basis for prompt handling of any points of infestation which may later be determined in other States.
In this connection, attention is again called by the department to the fact that prior to the discovery of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Florida, between two-thirds and three-fourths of the citrus crop of that State had already moved out through normal channels of distribution and -dispersion. That such movement 6has involved a disti nct risk has already been determined by the finding of infested Florida fruit in some half a dozen States. Efforts to follow up all such movements from Florida and to have all infested lots destroyed were instituted in cooperation with the States concerned at an early period in the campaign, and later have been intensified by the mobilization of the State and Federal Extension Service and the very great enlargement of State forces.
It is further pointed out that while a vigorous effort is being made, by repeated and state-wide inspections, to locate all points of spread of the fruit fly in Florida and to destroy all fruit at such points, including a considerable area around the determined infested groves, the fact remains that infestations are being found at new points-so far all contiguous to or within areas already determined as infested. This situation was the basis for the amendment to the quarantine of May 16 prohibiting the movement from Florida of host fruits ;andi vegetables to the Southern and Western States where there is a distinct possibility that this pest may become established and maintain itself.
The action now proposed would strengthen the order of May 16 by protecting such Southern and Western States from reshipments from the North of articles the direct shipment of which from Florida is already prohibited.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON JUNE 1, TO CONSIDER. THE ADvIsABILITY oF
EXTENDING THE MEDITERRANEAN FRuiT-ELY QUARANTINE TO' OTHER STATES

MAY 28, 1929.
The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the Mediterranean fruit fly, a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States but recently discovered in the State of Florida, has been transported to other sections of this country in shipment Of fruits and vegetables from that State.
It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of quarantining each and every State of the United States and of extending the provisions of Federal Quarantine No. 68 to provide for such regulation of the 'interstate movement of fruits and other articles as shall be necessary to, prevent the spread of said Mediterranean fruit fly from any section of the United States which infested fruit may have reached.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 111

Notice is therefore hereby given that, in accordance with the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), a public hearing will be held at 10 a. m. on June 1, 1929, before the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration and the Federal Plant Quarantine Board of the United States Department of Agriculture in the offices of the said administration of 1729 New York Avenue, N. W., Washington, D. C., in order that any person interested in the proposed quarantine action may appear and be heard either in person or by attorney.
The object of this hearing is to provide a basis for the better enforcement of restrictions under Quarantine 68 and amendments thereto on movement of host fruits and vegetables originating in Florida. The particular object at this time is, by regulation, to prevent any reshipments of such Florida fruits and vegetables from the areas of destination and utilization specified in the quarantine and amendments thereto into other sections of the United States. It is intended also to furnish the basis for prompt handling of any points of infestation which may later be determined in other States.
ARTHUR M. HYDE.
Secretary of Agriculture.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS
[Approved June 4, 1929; effective June 4, 1929) P. Q. C. A.-234 JUNE 4. 1929.
Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 68) the following administrative instructions are issued with respect to the movement of restricted articles:

SHIPMENT OF NrURSERY STOCK BY MAIL FROM FLORIDA PROHIBITED)
(Modification of regulation 9)

Nursery stock (including all kinds of plants and plant roots except portions of plants without roots or soil) shall not be shipped by mail from any part of the State of Florida.
ExTENSION OF oCITRUS-FRUIT SHIPPING SEASON FROM NEWLY ESTABLISHED
PROTECTIVE ZONES
(Modification of regulation 3, section A (4))

Citrus fruit may be moved interstate under permit during the period June 1 to June 15, 1929, inclusive, from protective zones established subsequent to May 31, 1929. Such shipments shall be subject to all other requirements of the regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 6OS as to destination, packing, marking, and other conditions of transportation.
C. L. M ALI.rr.
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

ORCHARD AND PACKING-HIousE SANITATION UlEum von Am. Futrr SECTIONS

I Press not ice I
IUNE 7, 19' 9.
Discovery of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Florida and infested Florida citrus fruit in several other States recently has cIntered the attention of officials of the United States Department of Agriculture 41on wide-slpread clean-up measures in orchards and( fruiit-packing houses.
Clean-up of fallen fruit andl destruction of fruit clumps and rejects is particularly necessary this year nIot only because of the fruit ily but also cnuse of other common plests, according to C('. 1. Marlatt, chief of the Pllit QuaranItine and Control Administration.
Such clean-up of orchards and( safe disposition f placking-louse culls is probably seldom made, Doctor Marlitt says, but the necessity is clnerly






112 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION (April-June,

apparent and lie has urged all department inspectors to give wide publicity to the need for the practice and if possible to secure its general adoption.
The reports of finding infested Florida citrus fruit received from other, States mention only the finding and destruction of such fruit, Doctor Marlatt says, and make no mention of any clean-up of storage places and premises.. Doctor Marlatt is anxious that fruit handlers, dealers, and the public generally realize the necessity of thoroughly cleaning and disinfecting cars, storagerooms in refrigerating plants, boxes and other containers, and the immediatesurroundings, in shops or other places where such fruit has been kept.
Risks of spreading the fruit fly another pests can be very much reduced,, Doctor Marlatt says, by making sure that all boxes and other containers are thoroughly cleaned, followed by very careful sweeping up of all dirt, dust, and trash which may be beneath the boxes. Such sweepings should be carefully taken up and burned.
Applications of oil, boiling water, or steam to all places likely to be infested with the larvTe of the fruit fly are advisable.

RE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY-ORCHARD AND PACKING-HOUSE
SANITATION URGED FOR ALL FRUIT SECTIONS'
P. Q. C. A.-235. JUNE 5, 1929.
The Mediterranean fruit-fly situation in Florida has emphasized the great desirablity in all fruit sections, of clean-up of fallen fruit and the destruction under safe means of fruit dumps and rejects, and this is particularly true, of all commercial orchards and-of packing-houses. It is unnecessary to, point out the increase of risk from such dumps and rejects and fallen fruit in orchards not only as to the Mediterranean fruit fly, but as to other common insect pests of the fruits. Such clean-up of orchards and safe disposition of* packing-house culls is probably seldom made, but the necessity therefor is& clearly apparent and you are urged to give wide publicity to this idea and, if possible, secure its general adoption.
This is certainly a time when an accounting -should be taken of methods of handling crops to safeguard against pests, but this is of special importance in relation to the present uncertainty as to the extent of spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
C. L. MAIRLATT,
Chief, Plant, Quarantine aiud Con troll Administ rat ion.
MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE REVISED TO PROHIBIT RESHIPMENTS
OF FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM NORTHEASTERN STATES TO
SOUTH AND WEST
[Press notice]
JUNE, 8, 1929.
The Secretary of Agriculture announced to-day a revision of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine effective immediately. The primary purpose of the revision is to provide for the regulations, issued therewith, forbidding the reshipment of Florida host fruits and vegetables: from- Northern and North-i eastern States into the territory of the South and West into which direct shipment from Florida is already prohibited. The revision is intended also to. furnish the basis for the prompt handling of any infestations which may later be determined in other States. The Secretary points out that the regulations. issued with this revision of the quarantine are merely supplemental to theregulations, and amendments thereto hitherto promulgated under the original edition of the quarantine, which latter regulations remain in full force and' effect.
Under the supplemental regulations issued with the revised quarantine, host fruits and vegetables which have been produced in and moved from the State. of Florida shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported into theStates of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, or Washington, or into the Territory of Porto Rico. It is further provided that host fruits and vegetables which have been produced in a protective zone "-i. e., the zones immediately surrounding infested zones--and moved into the area northeast of and including Potomac Yards, Va., the District of Columbia, and the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania, shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported to points in theUnited States outside the said northeastern area.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANN OUNCEMENTS 113

This revision places no restrictions on the interstate movement from noninfested States of articles which have originated outside of Florida. Florida is the only State definitely known at this time to have groves or orchards infested with the Mediterranean fruit fly.
MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE
QUARANTINE No. 68.-REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. GS (REVISED)
(Approved June 7, 1929; effective June 7, 1929)

I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, having found that an infestation of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.), a dangerous inset pest new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exists in the State of Florida. in order to prevent the spread of such Mediterranean fruit fly by (1) the shipment or movement of any of the articles, vehicles, and containers hereinafter mentioned from the State of Florida into the States of Alabama, Arkansas. Arizona, California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North
-Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, Tenneswee, Utah. and Washington, or into the Territory of Porto Rico; or the shipment or movement otherwise than as permitted by regulations hereinafter referred to of articles, containers, and vehicles hereinafter mentioned from the State of Florid:t to States other than those mentioned above and the Territories and the District of Columbia; (2) the shipment or movement otherwise than as permitted by regulations hereinafter referred to of articles. vehicles. and containers hereinafter mentioned from any other State which may become infested w ith said fly; (3) the shipment or movement into the States mentioned in subdivision (1 ).
-or into the Territory of Porto Rico, of such articles, vehicles, and cnainrs originating in or moving from an infested State to authorized destinations in a noninfested State, Territory, or the District of Columbia, have determined that, for the accomplishment of the purposes set forth in (1) it is ne:ess::v to quarantine the State of Florida; and for the purposes of (2) and (, i is necessary to quarantine each and every State in the continenial United States and the District of Columbia.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quar.antine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of' March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), having duly given the public hearing required thereby, and to effectuate the purposes aforesaid, I do quarantine the State of Florida and each and every other State of the continental United States and the District of Columbia effective on and after June 7, 1929.
For the purpose of this quarantine any State, Territory, or District of the United States in which the Mediterranean fruit fly is determined to be established will be designated as an infested State, Territory, or District:; all other :States, Territories, or Districts for the purpose of this quarantine will be designated as noninfested States, Territories, or Districts.

Restrictions Applying to Infested States, Territorie, or the District of Columbia

Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds;
(2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles, and containers which have been used in conveying fruits or vegetables; (4) fruit-packing equipment and all other articles including nursery stock which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits
-or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil. earth ,. l at, compost, or manure shall not be shipped, offered for shipmenit to a comnmo
-carrier, received for transportation or transported by a cnnon carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from an in'e'sted Ste into or through any other State or Territory or the District of Columbia in .manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and in amendlments thereto r in the ,revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 6S:







114 PLANT QUARANTINE'AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in an infested State, or Territory, now or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary otr Agriculture as regulated areas, when in the judgment of the Secretary of' Agriculture, such limitations shall be adequate to prevent the spread of theMediterranean fruit fly to other States, Territories, or the District of Columbia, and when the movement of the restricted articles intrastate from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean. fruit fly therefrom to other parts of the quarantined State or Territory andthence into interstate commerce.

Restrictions Applying to Noifested States, Territories, or the District of, Columbiia

Hereafter, the different classes of articles enumerated above, originating in and moving from an infested State, Territory, or the District of Columbia' to, authorized destination in a noninfested State, Territory, or the District of' Columbla, under the aforementioned rules and regulations, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the said noninfested States, Territories, and Districts into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions, other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and in amendments thereto.
Done at the city of Washington this 7th day of June, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture-.
[SEAL.] ARTHiuR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agricn~ture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 68 (REVISED).
(Approved June 7, 1929; effective June 7, 1929)

Regulation 1

The revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 08, and the administrative instructions issued subsequent thereto, with respect to the interstate movement of restricted articles from the State of Florida and the cleaning and disinfection of vehi-cles involved in such movement, shall remain effective until further notice. The term quarantined State as used therein shall be construed to mean the State of Florida.

Regulation~ 2. Reshipmernt from Noniinfested States of Host Fruits and Vegatables Originating in an Infested State or Area

(1) Host fruits and vegetables which have been produced in and moved from the State of Florida shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported into the States of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California,- Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, Tennessee, Utah, or Washington, or into theTerritory of Porto Rico.
(2) Host fruits and vegetables which have been produced in a protectivezone and moved into the area northeast of and including Potomac Yards, Va., the District of Columbia, and the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania. shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported to points in the United; Sta-tes outside the said northeastern area.
(:3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement from noninfested States of articles other than host fruits and vegetables and railway cars and other vehicles and containers, unless such articles have been moved from an infested State ini violation of the, rules and regulations supplemental to, Noticeof Quarantine No. 08 or any amendment thereto or revision thereof.
(4) The term noninfested States'" as used in Notice of Quarantine No. OS (revised) shall be construed to mean States other than Florida, and the term "1infested State as used therein shall be construed to mean the. State of' Fl orida.

1The Interstate, transportation of living Mediterranean fruit files In any stage of development and for any purpose Is prohibited under the provisions of the act approved Mar.3. 1905 (33 Stat. 129)






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 115

These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after June 7, 1929.
Done at the city of Washington this 7th day of June, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERS

WASHINGoTON, D. C., June 7, 1929.
Sm: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 313) as amended, has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 68, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effective June 7, 1929, and has issued rules and regulations supplemental thereto. Under the important modifications made at this time it is ordered (1) that host fruits and vegetables which have been produced in and moved from the State of Florida to authorized destinations in northern and central States shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported into the States of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Georgia. Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, Tennessee, Utah, or Washington, or into the Territory of Porto Rico; and (2) that host fruits and vegetables which have beel produced in a protective zone and moved into the area northeast of and including Potomac Yards, Va., the District of Columbia, and the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania, shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported to points in the United States outside the said northeastern area. Under the revised quarantine the former restrictions on the interstate movement of restricted articles from Florida remain unchanged until further notice.
A copy of the notice is inclosed herewith.
Very respectfully,
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
(Inclosures.)

[Do not detach this receipt]
Received this notice and the Notice of Quarantine No. 68, revised, with rules and regulations mentioned therein this ------day of ,---- 1929.

(Signature)

(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers within and throughout the United States.]
NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH 11 NEWSPAPERS

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated a revision (of Notice of Quarin ine No. (l on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effective June 7, 19291, and has issued rules and regulations supplemental thereto. Under the important uoditi.atiois nate at this time it is ordered (1) that lhost fruits a:nd vegetables which lhave been produced in and moved from the State of Florida to authorized desinations in northern and central States shal not thereafter hie reshipped r otherwise ransported into the States of Alabama, Arizon, Arkansas, (alifornia ......i" Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi. Nevada, New Mexico, Nrth Caroline. Oklahama. Oregon, South Carolina. Texas. Tennessee. li. or washingtm. r into the Territory of Porto Rico; and (2) that hlot fruits and veget hllt aih Uic been produced inll a pro(etive zone and1 movlmd into the ar,: n 1r thi ofu' al including Potomnac Yards, V., the District of C)lumbia, urail Ilhe, St:kalI of




1


116 PL-kNT QUARANTINE 'AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

Maryland and Pennsylvania, shall not- thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported to points in the United States outside the said northeastern area. Under the revised quarantine the former restrictions on the interstate movement of restricted articles from Florida remain unchanged until further notice.
Copies of the said revised quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be obtained from the Plant, Quarantineand Control Administration, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
f Published in the following newspapers:
The Birmingham News ------------------------------------ Birmingham, Ala., June 18, 1M.
The Arizona Republican ----------------------------------- Phoenix, Ariz., June 16,1929.
Arkansas Gazette ------------------------------------------ Little Rock, Ark., June 18,1929.
San Francisco Examiner ----------------------------------- San Francisco, Calif., June 19, 1929.
The Denver Post ------------------------------------------ Denver, Colo., June 18, 1929'
The Hartford Times --------------------------------------- Hartford, Conn., June 17, 1629.
The Evening Journal -------------------------------------- Wilmington, Del., June 15, 1929.
The Evening Star ------------------------------------------ Washington, D. C., June 15,1929.
The Florida Times-Union ---------------------------------- Jacksonville, Fla., June 18,1929.
The Atlanta Journal --------------------------------------- Atlanta, Ga., June 18, 1929.
Idaho Statesman ------------------------------------------- Boise, Idaho, June 19,1929.
The Chicago Daily News ---------------------------------- Chicago, Ill., June 19, 1929.
The Indianapolis News ------------------------------------ Indianapolis, Ind., June 17, 1929.
The Des Moines Register ---------------------------------- Des Moines, Iowa, June 18,1929.
The Wichita Eagle ----------------------------------------- Wichita, Kans., June 18, 1929.
The Louisville Times -------------------------------------- Louisville, Ky., June 18,1929.
The Times Picayune --------------------------------------- New Orleans, La., June 18, 1929.
Portland Press Herald ------------------------------ ------ Portland, Me., June 18, 1929.
TheSun --------------------------------------------------- Baltimore, Md., June 17,1929.
The Boston Herald ---------------------------------------- Boston, Mass., June 19,1929.
The Detroit News ----------------------------------------- Detroit, Mich., June 17,1929.
The Minneapolis Tribune --------------------------------- Minneapolis, Minn., June 18,1929.
Jackson Daily News --------------------------------------- Jackson, Miss., June 18, 1929.
The Kansas City Journal-Post ----------------------------- Kansas City, Mo., June 17, 1929.
The Great Falls Tribune ----------------------------------- Great Falls, Mont., June 18, 1929.
The World-Herald ----------------------------------------- Omaha, Nebr., June 18,1929.
Reno Evening Gazette ------------------------------------- Reno, Nev., June 19, Im.
The Manchester Union Leader ---------------------------- Manchester, N. H., June 18,1929.
Trenton Evening Times ----------------------------------- Trenton, N. J., June 17,1929.
New Mexico State Tribune -------------------------------- Albuquerque, N. Mex., June 19,1929.
The World ------------------------------------------------- New York, N. Y., June 15,1929.
The News and Observer ----------------------------------- Raleigh, N. C., June 18, 1929.
Grand Forks Herald --------------------------------------- Grand Forks, N. Dak., June 18,1929.
The Toledo Blade ----------------------------------------- Toledo, Ohio, June 18,1929.
The Oklahoma News -------------------------------------- Oklahoma City, Okla., June 19,1929.
The Oreaon Journal--- ------- -------------- Portland, Oreg., June 18, 1929.
--------------- Z
The Philadelphia Inquirer --------------------------------- Philadelphia, Pa., June 17,1929.
The Evening Bulletin ------------------------------------- Providence, R. I., June 18,1929.
The State -------------------------------------------------- Columbia, S. C., June 18,1929.
The Daily Argus-Leader ----------------------------------- Sioux Falls, S. Dak., June 18,1929.
Nashville Tennessean -------------------------------------- Nashville, Tenn., June 19, 1929.
Fort Worth Star-Telegram --------------------------------- Fort Worth, Tex., June 19, 1929,
The Salt Lake Tribune ------------------------------------ Salt Lake City, Utah, June 19, 1929.
The Burlington Free Press --------------------------------- Burlington, Vt., June 18,1929.
Richmond Times-Dispatch -------------------------------- Richmond, Va., June 18,1929.
The Seattle Times ----------------------------------------- Seattle, Wash., June 18,1929.
The Charleston Gazette ------------------------------------ Charleston, W. Va., June 16,1929.
The Milwaukee Journal ------------------------------------ Milwaukee, Wis., June 18,1929.
Wyoming State Tribune-Leader --------------------------- Cheyenne, Wyo., June 18,1929.1

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

EXTENSION OF SHIPPING PERIOD FOR FLORIDA EGGPLANTS AND PEPPERS

(Approved June 14, 1929; effective June 14, 1929)

P. Q. C. A.-236. JUNE 14, 1929.

Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 68) the following administrative instructions are issued with respect to the movement of eggplants and peppers of all kinds under permit (see regulation 5, paragraph 4) from protective zones:
Permits may be issued up to and including June 30, 1929 for the shipment of eggplants and peppers of all kinds from protective zones to move interstate only to the District of Columbia including Potomac Yards in Virl-inia and to destinations in the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania and States north and






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 117

east thereof when the fields in which such vegetables are grown are so located that in the judgment of the inspector such movement does not involve risk of spreading the fruit fly and conditioned further upon the daily destruction of all ripe or ripening eggplants or peppers in the field and their disposition in a manner satisfactory to the inspector. Such eggplants and peppers are to be packed in the field: Provided, That all eggplants and peppers, crop remnants and vines, immediately after the movement of the commercial crop is completed, but not later than June 30, shall be cleaned from the fields and destroyed by burying with quicklime and covering with three feet of earth or by burning.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
COWPEAS RELEASED FROM ]RESTRICTION UNDER MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY
QUARANTINE
[Press notice]
JUNE 28, 1929.
Instructions removing cowpeas from the list of host vegetables restricted under the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine regulations have been issued by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, the United States Department of Agriculture announced to-day.
The department states that while other kind of beans are susceptible to infestation by the fly, the type of bean known as the cowpea is not recorded to have been infested in the past. Experimental studies have been carried on under which an attempt has been made to force the fruit flies to lay eggs in cowpeas, but these attempts have not resulted in infestation. This experimental work is being continued and if at any time it is shown that cowpeas are not immune, they will again be placed under restriction.
While cowpeas are not shipped commercially from Florida, the action taken by the department is of importance, as it permits the planting of cowpeas in the Infested zones, a measure which is valuable for the maintenance of the fertility of the soil. Cowpeas are also extensively used as a vegetable.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS ON COWPEAS
(Approved June 27, 1929; effective June 27, 1929)

P. Q. C. A.-237. JUNE 27, 1929.
Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine regulations (Notice of Quarantine No. 68) the following administrative instructions are issued:
In view of the absence of any record of Mediterranean fruit-fly infestation in the type of bean known as cowpeas and the failure thus far to force infestation therein experimentaly, cowpeas are until further notice removed from the list of host vegetables restricted under the Mediterranean fruit-flyquarantine regulations. The said regulations are amended by inserting the words (except cowpeas) after the words "beans of all kinds" where the latter terms occur in paragraph (h) of regulation 1, and paragraph (1) of regulation 5.
No restrictions will hereafter be enforced under this quarantine with respect to cowpeas either as to Interstate movement, or the planting, growing, or maintenance of such cowpeas in infested or protective zones or elsewhere.
Regulations affecting other kinds of beans remain in full force and effect as heretofore.
C. L. MARrATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administrati0)1.
Approved:
ARTHUR M. HyDzc,
Secretary of Agriculture.






118 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION (April-June,

NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)
ENTRY OF NARCISSUS BULBS FOR PROPAGATION IN THE FALL OF 1929
P. Q. C. A.-223. APRIL 10, 1929.
It is evident that the bulb growers of this country have now had ample opportunity to import narcissus bulbs in sufficient quantity to meet propagation requirements, and hence there is no further need for the present limit of 100,000 bulbs per variety.
In order to reduce the pest risk to the minimum, it is ordered that, beginning with the season 1929, importations of narcissus -bulbs shall be limited to a total of 25,000 bulbs in any one year. This total may include any number of varieties and permits. This limitation shall not apply to the Chinese sacred lily (narcissus), but the quantities of this variety authorized are to be indicated in the permit.
On the ground that it is believed that the following varieties are adequately available ini the United States to meet essential propagation needs and that it is therefore unnecessary to accept the pest risk which accompanies their entry, further permits shall be refused for the following varieties: Glory of Sassenheim, 'Laurens Koster, King Alfred, Paperwhite, Sir Watkin, Soleil d'Or, and Spring Glory.
From present indications, it would appear that there will be no need for further importations for propagation stock of Gloriosa, Minister Talma, Pheasant's Eye (Poeticus recurvus) and Tresserve after the importing season 1929.
On the basis of the applications now on file or those later received, special permits for the importation of narcissus bulbs in the fall of 1929 will be issued as promptly as possible in accordance with the above limitations.
The attention of all persons who are now growing narcissus bulbs imported under special permit for propagation, namely, the imports of the crops of 1927 and 1928, is called to the fact that before further permits can be issued to such persons, the administration must have on file either a map or a statement showing the exact location where the bulbs are being grown. Moreover, the plantings of all such importations must be appropriately labeled with permit number so as to maintain their identity.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quaran~tine andZ Control Administration.


PHONY PEACH-DISEASE QUARANTINE (NO. 67)
GEORGIA AND) ALABAMA QUARANTINED ON ACCOUNT OF THE PHONY PEACH DisEASE'
[Press notice]
MAY 6, 1929.
The Secretary of Agriculture has announced the establishment of a quarantine, effective June 1, 1929, on the States of Georgia and Alabama to, prevent the spread of the phony peach disease.
Under the provisions of this quarantine, restrictions are placed on the interstate movement from the regulated areas of peach and nectarine trees, peach and nectarine roots, and all other trees and shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots. The areas affected cover 64 counties of central and western Georgia and 1 county of eastern Alabama as follows: Baker, Baldwin, Barrow, Bibb, Bleckley, Butts, Calhoun, Chattahoochee, Chattooga, Clarke, Clayton, Coweta, Crawford, Crisp, DeKalb, Dooly, Dougherty, Fayette, Fulton, Greene, Gwinnett, Hancock, Harris, Henry, Houston, Jackson, Jasper, Jones, Lamar, Laurens, Lee, Macon, Marion, Meriwether, Mitchell, Monroe, Morgan, Muscogee, Newton, Oconee, Oglethorpe, Peach, Pike, Pulaski, Putnam, Quitman, Randolph, Rockdale, Schley, Spalding, Stewart, Sumiter, Talbot, Taliaferro, Taylor, Terrell, Troup, Twiggs, Upson, Walton, Washington, Webster, Wilkinson, and Worth Counties in Georgia; and Lee County in Alabama.
The shipment of peach, nectarine, and other restricted trees, or peach and nectarine roots interstate from the regulated areas will, under this quarantine, be conditioned on the securing of a permit from the United States Department cif Agriculture. Such permits are to be issued only to, nurseries withinn which aind within 1 mile of which no infection of the phony peach disease has existed for at least two years prior to the proposed date of movement." Applications

12 See notice of hearing, S. R. A. No. 97, p. 134.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 119

for nursery inspection are required to be filed with the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration prior to July 1, and, except for 1929, at least one year preceding the proposed date of shipment. Shippers may secure copies of the
-quarantine regulations without charge by addressing the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, 1729 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C.
The phony peach disease is an infectious condition of the root system which causes peach and nectarine trees, and other trees grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots, to become dwarfed and to produce abnormally small and poorly flavored fruit. The infectious virus appears to be confined entirely to the root system and no restrictions therefore are placed on the movement of fruit or of scions, branches, and other parts of peach and nectarine trees without roots.
The disease has been known for some years and has gradually spread until it is now found in 90 per cent of the commercial peach orchards of Georgia. Surveys indicate its absence from other States, except at one point in Alabama.
An eradication campaign in the infected area is being undertaken by the Federal and State Departments of Agriculture, and the nature of the infection is .uch that this plan offers great promise of success.
QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE PHONY PEACH DISEASE
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 67
(Approved April 30, 1929; effective June 1, 1929)
I, A. M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the States of Georgia and Alabama to prevent the spread of the phony peach disease, a dangerous plant disease new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Georgia and Alabama, effective on and after June 1, 1929. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, no peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots, or any kinds or varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots shall be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the said quarantined States to any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and in amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in the quarantined States now or which may hereafter be designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, such limitation shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the phony peach disease to other States and Territories, and when the movement of the restricted articles intrastate from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the said disease therefrom to other parts of the quarantined States and thence into interstate commerce.
Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of April, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Departemt of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. IlhiF.
Secretary of Agriculture.
RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARAN TfINE r No. 67
(Approved April :10, 1929; effective June 1, 1929)

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONs

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, ia zies, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Phony peach disease: A comnuinicable disease of peaIch :l :mt r reeth commonly known as phony peach diseasee and characterized hy stuan'ia h trees, reduction of the crop and certain other symptoms.







120 PLANT QTJARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

(b) Quarantined area: Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agricul-, ture to prevent the spread of the phony peach disease.
(c) Regulated area: Any area in a quarantined State which is now or which may hereafter be designated as such by the Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the 'proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 67.
(d) Restricted articles: Peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots, and all kinds and varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots.
(e) Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.;

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 67, the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 67, the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas the following counties, including all cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their, limits:
Ala bamva.-County of Lee.
Georgia.-Counties of Baker, Baldwin, Barrow, Bibb, Bleckley, Butts, Calhoun, Chattahoochee, Chattooga, Clarke, Clayton, Coweta, Crawford, Crisp, DeKalb, Dooly, Dougherty, Fayette, Fulton, Greene, Gwinnett, Hancock, Harris,, Henry, Houston, Jackson, Jasper, Jones, Lamar, Laurens, Lee, Macon, Marion, Meriwether, Mitchell, Monroe, Morgan, Musco-gee, Newton, Oconee, Oglethorpe, Peach, Pike, Pulaski, Putnam, Quitman, Randolph, Rockdale, Schley, Spalding, Stewart, Sumter, Talbot, Taliaferro, Taylor, Terrell, Troup, Twiggs, Upson, Walton, Washington, Webster, Wilkinson, and Worth.
REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED, AREAS

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies doing business in or through the States in. which such areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.

REGULATION .5. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF PEACH TREES AND OTHER RESTRICTED ARTICLES FROM THE REGULATED AREAS

(1) No peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots, or any kinds or varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of peach 'or nectarine fruit, fruit pits, cuttings, scions, or other parts of peach or nectarine trees without roots.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.

REGULATION 6. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF PERMITS

(1) Permits authorizing the interestate movement of restricted articles from the regulated areas into or through points outside thereof may be Issued under either of the following conditions:
(a) That the articles to be moved shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector to have originated outside the regulated areas and not to have been subject to infection within such areas.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 121

(b) That the articles, if originating within a regulated area, shall have been produced in a nursery within which, and within one mile of which, no infection of the phony peach disease has existed for at least two years prior to the proposed date of movement.
(2) Upon determination by the inspector that the articles concerned comply with either of the conditions named, the inspector may issue to the grower or shipper a permit and such number of shipping certificates as may be necessary for the movement of the said articles.
(3) Outstanding permits and certificates may be withdrawn and further permits and certificates may be refused as to any grower or shipper who has violated any of these rules and regulations or who has falsely labeled or mislabeled any shipment so as to evade any of these rules and regulations, or who has made any false statement or representation in connection with securing a permit or certificate. When any permit is thus withdrawn and the permittee is duly notified thereof, further use of the shipping certificates issued to such permittee is prohibited.
REGULATION 7. APPLICATION FOR PERMITS

(1) Applications for the inspection of nurseries from which restricted articles are to be moved interstate to points outside the regulated areas under permit shall be filed with the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration prior to July 1 at least one year (except for 1929) preceding the proposed date of shipment: Provided, That such period of one year shall not be required with respect to applications submitted within 60 days after the effective date of the designation as regulated area of the territory in which the nursery is located.
(2) Applications for permits for the reshipment from points within the regulated areas of restricted articles grown by a permittee under the conditions prescribed in paragraph (1) (b) of regulation 6 may be filed by purchasers of such articles at any time and shall be accompanied by a signed agreement by the applicant agreeing to observe these regulations and the conditions under which the permit is issued.

REGULATION 8. MARKING REQUIREMENTS

Every car, box, bale, or other container of articles for which permits are required by these regulations shall be plainly marked with the name and add re s of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee, and shall bear securely attached to the outside thereof the shipping certificate (Form 589) prescribed in regulation 6.

REGULATION 9. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved interstate or offered to a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspiection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 10. SHIPMENTS BY TIE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration showing comliliance with such conditions.
These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after June 1, 1929.
Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of April, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL. ARTmUu M. IIYIE.
Sec-r~tary of AIgrici It u ic.

With respect to shipments made prior to July 1, 19:10, ovidemwe bise'd o1 .1 sigleIo season's inspection may be accepted.







122 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

APPENDIX

PENALTIES

The plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), provides that no person shall 'ship or offer for shipment to any comon carrier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, * 'or any Other article * specified in the notice of quarantine * in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of' Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500 or by imprisonment not exceeding one year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion, of the court.
STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

The States of Georgia and Alabama have promulgated or are about to promulgate quarantines restricting intrastate movement supplemental to theFederal quarantine. These State quarantines are enforced in cooperation with the Federal authorities. Couples of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained by addressing United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Washington, D. C.
Early in June a subsidiary office will be established in the office of the Stateentomologist at Atlanta, Ga.

NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERS

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 30p 1929.
SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and mail this sheet to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as follows:
That the Secret.,iry of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, by Notice of Quarantine No. 67, effective on and after June 1, 1929, quarantined the States of Georgia and Alabama to prevent the spread of the phony peach, disease and has ordered that no peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots, or any kinds or varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots shall be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the said quarantined States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental to said quarantine or in amendnients thereto.
Very respectfully,
ARTHuR M. HYDE,
Secretary 'of Agriculture.
(Inclosures.)

[Do not detach this receipt]

Received this notice and the copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 67, with rules and regulations nientioned therein this ------ day of ------------ 1929.
-------------------------------(Signature)
---------------------- r ---------(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers doing business within I and throughout the States ot Georgia and Alabama.)






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 123

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has, by Notice of Quarantine No. 67, effective June 1, 1929, quarantined the States of Georgia and Alabama to prevent the spread of the phony peach disease and has ordered that no peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots, or any kinds or varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the said quarantined States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations made thereunder and amendments thereto. Copies of said quarantine, and the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculturc.
[Published in the Atlanta Journal, Atlanta, Ga., June 15, 1929, and in the Opelika News, Opelika, Ala., June 19, 1929.]
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

PosToFncE DEPARTMENT.
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, May 2., 1929.
POSTMASTER.
MY DEAR SIn: There is inclosed for your information and guidance a copy of Quarantine Order No. 67 of the United States Department of Agriculture, on account of the phony peach disease, effliective June 1. 1929.
It will be noted that under Regulation 5. no peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots or any kinds or varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots, shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of peach or nectarine fruit, fruit pits, cuttings, scions or other parts of peach or nectarine trees without roots.
Under the provisions of paragraph 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regulations, parcels containing any of the prohibited trees, roots or shrubs may not be accepted for mailing from any point in the area quarantined by the Order unless the articles are accompanied with the required certificate of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Sincerely yours,
R. S. RX;AR.
Third AR.Nistant Postmaster Gemcral.
[Above Instructions sent to all postmasters in Georgia and in Lee County, Aa.1


PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (NO. 52)
PINK-BOLLWORM REGULATED AREA MODIFIED [Press notice]
MAY 20, 1929.
A portion of the northern half of Dawson County, [ex., will be released Ma 25 from the areas regulated under the Federal pink-bollworm quarantine. according to an announcement by the Secretary of Agriculture. The amendnien, effective May 25, removes restrictions on the interstate inoveineiit of cotton lint, cottonseed, and certain other products from the area so released. The boundary line of the regulated territory as now designated separates the ginning areas more logically than the line prev\iouSly adopted, accorti g t tlthe Department of Agriculture, and the action taken is fully justified because of the fact that no infestation has ever been found it? the po'rt ion of I ) oti ('m)inty referred to. A similar regulation affecting intrastate shipmients \, va i-1sued1 by the State of Texas on March 12, 1929.






124 PLANT QUARANTINE AND -CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

MODIFICATION. OF, PIWK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
AMENDMENT No. 3 11 To RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To NoTicE OF QUARANTINE No. 52 (RmvsED)
(Approved May 16, 1929 ; effective on and after May 25, 1929)
Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1166). it is ordered that regulation 3 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), on account of the pink bollworm, which were promulgated July 9, 1927, be and the same is hereby amended to read as follows:
REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS
In accordance with the first proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised),, the Secretary -of Agriculturei designates as regulated areas the, following counties and parts of counties in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, including all cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:
Teasa. area.-The counties of Terrell, Presidio, Brewster, Pecos, Jeff Davis, Reeves, Ward, Loving, Culberson, Hudspeth, El Paso, Winkler, Andrews, Ector, Crane, Upton, Midland, Martin, Glasscock, and all those portions of Dawson, Borden, and Howard Counties lying south and west of the following described boundary lines: Begininng at the west boundary line of Dawson County at the southwest corner of section 114 of block M; thence in an easterly direction on the south line of sections 114, 89, 84, 71, 66, 53, 48, and 35 to the southeast corner of said section 35; thence northerly on the east line of section 35 to the northeast corner of said section; thence easterly on the south line of sections 28, 27, 26. and 25 of block M, and of section 27 of block C41 to the southeast corner of said section 27 of block, C41; thence southerly 3 miles on the east line of sections 7, 6, and 1 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5 to -the southwest corner of section 2 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5; thence easterly on the south line of sections 2 and 3 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5, and of sections 12 and 11 of the Georgetown Railroad Co. block 35 to the southeast corner of section 11 of said block; thence southerly along the east line of sections 24 and 21 of the D. L. Cunningham block 4 to the southwest corner of section 22 of said block 4; thence easterly along the south line of section 22 of said block 4 and section 1 of the Georgetown Railroad Co. block 34 to the southeast corner of said section 1; thence southerly on the east line of sections 6 and 7 of the J. Poitevent block 2 to the southeast corner of said section 7; thence easterly on the south line of section 8 of the J. IPoitevent block 2 and of sections 9 and 10 of block 34, township 6 north, to the southeast corner of said section 10; thence northerly along the east line of said section 10 to the northeast corner of said section; thence easterly along the north line of 'section 11 of block 34, township 6 north of the northeast corner of said section; thence southerly along the east line of said section 11 to the southeast corner of said section; thence easterly on the south line of section :14 of block 34, township 6 north, to the southeast corner of said section; thence southeasterly along the meanderings of Dry Tobacco Canyon and the south fork of the Colorado River across the boundary line between Dawson and Borden Counties to a point in Borden County where the Big Spring-Gail public road crosses said river; thence in a southerly direction following the said Big Spring-Gail road to a point 1 mile south of Morris schoolhouse in Howard County, the same being at intersection of the Vincent road; thence south along fence to Morgan Creek; thence southeasterly along the meanderings, of said Morgan Creek to the Howard-Mitchell County line; thence south along said county line to the southeast corner of Howard County.
New Mexico area.-The counties of Chaves, Eddy, Otero, Dona Ana, Luna, Grant, and Hidalgo.
Arizona area.-The counties of Cochise, Graham, and Greenlee.
This amendment shall be effective on and after May 25, 1929, and shall cancel and supersede amendment No. 1 to the rules and regulations 'supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 as revised.
Done at the city of Washington this 16th day of May, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department 'of Agriculture.
[ISEAL.] R. W. DUNLAP.,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
U' This amendment consists In the release of part of the northern half of Dawson County, Tex., from the areas formerly designated as regulated.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 125

NOTICE TO COMMON CARIES
WASHINGTON, D. C., May 16, 1929.
Sra: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, by amendment No. 3 to the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (Revised), on account of the pink bollworm, given notice that regulation 3 has been amended, effective on and after May 25, 1929, to read as per copy inclosed.
Very respectfully,
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
(Inclosures.)

[Do not detach this receipt]
Received this notice and the copy of amendment 3 to the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 mentioned therein this
------ day of ----------, 1929.

(Signature)

(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers doing business in and through the State of Texas.]
NOTICE TO GENERAL PuBIuc THROUGH NEwSPAPRS
WASHINGTON, D. C., May 16, 1929
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment, effective May 25, 1929, to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, as revised, on account of the pink bollworm. This amendment modifies regulation 3 by releasing part of the northern half of Dawson County, Tex., from the areas formerly designated as regulated. Copies of said amendment may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agricult ure.
[Published in the Dawson County Journal, Lamesa, Tex., May 30, 1929.1


WOODGATE-RUST QUARANTINE (NO. 65) INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POsT' OFFICE DKIhARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTIa GENERAL, lfash1 iflton, May ;, 19 1?!
POSTMASTR.
My DEA Sia: There is enclosed for your irifornition and guidance a copy of quarantine order No. 65 of the United States Department of Agriculture, on account of the Woodgate rust, together with a copy of Amendment No. 1 thereto, effective April 1. 1929, which prohibits the movement of Scotch pine and other hard pine from the counties of Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, and St. Lawrence, N. Y.
It will be noted that regulation 5 of the order absolutely prohibits the mvement of Scotch pine and other bard pines or parts thereof from the rgublitod area into or through any point outside such area.







126 PLANT QUARANTINE, AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

Under the provisions ofparagraph 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regulations, you will please be careful to see that no trees, branches, limbs or twigs of any variety of the pine trees mentioned in the order are accepted for mailing at your office.
Sincerely yours, R. S. RwAnt

Third Assistant Postmaster General.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC ADDED TO COUNTRIES WHICH MAY SHIP POTATOES TO THE UNITED STATES

Evidence has recently been submitted to the Department of Agriculture, through the State Department, that the Dominican Republic has met all of the general conditions set forth in regulation 2 of the regulations governing the importation of potatoes into the United States, including the establishment of the fact t hat it is free from the potato wart and other injurious potato diseases and insect pests new to or not widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States. This administration is, therefore, now in position to issue permits for the entry of potatoes from the Dominican Republic.

PARCELS CONTAINING PLANTS ACCEPTED; IN VIOLATION OF JAPANESE BEETLE AND OTHER QUARANTINES

THIRD AsSISTANT POSTMAsTEn GENERAL,
Washington, April 17, 1929.
The United States Department of Agriculture has informed this office that a large number of parcels of plants and plant products were accepted for transmission in the mails during the past year in violation of the quarantines established by that department on account of the Japanese beetle and other injurious insect infestations or plant diseases. The reports show that the wrongful acceptance in the majority of the cases was due to negligence of window clerks to inquire as to the nature of the contents of the parcels when offered for mailing, or ignorance on the part of postal employees of the quarantine requirements.
The Department of Agriculture states that this is a very serious matter, since failure to comply with the prohibitions and restrictions of quarantine orders is likely to result in the spread of injurious insect infestations and plant diseases and thus lead to disaster of the first magnitude, and that in addition to the injurious effect on the agriculture of the region involved, would probably necessitate large Federal and State appropriations.
Postmasters and postal employees are, therefore, admonished that all plant quarantine orders in effect in their respective States must be rigorously enforced, careful inquiry being made to ascertain the nature of the contents of parcels mailed, and close study made of the conditions governing all quarantines in effect in their particular State or county.
Postmasters must see to it that all window clerks in their offices are thoroughly instructed with respect to the requirements of the quarantines in effect in their particular locality, and if any plant material should be accepted in violation of such quarantines must take suitable action to prevent a repetition.
R. S. REGAR,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


CONVICTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

The following convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act were reported to the administration during the period April 1 to June 80, 1929;
JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE
In the case of the United States v. W. E. Marshall & Co. (Inc.), New York, N. Y., in the Interstate shipment of 1 calla, 1 amaryllis, and 2 large crinum






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 127

bulbs from New York to a point outside the quarantined area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25. (Plant quarantine case No. 363.)
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the case of the United States v. Maria Lucinda Padillo, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in seven avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Manuel Caldera, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Pedro Montes Chavez, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 14 avocados and 4 mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Simon Flores, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in six avocados and one mamey from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Fisk Nancy, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Jesus Martinez, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in six avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. E. W. Vertress, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in seven avocado seeds from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Mrs. R. M. Earnest, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in six avocados from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United State v. Dan Skeens, McAllen, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. M. Melancon, Mission, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one mamey from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. A. S. Regna, Laredo. Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in 28 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Mrs. B. L. Cain. Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 17 mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Jose Zamora, Brownsville. Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Francisco Jimenez. Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 12 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Trinidad De Leon, Eagle Pass. Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mameys from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Ignacio Puga, El Paso, Tex. in attempting to smuggle in one avocado from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Felix Benavente. El Paso, Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in four mangoes from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. David Ortega, El Paso. Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in six mangoes and two avocados from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the ase of the United State< v. Glen Lewis. El Paso. Tex., in attempting to smuggle in seven mangoes a nd eight avocados from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. 1. Guajardo, Eagle Pass. Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in seven oranges from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Jesus IIerandez. Egle Pass. Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in four avocados from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the Uniited States v. Maria P. de Lopez. El Paso. Tex.. in attempting to smuggle ii 45 pants from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. M;ircos Zepedn. TIlidalgo. Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 12 avnedos from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the Untod Stat(es v'. Gueneva Perez. Hidalgo. Tex.. in at empting to smuggle in five vocdo seeds from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. F. Gonzales, Brownsville. Tex., in attempting to smuggle in five avocados frma Mexico, the defendant was fined 5.
In the case of the United States v'. G. Saenz. Brownsville. Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in four avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined 95.
In the case of the United States v. Manuel Solls. Brownsville. Tex in attempting to smuggle in five avocados from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5..
In the case of the UnitTd States '. Reyes S. Santiago. Eagle Paw. Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in 2 oranges, 5 avocados, and 4 plants from Mexico the 4idefendant was fined $5.






128 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

In the case of the United States v. Juan Trejo, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two avocado seeds from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Malilde Alderete, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three figs and two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Manuel Bustamantes, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Trinidad Zamora, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two avocados with seed from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Pedro Mercado, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two sapotes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Esteban Ramirez, El Paso, Tex., ,in attempting to smuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant Was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Virginia Jasso, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant wasfined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Maria M. Moore, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. M. A. Capiro, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in six avocado seeds from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Felipe Rodriquez, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Antioca Hinojosa, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. L. E. Johnson, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three avocados and two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Barbara Rodriquez, i Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 14 avocados and 9 mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Maria E. de Elizondo, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 11 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Emideniciana C. de Ramirez, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Aurelia Haro, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Ester Robles, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in five avocados and one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. James E. Harvey, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Maria Salazar, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the Case of the United States v. Maria, Hernandez de Munoz, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Lorenzo Poblano, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in five avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United, States v. Clotilde M. de, Moreno, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 2 mameys, I mango, and 2 sapotes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Miguel Barron, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Martin Campos, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendent was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. J. L. Arnold, El Paso, Tex., in attempting' to smuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Jesus Medrano, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-, ing to smuggle in four mameys from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Timotea Cruz, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three sapotes and two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Nemesia Gonzalez, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three avocados from Mexico," the defendant was fined $5.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 129

In the case of the United States v. Dononciano Aguirre, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Elena Casillas, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in six mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Lucia Solis de Hernandez, El Paso. Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Clayton McCord, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Maria Carrasco, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Loui Bruce, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. W. M. Robinson, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes and one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Dr. C. M. Williamson, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 12 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. John Jaeaman, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in nine avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. L. Pena, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two avocados and two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. W. M. Mosheim, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. L. C. Fitzhugh, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 11 mangoes and 5 avocados from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Geo. Alexander, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. J. A. De La Garza, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 4 mangoes and 11 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.


ORGANIZATION OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION

C. L. MARLATT, Chief of Adrministration. S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.
B. C ONNoa, Business Manager.
R. C. ALTHOUSE, Informational Offcer.
C. A. LOCKE, Executive Assistant.
H. T. CRoNiN, Administrative Assistant. E. R. SAsscER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantin,. B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date-Scale Qirantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge European Corn-Borer Quarantiwne (HIcadquarters, Eastern Section, Boston, Mass.; Western Section, Toledo, Ohio).
A. F. BURGEs, in Field Clharge Gipsy-Moth and Broen-Tait-Moth Quarantine
(Headquarters, Melrose Highlands, Mass.).
C. H. HADLEY, in Field Charge Japanese-Beetle Quarantine (Hedquarters,
Camden, N. J.).
R. E. McDoNALD, in Field Charge Pink-Bollworm and Thurbrria-Weril Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
M. H. FoD. Acting in Field Charge Mexican Fruit-WVorn Quarantine (IHeadquarters, Harlingen, Tex.).
WVILMON NEWE-L, in Field Charge Mfediterranran Fruit-Fly Quarantine int Florida (Headquarters, Orlando, Fla.). A. C. BAKER, Bureau of Entonolog/, in Fih 1d Iarge Inrestigqational work. Mediterranean Fruit-Fly quarantine (Headquarters, Orlando, l*Ia.). P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mediterranean Fruit-Fly Quarantine Enfor ement and Inspection. Work in States other than Florida i(Headqurt rs, Atlanta, Ga.).







130 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,

ADVISORY FEDERAL PLANT QUARANTINE BOARD C. L. MARLATT, Chairman. J. E. GRAF, Bureau of Entomology, Member. R. A. OAKLEY, Bureau, of Plant Industry, Member. M. B. WAITE, Bureau of Plant Industry, Member.
Forest Service, Member.






















































U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1Z9) For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. Price 15 cents.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 09230 9169




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S. R. A.-P. Q. C. A. No. 99 Issued December. 1I*29UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUREPLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATIONSERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSAPRIL-JUNE, 1929CONTENTSRecord of current work, April 1 to June 30, 1929: PageMediterranean fruit fly ----------------------------------------------------------50Extent of infestation--------------------------------------------------Quarantine action----------------------------------------------------------1Destruction of fruit --------------------------------------------------------51Spraying-----------------------------------------------------------------5Elimination of summer host fruits ----------------------------------------------52Cleaning of railway cars and boats at destination----------------------------------2Road station operation-------------------------------------------------3Prevention of spread of gipsy moth ---------------------------------------------European corn-borer-quarantine enforcement -----------------------------------------4Local eradication measures. ----------------------------------------------------State legislation --------------------------------------------------------Extent of regulated areas-------------------------------------------------Mexican fruit-worm eradication ----------------------------------------------6Reappearance of the fruit worm in Texas -----------------------------------------d5Enforcement of a nonhost or starvation period ------------------------------------35Fruit movement -------------------------------------------------------Japanese-beetle control ----------------------------------------------------Trapping adult beetles-------------------------Soil treatment and spraying -----------------------------------------------Inspection, treatment, and certification of restricted articles -----------------------Quarantine violations ----------------------------------------------------Prevention of spread of pink bollworm-----------------------------------------Parlatoria date-scale eradication-----------------------------------------------White-pine blister-rust quarantine enforcement ------------------------------------Pine shipping permits -------------------------------------------------------ci)New State legislation----------------------------------------------------Transit inspection------------------------------------------------------Quarantine and other official announcements:Asiatic-beetle quarantine (No. 66) ---------------------------------------------62Instructions to postmasters--------------------------------------------62District of Columbia plant regulations ---------------------------------------2Instructions to postmasters ---------------------------------------------62Japanese-beetle quarantine (No. 48)---------------------------------------------------62Instructions to postmasters -------------------------------------------6Instructions to inspectors on the disinfection of nursery products for the Japanese and Asiatibeetles (P. Q. C. A. 224) -----------------------------------------------------------3Japanese-beetle traps set in areas of light infestation (press notice). .---------7Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine iNo. 68).---------------------------------.-. 77Mediterranean fruit fly discovered in Florida (press notice)---. 7Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the State O Flr onaccount of the Mediterranean fruit I ------------------------------------7Florida to be quarantined on account of the fruit fly (press notice)--------------------Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine issued (press notice) ----------------------------Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (effective May 1, 1929)------------------------------Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine revised (press notice ---------------------------Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine revised (effective M ay 10, 192 h-------------Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine revised th prohibit resh i pIent I ) tl T I t S L Ivegetables from Northeastern States to South and West (press notice) ..1.Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine rev ised (effective June 7, 1929) .11Nursery-stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37) ..-. 11Entry of narcissus bulbs for propagation in tIe fall of 1929 k Q C. A. -'. A 11Phony peach-disease quarantine N .).-.-.-.-. ---------1Georgia and Alabama quarantined on account of tile phony peWch -il'kl --e n-I w -Quarantine on account of the ihony peach d isease-.---.-.I 19Pink-hollworin quarant ine (Nf). --. --Pink-bollwormn regulated area imdiie led ipress nOiet i-cModification of pink-bolkworm quiaranti-e -Woodgate-rust quarant ine (No. --Instructions to postmastersMiscellaneous itTns----------------------Convictions for violations of t he p it quair o ine act I ,Organization of the Plant Quarantine A d olrui \donsuvrat "n.,"297--."01

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50 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,RECORD OF CURRENT WORK, APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1929MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLYThe Mediterranean fruit fly was discovered at Orlando, Fla., on April6, 1929, and the identity of the pest confirmed by the specialists of the depart-ment at Washington on April 10. A rapid survey of the immediate vicinityresulted in the determination that the fly was thoroughly established in severalorchards within the town limits of Orlando and at a few outlying pointsseveral miles north and south of that city. Subsequent scouting eventuallyshowed the infestation to cover a considerable part of central Florida.The seriousness of the situation and the importance of completely eradi-cating the insect, if possible, were at once recognized. Emergency funds of$50,000 were immediately released by the State, and, by transfer, $40,000 was promptly made available by the Department of Agriculture for preliminarywork. This was followed by congressional action upon recommendation ofthe Secretary of Agriculture, making $4,250,000 immediately available forthe control and eradication operations.Lines of work which were undertaken immediately following the discoveryof the insect included (1) scouting to determine the extent of the spreadin Florida and elsewhere, (2) quarantine action regulating the movement ofall products that might carry infestation to other localities, (3) destruction ofall fruit in infested and surrounding orchards, and (4) spraying the treesconcerned with an attractive poison bait as a substitute for the natural foodthus removed.EXTENT OF INFESTATIONThe surveys undertaken to determine the extent of spread confirmed theidea that Orlando was the starting point of the invasion, particularly asno infestations of a like nature have been determined elsewhere. Surveysaround this center of infestation first revealed the pest to have been distributedrather extensively throughout Seminole, Orange, and the eastern part of LakeCounties, and into the extreme north end of Osceola County. This was fol-lowed soon by the discovery of fruit-fly infestations along the east coast extend-ing throughout the eastern parts of Brevard and Volusia Counties fromOrmond Beach to Merritt Island. During May infested fruit was discovered in five additional counties, andby the close of the fiscal year on June 30, 16 counties were known to beinvolved in the spread of the pest. Table 1 shows the number and location ofproperties found infested from the time the fruit fly was discovered untilthe end of June. Most of the properties listed were town lots and similarlocations other than commercial orchards, and, outside of the immediatevicinity of Orlando, the infestations found in commercial orchards wereextremely light and difficult to discover, indicating a very recent establish-ment of infestation.TABLE 1.-Number of properties found and reported infested with the Mediter-ranean fruit fly from the date of discovery to June 30, 1929Apr. 6June1-30 Total to Apr. 6June 1-30Total toMay 31 June 30 May 31 June 30lBrevard I----------59 13 72 Pinellas ------------0 9 9)uval 2 (2) 0 0 Polk ---------------7 27 34Flagler 0 4 4 PLutnamu --------------5 13 18lillsborough 0 17 17 Ht. Johns -----------0 8 8Lake I ---------------53 35 88 Seminole I 88 9 97Levy -----------------0 1 1 Sumter ---------------1 0 1Arion 3 4 7 Volusia I -----------107 37 144Orange I 356 44 400 -Osceola I ------------17 10 27 To-l 697 230 9271In festations (iscovered in these counties before the end of April.2 Thie reported infestation at Jacksonville was based on the discovery of Mediterranean fruit flies in aresidence, where they had eml ergO(I from a box of fruit shipped from Orange County. The flies were killedand 0 no fie(1 infestation has been discovered at that point.

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19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51The likelihood of carriage of infested fruits into the Cotton Belt Stateswas obvious, and even prior to the taking of Federal quarantine action, thenature of this risk was brought to the attention of the appropriate officialsof these States in communications on April 23, in which such officials wereurged to have inspections made of all Florida fruits in markets or storageso that any infested shipments could be promptly destroyed. The Federaldepartment assisted in this survey of other States to the extent of supplyingsome funds and personnel.This work resulted in the discovery of some 14 shipments of infested fruit-a good deal of it in carload lots-distributed to 10 localities in the followingStates: Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, and Texas. The infesta-tion in North Carolina was at Italeigh, and was based on the discovery of adultflies which had emerged in a smill grocery store from infested Florida fruit.Intensive clean-up operations were conducted at this point by the State offi-eials with Federal cooperation. Additional instances of infested fruit werereported from New York and Ohio. Especially extensive field surveys wereundertaken in vicinities in which infested fruit was discovered, but their resultswere all negative and up to the time of the preparation of this report no ap-pearance of the fruit fly has been determined anywhere outside of the centralarea of Florida-a situation which greatly favors the eradication effort.QUARANTINE ACTIONThe State Plant Board of Florida promulgated on April 15 a State quarantinecovering the then known area of infestation, together with a wide protectivezone. Federal quarantine action restricting all movement of host fruits andvegetables from all parts of the State of Florida followed as soon as therequired legal notices permitted. This quarantine, as issued April 26, becameimmediately effective as to all areas in that State which had been determinedas infested, and was effective throughout the remainder of the State on M.ay 1.As the surveys revealed new properties involved outside the known infestedareas, the State regulations were amended to cover such additional districts.Modifications making additions of this kind were issued by the State plantboard on April 27, May 4, MNay 13, MNay 2S, June S, and Junle 17.Both Federal anid State regulations prohibited any movement whatever fromgroves within 1 mile of infested properties and placed especially severe rest rie-tions as to destiIation on fruit prodliced withiti 9 miles of infested propertiesIn this manner the quarantine restrictions were automatically extended to newterritory as rapidly as new infestations were discovered. The host fruits and vegetaides listed in the Federal quarantine regulationsas first issued included all wild atd cultivated cit rus and noncitrus fruits(except watermelons, pih apples, coconutS. ai other nuts) and the followingkinds of vegetables: Peppcrs of all kinds, gourds, pumpkins. squashes, toma-toes, beans of all kinds, and eggplants. Later, in August, straw wherries, squashes,pumpkins , gourds, and all kinds of beaus except Limai. betn s antid broad beansvere released from restriction, as 11 the experimiieit ll work failed to rex eat ade-quate evidence of their being susceptible to attack.DESTRUCTION OF FRUITThe destruction of bust fruits on ilntil prperties and prperties in theimmiiiedijate vicinity-that is, within 1 mIile--c(istit tit ed the first point of attackin the eradicatiin effort. POy the end it' Mniv 11. 1dehat been cleatiedan( the equivalet it of 563.0;7 wxe (if citrus fruit diiesIroyd. Within thisa ren 77,702 acres hind beent covered by the crewN Ihe secol time anid were0t11prted as lhavill been reelealield. Di uring .Iiune 13,913 additional awres werecleaned thIe first miun .62,357 iervs r'cleantd, .1d the eqljiv.;leit of 1-5.413boxes of citrus fruit destroyed.SPRAYINGFollowing tht' destruction (if the ilfi tIed fruit. the liexI -t1 p wN s to elii-hate the flies relnnining in the district to prevent thwir 1i1mirtig elsewhere.To uIccoiplish this the infe-t ed grt ves at14d others within I mn le hi'ret as to allpoints of infestation vre promptly > ,\rayed Wili a SWeet 1t -TI li i nIthese sprayings were rej I 'atted at frequeI iterva I i' possible, cvi \ week.and. at the beginning ill the heavily infested a , eve-t vftenq''r.

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52 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,The work of fruit destruction and spraying at the height of the seasonrequired the services of upwards of 5,000 men, of whom 250 or more weredirectors of work, the rest laborers, and of all available trucks, spraying ma-chinery, etc., secured by loan and purchase and the establishment of a depotof machines and supplies which rivaled war conditions. The progress in boththe clean-up work and the spraying activities is shown in Table 2.TABLE 2.-Progress of eradication measures, April 6 to June 30, 1929Apr. 6 to June 1 to TotalMay 31 30Clean-up:Citrus-Cleaned first time .--_.------------------------------acres-. 86,336 33,913 120,249Cleaned second time ---.---------------------------------do. 77,702 62,357 140,059Total citrus cleaned and recleaned ---------------------do.164, 038 96, 270 260,308Citrus fruit destroyed _---.---------------------------boxes-563,067 15,433 578,500Cultivated noncitrus-Cleaned first time -----.-----------------------------acres. 10,000 84,527 94,527Cleaned second time -.----------------------------do. 0 1,458 1,458Properties cleaned ..----------------------------number -----------8, 548------Properties recleaned -.-----------------------------.do.----.---------2,847Clean-up personnel-Inspectors. ...-. .....-------------------------------------do-. 49 52Foremen...--------------------------------------do. 264 258Laborers -.--.-------------------------------------do. 3,290 2,172Spraying:Area sprayed 1 -. _-.-.-----------------------------------acres-69,306 293,359 362,665Materials used-Sugar.-.-.--------------------------------------pounds-. 281,600 498,603 780,203Molasses.-..-. ..------------------------------------gallons. 25,761 27,703 53,464Lead arsenate.----------. ---. ..-------------------pounds. 32,896 56,490 89,386Spraying personnel-Inspectors.-.-.----------------------------------number. 6 14Foremen ._.-. ..-------------------------------------do. 38 59Laborers--------.-.--.-------------------------------.---do.-. 211 4711 In this table, an acre sprayed three times, for example, is counted as 3 acres.ELIMINATION OF SUMMER HOST FRUITSIt was agreed by State and Federal authorities and others in interest thatthe program which had been adopted in the case of the Mexican fruit-worm in-vasion in the lower Rio Grande Valley was essential to eradication of theMediterranean fruit fly in Florida, namely, the establishment of a summer star-vation period within the infested and protective zones during which there wouldbe a complete elimination of all host fruits and vegetables in a stage of growthattractive to the fly, and, in lieu of such source of normal food, to supply theflies with an attractive substitute in the form of the sweetened poison bait towhich reference has already been made. The effectiveness of this method hasbeen fully demonstrated in the work so far, and the hope of eradication islargely centered on its intensification and continuance. It involves, however,cooperation on the part of every citizen of the State, and the acceptance by suchcitizens of very material sacrifices, in as much as it will mean, if success isto be achieved, the elimination-grubbing up or cutting down-of the trees orshrubs ripening fruit during the starvation period, as well as the prohibitionof the growth of host vegetables during that period. This need of the destrue-tion of plants comes from the impracticability which has been fully demonstratedof the daily or weekly removal of ripening fruits and vegetables from suchareas. This giving up, during the period necessary to eradicate the fly, of cher-ished yard or garden plants and commercial or other plantings of the typeindicated in the interest of the major citrus industry is recognized as a hardrequirement of the citizens of the State, but one which seems to be absolutelynecessary if the fruit fly is to be eliminated.CLEANING OF RAILWAY CARS AND BOATS AT DESTINATIONRailway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been usedin transporting restricted articles from Florida are required to be cleaned ordisinfected at the point of unloading before being used again in interstatecommerce.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53In view of the fact that the Florida situation was not fully known ndl thatthere was a possibility of such cars containing infested products. it was ppareitthat cars loaded with Florida host fruits and vegetables unloaded at northernpoints and then placed uncleaned on loading tracks in peach-growindistrictsand other fruit-producing 8reas might result in the escape of the MedEterr-neanifru t fly in such areas and eventually in the general establishment of the postthroughout the United States.As the shipment of Florida host fruits and vegetables to the Southern andWestern States was discontinued on May 16 under department order P. Q. C. A.No. 229 (which is printed in full on p. 101). the dcstinations involved in the car-cleaning requirements throughout tin remainder of the spring shipping seasonwere confined to the Northern and Central States.Between May 16 and June "0. 4.310 carload .hipments of reotriclod materialwere reported as confined from Florida to approximately 1D0 cities nd tmnsscattered throughout such States. By June 80. car-cleaning reports I1:1 heenreceived from the railroad companies covering 4.1 arIn order to check on the efficiency of car cleaning. empty refrierator ndventilated cars were inspected in transit at Potomnac Yards. Cincinnati. Evaius-ville. St. Louis. and Atlanta. and for briefer period; at Buffalo. ClovAandlToledo. and Chicago. One hundred thirty-one cars which bore evidence thatthoy had been used in the transportation of Forida pro(licts but lhad not beoincleaned at the unloading point were intercepted bet ween the middle (if Mayand the end of the fiscal year. ThesC were either clemed at the point of in-terception or traced and cleaned later. The figure given is in addition to certaincars found dirty by railroad employee themselves and which were eLanmedwithout reporting the individual iimher' of the c. ars concerned to thedepartment.Supplemental to the Federal requirements. the ofier, of the States ofArizona and California inisted on the fumigation of all refrigerator cars en-tering their borders from eastern points, and under these requirements thelargest of the refrigerator-car lines operating in the S',uthwectrn States re-ports having fumigated 295 ears with hydrocyanic-acid gas during May. and1.174 during June.ROAD STATION OPERATIONIli order to prevent 1he i nov ment of Florida host fruits and egetabie bytruck and other roaod vehicles, a I patrol service was established zi long the borderbetween that State and Georga and Alhbama.There were 22.727 cars inspected on the Georgia-Florida boundary during theperiod from May 16 to 31: of these i .167 carried 1.412 lots of contraband fruitsni vegetables. During Juno. 53,872 vehicles were iinspectcd oil this line. ofwhich 2.19 carried 2.627 lots of contraband articles.On the Fborida-A laba ma line during iJune. 84.747 vehicles were insi'cted, ofwhich 5.332 were foimid tt 1 e:irrying fruits anil vegetables.PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF G1PsY MOTHD)urinlg the -munth peri i cover('di by vhii report tlie priuncip:il wvork1 ("I)-cerns forest scotitiiig in the harrier zone and in New Jersey to determine aiivpoints of in festationi. together witi Ih cresoiiting of all egg ma s les fi 1 atany sie pOints, Ill June, spraying begins in all district' which have beendetermined to 1e infested by O w preceding scouting wirk Of fall 11l winter.As to New Jersey lie out Qnnliing feature was the nling of blit' a singtepoint of infestation during the fiscal ye:lr. This coasted of :i number ofegg ('lust ers folnid in lOe we sterii extreinli of Pi seat a way TowNhip ii Midle-sex Couuty. All Of the egg l 1strl:i hd hatched anmid small gip'y-mIth ewere found feeding o? '-lirubibery 1nd young fruit t iree in Ihe iniiediatevicinity. The vegetat ion in inl srroudiig tle area determined :i' inifestedwas sprayed during the period between May 10 and Juiie 10 anld w\a's cliselvguliarded to prevent the removal from the vicinity of iny lre S. shrubs or pr-tions thereof.Spraying work ill the barriir-zoie are:a in we'-tern N Fw EnglaImd N a'tartedoi June 3 aid finished shwlrtlv :lfter lie enid of the mnt. Iifeti'd bealitie"wcre sprayed in thle towiis of Pulltnev Vt,. Egremont. New Marlboro. T is,Sandisfield. Sheffield, and Tyrinm-hamii. Mass., and C':lmal:nn, ('orniw:ill. hNorfolk, North Ca:inaan, Salisbury. Wallingford. and Warren, (on An in1"W Ivel l

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54 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,festation of a single egg cluster in Fairfield, Conn., and of two egg clustersin Lee, Mass., were treated, but spraying in those towns was not considerednecessary. In the New York section of the barrier-zone similar spraying op-erations were carried out by the State department of conservation.The inspection carried out in connection with quarantine enforcement con-tinues to show some infestation of forest products and stone and quarryproducts offered for interstate shipment, but no infestations have been dis-covered on such shipments of nursery stock and other evergreens. The de-tails of this work for the period from January 1 to June 30, 1929, are shownin Table 3.TABLE 3.-Inspections under Federal gipsy-moth quarantine, January 1 toJune 30, 1929Forest products Stone and quarry Nursery stock Other evergreensproductsMonth ShipShipLarvae ShipShipShipShipShipShip-mients ments ments ments Egg ments ments Egg ments ments Egginine ininmasses inininmassesspected fasted masses spected, tested spected tested spected testedNumber ATumber Number NumberJanuary--1,690 2 27 10, 535 4 4 311 0 0 287 0 0February-2,392 1 6 11,651 9 11 440 0 0 280 0 0March.2,086 2 14 18,353 1 1 2,572 0 0 1,137 0 0April-----854 7 204 29,633 19 27 14,051 0 0 861 0 0May-----2,079 3 6 34,332 1 1 9,175 0 0 838 0 0June-----2,149 2 213 39,540 3 254 956 0 0 96 0 0Total. i1, 250 17 260 144,064 37 3 98 27,505 0 0 3,499 0 0'Not including seven egg clusters found on boards which were to be used for car doors.2 Larvae.'Not including 32 egg clusters found on car stakes and materials to be used in crating granite.EUROPEAN CORN-BORER-QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENTActive permit and inspection operations for the season started during Junewhen the market inspection of vegetables was begun at Boston, and the NewYork City office opened for the issuance of permits for the redistribution ofgreen corn grown outside the regulated area. Beets grown in eastern Massa-chusetts arrived rather badly infested and borers were also found in cut gladi-olus flowers. Slight infestation was reported in New England-grown beans.The infestation in the market-garden areas is most pronounced in the vicinityof Woburn, Arlington, Winchester, Dighton, and Somerset, Mass., and Newport and Bristol Counties, R. I.The products certified during the 6-month period from January 1 to June 30,1929, are shown in Tables 4 and 5, respectively.TABLE 4.--Shelled corn certified under the European corn-borer quarantine,January 1 to June 30, 1929Month I Central Western Month Central Westernarea' area area areaBushels Bushels I-Bushels BushelsJanuary --------------------189,539 503,768 A a 83,444 233,320February -------------------153,237 380,994 June -----------------------147,046 196,662M arch ----------------------91,442 382,104April ----------------------105,781 244,677 Total ----------------770,489 1,941,525That part of the 1-generation area east of the western border of Pennsylvania; this area was listed as"eastern area" in Table 2, p. 98, S. R. A. No. 97.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55TABLE 5.-Certiflcation of cut flowers and plants in 2-generation area easternNew England), January 1 to June 30. 1,929Cut Beans, Beans,flowers Belsowers E2'Mot ,lwr celery, Monthe celery,Month andentie beets, and Month and entire beetseanrhubarb 1 pat rhubarbcert ified certified-,Number Bushels Nmber BushehJanuary .--------------------5, 124 0 M ay ----------------------2,540February .------------------25,800 0 June ------------------------19 194 -4,560March.---------------------17,937 0April .----------------------20,203 0 Total -----------------1006 24,560I Not restricted Jan. I to May 31, inclusive.I In addition to 2,612 celery plants, and 23 rhubarb plants.LOCAL ERADICATION MEASURESLast season isolated European corn-borer infestations were discovered attwo or three points in western New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania. Inorder to delay the spread of the borers into these localities, the extension ofthe regulated 8rea was limited in such a manner as to prevent the movementof infested products to those points, and( an effort has been made to eradicatethe infestation completely from these localities by means of burning over theinfested fields with fuel oil. The burning operations were begun in New Jerseyon April 17 and completed during May. Prior to that time, similar work hadbeen carried out in the outskirts of Brooklyn and on Staten Island, N. Y., ascontrol measures to prevent spread into New Jersey.STATE LEGISLATIONThe Legislature of Michigan, on April 23, 1929, repealed the State corn btrerenforcement act in the belief that farmers are now able to carry out effectivecontrol measures without State aid.EXTENT OF REGULATED AREASltecent .'alcul tions as to the amount of territory now infested by theEuropean corn borer in the United States sihmws that Imore than 175.000 squarLVmiles in 18 States are involved iin infestations. The regulated area totals1s4,580.q4 square miles, practically 811 of which ha s been reached by the borerwith the exception of ml0,5t of the Upper and ;ibout one-third of the LowerPeninsult of 'Michigan. (See S. I. A. No. 9s.) The areas at present re-stricted under the Federal quarantine regulations on account of this pest areshown in Table 6.TALJm: G.--Area, regulated on account of the European corn bor( r under thequarantine amcndicnt approved February 25, 1.921-genvration area: Suare iie, 21eierAt iu area >V qur& micesNew hampshire -------------------1V0 -ai --------,--.62\ermIonII -------------4, -2. --liai---shire 4 .6 59. ))0IM assachmsetts---,--------2. 243. 25 I assachusits 4 5;7. 92Conneticut----------------------42 73 (h0dh isI,2KNew Jersey----------------71. 2'J ( 'uneu ciut I, Ut)0 MNew iork------------------4 1 isers Isla NPensl an4--------7. 35Ohio4 -------------------Indiana -------------------------140N~il~~2~1f-------------------West \irgini --------------Tot . .4 t 1, 72,42

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56 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,MEXICAN FRUIT-WORM ERADICATIONREAPPEARANCE OF THE FRUIT WORM IN TEXASThat the Mexican fruit worm had regained foothold in the lower Rio GrandeValley of Texas was determined in April by the finding of infestation in twolocal packing houses in which a small quantity of fruit had been stored at theclose of the period permitted for the harvesting of the citrus crop. Previousto such reappearance almost two years had elapsed (from June, 1927, to April,1929) during which no specimens of the pest had been found in the area. Anintensive reexamination disclosed that the premises of 10 growers in HidalgoCounty were involved in this reinvasion.Upon the determination of this infestation all existing permits to ship citrusfruit from the district were canceled and new permits were issued authorizingthe movement of fruit held in storage in the quarantined area only to pointsnorth of the Cotton Belt. The fruit remaining on the infested properties was destroyed.As reported in the last issue of the announcements, at the earnest request ofgrowers and shippers, supported by requests from the appropriate State officials,the time for harvesting the crop of 1928-29 had been extended for the season of1929 from February 28 to March 30, this action being based upon the latenessof the crop in maturing, the unusually weak demand for citrus fruits throughoutmost of the season, and the seeming absence of an infestation during this andthe preceding crop, together with the apparently complete elimination of infesta-tion in the area. This extension to include what in that section is practicallya summer month, March, apparently gave opportunity for the insect to becomereestablished from infested fruit reaching the Mexican towns along the border,and as now recognized by all concerned was an error of judgment not to berepeated.ENFORCEMENT OF A NONHOST OR STARVATION PERIODDuring the 3-month period the elimination of trees and shrubs which producefruit during the summer season (such as peaches and plums) has reached sub-stantial completion. All but 77 of the 37,293 such trees found have beendestroyed.On the subject of alternate host trees the Texas regulations relating to thefruit worm were amended by the commissioner of agriculture June 3 by makingprovision thatin the event any person, firm, or corporation owning such condemned fruit trees shallfail or refuse to destroy such trees immediately after having been instructed to do soby the commissioner of agriculture, * * * it shall be the duty of said commissioner* * * to forthwith destroy such trees, or otherwise render them not a nuisance.Under a proclamation issued by the commissioner supplementing this amend,ment, dated June 20, 1929, it is ordered thatwhereas the introduction of host plants into * * * control zones constitutes a seriouscomplication to the Mexican fruit-fly eradication work * * * therefore * * * nosuch host plants shall be permitted to pass over the said quarantine lines hereby estab-lished at the boundaries of Hidalgo, Cameron, and Willacy Counties, except under specialpermit by the commissioner of agriculture.Related to the above action was an order issued by the State regulating thestorage of host fruits in the valley and requiring that such fruitsoffered for sale or held in storage in the control zone * * * shall be protected frompossible infestation by the Mexican fruit worm by being covered with screen not to exceeda sixteenth-inch mesh.FRUIT MOVEMENTTo a large extent fruit movement ceased at the end of the harvesting periodon March 30. The small amounts remaining which were shipped from storage brought the total movement for the season from October 1, 1928, to June 30, 1929,to 1,745 carloads by freight, to which should be added the equivalent of 233carloaIds by express, and 445 carloads by truck and auto, or a total of 2,423carloads of fruit.Highway traffic in fruit having practically ceased at the end of March, theroad station at Encino was closed on April 12. Eleven days later it was re-sumed on account of the discovery of infestation in the valley and since thattime traffic moving in both directions has been inspected in order to prevent theentry of Florida fruit which might contain the Mediterranean fruit fly.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7Of the 44,018 vehicles inspected during the period from January 1 to Jui :;.1929, 6,911 were found to be carrying host fruit. The fruit in 2.123 pa0' eiiercars and 2 trucks proved to be uncertitied and was not permitted t4 pr e) eJAPANESE-BEETLE CONTROLTRAPPING ADULT BEETLESOne of the new features of the Japanese-beetle-control project this Seasonhas been the utilization of geraniol traps at the isolated points of infestati on of1928, with the purpose of greatly reducing. or possibly, as to some points. eradi-cating the insect by this means.Such trapping is particularly useful if started promptly with the tirsi emer-gence of the beetles, namely, before they have begun to lay eggs in the soil.The geraniol used is a powerful attractant for the Japanese beetl ani is in alarge degree selective in that it does not attract other insects. In isolated areasthe traps can be used without running the risk of attracting beetles from sur-rounding territory and the total number caught in the traps repi'etetcl so muchgain in beetle r. duction and prevention of local multiplication and spread.Some 15,000 such traps were purchased during the spring of 1929 and arrangre-ments were made during, the latter )itrt of May for their distribution, baitin:.and tending. At the close of the fiscal year traps were in operation it the sitesof last year's infestations at Alexandria. Va.: Washington. D. C.: Baltimore.Hagerstown, Frederick, Canbridge. Delmar. Chesapeake City. E Ikton, Perry-ville. and Perry Point, Md.; Gettysburg. York. Lewistown, and Sayre, Pa.:Delmar, Del. ; Springfield and Boston. Mass.: aind Hartford and New London,Conn. Japanese beetles had been trapped in all these localities except Fred-erick, Md., and Sayre. Pa., by the middle of July. 1929. Necessarily the workof this season is experimental, and the reduction of future Japane--leetiepopulation at these points will be in direct proportion to the etlicieitv yf Thlemethod.SOIL TREATMENT AND SPRAYINGControl measures employed at isolated points of infestat ion, in addition totrapping and collecting the adult beetles. included soil treatment f1 ,r the ie-struction of the larvae. and spraying all foliage in the vicinity of the iiifesta-tion with arsenate of lead coated with lead oleate. a form of arsenical especiallyvaluable for the destruction of this insect.As will be seen from Table 7. carbon disulphide was used for the treatmentof about 53 acres of soil (2.327.533 square feet), and had arsenate wais em-ployed on about 31 .' acres (153.500 square feet ). In Maryland. spraying ope' A-tions were carried out at Cambridge, Delmar, and Chesapeake City.TABLE 7.-Outline of SOil treatment t an(d sprayllig operations to control theJapawwsc bcetic at isolated point ts of infcstation, fiscal ytar 1929SOIL AND TURF TREATMENTPlce Area (.'S used Co It NV or ''Squa refeet Gal1ons Do1Iar.Cam br idge, M-4, 0oo 1,030 2,, 7 30 -,1t. 22 No. 7Delmiar, Md. (fall) --0, 133 1, 26W 2, 64 N ov Dec. 5Delmnar, Md. (sprin ) 108, 000 210 47-.) Apr 9 Apr. 31Delmar, Del --, 200 1, 375 3, N. 23 Apr. 4 May 4M ilford, i)el 4-----, --00 12 3,k 2A pr 3 \ y 3Springfield, M a--1-7, 200 00 1, 43> 73 A pr. i A pr. 2New London, onn 27,200 i-203.42 J n. .June 5Hartford, Co4n 07, 200 24l 3r4. 32 Ia\ 31 June 'IThis Cost was all horne by the States concerned except $331 47, which w' e expende hi11b the Federal dov-e nent in Connec icut ani Mt: i Ihusetts.2 Additional work inwludedIn Ih truat ment of 133,300 square fee't of soil at S pr .iie. \ I v wa h renof lead, at a total cost of $22.44.80297-30 2

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58 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,TABLE .-Outline of soil treatment and spraying operations to control theJapanese beetle at isolated points of infestation, fiscal year 1929-Contd.SPRAYINGPlace Shade Fruit Shrubs ofs nate Cost I Work Work trees trees used began endedPounds DollarsCambridge, Md----------------1,890 215 11,055 4,022 2,062.81 June 6 June 27Chesapeake City, M d.-.--.--. --.-.---.---1,800 309. 67 June 13 June 18Delmar, Md. (spring)----------360 50 3, 400 624 364.80 June 28 July IDelmar, Del.-. .---------------.-.-.-.----------(3) (3)Total --------------------2,250 265 14,455 6,446 2,737.28..I This cost was all borne by the States concerned.3 Spraying at Delmar, Del., is to be carried on in July.INSPECTION, TREATMENT, AND CERTIFICATION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLESThe details of inspection, treatment, and certification of the various classesof articles whose movement is restricted under the Japanese-beetle quarantineare shown in Tables 8, 9, and 10.TABLE S.-Quantities of farm products, cut flowers, soil, and similar products certified under Japanese-beetle quarantine, January 1 to June 30, 1929Month Cut Sand, soil, Peat Compost Fruits and Hay andflowers earth, etc. and manure vegetables strawBoxes Carloads Carloads Carloads Packages BalesJanuary.----.---------------------0 409 23 91 0 0February ------------------------0 786 31 113 0 0March--------------------------0 1,472 45 171 0 0April-----------------------.---. 0 779 52 70 0 0May---------------------------0 4,167 52 80 0 0June. .-------------------------1,446 2,294 57 64 856,755 1,379Total. .--------------------1,446 9,907 260 589 856, 755 1,379TABLE 9.-Chemical treatment of articles (other than nursery stock) restrictedunder the Japanese-beetle quarantine, January 1 to June 30, 1929Carbon disulphide1 Arsenate Naptha-of lead lineMonthPotting Sand Leaf Clay Surface Surface SurfaceSoil S mold soil soil soilCu. yds. Cu. yds. Cu. yds. Cu. yds. Sq. yds. Sq. ft. Sq. ft.January -----------------------23 0 0 0 0 2,110 0February ----------------------56 0 0 0 0 0 4,091March----------------------80 0 0 0 418 19,035 0April --------------------------149 0 109 0 61 0 0May --------------------------1021 0 160 0 0 0 0June. --------------------218 0 109 0 0 59,817 0Total ------------------628 0 378 0 479 80,962 4,0911 No calcium-cyanide treatments of restricted articles were carried out during the 6-month period.3 In addition to the figures given above, 6 cubic yards of potting soil were treated with steam in February,12 in M arch, and 8 in A pril.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59TABLE 10.-Certification and trcitmeot of nursery Stock under J(!i aneCbeet 4tquarantinc, Jamuary 1 to June 30. 192!Plants certified after chmii-al(ertified or thermal treatmnw lt ith-1\lnthwithut ToaltMonth chemicalor thermal WormHot certifiedtreatment CS 2 seed oil waterJanuary----------------------------------12, 42 0I 0 0 5,642,-82February ---------------------------------.241,190 0 0i 0 6, 244, 1){March -----------------------------------, 369,679 1, 501 0 7, 328 8, 37, )08A pril -------------------------------------, 400,.60 1,045 0 6. 172 5,407,7807Qay.-.----------------------------6, S16.551 1,512 0 2, 0SO, 6, 820,143J une -----------------------------------7, 275.286 4 0 0 7, 275, 20Total .-.-------------------------------42, 749. 14S 4, 065 0 1 15, 5S0 412.70 , 793Included in this column are large numbers of plants which were certified after the roots bad beein washedenirelv free from soil and thoroughly examined by an inspector.QUARANTINE VIOLATIONSA total of 387 shipments in apparent violation of the Federal or StateJapanese-beetle-quarantine regulations was intercepted during the first sixmonths of 1929. In the majority of cases, the return of the uncertified ma-terial to the shipper was effected. A few of the shipments were permittedto proceed, ind in a number of instances the contraband material was de-stroyed. In every case where practicable an investigation was made by aninspector, which included an interview with the shipper and the agent of thecommon carrier, and when the circumstances seemed to make it desirable theshippers were prosecuted.Letters were addressed by the administration to a number of violatorswarning them of the possible consequences of further violation 'is, and severalprosecutions were instituted.PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF PINK BOLLWORMThe quarter beginning April 1 i'the least active p-triod of the yoar ill pink-bollworm-control operations. Teinpora ry employees are Laid off during I hattime and the permanent employees are detailed to bully inspetioii. gin andoil mill clean-up work, and the itmaineimniee of ri ind statiollns.The examination of bullies is e i'rried out at Snii Antonio from iat trialcollected at various points in the State of Tex;ls. Between tie time the lield-scouting season closed atid the coipli'tion of the work during tg the latter partof June, 1,557 bushels of follies were &xamniied. including material from prac-tically every cotton-growing e'unty ill Texas outside the regulated area -;. Noindication of pink-bollwori infestititot w\as foitld.The gJis and oil mills weri closed aInl tihe cleat-up of the premises prac-tically completed by June 1. In 'dditioi to the gilliiliig and fuinigationfigures for the crop yo.a r, given i tihe aie in the last isse Or the Serviceand Regulatory Annoumicelients. 161 bn les of lint w cre -ilined durii:the3-moitth period be-inming April 1. :md S,742 bales of lit 'nld 1,410 bales ofliters were fumigated in Texis: 2,371 bales of lint were ginned ind 2,210bales of lint amd 410 bales w' liiiters were fIm iga ted ill New Mex iu. 1ud720 bales of lint and 275 bales of litters w ere ftuigated in Arizona. 1tniderthe supervision of tle insi'cttir of the adiiiiistra ti ii. The total ft ir tiitseason amouunted to 257.834 bales (f lint igi ied in the rezula ted arca in thrnequar ntined State and 11.713 haIS gitied in t hat part If jjexico :iIj neentto the border; 265,622 bales of lint atld 18,360 ba .es of winters were futigai tedunder Federal supervision ilicl udi ha tilt wvhit was imported froiim I lie ad-joiining areas iti Mexico.PARLATORIA DATE-SCALE FUA ICATIONThe recommiaissance surveys o(itsidle knowii sale-intest'd area uuirtak'ias a part of the vigorous Parlatoria-eradiea ion opvra lots now in pgr i yelargely been completed, and nearly all the uva il:1ble funds :utit l rt

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60 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,at present assigned to direct scale-extermination work. The limited surveysstill under way have resulted in the addition since January 1, 1929, of 325palms in the Imperial Valley and 8,305 in the Salt River Valley to the total of52,785 palms recorded and mapped in these valleys during the last six monthsof 1928. (See S. R. A. 97. p. 97.)The virtual completion of the reconnaissance work and the fact that manyof the recently 'appointed inspectors now have enough experience so that theyare able to work independently, have made possible an enlargement of theintensive palm-inspection program. A total of 169.973 palms were thus ex-amined during the first six months of 1929 as compared with 70,630 during theprevious half year. Nevertheless, only 362 infested palms were found ascompared with 1,228 for the last half of 1928. The difference is largely in theImperial Valley of California where a number of heavily infested propertieswere discovered in the fall of 1928 and the palms destroyed, or pruned andtorched.An important factor in the improved conditions has been the adoption ofthe policy of destroying abandoned and uncared-for palm plantings by pullingout the palms with tractors or having laborers dig them out. A total of16,987 palms were so destroyed during the 6-month period, consisting in themain of slightly infested seedling gardens without commercial value.The outline of field activities given in Table 11 indicates the progress inthe scale-extermination operations. It will be noted that in the CoachellaValley, 218 palms were found infested. Over half (120) of this number were on one property, newly found infested in April, and almost all the palms in thatgarden were destroyed.TABLE 11.-Pamn inspections, date-scale-eradication project, January 1 to June30, 1929Arizona CaliforniaItemPhoenix Yuma Coachella Imperialdistrict district district ValleyPalm inspections.-----.---------------------------------------15, 198 6,935 144,540 13,300Infested properties found -------------------------------------10 0 1 21 57Infested palms found and treated or destroyed ------------------32 0 218 112Palms located on reconnaissance survey --------------------8, 305 -------------------325Of the 21 properties on which infested palms were determined in the Coachella district during the6-month period, 7 were reported as new infestations.WHITE-PINE BLIST'ER-RUST QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENTPINE SHIPPING PERMITSUnder the revision of the white-pine blister-rust quarantine regulations whichbecame effective August 15, 1928, provision was made for shipping 5-leaf pinesfrom New England or New York or Washington State into certain other infectedStates when the trees are grown from seed under specified sanitation conditionsfor protection from the blister rust. One New England applicant for such apermit was found to be growing pines under those conditions during the pastsix months and a permit was issued to his nursery.NEW STATE LEGISLATIONThe State ol Michigan declared the cultivated black currant a public nui-sance, under public act No. 313 approved by the governor on May 24, 1929.This act also authorizes the commissioner of agriculture to set aside certainareas for growing white pine, and other areas for the culture of currants andgooseberries. Minnesota has also enacted new legislation under which thecounnissioner of forestry a1d fire prevention is authorized to designate blister-rust -control iroas within that State.TRANSIT INSPECTIONThe inspection of nursery stock in transit resulted in the interception of 138violations of the white-pine blister-rust quarantine during the 6-month period

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192DJ SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61ending June 30, 1929. Of this number, more than 55 per cent were shipbyed 1ypersons having no previous knowledge of the quarantine restriciois. Sxty-two per cent of the violations by commercial concerns, and 80 per Ccft <, tlwveby other consignors were moving by parcel post ani most of the remainderwere shipped by express. Violations by nurserymen decreased from 131 in the spring of 192> to (1 during the present season, a decrease largely due, in allprobability, to the modification of a former regulation which required the lubel-ing of containers to show contents. One shipment of black currants fromCanada was found in transit in violation of Federal quarantine No. 7 pertaill-ing to the importation of blister-rust host plants froi foreign countries. Duringthe course of inspection, one of the inspectors at Chicago intercepted a shipment of Pinus pondero.sa disea-ed with a rust known :s PTridc riiimi u harkniesiwhich is not believed to be established in the eastern Uiiited States. The ship-ment was consigned from a Pacific Coast State into New York.State inspectors reported 7 violations of the blister-rust quarantine and 2 ofthe narcissus-bulb quarantine, while Federal inspectors not regularly engagedin transit inspection found 13 violations of the former quarantine and 1 ofthe latter.Table 12 summarizes the violations of the various domestic quarantines inter-cepted by transit inspectors during the first six months of the calendar year1929.TABLE 12.--Shipmen ts intercepted by white-pine blister-rust inspectors, January 1to June 30, 1929CnxnlerNoncontComnerI Nomanl-Quarantine vial merial Quarantine cial mercialuippers shippers shilppwr, shippersNo. 3.--Black stein rust -0 No. 66.-Asiatic beetle .4 No. 43.--Eiuropfin -orn bcrer .21 violations of hoth No. 4% awlNo. 435.--Gipsy moth and No. 66.----------------------brown-tail moth.-.-.-.17 Violation of hoth No. $2,No. 45. -Japanese beet I 3 2 Pink bollworni, and No. C ,No. 53.-Satin moth --11 Thurberia weevil.---------No. 62. -Nareissus bulb .--. 1 37-No. 63.--Whito pine bliser Total ------------------1244rust-------------------. 1 77In addition to the figures given in Table 12, the transit inspectors at NewvYork City stopped 19 intrastate shipments moving in New York in violationof the Jipanese-beetle quarantine established by that State to protect its Un-infested areas. Shipments found moving in violation of Federal quarantines are systematically turne(l back, this practice in itself often constitute 1!U, 11( smallpenalty, at least in the case of cooniercial shipment 7. 1ProseeutiotiS : nre aIsoinstituted when the situation justifies that action.Table 13 gives tfli number df shipments inspected at the various stations.TABLE 13.--Shipwcuis bi.pected for violations of Federal quarantines, January 1to Junc 30. 192)Station rIss right Ts Fa]('hcag--------------------------------------1l:t2 2,3I a7 22,MKansas 'City --------------------------,15 s,2Om1aha and Council llul ---------------------------71 3 10, 97New York -------------------.4,42 7 -St. Paul----------------------------29,2 7s 7 37, 042St.er---------------------------------------------I 1,-i_0 ' uDenvcr-----------------------,-4T 5:i 5, 0APortland----------------------------------------2071ett-----------------. --------e .~ 20. wsSpokne-----------------------------------------1~w .2w 4; t,3~Total--------------------------------------40,aw r;ou K; 4> o;-4

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62 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSASIATIC-BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 66)INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,Washington, May 10, 1929.POSTMASTER.My DEAR SIR: There is inclosed for your information and guidance a copyof Quarantine Order No. 66 of the United States Department of Agricultureon account of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle, effectiveMarch 15, 1929.The conditions governing the movement of nursery, ornamental, and green-house stock and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers or other portions ofplants for ornamental use, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, areclearly set forth in regulation 5 of the order, and all postmasters concernedwill be governed in accordance with the instructions contained therein.Under the provisions of paragraph 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regulations, parcels containing any of the articles mentioned in the preceding para-graph may not be accepted for mailing from any of the areas quarantined inthe order unless the articles have been inspected, certified, and marked asrequired.Sincerely yours,R. S. REGAR,Tlird Assistant Postmaster General.DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PLANT REGULATIONSINSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, 1Washington, April 9, 1929.POSTMASTER,Washington, D. C.My DEAR SIR: Inclosed herewith are copies of the revised rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products and other quarantined articles into and out of the District of Columbia, which became effectiveApril 1, 1929. The purpose of th's revision is indicated in the press noticeattached to the regulations.Kindly see that all stations of your office receive proper instructions inregard to the enforcement of these revised rules and regulations and furnishat least one copy to each station of your office.If additional copies can be used to advantage they will be furnished uponrequest.Sincerely yours.R. S. REGAR,Third Assistant Postmaster General.JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,Tnuni AssISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,Was hington, April 10, 1929.PosT1wA\sTv1:.Mvy DEA Si1: Tlire is inclosed for your information and guidance a copyof notice of quamtr, ille No. TS with regulations (sixth revision), on accountof tie J.Apnese eetle, xliicih became effective February 15, 1929.Yo t careful a:t4('ltion -, is invited to the introductory note from which it willbe Se:(i t)h it t he rVolt1u1 tedi irea has been considerably enlirged, that the ship-

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1929] SERVICE AND RkEGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENT> 63ment of farm products from New York City is brought under the saie oert ilication requirements as apply to the remainder of the main regulated area, andregulations 5, 6, and 7 have been rearrangedl in the interest of ,implification.You are requested to see that all requirements of the quarantine order arecarefully observed at your police. See paragraph 1, section 467, Postal Law.and R regulations.Sincerely yours,Third Assistaiit Postma.Yrr GeneriINSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE DISINFECTION OF NURSERY PRODUCTSFOR THE JAPANESE AND ASIATIC BEETLESF. Q. C. A.-224. APRIL 16 1929.At the request of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. theBureau of Entomnology has subimitted recommendations on the disinfectionmethods to be employed for the elimination of the Japanese and Asiaticbeetles from nursery stock aml" other plant materials as well as from sand,soil, earth, peat, compost, and inanure. These recommendatiions have been-eviewed by members of the administration staff and found satisfactory as abasis of quarantine enforcement. They are therefore submitted for your -uid-ane in carrying our treatment& as a Ibasis for certification under quarantines48 and (.All treatments herein described fall within the methods authorized underthe uarantine regulations, except those providing for the temporary disinfec-tion of soil plots, coldfranes. hotbeds, etc., with carbon disulphide or naphtha-lene. These treatments have been authorized by the administration under theemergency existing in certain nurseries in the spring of 1929. but are iot to heemployed in the future except on specific authorization of the Chief of the PlantQuarantine and Control Administration.Whei impr( vements in the methods described in this paper are developedas a result of experience and experimental work, they Will be incorporated ina (ilendments or revisions of these instructions, and are not to be employed as abasis of certification until so authorized by the administration.C. L. MARLATr,Ch icf, Plant Quarantine and Control Admini.t ratin.DIsTVINFECT1oN OF NURsE-vRY PODUCTs VOR THE JAPANESE AND A>IATIC BEEfLEsPrepared by Walter E. Fleming, entomologist, Japanese beetle laboratory,United States Department of Agriculture, Moorestown, N. J., March, 1029TABLE OF CONTENTS.Introduction ------------------------------------------------------632. Disinfection of soil in the absence of plants 4-----------------------------A. Potting soil.--------4---------------------------------------------------------1. ('arbon-disulphide fumiigat ion -42. N aplhthalene -. -.-.-.-----.tea ..---------------------------------I .5and, peat, I(Ompost, and Iainu --re 65C. Soil plots, coldfraimes, hot be--661. Le--arsenate---.-.-.662. C arboni l ide *.,!a I -----------663. Carb tn-tisulphide tiil I --ui I664.N aipth!i 't-ne .-----------------.-. .673. I)isinfeeli woI of 11u 1b ut 1h1 rtu, :f t iant 67A. 11efong infestatin by \a\i g with wa tr 67B. flot w-rC. Carboii-diuv I hid,Im u ilt d1). Cartoniuluhd,m ii n i eld timrtalun t 694. Directions fur tr ating diff r,unt nrsery plants 7A. Pi)Itt grnt~ house pl it 72D. 0-aid i tu -a nt al trco-F. Narrmwltaf .r r'ncri1. INTI t 1) IUCT1INThe iminittire st1,,h.s of tile Japiiiese beethe, Popilliel J/ttia N n1uusually cause little eoio11lic hmige y f ding on he riot iA the Ii tlrent'VaIrieties of llurlsery plai1ts. h'lle atduult, hivevwr, i4 I ree(o.( ize' .11;Um

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64 # PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,pest. In view of this fact and of the limited distribution of the pest in theUnited States, it is desirable to prevent its artificial dispersion as much aspossible. As nursery products are shipped to distant points, they are amongthe most dangerous agencies for dispersing the pest.Research has been conducted at the Japanese beetle laboratory for over eightyears to develop methods for treating nursery products so that they can beshipped into uninfested areas without danger. Most of this work has beendone in cooperation with the nurseryman immediately concerned with theproduct to be shipped. Because of the cooperative nature of the work it hasbeen possible to obtain a large amount of information on some varieties whileit was possible to obtain only a limited amount of data on others.This paper is prepared with the object of presenting the latest technical in-formation on the disinfection of various nursery products infested with the immature stages of the Japanese beetle. The term " disinfection " in this papermeans the destruction of the immature stages of the beetle by physical or chem-ical treatments.Introduction.-The information is presented, for convenience, under the fol-lowing headings: 1. Disinfection of soil in the absence of plants. 2. Disinfectionof soil about the roots of plants. 3. Directions for treating the different nurseryplants.2. DISINFECTION OF SOIL IN THE ABSENCE OF PLANTSInfestation may occur in potting soil, in soil plots used for bedding plants,in frames, and on greenhouse benches. The following methods have been de-veloped for disinfecting soil under these conditions.A. Disinfection of Potting SoilInfested potting soil may be disinfected by fumigation with carbon disulphideor with naphthalene, or by beat treatment. All of these tretments are effectiveand do not impair the soil fertility when applied as recommended.A. 1. Fumigation of potting soil with carbon disulphideMaterial.-A technical, C. P., or U. S. P. grade of carbon disulphide should beused to fumigate soil in which plants are to be grown. CAUTIoN. Carbondisulphide is a dangerous chemical. The vapor is inflammable, and is explosivewhen mixed with air. At a temperature of 297* F. it will take fire spon-taneously. It should be kept away from fire of all kinds, and from hot objectssuch as electric light bulbs, heating coils, steam pipes, etc. Lighted cigars, ciga-rettes, or pipes should never be brought into the same room. These facts mustbe brought to the attention of a responsible person at the nursery before thetreatment is applied to the soil.Equipment.-The fumigation must be done in a tight box or bin, which maybe made of metal, wood, concrete, brick, stone, or other material providing thetop, sides, and bottom are gas proof. It should be of a size adapted to thequantity of soil to be treated. Some convenient sizes for treating small quanti-ties of soil are shown in the following table:TABLE 1Capacity Depth Length Width Capacity Depth Length WidthFeet Feet Feet Feet Feet Feet2 cubic yards 3 6 3 7 cubic yards .--. 3 9 73 cubic yards 3 9 3 8 cubic yards ----3 12 64 cubic yards 3 9 4 9 cubic yards -.-. 3 18 4.55 cubic yards 3 9 5 10 cubic yards 3 18 5(; (ilhi( yard 3 9 6Condilioa of 8Odi.-Soil of any type may be fminigated with carbon disulphide,providing the soil is friable and is thrown loosely into the box. It should bedry or only moist ; wet soil must never be treated.TemperaturCe.-The effectiveness of treatment with carbon disulphide de-pe11(1s, to a large extent. upon the temperature of the soil. The higher the

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1929] SERVICE AND IREGULATOB.Y ANNOUNCEMENTS 65temperature the more readily the vapor diffuses through the soil, and the moreeasily the immature stages of the beetle are killed by its action. The tempera-ture must be at least 45' F. when the 1reatnlent is applied. It niust not fallbelow 40' F. during the course of the treatment ; otherwise, it will be iec ssaryto treat the soil again to insure destruction of the immature sIages of thebeetle.Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be used at the rate of 1 pound, or 350 cubiccentimeters, to 1 cubic yard of soil.Application to soil.-Any quanutity of soil may be fumigate< d, providing thecarbon disulphide is distributed uniformly throughout. One method is to treatthe soil while the box is being filled. PIlce 1 inch(-s of soil loosely in the box:inject carbon disulphide at the rate of 176 cubic centimeters for each squareyard of surface, distributing the material tIniiormly ill holes 2 iliehes deel, and18 inches apart, 44 cubic centimeters to each hole. Fill the holes with soilimmediately after the L quid is injected. When the first 18 inches of soil hasbeen treated, put in 18 inches more, and 1reat it the same as the first. Thiscan be repeated until the box is filled. Another method is to treat the soilafter the box has been filled. This is done by making holes from the surfaceto the different levels, so 1hat he carbon disulphide can be applied in the s>ae positions as by the other method. The liquid. in this case, must be poured intothe deep holes through a tube to insure its reaching the proper level.Period of fumigation.-The box mu4t be sealed, and 1cft undisturbed forat least 48 hours.Storage of soil.-The soil must be stored under such conditions as will proven,reinfestation.A. 2. Treatment of pottiing soil with naihthaleneMat(rial.-Flake naphthalenie firee from tar must be used for fui gal oti.CAUTION. Naphthalene will burn. It must be kept away from fire of all kiuds.Equipmemt.-It is not necessary to hav a speciall fumigation box ill whie-to treat soil with naphthalene.Condition of soil.-Dry or moist soil of ainy type may be treated with1 iiidv-thalene. Wet soils can not b ' Ireated satisfactorily.Temperature.-The ffectIveness of tOw tren tlmntME depends to a larg xntupon the temperature of Ole soil ; the higihwr Ihe teniperature Ihe imre -1ff etiVthe treatment. The temperature itiK ive' 1r e allowed to fall below ' F.Dosuge.-Five pounds of llhike Iim11i telne mt be -(:<(A to a 1Ae r f : fsoil.Aixing.-The success of Ile reamenit ilptnds t0 a ltrge ex(ent vi mhthoroughness with which th filakos are mix d with 1 h soil. Sprea thie flak'.on the soil and mix hiroughily by shoveliing over at lealit 1ihree 1imes.Period of funigalion.--Soil must be it inst red for a we kc aftrtreatment.Storage ' of ,oil.-The soil mulst be stored udeb r sltiJ 0. editiolis a will pr -vent reiinifestation.A. 8. Treotml ii ' I11ting -zoil wiih st1 imEquipineW.-It is neces ar, to Live a boiler 1 hat will gceintre al 111supply off ste mi under 70 pounds '111r ; 8id etiilient for Irowprly dpersing the sleam 1 rouighoi th Soil.Condition of soil.-Soil of any type n:y be iutri ized with ste:li, Jridilinit is fri able.TFCmfll)r.1.urtl~fl Thle so4 nmrt h ie hted fhr Iiont to :1 t empIrm il ;Period of tr"( nut a f (7 he til i erll i Iure iu11t Ihe v.it ailed Fr : liinutes alter it 11:< reneiled 1:"W F. f t llilt II UsStorage Of Nuil. Altr (''1reaR m1* lt withI steam, lii. muo I1Be >t or;d alit IhVn lMO 1s to prevon rr'linte'tiol.B. I)i.inf ction of Sawl, Soil. 1 .I P'1, (om;,\ and lJu u, .J .Thle oily disinfection Im;t liodih rized ml,. 1r0 a. 7: .(i rOZ ( I: a hfor tie certificationl of saId. Soil, eapth l. 1, e;m;l L , 81n I m111 1 r IhiIme 0t outs-3de Ie reg lated Ireas 4,:l (is Jl l f1mi :tion. 1n ml yin1802917-30-3

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66 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,this method, follow the detailed instructions given on a previous page for thefumigation of potting soil with carbon disulphide.C. Disinfection of Soil in and Around Plots, Coldframes, Hotbeds, etc.Soil in and surrounding plots, coldframes, hotbeds, etc., which is used forplunging pots or heeling-in plants. must be disinfected by treatment with leadarsenate as prescribed in section C. 1. Under special conditions on specificauthorization from the administrator in field charge of the Japanese beetle and Asiatic beetle project, fumigation with carbon disulphide, carbon disulphideemulsion, or naphthalene may be substituted for the temporary elimination ofinfestation.C. 1. Treatment with lead arsenatefaterial.-Use powdered acid lead arsenate. Condition of the soil-The soil must be friable and in good tilth.Season.-Treatment must be applied before August 1 if the land is to beused that autumn.Dosage.-Lead arsenate must be applied at the rate of 1,500 pounds to eachacre, or 35 pounds to each 1,000 square feet.Application.-Plow and harrow the soil until it is in good tilth. Mix thelead arsenate with ten times its volume of dry soil, sand, or other fillers, andapply with a fertilizer drill, or broadcast it by hand. Harrow the soil well, asa thorough mixture is essential.Period of treatinent.-As lead arsenate is a stomach poison which has to beeaten by the larvT, it may take several weeks before all infestation is elimi-nated. Do not plant, heel in, or plunge plants in soil poisoned with lead ar-senite until at least eight weeks after treatment.C. 2. Fumigation with carbon disulphideMaterial.-A technical U. S. P. or C. P. grade of carbon disulphide shouldbe used. Carbon disulphide is explosive; observe the precautions on page 64.Equipment.-A tarpaulin or other air-proof cover must be provided, to coverthe soil after treatment. Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be treated providing it is friable.Wet soil must not be treated.Tempcrature.-The temperature of the soil 6 inches below the surface mustbe at least 450 F. when the treatment is applied. If the temperature fallsbelow 400 F. before fumigation is complete, the treatment must be repeated.Weather conditions.-The ideal conditions for treatment are a warm, humid atmosphere without wind.Season.-The treatment must not be applied when adult beetles are present.An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.Dosag.--Carbon disulphide must be used at the rate of 6 pounds or 2,100cub'c centimeters to 100 square feet of soil surface.Application .-Carbon disulphide must be uniformly distributed throughoutthe upper ( inches of soil. Apply it in holes 12 inches apart and 1 to 2 inchesdeep, putting 21 cuibic centimeters in each hole. Fill each hole with soil im-mediately after the liquid is poured in. Complete the treatment as quicklyas possible, covering each section with tauaUlin as soon as it is treated.Period of fuinigation.-The soil must remain covered for at least 48 hours.C. 3. Treatment with carbon disulphide emulsionMi[lcri l .-0y ")' per cent miscible carbon disulph ide is to be used for thistre'atI iieit. Tllis muiist be prepared accordini1l to the foirmula recommended bythe Jaop 1nse beelle ] aloratory aid published in the Journal of Industrial andEngineeriigy ('11i St, )llimIe 20, 1 : ges 8-49-,50, August, 1928. Miscible(.,I HaI distiulhide when diluted with 1 water forms an emulsion. CAu'rION.Miscible (arbwl djisl Iphlide mid carbon disnlpide eimulsioi are ilillaniable.S;e caution (i pni e G4.Iuivau'/.-Tvenid r-gage galvaniizetl-iroi co~llrs )10 inches wide an.dnot l tll1e tt fIet squla'rQ are Ineedo(l r applyifog 1ohe emulsion. Suitabletalks, barIre's, or Itubs for prejiring I hi solutioI Should be provided.Co,,diti"w of Noi/. Aniy Iype ()I Sf111 iiiay be treated by tiis method. Thesurface mu1sl h level 'inid not distmnbed by recent cultivlion. The drainage

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S 1 J j!"' "l f I NU .a I: sf >.) p JI I 1 I00.1plt t 0 1 1. 1 ' \\ f I A ) I \\ '' I oj" H al ,l m l I ! 1. 1) v)(1 1)[11~t ) j, TI'\ N~ .l .~ 01 Iit *u ,11tL) 1 \ ' I iJ )T i lp m ' 1"ip im p pol j'.,II t fU Sl\ lo~ i: U'[ 1j 11 ) 11811. I 0 ~d' .f jt iltT! 111io * Ufd 01 'ffl/r 011 lit?)I~s1t i j U I .1 ( ) IS VIi ' 0,1 0 1 111111 I)f) d 1 O it o'.)lT IT1i. 011 Io I o.) *il If. TI! 1011 d 1)J&?'1 .T'I lT~ ) 111),' 0! I I lfINIT!)j >411:JT ).AI! j " ~ U.~, 1;11,14 )1111,T~ po ',1fl I fI Iu j'dl~~~~~~~~~~~~ itT. 0 I 1~UII ~I~[~fIi~lI i1 u 11 .TU -."u1()AI), il .0:f1T1 i mp J,1111oJo~~ ~ s~oA l:fai ' ''' .1 TO \ 11A 8!0 JO I' A JOI 1 10'~ 1 ) ,t I ti ot 1 f 1!8tilI)0 I'll Ii I v .T 1 , ]0IIIA ),I Ol IUti j' k\ II [v i I *SpIls 'I Jo l 1,111 l i l .lfl)')d T,)III p ZII 1Jd l 1111).1 'I 10 .i) 01 )1 :8 i )IIIp~ Id8ff(1 S)Ai8{ 11{)U ~ p(diii l~.aAIoJ i1\ I() vld Jo).j i 3 1110)A (Lip -,J p911 O "1 1' [f11 J~ si'l " l(t ( /)0 d ]L ",)I hI111:.1 ) o.j o dilljlj ilIIA\l P.) iiI4,dUiIiil { )II})u{ \II Iu .a I A)-i~~d '(10,1 1T J111 '>011111 1I lO8 sA lwI1 )II I p8)1 s i.ou 01 Jo 1110 j 11t" I*. 1I ~ A\j.I~pui:P~ 111!li.t? til .hA IX i ljJ)j fiqd~ m11 ) JO di fl l .!.I 11 o) III, .t I)/fUf'9'71""' N oo.1811f08 00 )( Sum~i JoITI~l.,)10 0118 *~I 1 0111 *J 01Th I '4 1 111 p )0>11 l .1 481111 I() l1Hl111 iia -)II Inm!1TI~ I I .1O S 10,1 LI-1111 bA0 111 110S AO' 11L:18 8 {AIf 1)14811 0Tall~.I lo tillu~p v a udolp, po 011 IO t)(.I SaIP l Of 01 4,111 A PTlVd 011111ig limm Jo polu t 10-,I )I{ 1 \1 ll)!A' p m* Iloo o df Jil / u D.I ldlUoL'j-I 0,Ir I ) 1 1!111 'sou I iI{) i'.)If.X\, i.HP oh: 09ll f711 JO411 i I IdI V0 11M --MPUT, *01)~pt*I 011 JOAO 1 1'.) 'I! lTlo I() 1 11111 S11dx. s 0II~J ) 1014 '8jll p-I111 801 )IWI1 X8>0 101I I 'AU21 0 10S ")II Moll Put11 mill 0-1lpJji 4 dUt'1A00.1 oauIfT11. 0(()f z.1)(I u s1i l/u 1r.7;p p e 0 a j!m 8 AII 40Opd~IAa~' I -dii I 10 II''98 If1TA IX!11 18,liJ I, UdIto i{. dio( ll 7U'pi0J1 >il1fi 1 S-opi l 0UJO.J \XXXI 1iOl ,, P111018 I0.l klto,0 iI'' JI ThIIITI 11 0 1 l-IJ NflI2 tU~-11' .j .1 V1.1 1>11' JO T(l10: I) l )11 11)xa(."1 I,811.T o I) !tlf -To8 10'. ' '8.1 1). Jo f I i1lliAX 0111 ' IIN jill(t 1111m ijilm l isi ln 110mu 0111)t I l''t~)P( i 01US1H~I O'l Oil III!.) >;Ldx\ ZIIA 10~.I,) 'f-iI lmm li p I~~o 11 l8 o~'i11i"1:p.110.1 Oif1>1111 j 8 1 fif"'!J sI III TIl:0.i4 11) ),ti 0J)(I StAm w0lo. olp'.j j8 .ii 18III I.1 I JO I 1 11 'p Q s 1 I s 1) 1 I)11[ 1 'd!I Il T fA i-4l stf Tim)", T11 1118110 0 1ls o", fiII Ajuou a 0 0 i9 88O1 J .V l.l(iI iI-jdl1I.dIU.,jjos Wj 11,11 I)Tl' O tj )til -,O plu , fl01m,uhf ~ oII,)I ill I"11 118 Of if f.(. o s 011 48hik1 pI1 ST 0114 oaop -[,,TI "(-)t m1 0 l

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68 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [AprilTune,B. Treatment itch Hot Water.Iminersion of the roots in hot water is a simple, quick, and effective methodfor destroying infestations in the roots of certain nursery plants.Equipmnc.-It is necessary to have a water tank equipped with a suitable heating device, and a system for circulating the water in order to maintain auniform temperature. Equipment for drying certain plants after treatmentmay be required.Condition of plants.-Plants are usually most resistant to hot water whenthey are dormant, and most susceptible when they are growing vigorously. Itis therefore recommended that treatment be applied only when the plants aredormant or semidormant.Tcmperature.-The water must be maintained at a temperature of 1120 F.for the entire period of treatment. If the temperature falls blow 111.50 theinfestation may not be destroyed; if it rises above 112.50 the plants may beinjured.Period of trcatnent.-The treatment must be continued for 70 minutes afterthe root masses are heated throughout to 112' F.Preparation for treatment.-A large proportion of the varieties which aretreated with hot water have roots nearly free from soil. All excess soil mustbe removed, the roots pruned, and large clumps divided as much as possiblewithout injuring the plants. Small plants. bulbs, and root stocks may bepacked loosely in wire baskets or in other containers providing water can cir-culate through the masses. Large plants must be placed individually in thewater. Before the plants are immersed, thermometers must be inserted withthe mercury bulbs in the centers of at least three of the largest clumps, baskets,or root masses of each variety, and must be left until the end of thetreatment.Application.-The roots must be immersed completely. The temperature ofthe water may drop for a few minutes after the plants are immersed, but itshould soon come back to the required degree. A record of the temperature ofthe masses of plants and of the water must be made every five minutes as longaz the plants are in the water. After the masses are heated to 1120 F. thetemperature must be maintained for 70 minutes.Care of plants after treatment.-The insecticidal action of hot water is com-plete when the plants are removed from the tank. The way plants arehandled after treatment may seriously affect subsequent growth. Bulbs andtubers should be dry when packed for shipment. Plants should be cooledslowly to room temperatures. Plants should not be removed from the hotwater and heeled in cold soil. Pot the plants, or set them in the ground assoon as possible after cooling to room temperature.C. Carbon-Disulphide-Enulsion DipMaterial.-Use 35 per cent miscible carbon disulphide. See page 66. CAUTION.Miscible carbon disulphide and carbon disulphide emulsion are inflammable,and the same care should be exercised in handling them as in handling carbondisulphide.Equipment.-Metal or wooden tanks or tubs in which the plants can betreated at a temperature of 700 F. should be provided.Condition of the plants.-Dilute carbon disulphide emulsion is least injuriousto root when they are dormant or semidormant. Treatment should be appliedduring the dormant period of the variety to be disinfected.Teniperature.-The temperature of the dilute emulsion must be maintained at approximately 70' F. If the temperature falls below 650 F. the treatmentmay not be effective; if it rises above 70* F. the plants may be injured.Dosaqe.-Miscible carbon disulphide must be mixed with water at the rateof (35 cubic centimeters to 10 gallons.Period of trea(11)nWt.-The roots must be immersed for 24 hours.Preparation of treating bath.-Mleasure the tank, taking the distance from the hottoim to the surface of the water as the depth. Determine the capacityfrom TaYle 2 or 3, f1n(d measure out 05 cubic centimeters of miscible carbondisulphide for each 10 gallons. Pour this into the tank, and stir until mixed.Do tot mix with a mechanical agitator or stir too violently, as this causeslosses of carbon disulphide. Mix just before using, and do not make up lessthan 10 gallons at a time.

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19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69TABLE 2.-Capacity of rcCtanyuiur taH k'Capacity in gallons ifCapaity n -Length Width Ieth W dTh(feet) (feet) 1 foot 2 feel 3 (t 1 ffet 2 feet feetdeep de p (deep dp Ie) de2 2 30 60 90 712 41 42 1'-52 -2 .47 4 141 IS KN ,3 37 L l% 12 9 1,6 7 I,42 1 4 7 9 .1.4 4 1210 '14o 0i~ 602 67 1/2~41, 412 151 :-J2 4,53 11 7T 1. ;2 r,7 34 5U 0. 0~2 ~ .15 Y2 V2 9 t) 0 11 12 9~ .6// 61 3B 6;1 12 12 1, 077 2, 174 ,7 7 367 734 1,1(1TABE 3.--Capacity of cylindricl takCapacity in gallons ifCapacity in gallons if-Diameter ---Diameter(feet) 1 foot 2 feet 3 feet (feet) 1 foot 2 feet 3 feetdeep deep deep deep deep deep2 24 72 718 3302 37 74 111 S 37( b 1, L3 53 10 159 12 424 1.2-31 72 144 21( 9 476 92 1,21 94 18 282 9 2530 1, (16; 1, (14V2 119 2:; 3 10 i 1, 176 1,5 147 2 4 .44 1 1 0 64S 1, 2 ! 1 ,4 I5J 2 178 376 534 11 711 1,422 2, IJ6 .11 422 633 11 777 1, 554 2, 16 / 24N 496 744 12 S46 1, 62 2,57 21 76 864Preparation of plants.-This treatment is not effective when the soil :boutthe roots is too wet or compact, or when the d(iamlieter of the ball is more than6 inches. The temperature of the plants should be at le ot ' F. at thebeginning of the treatment. Shake off the loose soil. al prune the roots asmuch as possible without injuring the plants.Application.-The roots must be immersed completely.Care of plants after trci nictt.-The insect idal action is colnljie 1 lienthe plants are removed froim the sotillion. The slwLest itn inai-en ' a efor handling plants after Ie hot-wai er treatielnt '-hIubl be MloweiD. C'arbot-di'.aph iduewt /i(ld tr miintjlfatcrial.-Use 85 ;er cent lil cible cirbo diIlpide. S ( la' t)d. C oIw.Miscible carbon disIlphlidLe ald carboli disutlphide emnulsionl are 'iitimmalQ,and the samC lIVe 1h(Mud be exercied ill haIndling them e-, ill 1iandiliinvibodisulphiide.Equipmefn .-Strips of 2 -ga e galvaiized-irin 10 illclie's wvide :id of theproper length aIe required. (S ( Tablo 4.)ll F 4. izc of c.9)/(fr12iches orless-K .14 n14 inches -118 inc e. ---------" -i20 i-ces .-.------i22 inches ---------36 iC

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70 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,Condition of plan ts.-Dilute carbon disulphide is least injurious to roots whenthe plants are dormant or semidormant, and treatment should be applied atthat time.Dosage.-The dilution depends upon the temperature of the soil during the 48hours following application, and may be determined from Table 5.TABLE 5Minimum Misciblesoil temcarbonperature 6 disulphideinches beper 10 gal-low the Ions ofsurface water*F. C. c.40-50 9750-60 8160-70 65The concentration of the emulsion must not be greater than is necessary, asthis may injure the plants.The dosages which must be applied under different conditions are given inTable 6 or 7.TABLE 6.-Do8age for circular collarsMiscible carbon disulMiscible carbon disul-Dianphide Diamphideeter of Water eter of Watercollar 40-500 50-600 60-700 collar 40-50* 50-60* 60-70*F. F. F. F. F. F.Inches Gallons C. c. C. c. C. c. Inches Gallons C. c. C. C. C. C.12 2.0 19 16 13 33 15.0 146 122 9715 3.0 29 24 20 36 17.5 170 142 11518 4.5 44 36 29 39 21.0 204 172 13721 6.0 58 49 39 42 24.0 233 195 15624 8.0 78 65 52 45 27.5 267 233 17927 10.0 97 81 65 48 31.5 305 255 20530 12.0 116 97 78TABLE 7.-Dosage for square collarsMiscible carbon disulMiscible carbon disulLength phide Length phideof side Water of sde Watercollar 40-500 50-600 60-70o collar 40-5050-600 60-700F. F. F. F. F. F.Inches Gallons C. c. C. c. C. c. Incles Gallons C. c. C. c. C. c.12 2. 5 24 20 16 33 19. 0 184 154 12415 4. 0 39 32 26 36 22.5 218 182 14618 5. 5 53 44 36 39 26. 0 252 210 16821 7. 5 73 62 49 42 30. 5 296 247 19824 10. 0 97 81 65 45 35. 0 340 284 22827 12.-5 121 101 81 48 40.(0 388 324 26030 15.5 150 126 101Tnctaperal Io'c of the soil.--!e[igi treating in the spring when the minimumSoil teimiperntiulre at a tieptlh of ( inches remtains above 400 F. using 97 c. c. ofmiscibl ca)rbt4n disilphiide to 10 galons ol water. Wheni tie lminiuill soiltemliperalletire ot this deptli reiiains above 50 F. decrease the concentrationto 81 C. c. to 10 galon101. When tile mflinlimluill soil temj)erahure remains above60* 1. decrease t11he coiceiinition to 65 c. c. to 10 gallons. In the autumn, asthe millin11Ul I teiliperathire of (He soil (lecreases, it: is necessary to increasetile coCellt ration il the opposite 'e order. Troatmient itist be discontinuedwiei the minimlm soil tell)erature at the G-inch depth is below 40' F.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71For the treatment to be successful the temperature of the soil dtiringthe48-hour period of treatment should never fall below ttlhe minimum teimperaturefor the dosage being used, as shown in Tables 6 and 7. A iap has beenprepared of the different townships of the Northern and Middle Atlanticseaboard States, based upon data frot the United States Weather Bureau,and which indicates the probable dates when the soil temperature at a depthof 6 inches will not fall below 40' F. The inspector should obtain from theCamden office information oil this point with respect to the area in which he isworking. The dates f ir the minimum temperature are shown ill Table 8.Treatment may be started on the darte given in the first column, and thedosage should be changed accordingly.TABLE 8.-M imuIM temperatures datesSpring temperatures Autumn temperaturesZone No. -----400 F. 500 F. 600 F. 600 F. 500 F. 400 F.1---------------Mar. 4 Apr. 19 May 19 Oct. 11 Nov. 4 Dec. 112.----------------M Xar. 11 -o ----do------do.-----.-(,o-Do.3--------------M -tar. 19 Apr. 27 -Mav 27 Oct. 4 Oct. 27 Nov. 274-----------------M -mar. 27 -.do -----do-------dodo---Do.5.---.-.-.-.--Apr. 4 M ay 4 June 4 S t. 27 Oct. 19 Nov. 196----------------. Apr. 11 May 11 June 11 --.o ------Do..-----------------Apr. 19 May 19 June 27 Sept. 19 Oct. 11 Nov. 118----------------. .Apr. 27 do -----do----Sept. 11 Oct. 4 Nov. 49-----------------ay 4 May 27 July 11 :Aug. 27 Sept. 27 Oct. 2710-------------\ ay 11 June 4 July 19 Aug. 19 .do Do.The inspector must keep an accurate record of the mlinlimmllIl soil teilperat uresat a depth of 6 inches throughout the season. An accurate theritinieter gradu-ated in at least single degrees must be used. The temperatures luist be tztkenbetween 6 a. lit. aid 8 a. im. each morlinA in order to obtai ii the mlinimumn lnm-perature. This must be done iii tle nu1eiy phl ts (r bwds from whih theplants are being taken. If the soil tPmprature in the spring has not reached40* F. by the date in column 1, treaty eilt lutist be delayed until this point isreached.Preparation of plant for treatment t.-R-lemove all weodl an dbris fromi tihesoil about the plant. Tie low haiigingilbranirhes so they will n1 4t dil ini to thesolution. Level the soil. After tile >ize of the iiat4s of >il to be lifted has borndetermined, place a galvanize(A-iron collar about the plant anl or ii 8 inchesinto the soil. Tel(, size of the collar to be Se is shnil il Table 1. Firi thesoil carefully oil eanh side of the metal.Application.-Measure le diamieter of the colir, Iid froum Tablh G #r 7 thenumber of gallons of Waler anid tle biio ceallimiielers of misrihle 1hndisulphide required, and mix with a stick. Pour into lie roar, av idil2 plash-ing or vneressary disttirbice of the soil.Period of Irca/nirnt.-Tie rullar and tie soil muniit lnt lhe diVturblvld i1Ir TShours. The J)lait mivit be duili betw( el t wo a lid five 11y1 after r1lea I lnnllt.Hiandlinrj af/cr trcatni t.Th plait 111ty be 11 a mliaole (1 ordin tothe usual nursery practice, except that no soil outside of the ollar iuit betaken Up with it.Condition unfarorablc for treatment. AI( ln iillsidcs havii. a slope ofmore than 1 inch to 10 iicirhs it is practically impos ible to di tito the -oIl-tioli uniformly over lie (1rfa)e. 2 lit oiy lold it lfily 1w imp.ble toplace the collars ill lie sil. ( I ardp:t ():r a li-h wator t ble may i ethe solution to soak too slowly into he round. It* lihe Si dlutimn dnl !,tnt P1 we-trate within five hours treal lnit will pru hly hr itieffect ive. I L)\'eeivelyfree 10railge, mule holes, or plalit I ha hi:vi e been rowe tlv rai laitt maycause abnornimlly rapid penletratiwn of whe s(l41it .If lhw li hm dio-pears within 10 iiilut es :fter atpi u in the ltrimioy 0 hle ti 'ti 111t .ry11. DIRCTIONS FOR TITMi \NT ( uP [F1E1iN VI \\ IThe disinfect ioll of soil aiout t Ie roits of nursery 1! -1' t. ii' he pr11 o1destroyiilg the inima mture sti-es of Ja paiese and A it heet les iK Ny o ill, iltbecause the iiseel s a ri ill rlnse proximiti y ti o N I; v l able living pl it ii \N wllhi ! m:

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72 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTrOL ADMINISTRATION [April-Junebe easily injured. Several hundred species of deciduous, herbaceous, and ever-green nursery plants have been treated under as varied conditions as possible,to determine the safest methods for disinfecting each species. It has been foundthat insecticidal treatments may be applied safely to the roots of nursery plantsonly when the plants are dormant or seinidormant. If they are growing vigor-ously, serious injury may result. Normal. well-nourished plants usually with-Qtand treatment when weak, poorly developed plants may be killed.A. Potted green house plantsThere is no safe and effective method at the present time for destroying beetleinfestation in the soil of potted plants. The infestation may be removed fromsome plants by washing all soil from the roots and repotting in disinfected soil,but this is not recommended for general practice.The nurseryman who desires to ship potted plants should take every precau-tion to have both soil and plants free of infestation at the time of potting.After potting, the plants should be grown in properly protected frames or housesto prevent infestation.B. Hardy herbaceous plantsMany hardy herbaceous plants may be disinfected in commercial nurserieswhile in storage during the dormant season. These plants may be divided intothree groups, according to the method by which they should be treated.Washing the roots.-Infestations can be removed safely from some species only by washing all the soil from their roots. Among these species are thefollowing:Aconitum californicum.---------..-.----------------------------Monkshood.Aconitum fischeri-----------------------------------------Azure monkshood.Arenaria balearica ..---.------------------------------------------Corsican sandwort.Arenaria montana -.----. .------------------------------------------Mountain sandwort. Aubrietia deltoidea------------------------------------------Common aubrietia.Artemisia abrotanum ---.----------------------------------------Southernwood.Artemisia vulgaris (lactiflora)-------------------------------White mugwort.Bellis perennis ---. ...---------------------------------------------English daisy.Boltonia asteroides ----.--.-----------------------------------------White boltonia.Calimeris incisa --_-------------------------------------------------Calimeris.Campanula persicifolia.-.-.--------------------------------------Peachleaf bellflower.Centaurea dealbata.---------------.---------------------------Persian centaurea.Centaurea macrocephala.-----.--------------------------------------Globe centaurea.Centaurea montana -------.-----.---------------------------Mountain-bluet. Centranthus ruber (Valeriana coccinea; V. rubra)------------------Jupitersbeard.Chelone glabra ---------------------------------------------White turtlehead.Chelone lyoni ----------------------------------------------Pink turtlehead.Chrysanthemum sp ------------------------------------------Chrysanthemum.Delphinium sp --------------------------------------------Larkspur.Digitalis lanata --------------------------------------------Grecian foxglove.Digitalis purpurea -------------------------------------------Common foxglove.Erigeron coulteri --------------------------------------------Fleabane.Festuca qlauca ---------------------------------------------Blue fescue.Gaillardia aristata (grandiflora) --------------------------------Common perrennial gaillardia. Gypsophila paniculata ----------------------------------------Babysbreath.Gypsophila repens -------------------------------------------Creeping gypsophila.Hibiscus moscheutos ------------------------------------------Common rosemallow.Hypericum calycinum ----------------------------------------St. Johnswort.Hypericum moserianum --------------------------------------Goldflower.Ligularia clivorum (Senecio clivorun) ----------------------------Giant groundsel.Malva inoschata --------------------------------------------usk mallow.Monarda didyma -------------------------------------------Oswego beebalmi.&enecio pu/cher --------------------------------------------------ruguay groundsel.Sidalcea candida --------------------------------------------W ite prairiemallow.8ilene schafta ----------------------------------------------------scafta catchfly.,tachys grandiflora -------------------------------------------Big betony.Stachys lanata --------------------------------------------------Woolly betony.Ytatice arieria (Armeria cephalotes) --------------------------------Common thrift.Statice artneria (Armeria maritima) ----------------------------Common thrift.Valeriana offici nalis -----------------------------------------Common valerian.Washing the roots or hot-water treatment.-Some species of herbaceous plantscan le treated successfully both by washing the soil from the roots and bysubmerging, while in a dormant state, in hot water. The species marked withan asterisk can be subjected to the hot-water treatment without danger ofinjury ; the others are less resistant, but may be treated if sufficient care isexercised.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 73Achillea filipendulina. .... ..---------------------------------------Fernleaf yarrow.Achillea ptarmica.-. ....------------------------------------------Sneezewort.Achillea tomentosa.-----------------------------------------Woolly yarrow.Ajuga reptan . ........--------------------------------------------Carpet bugle.*Allium schoenoprasum.-----.-------------------------------------Chive.*Amsonia tabernaemontana (salicifolia) --------------------------Willow ainsonia.Aquilegia chrysantha.-. ..---------------------------------------Golden columbine.Aquilegia flabellata -----------------------------------------Fan columbine.Aquilegia skinneri.-. . ..----------------------------------------Mexican columbine.Aquilegia vulgaris.---------------------------------------------European columbine.Arrhenatherum bulbosum -.------------------------------------Tuber oatgrass.Aster novae-angliae ........----------------------------------------New England aster.Aster subcaeruleus -.---.-------------------------------------------India ast er.*Astilbe dazidi (arendsi).-.--------------------------------------David astilbe.*Baptisia australis.----------------------------------------------Blue wild-indligo.Clematis heracleaefolia daridiana ------------------------------F ragrant tube clematis.Clematis texensis (coccinea) -.----------------------------------Scarlet clenmatis.*Coreopsis lanceolata.-.-. .----------------------------------------Lance coreopsis.*Coreopsis rosea .. ...---------------------------------------------Rose coreopsis.*Dahlia spp.---------------------------------------------------------iahlia.Dianthus barbatus. .-.---------------------------.-------------S weet-w illiam.Dianthus chinensis-----------.-----------------------------C hinese pink.Dianthus deltoides.--.---.-------------------------------------------Maidvn Pirnk.Dicentra formnosa.--.------------------------------------------West ern beelingheart.Echinacea (JRudbeckia) purpurea -----------------------------------1Le >-:-oneflower.Echinops ritro. ... ....--------------------------------------------acel gwlo ci iiistle.Elyrnus glaucus .------------------------------------------------Wild-r y e.Eryngium maritimum . .-. . ..--------------------------------------Seahliv.Euonymus radicans _-_ .. ...----------------------------------------Wintercreeper.Eupatorium urticaefolium (ageratoides). ..-------------------------Snow thoroighwort.Euphorbia corollata ----------. ---------------------------Ilowering s lrgCe.*Filpendula (Spiruea) polinata _. ..--------------------------------Siberhin 1eadowsweet.*Filipendula (Spiraea) ?iinaria. .....--------------------------------Eurepeii wadowsweet.Geun baulgaricuin .-. ..------------------------------------------Bulgarian averns.Geuin chiloense (coccineu m) ..-------------------------------------Chiloe avens.Ileleniaun hoopesi _ .--. ...------------------------------------------Ora-jige sneezeweed./Ieliopsis helianthoides.--.--------------------------------------S unflowe r heliopsis,Heliopsis scabra _ __-_ ...--------------------------------------------. _o.gh heliposis.*1osta carrulea (Funkia laineolata). .----------------------------ilue piaril ainlily.Ilumulus I plus _. .....-----------------------------------------C'mnIon hp.Iberis semperrirens _. ....-----------------------------------------Evergreen canidytuft.*Liatris pycniostachya ---------------------------------------------('attail gayfeather.*Litonin m latifolium (Statice latifolia)----------------------------Bigleaf seaiavender.Limoniun mataricum (Statice tatarica).------------------------------.T:iri:n sea-lavender.Lychnischu lcedo icta--_--------------------------------------------.-.lal.Ie O.Lychnis ( igrostemmum) corowaria ._----------------------------------oe aiu11.Lythruim sulicri. -.---.-.-._-.--------------------ure seri.Alentha rotundifolia ._---------------------------------------------A beW .Mentha ,pic(ta.------------------------------------------------------earw ifll.Aierembergia riyularis . ..------------------------------------------WhitctIl.*Pentstemon barbatus ------------------------------------------------Pnt no.*Pentstemon laerigatus digitalis (P. digitalis) ------------------------ove penteon.*IPhalarhi arwndinacea -------------------------------------------e r griss.*Phlox aimoena -----------------------------------------------------mi -h k.*Phlox maculata (P. decussata) -----------------------------------ilhA Pl*Phlox paniculata ------------------------------------------------r loPhysalis fra ncheti ----------------------------------------------L:ni Iou err.Physostegjiu virginiana -------------------------------------------\ : iei: ea*P0lygp tJ I miz comifl p aCtU Ill ----------------------------------------------Polygonuim1/1 CUSipidatUmi (ieboldi) ------------------------------iw e -he-el-wer.Potentilla sp -----.-----------------------------------------------Poteriu otusa .;----------------------------------------------------' ;r .liudbecl:ia lacinita. -------------------------------------------------( C .lurI I udlitkia maxima-------------------------------------------------(r iI(lfki qouos.----------------------------------------------ur.Suponariu ll Imid5 ------------------------------------------------l{1mIdcbios CUSCI -----------------------------------------------1CiS jpOiCa------------------------------------------------,S'a i .f(((bie-------------------------------------------------------------ll pilhiu p oliau -----------------------------------------i~o/~/quu/L.si~o----------------------------------------------------1 4 ~knklSli o bicolor-----------------------------------------------.Soida--------------------------------------hicrum c --------------------------------------------r.lirm it rnu\--------------------------------.-------hicr nin -------------------------------------------rue.Idca cocci -------------------------------------------SI1radesca)i ilai u )---------------------u iril zeri-------------------------------------T--ri/o,-ia (.\lonthr-ura t-T--unic s ra ------------------------------------------ur.I~ctjucuicuia--------------------------------------------------\~i K\rlVi-ro Ii Ic i~ i u, pr i.V veronica l, fi(la--------------------------------------V~eronicri Trep5------------------------------rj I .1\ll.Veroni c picU/a-------------------------------------1/e'oaicu sj)Uriu (amnc/hys/iovi) ----i ii u elI.Veronica l/UCiU .-I ---il------------------------u029'! 7 -I

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74 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,Washing, hot water, or carbon disulphide dip.-Hernerocallis dumortieri. .--. ..-------------------------------------Early daylily.Hemerocallisfulta. ....------------------------------------------Tawny daylily.Hemerocallis citrina.--. ..-----------------------------------------Citron daylily.Iris cristata -----.-. .-----------------------------------------------Crested iris.Iris germanica ---_ -------------------------------------------------German iris.Iris japonica -.---.--.----------------------------------------------Fringed iris.Iris ochroleuca .----. ..---------------------------------------------Yellowband iris.ris pseudacorus ----.-.-------------------------------------------Yellowflag iris.Iris sibirica. .. ...-----------------------------------------------Siberian iris.Paeoni a spp .--.--.----------------------------------------------Peony.Rheurm spp. . .. ....-----------------------------------------------Rhubarb.Small fruitsThe only small fruit which has been treated is the cultivated blueberry,Vaccinium spp., which can be disinfected by submerging the roots in hot waterwhile the plants are dormant.C. Deciduous Ornamental ShrubsThe soil about the roots of deciduous shrubs can be disinfected safely onlywhen the plants are dormant. In this state, they can be treated successfullyby washing the soil from the roots, by dipping in dilute carbon disulphide emul-sion, and by treating with carbon disulphide emulsion in the field. The follow-ing species of shrubs may be treated in this manner:Amygdalus (Prunus) persica. ._.-_ .---------------------------------Flowering peach.Azalea mollis ...--------------------------------------------------Chinese azalea.Azalea pontica. ..-------------------------------------------------Pontic azalea.Berberis thunbergi. ...----------------------------------------------Japanese barberry.Buddleia davidi -.-. .--------------------------------------------Orange-eye butterflybush.Callicarpa purpurea -.----------------------------------------Chinese beautyberry.Calluna vulgaris -. ....-------------------------------------------Heather.Calycanthus floridus ---.----------------------------------------Common sweetshrub.Cercis chinensis (japonica). _ ..------------------------------------Chinese redbud.Clethra alnifolia. ..--------------------------------------------Summersweet.Cornus alba _. ......-----------------------------------------------Tartarian dogwood.Cornus florida. ......---------------------------------------------Flowering dogwood.Cornus stolonifera ..---. .------------------------------------------Red-osier dogwood.Crataegus oxyacantha --.----------------------------------------English hawthorn.Cydonia japonica ---.-------------------------------------------Flowering quince.Deutzia gracilis ........--------------------------------------------Slender deutzia.Deutzia lemoinei. _ .....-------------------------------------------Lemoine deutzia.Deutzia scabra -. .....---------------------------------------------Fuzzy deutzia.Elsholtzia stauntoni. _ ..-----------------------------------------Elsholtzia.Euonymus alatus . . ._------------------------------------------Winged euonymus.Euonyrmus europeus _. .__ .----------------------------------------European burningbush.Euonymus japonicus . ....----------------------------------------Evergreen burningbush.Ezochorda grandiflora ..-. .---------------------------------------Common pearlbush.Forsythia suspensa ......-----------------------------------------Weeping forsythia.Forsythia suspensa fortunei (F. fortune) .------------------------Fortune forsythia.Forsythia viridissima ..-. ._.----------------------------------------Greenstem forsythia.Ilalesia tetraptera .... ...------------------------------------------Great silverbell.Ilamamelis virginiana --.---------------------------------------Common witch-hazel.Hibiscus syriacus . ..-------------------------------------------Shrub-althea.Ilydrangea arborescens _._ ...--------------------------------------Smooth hydrangea.Hydrangea opuloides _--_.-----------------------------------------_ _o.se hydrangea.Ilydrangea paniculata. .. .....---------------------------------------Panicle hydrangea.hydrangea quercifolia .... ...---------------------------------------Oakleaf hydrangea. hlypericurn calycinum. -.-------------------------------------.--.St. Johnswort.hlypericura devsiflorum. . --. ..--------------------------------------St. Johnswort.Hlypericuin patulum .-. .----------------------------------------Japanese hypericum.Ligustrum ibota ......--------------------------------------------Ibota privet.Lespedeza bicolor .......-------------------------------------------Shrub bushclover.Ligustruin otalifolium -------------------------------------------California privet.Lonicera fragrantissina -------------------------------------------Winter honeysuckle.Lonicera ledebouri -----------------------------------------------Honeysuckle.Lonicera morrowi ------------------------------------------------Morrow honeysuckle.Lonicera talurica T-------------------------------------------------tarian honeysuckle.Malus atrosaguiea -------------------------------------------------Carmine crab.Malus floribunda ------------------------------------------------Ja)anese flowering crab.Malaus ioensis ---------------------------------------------------Prairie crab.Malus iedzwetzkyana ------------------------------------------------Redvein crab.Malus scteidckcri -----------------------------------------------Scheidecker cral).Mauls Npectabilis---C------------------------------------------------Chinese flowering crab.Pihiladelphus coronarius -----------------------------------------Sweet miockorange.P'hiladelphus grandiforus -----------------Big scentless inockorange.Philadelphus vivalis ----------------------------------------------Snowbank mockorange.Prunus cerasifera -----------------------------------------------Il yrobalan plumi.Irunus glandlosa --------------------------------------------------Double pinkilowering almond.P1runus triloba --------------------------------------------------Flowering plum.

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1929] SERVICE AND EGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTs 75Rhodotypos kerroides-.--...--------------------------------eRhus typhina --.-a-.-..-----------.----------------------.-rn Su CR osa spp .-. .----.----.-.------------------------sSarmbucus canadensis --.n.e.der-----------------------------.c e .er.Sambucus nigra -..-..--------------------------.Euro; n elder.Sambucus pubens --ar--..-.-der---------------------------ar e l r.Spiraea billiardi.-----------------.---------.-----------------Billiari r(aSpiraea buamalda ..---.-------------------------------------------Bu ra.Spiraea dougl:si-.---. .--------------------------------------------DOUA irca.Spiraea japoi-a .--------.-------.----------.------------------n raSpiraea reu t iana..-.-.------------.-----------------------------:r-a.Spiraea sempcrjlorens_ . ..----------------------------------------Pr etu s~irea.Spiraea vanhouttei-----------.------.-------------------------------Vanhot e spreStyrax japonica------.--------------------------------------------Ja ; anese Sno'ell.Symphoricarpos racenosus.--------------------------------------(o:mion snow berry. Symphoricarpos v ulgaris ...-------------------------------------(Woralerry.Syringa japonica --.-.------------------------------------------Jaj anese tree lilac.Syringa josikaea . . ..--------------------------------------------Iungarian lilac.Syringa vulgaris.----------------.-.----------------------------Comaion Ilac.Tamarix gallica indica (T. indica).---------------.-----------------French tamari'Tamarix hispida..-------------------------------------------Kashgar tamnarix.Taimarix odessana..-------------------------------------------(dessa t1:narix.Viburnum sT) -------------. -----.--------------------------Vilkurnuin.Weigelia (Diervilla) anmabilis ..-.----------------------------------Eose N eigelia.Weigelia (Diervilla) rosea------.----------------------------Pinik weigelia.D. Deciduous ornamcn tal treesThe following -deciduous ornamental trees can be disinfected successfully bythe methods recommended for deciduous ornamental shrubs :Acer dasycarpum.---. ..-------------------------------------------Silver maple.Acer japonicum. . .. .. ..--------------------------------------------Fullmoon maple.Acer palmatu .. ...--------------------------------------------Japanese ma ple.Acer platanoides ---------------------------------------------Norwavy mtaple.Acer rubrum. .-----------------------------------------------I.ed aple.Acer saccharum ----------------------------------------------'ugar ma ple.Aesculus hippocastanum. ..-------------------------------------horsieihestnut.Betula ala -.--.--------------------------------------------------Eurol ean white birchCatalpa bunge.-----------------------------.---------------Manchurian catal paFagus sylvatica.-.---------------------------------------------Euro; ean beech.Fraxinus ornus. ... ... ...---------------------------------------------I. lo ering ash.Liriodendron tulipifera. ....--------------------------------------T ulipitree.Magnolia acuminata.---. ...----------------------------------------(ucuniertreeMagnolia glauca -.-.-.-------------------------------------------Sweethbay.Morus alba .-.-.--.-.-----.-.------.------.-.-.-.White mulberry.Platanus orientalis ------------------------------------------Euro ean jlanetree.Quercus palusTris. .------------------------------------------Pin oak.Quercus rubra -----------------------------.---------------Connon red oak.Robinia hispida.-.-.----------------------------------------------. se-aacia.Salix bab lonica. -.----------------------------------------------yon eping willow.Sorbus aucuparia. .....-------------------------------------------Euroi rn nountain-ash.7ilia to mentosa.-. .. .. ... ..--ivelinden.7iia ulgaris.-.-.----------------------------------------------Common linden.Omits americana -----------------------------------------riian elm.E. Broailuaf crorgrencisThe soil aboilt tlh (, dS of the folhviiig b)lh8:f r ultm he disinl-fectel Only by treating with car-bon disulphide eitiulsioni iii the field. Thisshould be doiw ill early sprin. or iii the tiihinthe 111ioinim um soil tem-Peratiure is between 40* and .50* F. at a depth of ' iieles.Abeliu chinn is-----------e aAzalea a ena ------------------------------------------Am na a.AZale( hi noedgir h nodiqir-I 1n0 1eu a1ale.Azalea nd ica--lulivatal.Azalea obtua uiaa ------------------------------------s ala.I uSi 'empeireo (-n --------------------------------------U uC.otuneasber horizontalis----------------------hul mikclneater.lex crenut--------.: neme Lulix.Keal 1 mIa laioll--hillhl, -w-o ----l-ureL-Pachysandr terin -I -----------Ja---n-a-dr .Pyraca nthet CCCCinei "rIeI 0r--l-rn.Rhododendron Call tbienuse----I-I,------h ----r---ndr-n.rhododendron muxi-u---rn-rin.F. Xarroriclca I; (rr'l/ nThe following narrowlieaf evergrIeeT s cn le disitlt !w ill it tihdd oly! vithcarb)On disUlpjhide emuljlsiOjI UtiIIl'r the 1dile miti l s!:td flr bromd-leaf evergreens.

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76 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,Abies c icica ----.--_-------------------------------------Cilician fir.Abies concolor -. . . ..---------------------------------------------White fir.Abies homolepis --------------------------------------------N ikko fir.Abies nordmanniana-. ..----------------------------------------Nordmann fir.Juniperus chinensis ----------------------------------------Chinese juniper.Juniperus communes. . . .. ..----------------------------------------Common juniper.Juniperus excelsa. . .. ....-------------------------------------------Greek juniper.Juniperus horizontnlis -_---------------------------------------Creeping juniper.Juniperusjaponica ..-----------------------------------------Japanese juniper.Juniperussabina-------.-------------------------------------------Savin.Juniperus squamata -.----------------------------------------Juniper.Juniperus virgin iana . .. ..----------------------------------------Red cedar.Picea canadensis . ....-------------------------------------------White spruce.Picea excelsa . .. . ..----------------------------------------------Norway spruce.Picea pungens. .. .. ..---------------------------------------------Colorado spruce.Picea rubra ----.-----------------------------------------------Red spruce.Pinus contorta __. ...---------------------------------------------Shore pine.Pinvs densi ora ----.-.-.-.----------------------Japanese red pine.Pnvs rno ntana ....--------------------------------------------Swiss mountain pine.Finns nigra ---------------------------------------------------Austrian pine.Pin us pungens--------------------------------------------Table mountain pine.Pinus resinosa ..... .. ._---------------------------------------------Red pine.Pinus strobus ... ..---------------------------------------------White pine.Pinus sylvestris _-_--------------------------------------------Scotch pine.Retinosnora filifera ..-----------------------------------------Thread retinospora.Retinospora obtusa -.------------------------------------------Hinoki cypress.Retinospora pisifera. .....-----------------------------------------Sawara retinospora. Retinospora plumosa ......----------------------------------------Plume retinospora.Taxrus baccata _ ......---------------------------------------------English yew.Taxus canadensis.------------.----------------------------Canada yew.Taxus cuspidata .-.-------------------------------------------Japanese yew.Thuja occidentalis ---.---------------------------------------------American arborvitae.Thu ja orientalis . ...--------------------------------------------Oriental arborvitae.Thuja plicata _. ....----------------------------------------------Giant arborvitae.Tsuga canadensis. ......-------------------------------------------Canada hemlock.JAPANESE-BEETLE TRAPS SET IN AREAS OF LIGHT INFESTATION[Press notice]JUNE 19, 1929.The appearance of small green buckets on iron supports and on trees through-out the District of Columbia and in Arlington County, Va., during recentweeks has aroused much interest. These buckets, placed by the United StatesDepartment of Apriulture. are Japanese-beetle traps designed, when properlybaited. to attract and catch the beetles as they emerge from the ground inJune .nd July after their triansformation from the white-grub stage.Tbe first capture in these traps occurred June 11, which, according to thePlant Quarantine and Control Administration of the department, is an earlyrecord for the occurrence of the beetle. On June 17. 55 beetles were taken inthe traps in the Arlington County infested district.Th infestation in Washington and vicinity, as indicted by the records madeduring the last two summer, is believed to be of resent beginning -nd was lastyear confined substantially to three districts, namely, a scattering infestationextending from the north end of Potomac Park througlh the Capitol Grounds toa point drectly east of the Washinton Railway Terminal. The second moreheavily infested district was in the extreme northwest in the area near thejunction of Wisconsin Avenue and Elliott Street. The third important infested(IiStrit was southwest of the Potomac Ya-(rs1 Terminal bet ween St. Elmo andRoucmnont in Arlington County, Va.li addition to these districts a few other isolated points of infestation werenoted last year. Two beelles were found in lhe White House grounds. 1 beetleliear Ile ild ersection of New Jersey and Massaclmsetls Avenues, and 1 beetlea lew blocks south of Brightwood. With the except tion of the findings in thePofonae Ytrd in Arliiigto iiCuty and along Wisconsi Avenue. tlie numbersof bC s Found at any point were fronm one to a half doz -n-iln a few instances(xcei( dil K ' i hat. nd at olie poiilt e sI of the WA'hin-iion Teriina 1, 15 beetleswere I llen. Aliout 100 h(ectlI('eS 1otOlhe. wvere found last year in I-he city ofWashingt on 1nd as many more in Arlington County, Va.Tile plUpese of tihe traps is lo attract a:d Ceptur as many of the beetless possilde folI wi11 their emergence, witi the object of reducing the spreadof the pesY or possibly, although tli:it is scarcely lo be hoped, to effect itseradi(eitioll ill Ile WA;slilgt o1 section. Such trapping in a new and isolatedI rca of in Iest at ion. as ill Ile case of Washington, should be of special valuein t h mel there are no beetles in surrounding territory to replace those caught

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77and killed in the traps, and therefore reduction of the future bi etle IopulaaIt Twill be in direct proportion to the eiiciency of the method.Similar trapping will be carried out by the Plant Quaranltine and ControlAdministration at a number of other isolated points. For Mary land ;hescinclude Baltimore, Cambridge C ty, Frederick, and Jagersiown-a single beetlewas found at Hagerstown and two at Frederick. Additional outlying pointsare Marysville and Sayre, Pa., Hartford and New London, Conn., and Spring-field, Mass.These traps have been developed as a result of experimentation extendiigover a number of years conducted in the heavily infested Japanese-beetle areasin New Jersey. In such areas in the perit d of be tle abundance it is p-sibleto collect a quart or more of beetles in a single night in one trap, aid witl1many traps in an orchard beetles may be collected in enornus numbers.To have any great benefit in effectively controlling tih pest in areas of heavyinfestation it would be iiecesary for all propl:rty owners to piace traps aiun-dantly, otherwise the few ind vidual property owners utilizing the traps woul1by the same means, attract the beeties from adjacent proerllies and anyadvantage might thus be ni re than offset by newconers. As already indicated,in outlying points such as those mentioned, this objection does not adhere andevery beetle killed is a reduction of potential increase in population duringthe breed ng sea'-on of June, JUly, and Augut. The bait used in the.'e' trapsis geraniol, a manufactured product which is a very powverful attract anit ltothe adult Japanese beetle. 6o far as knwiwn. this bait is Hot attractive toother insects. Te public is urged to respect these traps anld give thein thefull opportunity to do tieir job of control work.MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY QUARANTINE (No. 68)MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY DISCOVERED IN FLORIDAApim 12, 1929.The Mediterraneaii fruit fly, ani extremely destructive pest of frui is advegetables, has been discovered in Oranzige County, Fla., at points il ald a7jcentto Orlando, according to an announcement is-ued by the Denartient of Agri-culture to-day.Immediately on the confirimation of the dis-over., Doctor M rlwt. ehief ofthe Plant Quarantine ind control dtiinistntioin of the depart enlt, went toFlorida and is working in full cooperation with tile state ofliei1ik.Growers and packf rs are cool Prat ll,wh ilie Stthe i 41 a:. >i ce titediscovery no Ningerouins friuit or. prodc s likely to carr v1e 'c> ha e b eeallowed to move from infested orclmards ol packing hOU'N Steps IYe a Imelybeen takeni to clean tip ill iiihsted 'r1ves am1 p.,kii. pLans.The Florida State Plant Euard is to-day mwelinm at G:ine-vi1Ie, Fli., ani itis aiti jpaled 1 Rht bi t el bin wil1 be fI bowed ' an LI1n!e01i1 (4 tlleradicatiwi program.The Secrtary of Agricnltmure tai y aoh i lunimetid a public lieorinz to 1, hlmJat 1" a. m., April 22, b',foe the PlaNt (n:lrantine Ia Cmt OlAti 'and Federal PIIt Quant Inc Br 1t l0 KI) New Y rk Av1nl. N\\W. \\' :imfon, D. C., to consider the ot*lvi-ality of quarinina im Side tf FIdU uLaccount of tils pos! d O f ri'trid nnt r p 'hiihi: t le m-rmid -Lt W, p h plum1s, grIapel'ioit, u:: a all other lo-t! If iimien fuma ihat S-ad orfrom alry district terein.AThe M, iterrneai firit 1Y Is thlie mn-o1 wi1l y iq ribu:el :1, dn IeTe:fruit fl kniown anl ucur's in mamiv ptlanes ini lhi tip>e :ia suK ttte of iN'ew :i1nd ()l1 World. ierctfre l lm1s nol 1ime1 etIy into th' lnited Stoles.It aittaleks :1 1:irge Variety of lruitK inmuludlinL inlotii, :ITO a i'e Peltd m ihi'-of VV2 etabtles.NOTICE OF Pl IC IIEAIING TO (ONqDER TL A)VIS\tLTY OF \rU \n\'TiI' (;TilE STATE OF FLORIDA ON ACCOU NT OF THE MI)ItE'RANAN IUUI FLY\\ 1 N. VMoN, I) .( 1 pt v, r'yThe, S re ry o; Agklricullur h sIt.,h im te3edtra ea m l((erI/i/is. cuapitir, a damimit i i iiU in\w to :iud ntt hii't'om'n \\k hll ytwilt or dist riutmllcd wi lii '1d iI hr ugioi 1i-ii i S111f hi! s o rcc 'I Idiscovered ill ci utis grves in ()Ir e Cuniy, Fl.

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78 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of quarantiningthe State of Florida and of restricting or prohibiting the movement of peaches,plums, grapefruit, oranges, and all other hosts of this insect, from that State,or from any districts therein.Notice is, therefore. hereby given that, in accordance with the plant quar-antine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congressapproved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), a public hearing will be held before the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration and the Federal PlantQuarantine Board of the United States Department of Agriculture in the officesof the administration at 1729 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C., at 10 a. m.,April 22, 1929, in order that any person interested in the proposed quarantinemay appear and be heard either in person or by attorney.ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.FLORIDA TO BE QUARANTINED ON ACCOUNT OF THE FRUIT FLY[Press notice]APRIL 24, 1929.A Federal quarantine restricting the movement of fruit and certain vegetablesfrom Florida to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly, recently foundestablished in parts of that State, will be issued within a few days, or as soonas the requirements of the plant quarantine act can be complied with, it wasannounced to-day by the United States Department of Agriculture.Considering the presence of the pest a serious menace to the entire fruit andvegetable industry of the United States requiring emergency methods of control,the department has asked Congress to authorize the transfer, for use in fightingthe fruit fly, of $4,250,000 from the unexpended balance of a special appropria-tion made on account of the pink boll-worm which is available because con-ditions have prevented its use for the original purpose.In the meantime, Secretary of Agriclture Hdye has authorized an " emer-gency" transfer of $40,000 to provide for the preliminary steps which have beenand are now being taken to control the new pest.The intensity of the infestation, according to the department, indicates thatit will be necessary immediately to determine fully and accurately the area in-festedl; to destroy all fruit in the infested area; to clean up infested groves,involving the spraying of the trees to poison the adult flies, and the destructionof pupae in the soil; to trace shipments of fruits which have been made fromthe infested area ; to determine whether the pest has been distributed to distantpoints by means of infested fruit ; in view of the uncertainty of the extent ofspread within the State, to provide for the inspection and certification of allfruits and of all host vegetables moving out of Florida ; and as a further pre-caution approved by the representatives of the citrus industry of the State, toprohibit the movement of culls from all portions of the State-in other words,to limit shipments to graded and boxed fruit moving in refrigerated cars.The Mediterranean fruit fly occurs in many tropical and subtropical countrieswhere it causes enormous damage by its attacks on a very wide variety ofhosts-both fruits and vegetables-represented by such important commercial crops as oranges, grapefruit, plums, peaches, grapes, melons, squash, beans, etc.In addition to these important crops it also attacks guavas, mangoes, certaincherries, and many other tropical and subtropical fruits and vegetables grownin varying quantities in Florida and other parts of the United States. Thispest injures the fruit or vegetable only and does not attack the plant. Theeggs are deposited by the adult within the host fruit or vegetable, hatchinginto maggots which feed on the pulp until full grown. This pest breeds withenormous rapidity, a single female depositing upwards of 600 eggs, and inwairin weather there imay 1, a new generation every month, or even oftener.In IHawaii from 15 to 16 generations occur yearly. This fecundity makesposs ble within a single season the entire destruction of the crop.The department has for many years enforced a rigid quarantine againstfruits (1nd vegetables from the Territory of Hawaii, and in more recent yearshas enforced fruit embargoes against several foreign countries in which thefruit fly was known to be established. Further, fruits and vegetables fromall foreign countries are now admitted at ports of entry of the United Statesonly after inspection.

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19291 SITICE ANI LEGUtLATO!'Y ANNUINCE-MENT>7While the Mediterranean fruit fly is largely a subtr-opical pest, i Itively abundant cver such ranze in the M1editerralnean rgin otif EuLw> t adin parts of South America, Australia, and South Africa as to ind;ete Iheprobability that it would thrive with us at least throughout the C en B tand the citrus-producing reg oni of Catliforiiia, Arizona, and New 'x .well as Florida.Immediately upi 11 the (dscovery wf the fruit fly il Florida, C. L. Marflat t,Chief of the Plant (uaraitine and Cintrul Administration. ipoceeded to thatState to get first-i and iiiforiiati on of thle colldit iws :1id to o te withthe State officials in a phln fur a calinainIl of e:adicatioin agi l!, teV Pest.The State of Florida bad already bgUn vigiroms action ii owing the dis-covery of the pest an 1 its detierminaticn byoi I State a])d Federal a uthbnrities' afew days before. TIhe State plant 1 ld has r;aw moIb1 ilized iti i entire person-nel-with the exceptioni of its port guardian--in the infeted area. Con-siderable forces of Federal men were immediately called to aid in 1 he workfrom the 'Mexican fruit wrm and cotton projects in Texas. aid expertswere placed on the ground to aid in the supervision and determination ofinfested fruits.Ill the matter of funlds. tlie State (of Florida, ill addition to its currentappropriations. released an emergelnev finl of .~0,00. making it immediatelyavailable. It is alvo expected that a furtlher fund totaling at least S1,(iUwill be made available by the State appropriation for regulatory :nel eradieauinpurposes for the biennium be-iniiinii July 1, 11)20. At the present time, as aresult of the s('outin carried (ut by Sttate and Federal men, the insect lasbeen fouid ill wilat see,,l to )e iiTrelv beginiliuii polilts of infestaition insome seven counties. lIowever, i ll (a>U has any initense or geiteral infeta-tion been found at such ,utlyin points.The State dpant board pr mntull'ated a qua ranIti ne April 15 covering all ofOrange al d Sittminole C( mmties, aii1 pnrt if Lake (onty ; in other words,the district tiat was the kiiown to he lifted Lcy the pest. Prompt actionhas ben takell. however. with respect to ilie conltrl of all later determinedoutlvinl poitits of ilnfestation. Ti (uaralntitne uohibits the movemttt iit (dthe quarantined artia of :all h1 ts atid is V igiI eln1orced by 111 State militia,a portiont, of which it as beien 4i rVere out Iy th lie geiovern ar at the re uest ofthe State plant board.The concern which the inRv\asion o The Mel iter'iUeal frutit flv Vt aru-eithr'ougout the United ShateN was indicated by the large ittndlace at theplid' l'aritt April 12. r t eof itporltatit Ussoci'tis of traitt(vegetable ,rowers (I' tIhe Unil ed Stzltewet e ipreselt, together withmuembe' of ('otaress re(0eetim itaav of th e Slate interestcd in fruitawlvgea l prOduictionl. .11 11!y loeiding r o cr itnd rpresen "O~t ves (,.tiaIt' ta)1 tiOn I c('lli 11ies <>f the so h ea tern lii d Si at s were :l ri' seilt.E'xIre~ssioi i dcnterI a11d ree-t that th uliS he dI oNe by St ate 1aFederal Oautcies tO itali cut tlli 1'-t Ore rceivel :lso ly teleraiit antletter from .thcr Sitn S a ill iiit ee'sted lB ie4 illd pctrs aIi.MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE ISSUEDTrhe Seecre~tarv of A1rilitirei tttcuiced -Lld Ihe prt tLattion () I, iua1nitiine 1li teveit tille ''prtad oI tilt, di'c'c>Vti\ clu e lre ll N dic li' rr':te'tli trait ivYinf'station iFloridla.While the ej1ta1ii i e lI 1 t'giila t b t I oi 1 tnieler re'tIriot iot e titeof Florida as a wlwoii he. a; to all frn it. at a i wlit ed 111iit1()i f ' 'lcdwhich are ;tls'o alt ; ickelI by the 1lY, v r hcele ttletr 1 the''e r. i ti' i iO 1 mt o fthe fruil of Flhe'ida a ith racia lly all 4f it vtc NableN \ill he etmiut Ito 1110 U(t of I le Stlate a ider wha lre b1lI vd i e :ide'ita I e a to ditet t'The regnlatiolls h1a\ we'ee dils-, ed idl 11i nd ultreled to iiict V a' i 0 1SUggs! lls cf thle State P it (Iher I4 Fl'idai and l ' le:il ii crw ''4trlsport't: iot ollicer. of te ptitcipt l ("1111110 e1r1 i w n n tirn l in p cl1Noventeits frot floida.Pentdiig :Ictiol by ile State li nt b rii c id 1i 1rio lie State' t ii' afitime' .th restrictions i slider I his pI:1 ra tili m 1e iniiiee diIe'lyv el ff ci a ' It Ilhellre'ls desi"'natedl as infrestod ill the g11rn!i. 1irT'ilillated A}'ll 10by that board, and to 'uch addl ional Iinfli te ' oI n 1" 11ve bwlen lite d(-e

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80 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,mined and are being controlled by the State plant board. Except as tothis provision, the effective date of the quarantine is May 1, 1929.For the purpose of this quarantine the State of Florida will fall into threetypes of zones, namely (1) the infested zones, (2) the protective zones, and(3) the State as a whole outside of these two types of zones.Infested zones will include the orchards determined to have been reachedby the fly and surrounding properties to a distance of at least 1 mile. Withinthese zones all fruits and vegetables are to be destroyed or processed and nomore are to be permitted to develop until the zone is released from restriction.The protective zones will include all properties within 9 miles, surroundingthe infested zones. These zones are to be adjusted to natural boundaries.Within each protective zone all groves and all plantings of host vegetableswill be given intensive inspection but the fruits and vegetables will be allowedto move under certain safeguards and restrictions in interstate commerce,Within this zone, however, there will be maintained a nonfruit period of atleast six months beginning on May 1 each year, during which no fruits orvegtables in a stage to be attacked by the fly will be permitted to remain ; inother words, all fruits ripening on orchard trees will be removed before theyhave reached a stage to be attacked by the fly, and no vegetables are to beplanted which will mature during the period. It is anticipated that for theseason of 1929 host-free conditions within the protective zones will be com-plied with in full by the end of May.This annual nonfruit period prescribed for the protective zenes will be sub-ject to such adjustment as may be necessary to meet any seasonal variationand to meet any needs of eradication which may develop. For the springshipping season of 1929 shipments of citrus fruit will not be allowed to bemoved from the protective zone after May 31 nor from the rest of the Stateafter June 15. The green citrus fruit of the new crop will be permitted todevelop on the trees throughout the summer period but is not expected to reach a stage of development susceptible to fruit-fly attack until late fall. This new crop will then be marketed under a dequate precautions during thewinter months. The protective zone is, therefore, in a sense a buffer zoneand will be a material part of the eradication plan.All areas in the State outside of these two types of zones will be underrestriction merely to the extent of providing for inspection and certificationof fruits, and such control of host vegetable crops as may be necessary to fully determine that the fly has not spread to them. All classes of fruits, exceptwatermelons and pineapples, which latter are not known to be subject toattack, are under these restrictions. The restrictions on vegetables relate onlyto peppers, beans, tomatoes, squashes, gourds, and eggplants.Certain types of movement, including truck, mail, and bulk shipments, areprohibited altogether for the reason that movements of this kind involve amaximum of risk and can not be adequately safeguarded without great expense.In addition to covering fruits and vegetables, the Federal quarantine includesspecial restrictions on the movement of soil, earth, peat compost, and manure,fruit-packing equipment, and nursery stock. It is further provided that rail-way cars, boats., and other vehicles and containers which have been used intransporting restricted articles must be thoroughly cleaned at the point of un-loading and fumigation may also be required in special cases when necessary.A state-wide inspection will be made of all citrus groves and other fruit plant-ings as well as of host vegetables. Such surveys, together with the inspectionand certification requirements of fruits and vegetables, including the supervisionof all packing houses and other places handling or processing such fruit, willinvolve very large forces of men. Of necessity also rather intensive and widesurveys should be undertaken in the neighboring States of Georgia, Alabama,Mississippi, etc., for the purpose of determining whether there may have beenany spread into these States through the agency particularly of the truck fruitfrom Florida. This work is, of such magnitude, it is believed, as fully to war-rant the making available of the $4,250,000 item which is now before Congressfor consideral ion.(Consideraition of the joint riesoluition introduced yesterday by Mr. Wood,chairman of the C1(niinittee on Appropriatiolns of the house of Representatives.for the Ianisfer of the $4,250,000 item referred to in the previous paragraphwas given at an informal meeting of the Appropriations Committee of theHouse thlis morning and this joint resolution received the approval of theHouse directly after. It now goes to the Senate, where its prompt considera-tion is anticipated.

PAGE 33

2~~,A j4 ~~~~:~~ uIp.a~Jd.) .Iopul p,)jqjqoad St aSO(LIW1 uu aJ pt: 3[ldtUUo'0t l -Ijj !1 Hj 1:11. 1!IhJ~ JOI 11 *4~)1)l.1(IS UIlI 0j~j)Ad.Id I 0tIjJo)I q p m IIlIthfA o j) ,Ju~ .)Z ,qu)"; P11 p u p 1L\\. I)IJ ).111 l 1 I ). ItI o 1 .11 .1 H I I IL I I o II.(I1 I IOL ' I p s jII1 1.01 1p)3) v J.)JiI Noll :ixi.]J 01 ~j~Iio( S1,i~i 1hi18 0)fI11111l.IU JtuU (v OU}11 Ii~~lI~oo~'I01! IIU1 il) ~1(1 11P 1I1U1S1 0pPI V)V)JiI1 T111 0Joo' q)ABI JUR1i I 1 .1! 1~ 111 , I I I I 'I Ii I4 kk} 1I 1 I I Isu I viFUIll b u NfJ 04 I lid. 41118810 1~~~~~1l~~~~~~~~ 00l i i oII)111'01 31 1 1 .I A T)IT I I 11V 9A~ 0 (1 .)JI Il.) 4It8. 4111 44U,O ~113 1 01 1 It,)]. 11 In1,( I , !s 1.11 I~ I. it8.1 I Il P1 Jl 1 11 )111, )1{ [ t)Tl t i '80.031~ ~ ~ ~~~~j 31UL)lUSIIIUb1~ liI ) 11f t0V1{ll1'4y JO ,gl?0)0 11J31DiUf*' *~I.i~1lI Xiii t.11v :1[ r)4U f1 P0111 I1W 1 1111) _ U! *1)Ii0 1 ) 0 WA~~~i Pill IdII I, III)1~fIib )(IW I~~~3. 1I ji. 11 10i tp~ lm jI1 I 11 (I ? I ?IIo I, 0 I '111),1 M U1J IUI~ 'j) 0 It 0" J"1111111.10101)1100i i: 10AM psn: sp il .1 , hUoI tII~ I'l(1 0i 111 1, Z 0.1,' I )I 1 ., 1' I l [' 1 111 P ) I p .0. 1( f > j I{J a If I 1 )1{ Io S 110 1)10 .ldlflvlIi In ).HIIo I~I01~ l .o ) ltOiP)I1J 1), 01 "i 7, 1) " 01 o')jP.IPIII P I o11 I Sp)lJ Ipd.03 "It alJIB poso l alpA11 ,)I $1>iufi? 14lvam sti1111 .10 '.o11.1? 41uI ).') li Sq pollot-811,1 1( ~ol 11O~lU1 .' )0!00I .dTI~~) ~UIlID1A0 011U{IiS 10111 pOjt1J-110.) pill3, Ioll 101111L1.1111 )IU P) .1 IlJ UT li.1p111110 .9JO O n l~p-.0111op o liA plw)-41 pl.)lo~ )Mi u0\I 01A ',") Os8 SJSUI~!)lDI 81!113.0{(1130{ API I.)i{AX8.01113410 1)11?S~OI J()11 punOTIA01 130 'sIOT pll ("o.)0-)i1t IPII 1)11' PW" 1 -" o ii JO U-( I LP)' o (; T ) I 111u.j 111 Jo pva fls o.1( Itil1Jld0,o 1 li '1P8l Jso 111,01 ImInto 011 I,, oiI '.101110101 TJ(T S'T pop01utW11 110OA(i .01.11 'po Otl O 011 'm U d jv , o piI thl3fJ Tp[rl 11, Il 'Xq o113o PD!U 0 PaIUTI.O 0,111 (10mi 101 d,)Il ofits )o11111. jo 'ur ( am11 : ~G O ~~ litruu still U!JO 1101UI 01.1i1f-M 011 JMU 'P1101 l 0-?f* q 10.10111: .gJ.10Jal13 .Illf i lu adJ~a11 'ao0ju.1()1 IMl11 10 .111111 litX 1~111}81 P)1 iu j3o.(I T I(-)AX S.10J011.I01'101 Iloi.3111 J )i0I8 Dif 1( ())TIT II(I 01 ,4 J)1.1001 j( JO) )4134 11114 1 I4UU.TT,' 1 l 04 S.11388D)OTUp'l)(NIIS oq rvoT oalTl lop *)13' P(duJ.) Glva 'ili1.-Tvo PdAjosipins(IVIolum_110--) 0,13 '14) Tmo ao \ JOIM IVZ ' 1 Ojnl TJIT L)O UTTT; O J 1i;n olOIl 111 llooq J )iklcmloN '--LI S, S.:asm o ;'~ 3 )IUI o

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82 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,(d) Infested zone. The area included within one mile of any property onor in which infestation has been determined: Provided, That the State PlantBoard of Florida, with the approval of the United States Department of Agri-culture, may include in such infested zone such additional area as may benecessary for accomplishing eradication of this insect.(e) Protective zones. The area included within 9 miles of the outside bound-ary of any infested zone: Provided, That the State Plant Board of Florida,with the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, may in-clude in such protective zone such additional area as may be necessary toeffect the eradication of this insect.(f) Restricted articles. Fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard productsof all kinds ; sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure; railway cars, boats,and other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveying fruitsor vegetables; and fruit-packing equipment and all other articles includingnursery stock which have been associated with the production of or commercein fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil,eath, peat, compost, or manure.(g) Host fruits and vegetables. Fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchardproducts of all kinds susceptible to infestation by the Mediterranean fruit fly,namely, (1) all wild and cultivated fruits, except watermelons, pineapples,coconuts, and other nuts; and (2) the following kinds of vegetables: Peppersof all kinds, pumpkins, gourds, squashes, tomatoes, beans of all kinds, egg-plants; together with any other fruits or vegetables or other garden or orchardproducts which may later be determined as susceptible and of which due noticewill be given.(h) Host-free period. A period of time during which no host fruits orvegetables in any stage of development are produced or permitted to existwithin any protective zone except fruits or vegetables of such varieties, andfruits or vegetables held under such conditions, as are prescribed in these regulations.(i) Inspector. An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.REGULATION 2. CONDITIONS REQUIRED IN THE QUARANTINED STATEThe interstate movement of restricted articles from any part of the Stateof Florida will be conditioned on the said State providing for and enforcingthe following eradication and control measures in manner and by method 'atis-factory to the United States Department of Agriculture, namely:(A) Infested zones-eradication measures(1) Upon determination by the State Plant Board of Florida of a Mediter-ranean fruit-fly infestation, the area included within 1 mile of any propertyon or in which such infestation has been determined shall be designated bysaid plant board as an infested zone: Provided, That the State Plant Boald ofFlorida, with the approval of the United States Department of Agriculture,may include in such infested zone such additional area as may be necessaryto effect the eradication of this insect.(2) Within every infested zone as prescribed above, all host fruits, wildand cultivated, and all host vegetables, shall be destroyed or processed ortrefll (in a manner satisfactory to the inspector as soon as possible after thediscovery of infestation therein. No host fruits or vegetables shall thereafterbe permitted to develop to susceptible stages of maturity or to remain withinsuch zone, nor shliall any host vegetables be planted in such zone, until theSlate plant board, with the approval of the United States Department of Agri-culture, shall deterinille that all infestation in such zone has been eliminatedand lhat he restrictions of this paragraph shall no longer remain in forcewith respect thereto.(3) Such treatment as shall be satisfactory to the inspector shall be ap-plied to the soil of premises in the infested zone and to all railway cars, boats,and other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveying fruitsor vegetables therefrom, and to all fruit-packing equipment and all otherarticles which have been associated with the production of, or commerce in,such fruits or vegetables or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, com-post, or manure from the said infested zone.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83(B) Protective zone; host-free period(1) Immediately upon the designation of an infested zone, the area in-cluded within 9 miles of the outside boundary of said zone shall be dsim:atedas a protective zone: Provided, That the State Plant Board of Florida,. withthe approval of the United States Department of Agriculture, may icl ude in such protective zone such additional area as may be necessary to effect theeradication of this insect.(2) A host-free period shall be maintained each year throughout the Iretective zones, beginnin:: on May 1 and continuing for six months: subj. e t >such modification as to duration a:id d;ites of commencement and terminat.onas may be authorized by the United States Departm nt of Agriculare onpresentation of evidence that such modiilc:,tion is necessary or desiib'Ic anddoes not involve increase of ri -k of proaating the Mediterrane::n friit iiy. (9) Prior to the commenement of sueh host-free period each year, nil ripeor rieninl citrus fruits giowin, within the protective zones shall be enmoVedfrom the trees for shiijment, destruction, or processing.(4) No hot ve.etlbles shall be planted or grown within the prnteutivezOjiwn which will nature or reat a tage of development susceptible to in-festation during the host-free period.(5) No host fruits or veuevables of any kind shall 1,he permitted to grwor exist within the protective zones at any nine during the It;s-free priodexcept: Citrus fruit on the trees in such states of immaturity that in tiejudient of the inspector it is ni it susceptible to infe.Statioll; and host fruitsand vegetables in storage or on retail sale for immediate consumption, stored,or mainain'd under such conditans and for such periods of time as shall briapproved by the inspector.(C ) ji-! (1itonA system of inspection satisfacot ry to the United StateD')epariment ofAa-rijultui'e shall be c(aIrried on tIh ro ght i e yato i-roi'e for the elii entenfitwiculmenlit of thise r1gl;ititon: ;111t o lhe rmp l i i covry of any ii nfesttA-tions which may occur.(ID) Iitratiate mnorenicntThe intrastate iovenel of all re trIi.:ced niles with in the liurnt inedSlate shall be rnu-tii und'r -ulh wiiltrl as shall be satlsfactory to theUnited States Dlejartiment of A eul ure.(I) C ii ti of production and di.s4rib!WfI ion t: 'I WAll groves. orliards. track utrdens, packing plans, and ;ll theu jiace'ill which fruitV or vagrtebes are pr lnmI, pack{d. processed, mailuiet ured,or ithrwise ulitlze or iriiittnd to remil withithe urlh as liave b ci I1in l maniaturid it r 'proc I s>-I insuch a Iliier 85 in tie jidgmenl of the in eetor to eliimfite dan.tr olcarrying the Med iterr:neanii fruit fly, shAill not be i V'd or allowed I htmnovcI interstate Irm a quarantined State to or throt li an lvoint onsidet her'eol uness a prmit sl in1ii have been issued ,Ir-r by tilt Vlited StitosDepartIment of Agricil ure.(2) Citrus fruit in tulk, including' culls and drops in 1ny 1a11,er. llnot be moved or nllowed to be moved interstate trin ayv part 'f t juIra!iedState; nor shall any initersate ml;vemei ot crlls fuit by au nmobile truck be lllowvedlwThe host-frte period in 1921.) iS k'x1' t id to ap1PPr'oximutv Ivi .i m .

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84 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,(3) Citrus fruit may be moved under permit from a quarantined State(except as to fruit produced in an infested zone) only when packed instandard commercial boxes and when transported in refrigerator or ventilatedcars or boats equipped for refrigeration, such cars or boats to be iced orscreened in manner satisfactory to the inspector. This authorization shall applyboth to freight and express movement. Such shipments shall move only incar lots: Provided, That permittees may ship by express in express cars inless than car lots, citrus fruits produced in approved groves (see sec. B,3 (C) hereof) when such fruit is packed in standard commercial boxes, eachof which has a permit tag issued by the United States Department of Agricul-ture securely attached to the outside thereof: Provided further, That wheneversuch shipment shall pass through any protective or any infested zone, thecar containing such shipment shall be and shall remain securely screened orclosed in a manner satisfactory to the inspector throughout the entire time suchshipment is within such zones.(4) For the spring shipping season of 1929 ' citrus fruits shall not bemoved or allowed to be moved interstate from any part of a quarantinedState after June 15, nor shall any citrus fruits be moved or allowed to bemoved interstate from a protective zone after May 31.Section B. Conditions governing the issuance of permits(1) Infested zone.-No permits for the interstate movement of citrus fruitsproduced or packed within an infested zone will be issued.(2) Protective zone.-(a) No permits will be issued for the interstate move-ment of citrus fruits produced on premises within any protective zone unlessthe host-free period has been maintained on such premises. (See regula-tion 2-B.)(b) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of citrus fruitsfrom a protective zone only to the District of Columbia, including PotomacYards in Virginia, and to destinations in the States of Maryland and Penn-sylvania and States north and east thereof, including shipments via any of suchStates to foreign countries. Such shipments shall not be subject to diversion enroute except to destinations within the territory indicated: Provided, That anypacking house outside of the protective zone may be authorized to handle fruitproduced within a protective zone, but in such case such packing house andits entire output shall thereafter be subject to the restrictions as to destinationindicated in this paragraph.(3) Shipments of citrus fruits from a quarantined State.-Except as re-stricted in the preceding paragraphs of this regulation, permits may be issuedfor the interstate movement of citrus fruits from a quarantined State topoints outside thereof upon compliance with the following conditions:(a) Issuance of permits for interstate movement of citrus from a quarantinedState, exclusive of infested zones, shall be conditioned on such district or suchgrove inspection and such packing house operation as may be required bythe inspector.(b) Packers, shippers, or others intending to move or allow to be movedcitrus fruits shall make application for a permit to the office of the PlantQuarantine and Control Administration, Orlando, Fla., as far as possible inadvance of the probable date of shipment. Applications shall show the natureand quantity of the fruit it is proposed to move, together with the locationat which it is being or will be packed, the name and address of the consignorand a list of all premises from which fruit for packing will be secured, to-getlier with their locations and the names and addresses of the owners.(c) Each applicant for a permit shall file with his application a signedstatement in which he agrees to notify the inspector of all additional prem-ises from which fruit for packing will be secured ; to maintain, available for examination by the inspector, a complete list of all consignees, together with the amount and date of each shipment ; not to use nor permit the use of hispermit tags on citrus fruits from any premises until he has been issued anotice in writing by the inspector that shipment of fruit from such premisesis approved ; to discontinue packing and shipping the fruits from any premiseson notification by the inspector either of the discovery of an infestation of the1 Restrictions determined upon for Ihe crop of 1930 and subsequent crops will be laterIssued.

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It'A 2.) A1 k.1' VA I I IIti' ~11) 0 411111; 0All '1' 111oI 1 1 l0.' 11 )11 8 1 1111 1111 X s 10 IIIi I X.1i.',I I \d1'' A 14 1 ' '1 ALL I~ '.1 V i Id ~j1{ I 1011 :-I ~ I ~1 Al1iA 101.4'l i.nI021 I))11~ I~ Iu I .Mlps)ao a.j-j1 )I4 11,11 Ip 81 111H A.111 ) 11 ,(1. 1o~~ 1 1il i1.)ziiI1 Ti~A 101 I ~ i l i )1 ~' 4' 1, ! MOAOU)Ii ~ it-l 110 1 .11 ) I 11'1 s )1 I .1 0 'oil 4 11~d IJI tj I naj).;)Jul od~111W) l~u .1 ~.,11, ~0 21 IiOA 1 1 l ~~~.J 0 '' P0.u 114 1ZOA1.11 1AX pii 11~~d~i i' 1BI 1illI pop I ). II S III j10NXj -*Otidlz\ OAfi 0107 ). 1' .1 toj 11 m l 1 ''l PUiP.~~uI ~ di 101 i oI .10111111 11 UX JO ill q4111.1 lOfSdoR P'II ii)0.1.) 11 p1 1111ti 1 ,1' PUT t)(A' I 1 i1UNI ItIOUP10 t~iI > J04'111111,11j .111'i18111 TO I-,1 P Th11 dA AIT 41p2.' o liti1i~ 0,1' p( BIu)USSTp 1111dI~ dI", d~1) .1 stA\. 104 *SOXI ~ 1 SON!I1(10dlj I 41 )4 ' I ' d -,; 1 111.011f 112" 111 p .)fi' 'ik S'01 fz 101 1.10 iO ) A iH.1 Iddi A PIf.dS'III 1 1 .1 i s][ I T , Ili~ ~0 j s 11 TI '04111 IX I d I A'S dx j T,' 1 '14 ld I I ~ I I i h011di ~l 1pO1I'\ 11S1' OI dq ) IT 11I1IO 012 P11141110f1 2 1110,1 a Sll f 1 1s-II xd.,1 i) 1pull A 'A'I0J ()4 4110.( 'Nd11 11-2s11 II idifb.i 4111114,T M1 04aolT~k(ITI~O slI J ,12 polIII o Io1.,-f.jd I )IO S VII U IALP tsxott 111lmil' pauplirAl.)s (it;~I.P po:pi( ll_ _l .;110Z I)0llhIiI ] 11,' ;1sli4! ' .; 1p 111 sti .10111112 ) Olj, p U4' .1111 1 0~ .11 .1 ') 41"1 .1d .10)1_ji1211 1 M 110(I 111tt11T AX 11111.4' A' 1111 1d14'.1'~'Oil 12 'du )I)tSld 01I .1 0 I' '8ttId1104A 4) AittIon 0121~011" 011' p1 011:r ItrIii4 dolld. p )%,.7-w.1111.)11 jo 401A4 I .1 r. I<-V )'~ I.l'.1s, <1) ' .:1 i c1 J)A\41i .JO : II.)t11 l 1 011 IpO Mu jllqfi III -sMl y L1031I OIT fI P .JT ( It011 1) 1(1 dII11 0fj111 O 1 41,11 1 01 10 T1 pull o111.11 lI IP.0 1VIj iI kill( III OXXV (I XU.I)A 3I 1)0)11) ).1 ~ ~ i (1~G

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86 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,(5) Host vegetables from a protective zone may be moved under permitonly when packed in standard commercial containers and when transportedin refrigerator or ventilated cars or boats equipped for refrigeration, suchcars or boats to be iced or screened in manner satisfactory to the inspector.This authorization shall apply both to freight and express movement. Suchshipments shall move only in car lots: Provided, That permittees may shipby express in express cars in less than car lots, host vegetables produced out-side of infested zones when such vegetables are packed in standard commer-cial boxes, each of which has a permit tag issued by the United States Depart-ment of Agriculture securely attached to the outside thereof.REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF SAND, SOIL,EARTH, PEAT, COMPOST, AND MANURE(1) Soil, earth, compost, and manure of any kind as to either bulk move-ment or in connection with other articles shall not be moved or allowed to bemoved interstate from an infested or a protective zone to or through any pointoutside thereof: Provided, That this shall not apply to fuller's earth, kaolinclay, phosphatic sand or clay, peat, or muck, and similar mined or dredgedproducts, including sand, when in the judgment of the inspector such move-ment does not carry any risk of spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly.(2) No restrictions are placed on the interestate movement of sand, soil,earth, peat, compost or manure from points in a quarantined State outsideprotective zones.REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF RAILWAY CARS,BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS(1) Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have beenused in transporting any article whose movement is restricted by these regulations within or from a quarantined State, shall not thereafter be moved orallowed to be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly cleaned and, ifrequired by the inspector, disinfected, by the destination carrier and/or theconsignee at the point of unloading in manner and by method prescribed by thePlant Quarantine and Control Administration.REGULATION 8. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF PACKING EQUIPMENTAND OTHER CONTAMINATED ARTICLESFruit-packing equipment and articles which have been associated with theproduction of or commerce in fruits and vegetables or are or have been contami-nated with soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure, shall not be moved or allowedto be moved interstate from a quarantined State to or through any point outsidethereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United StatesDepartment of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such interstate move-ment upon determination by the inspector that the said articles have been socleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carrying Mediterraneanfruit fly.REGULATION 9. NURSERY STOCKNursery stock, including all kinds of plants and plant roots except portionsof plants without roots or soil, shall not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from a quarantined State to or through any point outside thereofun less a permit shall have been issued therefore by the United States Departmentof Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such interstate movement upondetermination by the inspector either (a) that the nursery in question was sositia ited and so protected as to eliminate the risk of soil infestation by larvaeand pupae of the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (b) that the said articles have beeno cleaned or treated as to eliminate any daiiger of their carrying the Mediter-ranean fi'uit fly, or (c) that the said articles have originated outside anyprotective zone.REGULATION 10. MARKI NG REQUIREMENTSFor all shijpments in less than car lots, each box, crate, or other container ofthe articles for which permits are required by these regoula tionis shall be plainlymarked with the name and address of the consignor and shall bear securely

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19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87attached to the outside thereof the permit issued in compliance with these regu-lations. In the case of car lots, no certification will be required of ilividualboxes, crates, or other containers, but the permit shall accompany the waybillcovering such shipment. All conductor's manifests, memoranda, or bills oflading pertaining to such shipments shall be marked with the mmber of thepermit, and with such instructions with respect to cleaning of said ears as aregiven in such permit.REGULATION 11. INSPECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES IN TRANSITAny car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved or offered for move-ment interstate which contains or may contain articles the movement of whichis prohibited or restricted by these regulations shall be subject to insp action byinspectors at any time or place.REGULATION 12. CANCELLATION OF PERMITSAny permit issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceledby the inspector and further permits refused, either upon determination ofinfestation on the premises on which the articles concerned are or have beenlocated, or for any violation of these regulations, or of the pernittee s agree-ment, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of suchpermits might result in the dissemination of the 'Mediterranean fruit fly.After any such permit is withdrawn or canceled, the further use of any per-mit tags issued thereunder is prohibited.REGULATION 13. SHIPMENTS FOR EXPERIMENTAL OR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSESArticles subject to restriction in these regulations shall not be moved orallowed to be moved interstate for experimental or scientific purposes in anyother manner than under the full restrictions prescribed in these regulations.'These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after May 1, 1929.Done at the city of Washington this 26th day of April, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department ofAgriculture.[SEAL] ARTIUR 1. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.PENALTIESThe plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 St t. 315), provided thatno person shall ship or offer for shipment to any commnlo1n carrier, nor sl1:hllany common carrier receive for transportation r transprt , nor tlnl1 anyperson caIrry or tralisport from any (jun anti ed State r Territory or Distietof I he I'iiited SIaes, or from any quarmiti led po tion hereof, into or throughaiiyv other Stab' Hr Teitiorv v) Disti-o, an (lhS ol nursery stoik or ayother class of plants, fruits, vegelabes, roots, bulbs, seed.M* or Ynyothcr articlb * * * sJrecitied ill the not i' qutrnitine * inIntI1(1' M 4 1 1 Ji 1od or !' d r cti (0 ilio o her thin ti ose 11re-r-d It\ t lieSecretary of AIriculture. It also pr'4vid(les' 11,1, :Iay Irs F 111 who shall violatea vy ofl the prOviio11s ot this act, or \ho >hial l ore, coIllunt rfeit, :0tr, a(1,l',or dc l t) ally ('ortifielk nr()vided f )r ill i ' :W1, (r ill lit , r4 1ti n "f tS4'(rVdiary of A gri'iltur'a 'hll lit deiiiwd ilty X i a liitimeanor. :iind >hiallUpon eoliv('iction 1hoiedo be published by a hihe I t iwe'win l5T 1 r 1y im-prisom III 11W (xemlin W.e y)ar, Srb t s ch finw :ind i p io m nilte d s r to of the( c()1rt.0N4iCE: T) CoMMON ( 'AlUItlsYou are loujtI( 'd to tt e, aI nd : iii sgli hi hlwk rof-i!t b indlyiiti ofic ial title, anlld rillur' n this 1ecier to 11 0 IA-Iillcb)' ( penlllty enveb)[e, which 114ls opo taNotice is I Icebll, "y i i i to t w 1ra 1 r1 a l mn1 1 r pr'i ent,follows:Tl'it the Suo'retlry of 1'' ! Air tti lle, 1111+' et hl4'1ity ll, 1Hw WI a rAuust 20, 1912, hnowt as Ihe plnmt sf101i 11ne ot (1 2 :11 21 8 U in' i dSSete .Iso froolIote, j. S1.

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88 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has byNotice of Quarantine No. 68, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effec-tive May 1, 1929, ordered that (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchardproducts of all kinds, (2) sand. soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, (3)railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been usedin conveying fruits or vegetables, (4) fruit-packing equipment and all otherarticles, including nursery stock, which have been associated with the produc-tion of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminatedwith sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure, shall not be shipped, offeredfor sh pment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transportedby a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved fromthe State of Florida in manner or method or under conditions other than thosepreser.bed in the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of QuarantineNo. 68, and amendments which may hereafter be made thereto.Very respectfully,ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.1eceived this notice and copy of quarantine No. 6S mentioned therein this-day of -----------1929.(Signature)(Title) [Sent to all common carriers within and throughout the United States.]NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERSNotice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),as amended, has promulgated Notice of Quarantine No. 68, with rules and regu-lations supplemental thereto, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effec-tive May 1, 1929. The effect of this quarantine is to prohibit the interstatemovement of (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of allkinds; (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure; (3) railway cars,boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveyingfruits or vegetables; (4) fruit packing equipment and all other articles, includ-ing nursery stock, which have been associated with the production of or com-merce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil,earth, peat, compost or manure; from the regulated areas in the State ofFlorida to any point outside thereof, in manner or method or under conditionsother than those prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto.Copies of said quarantine may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine andControl Administration, United States Department of AgrIculture, Washington,D). C.ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.[Published in the Sentinel, Orlando, Fla., April 30, 1929.]INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPosT OFFICE DEPARTMENT,Washington, April 30, 1929.POsTMASTER.MY DEAR Sri: Tlre is inclosed for your information and guidance a copy ofQuairantine Order No. 68 of the United States Department of Agriculture, onac('ounit oif lie Mediterranean fruit Ily, an extriemely destructive pest of fruits:11d vegei ables, effective May 1, 1929, quarantining the whole State of Florida.It will be 11oted tIhat the order absolutely prohibits the interstate movement1 y mail of citrins friuils, noncitrus fruits or "host vegetables," described in ther'PeHl1iofls issued in comection with the order. Therefore, under the pro-visiois of ragr' h 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regulations, parcels con-I Chilling oily of Owi fruits or vegetables mentioned may not be accepted forSiliii to iloints outside Hie Stite of Florida.Sincerely yoiirs,R. S. REGAR,Third Assistant Postmaster General.

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1929] SERVICE AND BEGULATOR Y ANN UNCEMENTS 89POsT (FITICE DEPARTME-NT.Washington. fay J,.0POSTMASTER.My DEA.R Sil: With refereiie to th letter addressed to you by this afli
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90 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,CLEANING REFRIGERATOR CARS UNDER MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY QUARANTINEP. Q. C. A.-226 MAY 8, 1929DEAR SIRS: You have doubtless been advised through press reports that theMediterranean fruit fly, probably the most serious of fruit-attacking insects,has been found over a considerable area in the vicinity of Orlando, Fla. It isnow apparent that infested fruit from this area has been distributed not onlyby truck and bulk shipments but probably also with packed fruit shipped inrefrigerator cars. To prevent spreading infestation to new localities, therefore,all such cars should be thoroughly cleaned before being placed again in fruit-growing districts in any part of the United States. This cleaning is for thepurpose not only of removing any fruit remaining in the car, but of destroyingany larvae or puparia of the fly which might be on the floor or elsewhere within the car.With respect to this situation your attention is respectfully called to regula-tion 7 of Notice of Quarantine No. 68, effective May 1, 1929. (See copy here-with.) This regulation is as follows:REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF RAILWAY CARS,BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERSRailway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been usedin transporting any article whose movement is restricted by these regulations within or from a quarantined State, shall not thereafter be moved or allowedto be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly cleaned and. if requiredby the inspector, disinfected, by the destination carrier and/or the consignee atthe point of unloading in manner and by method prescribed by the PlantQuarantine and Control Administration.To carry out the purpose of this regulation, your employees should beinstructed (1) to collect all fruit, crates, and trash material from the floorracks, from the floor beneath, and from the tank pan below the ice grates,and (2) to burn all such fruit, crates, trash, and sweepings. Such cleaningshould be done either at the point of unloading or at any designated point withinthe destination terminal.Yott are requested also to instruct employees to report, to the Plant Quarantineand Control Administration, Washington, D. C., the car number, and date ofcleaning of all cars to which these restrictions apply. They should be author-ized to permit inspectors of the department to examine any car falling underthe said regulation 7, either at the unloading point or, after having been un-loaded, at any transit point. You are further requested to send copies ofinstructions, issued on this subject to your employees, to the Plant Quaarntineand Control Administration.These cleaning requirements will apply not only to all cars used for thetransportation of host fruits and vegetables from Florida under Federal permitsubsequent to April 30, but also to cars which have been used for the trans-portation of such fruits and vegetables prior to May 1 and which may benow either at unloading points, or in transit to other fruit-growing areas, orin such areas. The damage which might result from a single infested fruitreaching other fruit-growing areas or from larvae or puparia of the flyremaining in the car and emerging as adults is so great that every precautionshould be taken to free " empties " from risk of carrying this pest.The foregoing instructions apply to the cleaning of cars covered underregulation 7 of quarantine No. GS. Later, instructions may be issued relativeto any required disinfection by steam or other means.This letter is sent in duplicate with receipt form attached. Please dateand sign such receipt on one copy and return the receipted copy in the inclosedpolialty envelope wlih requires no post age.Yours very t rily,C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Qiurantinc and Control Admin isration.Received above communication and copy of Notice of Quarantine referredto therein this-----day of1929.(Nane) -------------------------------------(Title) ----------.----------------------

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 91MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE REVISED[Press notivelMAY 9, 1921.The Secretary of Agriculture to-day almmtunced a revision of the rules andregulations supplemental to the Mediterranean fruit-Ily quarantine. The re-vision becomes effective May 10.The changes and additions provide (1) for the holding of citrus fruit in approvedcold-storage plants after June 13>; (2) for the shipimnent of limes from Monroeand Dade Counties subsequent to Jiue 15: 8 fur the use of packing houses inlightly infested zones, when, other facilities are absent for the packing of fruitcoming from tile surroutiding protective zones aild adjacenit oin!5 upsideethereof; (4) for the interstate movement mlller permit of host fruits and vege-tables in dining cars, and (5) that bulk, mail. alid automobile truck lmuvementof host vegetables from any part of a quarantined State is prohibited.In view of the fact that the regulations under this quarantine which wereapproved on April 20, regulate the movement of all the fruits anl vegetablesof the State of Florida, it was anticipated ihat the first week of operationunder the quarantine would reveal the ileed of certain modifications. Tiis hasproven to be the case and the revision is issued in order to imike specific pro-vision for the control of certain classes of movement not adequately coveredbefore.MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINENoTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. WSREVISION Or REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTE[Effective May 10, 1920]'The rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Qual'antiie No. M.approved April 26, 1929, in effect regulate the movement of all tihe fruits anidvegetables of the State of Florida. As was anticil : ed. it lias beeme incees;1ryto revise tliem as to certain details, and these clmati'es are eiltlied il ithi lrevision. Tile changes 1and additionls provide (1 ) for tle holding of citru,fruitin approved cold-storage plants after June 15 (see regulation 8, se -tion A-):(2) for the shipment of limes front Monroe and Dade C(ounties subsequent toJune 15 (see regulation 3, section A-4) ; (8) for the use of packing h houses inlightly infested zones, when other facilities are absent, for tim li kinw of fruitcoming from the surround ing protective zones and adIjacent I oints outsidethereof (see regulation 3, section 1 -l) : (4) for tlw inttrstate imioVeient under permit of host fruits and veget al es in dining cars ( e regul ion 8, sectionB-8 (d) ; regulation 4, paragraph G; regulation 6 Paratiih 6), al, t5) tharbulk, mail, and a tOmobile-truck i'vement of host vegetaides froimi any partof a quarant ined State is Iirohibitvd (see regulation 5, paragraph 2)C'. L. MAtRrAT,Chiief, Plant Quarant ina (iid Con trol -dini Str!ion.NoTIcE oF QUARA NTIN: No. GS(Approved April 26, 1929; effective May 1, 120)1. Arthiur M. hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it i -nwecessairy to quarantie the State of Florida to pr'eVent the spread of theMediterranean fruit fly (Crtatiis (w;lit(1ta Wied.), a dati gerous insect new toand not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within anld tihrou l out theUnited States.Now, therefore, under alithority con ferred by section S 4f tle plant qir-flitine act of August 20. 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended Iby the act of (ongressapproved March 4, 191 (39 Stat. 1181, 11 5 , and living duly -ivell thepublic hearing required thereby, 1 do quarantine the said Stite o Floila.effective on and after May 1, 1929. hereafter, inder tie at hutyv of sai-at of August 20, 1 912, amended as a toresaid, tI) fruits, vegetable-. iidgarden and orchard products of all kinds, (2) sand, soil, iarti, Jtt, tO-,d1d manure, (3) railway cars, boats, and otlier vehicles anid toitaier, whibhhave been used in conveying fruits or vegetables, i4) fruit packing equim nen

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92 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,and all other articles including nursery stock which have been associated withthe production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are con-taminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure shall not be shipped,offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or trans-ported by a common carrier, or carried, transported moved, or allowed to bemoved from the said quarantined State of Florida into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method orunder conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations here-inafter made and in amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of thisquarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be lim-ited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which may hereafter be, desig-nated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when, in the judgmentof the Secretary of Agriculture, such limitation shall be adequate to prevent thespread of the Mediterranean fruit fly5 to other States and Territories, andwhen the movement of the restricted articles intrastate from such regulatedareas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruitfly therefrom to other parts of the quarantined State and thence into interstatecommerce: Provided further, That the restrictions in the regulations supple-mental to this quarantine applying to the infested zone shall apply immediatelyto the infested area designated in the quarantine promulgated on April 15, 1929,by the State Plant Board of Florida and to such additional infested points ashave been determined and are being controlled by the said State Plant Boarduntil the State Plant Board shall have designated infested and protective zonesas defined in the regulations supplemental hereto.Done at the city of Washington this 26th (lay of April, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department ofA-riculture.[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To NOTICE OF QUARANTINENo. 68[Approved May 9, 1929; effective May 10, 1929)REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONSFor the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and termsshall be construed, respectively, to mean:(a) Fruit flies: The insects known as the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.) in any stage of development.(b) The terms "infested," " infestation," and the like relate to infestationwith the Mediterranean fruit fly.(c) Quarantined State: Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agricul-ture to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly.(d) Infested Zone: The area included within 1 mile of any property on or inwhich infestation has been determined: Provided, That any property of whichany part is within 1 mile of an infested property shall in its entirety be in-cluded in the infested zone, and that the State Plant Board of Florida, with theapproval of the United States Department of Agriculture, may include in suchinfested zone such additional area as may be necessary for accomplishing eradi-cation of this insect.(c) Protcetive zone: The area included within 9 miles of the outside boundaryof any infested zone: Provided, That any property of which any part is withinsuch distance of an infested zone shall in its entirety be included in the protec-tive zone, and that the State Plant Board of Florida, with the approval of theUnited States Department of Agriculture, may include in such protective zone,-uch additional area as may be necessary to effect the eradication of thisinsect.(f) Outcr zone: All portions of a quarantined State outside of infested andprotective zones.(g) Ruestricted articles: Fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard productsof all kinds; sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure; railway cars, boats,:ind other vehicles and containers which have been used in conveying fruits or5 ThP Interstate transportation of living Mediterranean fruit flies In any stage of devel-opment an(] for any purpose is prohibited under the provisions of the act approved Mar. 3,1905 (33 Stat. 1269).

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94 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,such modification as to duration and dates of commencement and terminationas may be authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture onpresentation of evidence that such modification is necessary or desirable anddoes not involve increase of risk of propagating the Mediterranean fruit fly.(3) Prior to the commencement of such host-free period each year, all ripeor ripening citrus fruits growing within the protective zones shall be removedfrom the trees'for shipment, destruction, or processing.(4) No host vegetables shall be planted or grown within the protective zoneswhich will mature or reach a stage of development susceptible to infestationduring the host-free period.(5) No host fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be permitted to grow orexist within the protective zones at any time during the host-free period exceptcitrus fruit on the trees in such stages of immaturity that in the judgment ofthe inspector it is not susceptible to infestation, and host fruits and vegetablesin storage or on retail sale for immediate consumption, stored or maintainedunder such conditions and for such periods of time as shall be approved by theinspector.(C) InspectionA system of inspection satisfactory to the United States Department of Agri-culture shall be carried on throughout the year to provide for the efficientenforcement of these regulations and for the prompt discovery of any infes-tations which may occur. (D) Intrastate MovementThe intrastate movement of all restricted articles within the quarantinedState shall be brought under such control as shall be satisfactory to the UnitedStates Department of Agriculture.(E) Control of Production and Distribution AgenciesAll groves, orchards, truck gardens, packing plants, and all other places inwhich fruits or vegetables are produced, packed, processed, manufactured, or otherwise utilized or permitted to remain within the quarantined State shall beoperated and maintained under the direct control of the State in such a mannerthat in the judgment of the inspector fruit flies could not exist therein or bedisseminated therefrom.REGULATION 3. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF CITRUS FRUITSFROM A QUARANTINED STATESection A. Control of Movement(1) Citrus fruits, except such as have been manufactured or processed insuch a manner as in the judgment of the inspector to eliminate danger of carry-ing the Mediterranean fruit fly, shall not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from a quarantined State to or through any point outside thereofunless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Departmentof Agriculture.(2) Citrus fruit in bulk, including culls and drops in any manner, shall notbe moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any part of a quarantinedState; nor shall any interstate movement of citrus fruit by mail or by auto-mobile truck be allowed.(3) Citrus fruit may be moved under permit from a quarantined State(except as to fruit produced in an infested zone), only when packed in standardconimercial boxes and when transported in refrigerator or ventilated cars or boatse(lul)pped for refrigeration, such cars or boats to be iced or screened in manners58tisf'actory to the inlslpector. This authorization shall apply both to freightand express movement. Rail shipments shall move only in car lots: Pro-vided, That permi ttees may ship by express in refrigerator or ventilated expresscars in less tihan car lots citrus fruits produced in approved groves (see sectionB, 3 (c) her'eof), wi hen such fruit is packed in standard commercial boxes, eachof which has a permuiit tag issued by the United States Department of Agricul-ture securely attaclhed to the Outsi de thereof: Providcd frti-ther, That wheneversuch shipment shall pass through aiy protective or any infested zone the carcontaining such shipment shall be and shall remain securely screened or closedin a muuanner satisfactory to the inspector throughout the entire time such ship-

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19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 95ment is within such zones: Prorided further, That the requirements 4f thisparagrziph shall not apply to citrus fruit moved interstate in dining curs incomipliance with Section B (3) (d) of this regulation.(4) For the spring shipping of 1929 citrus fruits 7 shall riot he movedor allowed to be moved interstate from any part of a quarantined State afterJune 15, nor shall any citrus fruits be moved or Alowed to he moved interstatefrom a protective zone after May 31: Prorided, That such fruit may be shippedunder permit subsequent to June 15 from approved cold-storage points uimlersuch conditions of storage and movement as shall be prescribed by the lanutQuarantine and Control Administration: Procided further, That this paragraiphshall not apply to the shipment of limes from Monroe and Dade Counties,Florida.Secliwon B. Coni dtion. Gorrcrn ifgl thw Issutan ce of Permits(1) Infeste'l zone.-No permits for the interstate movement of citrus fruitsproduced or packed within an infested zone will be issued: Providied. That tomeet eimergency cond ti lns, in the alb-stnlice if other facilities, the use of packinghouses in liLlhtlv infested zones may be authorized for the packing and ship-ment of fruit collinig froii tlie surrouidiiig protective zones mi l adjacent pointsoutside thereof. Such authorizations shill be conditioned on completion (f thecleanup of all cit rus fruits and the repeated spraying of all trees in the infestedzone involved, at least seven days. or ni re if required by the inspector. priorto the use of such packing houses. All fruit packed in such aut horized housesshall be subject to the same restrictions as fruit produced ill a protective zone.(See paragraph 2 (b) of this section.)(2) Protective zon.-(a) No permits will be issued for the interstatemovement of citrus fruits produced on prviimises with in any protective zoneunless tle host-free period has bec.n maintained on such premises. (See regll-lation 2-L.)(b) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of ciiru 4 fruitsfrom a protective zone only to the District of Coluiliia , includi ng.r Pi toiacYards ill VrginiIia, 'a11d to deSt i118tionis ill tile Stales of IMaryland anid P en syl-V8I1 1(l St1tes nothi'l md (85t thlereof, inc Wilinwsiipineits via any of suchStates to foreign couutries Such shipmenims shall not be subject to diversionen route xcept to destilatiois within the it erritory indicated: Proridcd. Thatany aeki g house ou t.side of tlie pl-otectivo zone ma y be auti ihoirized to Ii ndlefruit produced Withiiii a priteclive zone, but ill sUch Case such ackinigt liou"'e aniidits em ire output shall there fter be sublject to the restrictions as to dest nationinidicatoci in tils 8ragraph.(3) Sbhipment(11s of citr1 frllit from a qua raIntined State.--Except as re-sried in Ihe lrce dig pa ra -ral ills Of tbis regulatitn. perits may be iss'udfur tle ini ers!at mc l em t of citr(hs frilits 110 ' 1 8 f18 I8 a liti led Slate to I(Oill-soutside ic'eof upon comtjliince wih tHile followinli.L condili 01>:(a) Is.ance ol perii -lor ilnterstate movement 0 ciitIs froI a qulrin-tinei Stil, exci Ive of inifc sted zones, shAll Ile conlditi oed in suc di-ri tOr sIth gte in WIlo li ilsnl piwki;-hlit tqi vain :l nav '' ryred1;> thle it spe Ior.1/I vli I:i-i, is Iti p ri .xxi Vter j 'lil, he ziaic 18t ;ttlr a l it tt h l Iia I1'"t: Pr ls shadl 111,k t l pid )(:)Iionl t' rl t he e l oan ind 11 j uilhl'Id I"n r tMi i x hi rit Iorln ici. ii la e >rnv: d 'tow i inmel ~ ~ ~ ~ i il, In .wl h 1' B~I~: 'a~ tI ij 1 w 1,thi~vixdVaic lii I tn iu I \ 1rba l <1 lit >thii t .t piiei : i.:1V hilt lo w ;i~ Ili 81 11li d I it iini ty t'i I, i li lrit t i I i I .I ci ili'. i a , t 1 l th : x\ i i 11 i e a ihand a f f al prmios fren uhiebfri-t f-r ),ckiig iih e re .ITr 's fr; l ad di. eN i il ii lt' i 't iappix it lt. ixttr tO >iith i pin ii ii tiii 1ltiikL p -rsdr~i V a V twt.' Stati l'Int lof, d of k lloria, ()rlaiiti

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96 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,inspector that shipment of fruit from such premises is approved; to discontinuepacking and shipping the fruits from any premises on notification by the in-spector either of the discovery of an infestation of the Mediterranean fruit flycn such premises or of failure on the part of the owner or manager of suchpremises to comply with any other restriction of these regulations.(d) Permits may be issued by the Plant Quarantine and Control Adminis-tration to railroad companies authorizing them to serve citrus fruit on diningcars and to transport such fruit in the refrigerators of such cars en route froma quarantined State to points outside thereof upon the receipt of evidence thatthe fruit concerned was obtained outside a quarantined State at points ap-proved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, that such fruitwas not produced in an infested or a protective zone, and that the fruit con-cerned does not involve risk of spread of infestation. Furthermore, the railroadconcerned shall file an agreement with the Plant Quarantine and Control Admin-istration to comply with these conditions and to retain garbage containing suchfruit or portions thereof and dispose of it only at such points as may beapproved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.REGULATION 4. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF NONCITRUS FRUITS(1) Unrestricted fruit.-No restrictions are placed on the interstate move-ments of watermelons, pineapples, coconuts or other nuts, or of fruits whichhave been manufactured or processed in such a manner as in the judgmentof the inspector to eliminate danger of carrying the Mediterranean fruit fly.(2) Permit requirements.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof, non-citrus fruits from a quarantined State shall not be moved or allowed to bemoved interstate to or through any point outside thereof, unless a permit shallhave been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for such movement upon the receipt of evidence (a)that the fruit concerned was not produced in an infested zone, (b) that thepremises on which it was produced were operated in compliance with Federaland State quarantine regulations, and (C) that the shipment concerned doesnot involve risk of spread of infestation.(3) Prohibited shipments.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof, non-citrus fruits in bulk shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstatefrom any part of a quarantined State; nor shall any interstate movement ofsuch fruit by mail or by automobile truck be allowed.(4) Rail and boat shipments.-Except as provided in paragraph 1 hereof,noncitrus fruits may be moved under permit from a quarantined State (exceptas to such fruit produced in an infested zone), only when packed in standardcommercial boxes and when transported in refrigerator or ventilated cars orboats equipped for refrigeration, such cars or boats to be iced or screened inmanner satisfactory to the inspector. This authorization shall apply both tofreight and express movement. Rail shipments shall move only in car lots:Provided, That permittees may ship by express in refrigerator or ventilatedexpress cars in less than car lots, noncitrus fruits produced outside of infestedzones when such fruit is packed in standard commercial boxes, each of whichhas a permit tag issued by the United States Department of Agriculturesecurely attached to the outside thereof: Proridcd fart/icr, That whenever suchshipment shall pass through any infested zone, the .ar containing such ship-ment shall be and shall remain securely screened or closed in a manner satis-factory to the inspector throughout the entire time such shipment is withinsuch zone: Provided fiurtlicr, That the requirements of this paragraph shallnot apply to noncitrus fruit moved interstate in dining cars in compliancewith pa ra graph 6 of this regulation.(5) Shipments from a protective zone.-Except as provided in paragraph 1hereof, nonicitrus fruits shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstatefrom a prolecl ive zone to or through any point outside thereof during thehost-free period, and no permits authorizing the movemient friam such protectivezone of fruInits riJelliig dlurinug such host-tree period will be issued.(6) )iling Uir movemeit.-Pei s may be issued by the Plant Quarantineaid C ntIrol Alinilli'Aration to the railroads aut lorizingl them to serve noncitrusfriit oilning ears a 1d to jranspurt such iruiit in Hie refrigerators of suchca's (n 1011te front a qua rantined St ate to points outside thereof upon thereceiit of evi(lence that Ithe fruit concerned wNis obained outside a quarantinedState at points approved 1by the Plat Quirantine and Control Administration,

PAGE 49

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98 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF SAND, SOIL, EARTH, PEAT, COMPOST, AND MANURE(1) Soil, earth, compost, and manure of any kind as to either bulk move-ment or in connection with other articles shall not be moved or allowed to bemoved interstate from an infested or a protective zone to or through any pointoutside thereof: Provided, That this shall not apply to Fuller's earth, kaolinclay, phosphatic sand or clay, peat, or muck, and similar mined or dredgedproducts, including sand, when in the judgment of the inspector such movementdoes not carry any risk of spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly.(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil,earth, peat, compost, or manure from points in a quarantined State outsideprotective zones.REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF RAILWAY CARS,BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERSRailway cars. boats, and other vehicles and containers which have beenused in transporting any article whose movement is restricted by these regula-tions within or from a quarantined State shall not thereafter be moved orallowed to be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly cleaned and,if required by the inspector, disinfected, by the destination carrier and/or theconsignee at the point of unloading in manner and by method prescribed by thePlant Quarantine and Control Administration.REGULATION S. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF PACKING EQUIP-MENT AND OTHER CONTAMINATED ARTICLESFruit-packing equipment and articles which have been associated with theproduction of or commerce in fruits and vegetables or are or have been con-taminated with soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure, shall not be moved orallowed to be moved interstate from a quarantined State to or through anypoint outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by theUnited States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such inter-state movement upon determination by the inspector that the said articles havebeen so cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carryingMediterranean fruit fly.REGULATION 9. NURSERY STOCKNursery stock, including all kinds of plants and plant roots except portionsof plants without roots or soil, shall not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from a quarantined State to or through any point outside thereofunless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Departmentof Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such interstate movement upondetermination by the inspector either (a) that the nursery in question was sosituated and so protected as to eliminate the risk of soil infestation by larvaeand pupae of the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (b) that the said articles havebeen so cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carrying the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (c) that the said articles have originated outsideany protective zone.REGULATION 10. MARKING REQUIREMENTSFor all express shipments in other than car lots, each box, crate, or other con-tainer of the articles for which permits are required by these regulations shallbe plainly marked with the name and address, of the consignor and shall bearsecurely attached to the outside thereof the permit issued in compliance withthese regulations. In the case of car lot and boat shipments no certification willbe required of in(lividlual boxes, crates, or other containers, but the permit shallaccompany the waybill covering such shipment. All conductor's manifests,memoranda, or bills of lading pertaining to such shipments shall be markedwith the number of the permit, and with such instructions with respect to clean-ing of said cars as are given in such permit.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 99REGULATION 11. INSPECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES IN TRANSITAny car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved or offered for move-ment interstate which contains or may contain articles the movement of whichis prohibited or restricted by these regulations shall be subject to infectionby inspectors at any time or place.REGULATION 12. CANCELLATION OF PERMITSAny permit issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or caii-e ldby the inspector and further permits refused. either upon determina>n (finfestation on the premises on which the articles concerned are or have beenlocated, or for any violation of these regulations, or of the permittee agree-ment, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of suchpermits might result in the dissemination of the Aediterranean fruit fly. ,iterany such permit is withdrawn or canceled, the further use of any Permir t: sissued thereunder is prohibited.REGULATION 1. SHIPMENTS FOR EXPERIMENTAL OR SCIENTIIiC PUIZIRiE'sArticles subject to restriction in these regulations shall not be noved nrallowed to be moved interstate for experimental or seentific purpOSes ill anyother manner than under the full restrictions prescribed in tIhwee regular tioins.These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after Mlay 10, 192), andshall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated April 26, 1929.Done at the city of Washington this 9th day of AMay, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agrilulture.[SEAL.] ARTI ' M. llynE,Secretary of Agricaltiirc.PENALTIESThe plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), provides thatno person shall ship or offer for shipitient to any conanon carrier, iioi sh11allany common carrier receive for transportati, n or transport, no >l. anayperson cirry or transport from any quarantined State or Trir:ri Or Di -trict of the United States, or from any quarni ti iied portion there f, It) orthrough any other State or Territory or Istrict. aity cia ' IP ursIy Vtckor aliy other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, root' ,1ul w, .*or any other articles* speciIn'd ill the notinte of quartini il*in manner or method or under conditions other tiia thoge e,.ri. e by IlieSecretary of Agriculture. It also provides that aly .ers. iwo hl 1i4lAVany of the provisioms of this art, or who shill forge, enui erie a i4r, derive,or destroy any cotnificate proviiled for in this net or in ilthe rea iti tt(%Secretary of Agriculture shall be deelleoi guilty 4)I a mi-ieien i, :!id lhallupon conviction ther'eof be punished by a fine not exweedi.g 11Y r bI np lment not eXceedinlg one year, Or boli such inie anid iniprh4i nmeii, i tihi (i,cretion of the court.NOTICE To COMMO-N C RSMAY 10, :lt29Si: You are requested tO dato iit sign the1 blnk receipt below. i ialt-inyour official title, and return thls letter to lie secretary 44 AO rifulture in Lheinclosed penalty NNel' e, which requires no uist u -a e.Notice is hereby given to the traislhrtation conpauy you ne l It, "I"follows:That the Secretary of Agriculttire. uler aTlhority of tlie :'t a provdAugust 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine ::t (:")7 Sl:. :11, as :m1liedby the act of Congress apprtveol Maric 1, 1917 ()) Stat. 1131 '11651. 1--promulgated a revision Of the rules :111d regulation' stlplOilenit :tl 1() 4Iiceof quarantine No. 6S, on :lcouit Of tihe Mcdi t'r n fr11uit ily, i'fecl ive Mia.10, 1929, and has ordered that (1) fruits, X'egel ablus, :i11lI g:Irdeni alid w-bairiproducts of all kinds, (2) sand, soil, earth, weat, (mdsI. a 111unmal-ure (3)railway cars, boats, and other vehicles ant] cOntai('01 Ners wliohti have breet 1I-din conveying fruits or vegetables () fruit packing g et piilent atId a11 -iller* See also footnote, p. 92.

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100 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,articles including nursery stock which have been associated with the productionof or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated withsand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure shall not be shipped, offered forshipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by acommon carrier, or carried, transported, moved or allowed to be moved fromthe State of Florida into or through any other State or Territory or Districtof the United States, in manner or method or under conditions other than thoseprescribed in such rules and regulations and amendments thereto.A copy of the quarantine and of the revised rules and regulations is inclosed-Very respectfully,ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.(Inclosures.)[Do not detach this receipt]Received this notice and the copy of quarantine No. 68 with revised rulesand regulations mentioned therein this -----day of -----------1929.(Signature)(Title) [Sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the State of Florida.]NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERSMAY 10, 1929.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supple-mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 68, on account of the Mediterranean fruitfly, effective May 10, 1929. Of especial interest to shippers are changes affect-ing the shipment of citrus fruits from cold storage plants and of limes fromMonroe and Dade Counties subsequent to June 15; the use of packing housesin lightly infested zones when other facilities are absent for the packing offruit coming from the surrounding protective zones and adjacent points out-side thereof; and the issuance of permits for the interstate movement of hostfruits and vegetables in dining cars. A further modification prohibits bulk,mail, and automobile truck movement of host vegetables from any part of theState of Florida.Copies of the said quarantine and of the revised rules and regulations maybe obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, UnitedStates Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.[Published in the Sentinel, Orlando, Fla., May 17, 1929.]ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TOENFORCEMENT OF MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINEMOVEMENT OF TOMATOES AND PEPPERS[Approved May 11, 1929; effective May 11, 1929]P. Q. C. A.-228 May 11, 1929. Pending4 later aineinent of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (Noticeof Quarantine No. 68) the following administrative instructions are issuedwith respect to the movement of green tomatoes and chili and Cayenne peppersunder permit (see regulation 5, par. 4) from the infested zones:Permits may be issued for the shipment of green tomatoes, chili and Cayenne.peppers (bell poppers not included) from infested zones to move interstate onlyto the District of Columbia including Potomac Yards in Virginia and to destina-tions in the States of' Maryland and Pennsylvania and States north and eastthereof when such fields are so located that in the judgment of the inspectorsuch movement does not involve risk of spreading the fruit-fly and conditionedfurther upon the daily destruction of all ripe or ripening tomatoes or peppersin the field and their disposition in a manner satisfactory to the inspector.Such green tomatoes are to be packed in the field: Provided, That all tomatoes,

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19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 101crop remnants, and vines, immediately after the movement of bIe CQ -mmerialcrop is completed, but not later than June 30, shall be cleaned from the fielland destroyed by burying with quicklime and covering with three fcee of e .rthor by burning.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Con trol Admlintistrtion.Approved:ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.ADM\iJ NI STRATIVE IN STRUCTIONSFLORIDA FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTs LIMITED AS To DESTINATIoN[Approved May 16, 1929 ; effective May 16, 1929]P. Q. C. A.-229 MAY 10, 1929.The following additional restricti n1s 1>hall bV enforced wiith resJ ct to hemovement of all host fruits awl. vegetabl> out of he 11!ate of Florida. The'-erestrictions shall apply to anw lie an amendment of rogulation-4 1". 4. and S ofNotice of Quarantine No. 6,$ on account of the Mediterranean fruit-fly.For the crop of 192, unles othlrwi'e ordered, further pernits will iiot issued for the movement of host fruits or ve-etable from aiiy p-irt of Flw-idalinto the States or Territory lisiled below. am I any movement of such l st frui sand vegetables from Florida into lhefe St ateor Territory by rail, express. mil.or other means is prohibited: Waslington. (re1on, Idaho. Calif rna, N'vida,Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas. Porto Ilico, Oklahoma. Aikl Vnn as. Lowisiani,Tennessee, Mississippi. Alabama, Ceorgia, North Carolina, uid Sui'h CarolinaC. L. MAIIIATT,Chief, Plant Quarantinv.( aid Control Almiinisratioii.Approved:ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.WAR AGAINST THE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLYPROMPT FEDERAL AND STATE ACTIONP. Q. C. A. 230. M. y 20, 1929.The establishment in Florida of the Mediterranean fruit fly. probably theworst of all fruit pests, was at once recognized by both tihe S at e a d -er'lGovernments as a most serious menace to the fruit nt erest of a consi erabeitportion of the United States. An emergency funl of $50.1100; wNls imia eyliberated by Florida and all available State forces wert milize l it effrlooking to era(lica 1tion1. The large and wel1-develmped qnt ualan itine lw-sonnel of the State was thrown into this work anI aoiem n-ion !'ho "vt'and technical leaders fromii tihe Stale exp Nlen tiehiIt sIZlb ii :mit it t V tT.aid offered by hundreds of citizens. The Federal bovorti, upon i herecommendation of the Secret ry of Agriculture, ;tpprmved ).iv w Pi'r-: 'and Congress, muade $1.250.000 immediately I v:0i:i 1be for :1, i oitrmiol a11eradication work, which hid :lre:tdy beeti startedd by l1e l'1u til 01:1 r:1tV I it 110iControl Administration of tle Deprtmiint of AWriiiiure, ii moj1rat ion 1iFlorida, on a lriansfer of $1(,00) ant ;l.t 'r onnet Ir'm the L'X:k o'eAdministration.N1mT'PrI VRUIT w iwr.Y I mrmu ii'Tr:Prior to te diSCoVey of h i) > pst in t l ih f'ii e ( f )rlaindi F :l. wl A 11 Gand the confirni;Ition ofit i iu ntiitituionl ill W'Ialhingt on tin A)I il I0 h , -11two-thirds and tlir{e-fourtI s of le fruit ol t liat di trit :iil if hi ida, idalready moved out of thw Sl ite throuh t noruli chli an l i ii tib imand diversion, tbus carirryil ' the oit (,I , tliihment bf th'p t i ly 1nthe United States. On Iccoulnt (fl imir fivtrahe ylimi Cinit It it Arecognized that sucli niov'eim'iot 1h:1(1 a ptiular no '' e S ite 4f beCotton Belt from Tex:v :ild Oklahomlit v! wri, nimil, h S'i 2 wr:1i_ I,been reached during tht winner aind !Irin by tr liit moeet from Ilnoi,Much of such IovemntItI t i ntarby Si ; of Giltia :()fnI ib~l 1'perhaps Mississippi has beeti by itto )ru'k und Of fruit ol lu'w\ mr IrIdt, t

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102 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,culls, and therefore especially open to suspicion of possible infestation. The more western of the States indicated have been reached by fruit in bulk railshipments and by fruit packed and shipped in refrigerator cars. Much of thisfruit has been consumed but a considerable portion of it, together with fruitshipped from points more recently determined as infested, is still in localmarkets or in storage in the States of destination.GRAPEFRUIT THE PRINCIPAL CARRIERThe risk of carriage of infestation by Florida fruit applies at this timeparticularly to grapefruit which in Florida so far is the favored host of thefly and is grown largely throughout the area now known to be infested. Theorange is also attacked, but even in the center of the invasion in which, incertain orchards, grapefruit was 100 per cent infested, the orange infestationin the same properties has been very slight, rarely exceeding 5 per cent.STATE AND FEDERAL QUARANTINE ACTIONState and Federal quarantine action promptly followed the discovery of thefruit fly in Florida. The Florida action followed conferences between officialsof the United States Department of Agriculture and the State Plant Board ofthat State at Orlando and later at Gainesville, resulting in the promulgationof a State quarantine on April 15, covering the then known area of infestationtogether with a wide protective zone. This quarantine stopped the movementof fruit from the then known infested areas and its restrictions were addedto new areas as rapidly as these were determined. Federal quarantine actionfollowed as soon as the required legal notices permitted. This quarantine, asissued April 26, covered the entire State of Florida and was immediatelyeffective as to all areas in that State which had been determined as infested,and was effective throughout the State on May 1. The Federal action put adecided check on further movement out of Florida of possibly infested fruit.The very considerable enlargement of known infestation in the central part ofFlorida during the first half of May indicated sufficient uncertainty as to theextent of the infestation as to warrant even more drastic Federal action, andon May 16, the quarantine was amended to prohibit movement by any meansof host fruits and vegetables from any part of Florida into the cotton Statesfrom North Carolina and Tennessee southward and westward including Ar-kansas, Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico, and all States south of these, andalso California, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The south-western and Pacific Coast States named were included on account of therecognized possibility of the fruit fly breeding in all of these States exceptIdaho, which was included as an additional defense against accidental movementof Florida fruit.EARLY NOTIFICATION OF STATESBoth the State and Federal quarantines have been amended to include newterritory -determined as infested, but it is recognized that there necessarily hasbeen opportunity in much lessened degree for the movement out of the Stateof infested fruit. In all of these new areas the infestation was very slightand it is perhaps safe to assume that no badly infested material left the Statesubsequent to the original State and Federal quarantine action. In additionto the legal quarantine action the central and eastern Cotton Belt States whichwere under immni-ediate risk were given official advice from the Department inWashington on April 23-in other words, even prior to the Federal quarantineact-iol---Of the fact of the very considerable movement of fruit from Floridaeither by truck or rail, much of it of low grade and carrying a particular menaceof the Ifriit fly, and the appropriate State officials were urgedI to have inspecti on mIade (f such frilit in markets or slora ge so Hat any infested shipmentscould be promptly destroyed. Later on as the more widespread character oftle inlfesiation in Florida was determined these States were again notifiedof this risk by Ihe Florids Siate plant cunissioner, Wilmon Newell, and onI-le same dale this situation was confirmed by a telegram from the Departmentof Agriculture again urging the inspection and the destruction of infested fru t,followed by a thorough claninig of containers and locations where such fruitwas keji. A call was also issued at this time for a conference at Atlanta

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19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 103of quarantine officials concerned in the cotton States from Texas atward. andat th s conference, held on May 15. plans were made for Federal cooperatioa 'i1clean-up and control work in most of these States.COTTON BELT STATES MOBILIZEDIn many of the States mentioned in the previous paragraph wouk of in-tion and control had already been organized as fully as State fundand et on-nel permitted. It is recognized. however, that the time factor just now Ithe U-portant one. In other words ill the case of fruit in the hlds a dealers homaggots will probably emerge in a week or 10 days and may "0 to ripe1flInfruit in the neighborhood. peach or (ther-the peach being one lf the ;ihimtfavored host fruits. In cold storage the larvae wvll be held in whatever sinethey have reached to complete their devel opment as soOn a 0he fruit is plltc -din a condition of normal tempe nature. The necessity of lhvin, such fruitexamined and of destroying all infested fruit within the shortest posible t meled to the request at Atlanta that an effort be made to secure the inhilizatti iiof the State extension service in the Cotton Belt States from Texa< anldOklahoma eastward, to aid in the effort to locate and inspect all such fruits andparticularly grapefruit. Such mobilization of the State and Federal extends nservice in the work of inspection during the next two weeks would 1eem ) 1Ufully warranted because of the impossibility of gett ing any sufli-ient numberof persons with the general training of such extension agents to meet theimmediate necessity, and such aid has been approved by the Dire(:tor 4f Ex-tension Work of the Department of Agriculture. Proper notification will betransmitted to the appropriate State and district leaders.HOUSEKEEPERS AND OTHER PERSONS 170 E INSPEC'TORSEvery housckeepor in these States can reiider an important local atild pulicservice, and the home demonstration agents f the exi ci voni >erv Ice re 1 itRequested to aid in giving wide-spread publichiy to this p 'sliblity. MItt suwhFlorida fruit will ultimately go into hone s to r ctosunpti a 11uV w vor other persons concerned in the prpairatioli of firut for *le bl :, \v I asthe ultimate consumer of such fruit are the most inlrr aat :md i W( -jreadelements for the liscoVery of infested fruit. A special effort 1wull b' mudetherefore to bring to the attention of all housekeeper alAti perI' liin fIecessty of giving pailicular examination to such fruit ciA al I carry oUtthe precautions hereinafter noted with respect to tle lispoition f 1ly fruitwhich is found to ccnita in worms or ianu.'ots at any time. To ich U'h hiute-keepers and others, a canipaigni of pufblicitv sh bull be m)in(, t ii i a lvfor the short p (riod during which FI 'ida fruit vill be und ir ill-'ci, , 'uIalso throughout the seaNoN with respect to any forin of ma(Qots r uinfstat -in peach or other fruits-locailly -nrown or otherwi,--vhich i nuot :silyidentifiable as pertaining to older and known fruit pets.INDICATION S OF IN FST \ TION IN 1UI 'ITThe indications of infestation pai-ticulirly o ) f i ra\ .fru1 e i %tt I )i Inof the fruit as a whole or in particul ar sp)t s, such softiess b i'in g rem i y I -mined by the pressure of the ingers at different l point s ofl' ill et Amore pronounced inlfestation will be climr Fat prized by the lI bh itdi l 1 r I'ltunder slight presSure at exit holes wx hich ave lade t hr h the rinli by 11wmaturing maggots. Sometimes an ito :; i tf n will be a s1i lit harb'd!ii : aI(briw ning of the skin at the place covering the point in le era ce xlew b'hmaggots are wvorkiulgt. This discolorilion may be feutl oven wh n lc'I h i-been no noticeable siftenint at S'1,eh I"nit. No hu'bobIl frl it e:' Iiy%suspicioni what, vcr, should be thiirown out into 1le :,rbige Ir 0herwie, hitsht uld be kept in tiglitly covirI met:l or gla(1 cool ine tnr bI tunll veeprIomptly to the proper State p1:1t inspector or b 'ca oiler d'etel b thState. In a very slightly iife"tel fruit inifest:tion m1: 'y w ii ilt to Inhinasmuch as 11he maggots are very atixe and -I! I' ti 4 ri\ ue nt , :1iclIinto more or less firm tissue, but in all cases of advanced infetti Or harethe maggots have reached nearly full Ltrowvth their findina.g is not IT" lii.

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104 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,.ALL INFESTED FRUIT TO BE DESTROYEDAll fruit found to be infested, whether in homes or in the hands of distributors.or in storage, should be destroyed and by that is meant the entire lot of fruitwith no effort at selection. The infestation, unless it has gone so far as tosoften the fruit or cause its decay, can not necessarily be determined by ex-terior inspection. Fruit containing many maggots of nearly full-grown stagewill often give no visible indication of infestation nor can such infestationnecessarily be determined by feeling or handling. Therefore, the entire stockdetermined as infested through the finding of especially advanced examplesshould be destroyed, in carload lots or larger amounts if necessary.For the destruction or sterilization of small supplies in households, anymethod of heating or cooking, or burning in the furnace, will answer. Toshorten the time the fruit should be quartered or sliced and brought to theboiling point in any appropriate vessel. Similarly, baking in an oven, if con-tinued long enough to have the heat penetrate to the center of the fruit, will do.the work. It can not be too strongly emphasized, however, that no bad fruitshould be discarded or thrown out or fed to animals. To throw out fruit orgarbage of this sort would be furnishing the fly with the very best facilities forcompleting its development. In short, cook or otherwise sterilize all infestedfruit, reserving only a few maggots for identification. These can be killed inhot water or immediately immersed in 50 per cent alcohol and mailed for de-termination in a small, carefully packed, stoppered bottle to prevent its beingbroken, to the proper identifying officer of your State or district.Probably the simplest method of effectively destroying and safeguarding in-fested fruit in bulk is to bury it in deep pits so that when partially filled withfruit at least 3 feet of earth can be placed on top and tamped and wetted down.Prior to replacing the earth, however, the fruit and pit should be heavily sprayedwith fuel oil or motor oil-the discarded oil from garages will serve the purposevery well-or a covering of several inches of quicklime should be placed overthe top of the mass, the filling up with soil and wetting down to follow.Where considerable quantities of fruit are involved or where it is notpracticable to destroy it at once by simple methods and with the owner's con-sent, the proper State quarantine officer should be promptly notified of the situa-tion by telegraph, so that the destruction of the fruit can be effected, if neces-sary, under State police powers. Samples of the infested fruit should be takenunder the precautions indicated above for mailing, and the owner should beadvised not to move or disturb the fruit pending action by the State quarantineofficer.ATTACKS MOST FRUITS AND CERTAIN VEGETABLESIt may be noted that the Mediterranean fruit fly attacks practically allfruits except pineapple and watermelon that are grown in the United Statesand such garden vegetables as ripe tomatoes, bell peppers, eggplants, and beans-.WORMY FTUIT NOT POISONOUS IF EATENAll consumers of grapefruit or oranges should be assured that there is noth-i poi'fonous to human beings in the presence of this fly. Naturally, badlydecayed or rotted fruit would be inedible, but when the larvT are small or theinfe4al ion is just beginning, this condition can only be discovered with diffi-('lfy. There is no reason why fruit should not be eaten freely. As halved andordinarily prepared for the table, the fact of infestation should be discovered,and the same is true if the fruit is halved as a means of expressing juice.The attached statement, with figures, has been prepared by specialists of thelI ri ani of Entomology, to aid in separating the Mediterranean fruit fly larvTfroi other fly larv that may be found in fruits and vegetables. This informa-tion is more for the use of trained entomologists, and all other persons shouldtralismit material, as instructed above, to the State entomologist or the localoffifer of the State designated by him. The figures also indicate the adult flyand pii nl riuln.C. L. MARLATT,Chief of Administration.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 105HOW TO RECOGNIZE FRUIT FLIESLarra or MaggotsLook in the fruit for slender, whitish, or pale-colored maggots that are stoutbehind and taper strongly towards the head end. These may be as little asone twenty-fifth or as much as one-third inch long, according to their ae.Larval with legs or with a plainly recognizable head are not fruit-fly larva.Fruit-fly larvoo have only two pairs of breathing pores or spiracle,z one pairat the posterior end of the body, each half showing three narrow openings. theother pair near the front end. Tru(, fruit-fly larv:e hmve the posterior spir.,-!esset flush with the end of' the body; other larvae wh icli may he found in fruithave them set at the enids of prot1r0u0dilg cylilndrical tubes. These protrudingtubes are important in -eparating fruit-fly magegts from those of sefvenler fies.The drawings shiow the differences between true fruit-fly larvxp (No. 1) :moother fly larv.e thiat may 1be found in fruits an vegetables in the southeast (rnUnited States ( Nos. 2-3). If you find a maggot which looks like the top pivtt1reinside of or near a fruit, seid it to your State entomologist for identiti le h n.PupaC or Inactirc tarcExaminie the surface (f the soil beneath bearing fruit trees and sift thetop layer of this soil, looking for stout elliptical, brown bodies about one-sixthinch long wh leh resembb in general appearance swollen grains f h aSearch for these in the hottoms (I coitai ners in which fruit has beeni storedor shipped and in the b eds of trucks or wagons which have been used in lhulingfruit, and on or beneath the floors of buildings used for packinfruit or forstoring it in bulk. Such bodiemay he the puparia of the Mediterraneanfruit fly. If you litid anything that resembles such a brown "seed," seid itto your State entomologist for identification.Aduts or Fli.e.Th e fruit fly a dlt is a small yellow insect vithi dark spots about t 1 e sm:peand -ize oii tile common house 1ly, or somewhat smaller (about one-fi fthii inchlong) , which run< actively over the surface of the fruit anl foliage. it has twothin wings which are tot clear hut inst ead Show an i rreg'ul a r, colored 11 ltternOVer most of the suitrface, The flies are very difficult to find dn tIe three , 1t ifa suspicious looking specimni is ca u ghlt, sen1d it to your State e1tomiu I I rIidelti fication.1~RE1:ER\TIoN (iF I NFESTEFl) F~r lII N r A N At)EQ .rv S Ph 'na A n xsT Si'iaor FNi, F;ovF liiI' Fi,Y'P. Q. C. A -2:1 3 22. EFollowinltIg tile recent discovery )i* I11e isthil1l nii 4' the ie Ii:-l vWI0IFruit fli ill citrA Fi' rida there lii l4has be(n a :1 Ia Ige f1i:1 fr smpu :igivinig the life hjisiory, mhits. wad mnatis of con'lr'il (4 it''-I bavyailab' hub liea 41n onl Ihis '.ub'jeet lJolt l Gii , y 10. 1 :k 1 emb a iuthe Bureau of Enomoly, e iti led " The Me1i1errineit Fit Fb.' piblisrlin 1918 aim( bafSId om >0mew four yeai SI miies of this Jest I t Hlawaii To mithe del~inali fol. ilflormai tion, tis hli let in ha 1 behc re! lin eil d a I \\ Ydistribluted.Tfiv~ iw siuil it * v '4f doe-Ir) ovir11 1 11< 1,(, h 1The pssibiity o destoyin the early ea&'s uif tew Mliiirra~ynea raby refrigenallon( )I ile-ted fruit is bviely v IteM41 in lhis bulhii in ( 3this dlisculSIOi huis 0InCol11ag(d I le ideaiIli :h 1 'leillat 0 r'e1Vr~i': ertin coi11 hce1pted as n alternativee fir diesi flhi eti of fr-iit uttler ()t'ielt ot I1'',:1Th'(,e eXIperilieits were a lhii: I 4r! 01 't il-eule ii II 1W it' lil * v m1by commercial tests in builk or under shipping c'ndi, luns-and w\ ere 1it i mto be stoficiently ('ninci i warrant an m IlBvetl of frit I fIoml Ii i-0 ---------. ..10 This ('ircul~ir r'iprlcsi1'i st l 0:1 1, iif ilflt )! l 1,''thiit t 1eIin 1 WIssued. Tle d lterm intitfil w!i,-1h aIs 11-1' I" l 'i-t icii. r -can be carriedt wIth safety, namely wi thv, r ie. w, lh, :awthe basis of ndditliona l VXrerliuiiilatM o inI. Ilb the it t if 4I iiof killing Insect life in fruit, etc., by the Util ttln nf 1 tup Tr Ire a

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106 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,the mainland on the basis of refrigeration. These experiments are, however, ofvery distinct value in indicating that the immature stages of the Mediterraneanfruit fly may be destroyed in considerable percentage at least by holding such.fruit for two or three weeks in storage at temperatures approaching freezing.True Fruit Fly LarvaC posterior spiracle ( Ceratitis capital Wedposterior end lateral viewOther Larvae in Fruits~ (2)Euxesta notta Wddsaviewposteriorspiracleposteriorendlateral viewdors), 4Mfherigona excise TAoi-viewposterior spiracleposterior end lateral view~~(4) Dros5phila sp/7-\pos/erior splacleposteriorend' lateral viewposterior spiracle (5) Calobata lasciva Fabposterior end lateral view O,.n, 1 ear ,V. Z. 2That refrigeration, even for a period of six weeks, at a temperature of about34' F. does not furnish a safe basis for shipment of infested fruit would seemto have been v'ery clearly demonstrated by later tests. There is, however, need offurther investigation in this field, namely, the determination of whether the

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19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTs 107GERA TIT15 CAPI TA TA Wifo.PUPAposterior enddor5al view ven /r8/ viewADULT FLYWING OF ADULT FLY*x

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108 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,holding of fruit at still lower temperatures-28' to 320 F. for example-for thenecessary period will destroy the early stages of this insect, conditioned, 9fcourse, on the fruit being able to withstand such temperatures, and even moreimportant, the demonstration that in commercial practice the required degreeof temperature can be maintained and equally distributed throughout the massof stored fruit.The status of our present information with respect to refrigeration as ameans of eliminating the risk of the carriage of this pest with infested fruit issummarized in the following paragraphs which are taken, with little change,from reports which have been made on this subject in answer to various in-quiries as to the possibility of modifying the restrictions of Quarantine 56 andthe entry of fruits and vegetables from countries known to be invaded by the Mediterranean fruit fly:The possibility of killing fruit-fly eggs, larva, and pupa in fruit by refrigeration wasdiscussed at considerable length in connection with the public hearing held in 1923 pre-liminary to the promulgation of Quarantine 56, under which restrictions were placed onthe entry of fruits and vegetables from all foreign countries known to be generally invadedby the Mediterranean or other fruit flies. On account of the known general occurrenceof the Mediterranean fruit fly in the Union of South Africa these restrictions were extended to that country, and as a result the authorities of that country undertook a newand very careful and technical examination of the subject of control by refrigeration.The results of this examination were communicated to this department in a formal reportfrom the Acting Secretary for Agriculture. A summary of these results was later pub-lished by the Department of Agriculture of the Union of South Africa in the journal ofthat department for October, 1923. These experiments indicated that the fruit-fly larvemay live in cold storage at about 340 F. (approximately 10 C.) for a period of six weeksand still transform to adults when removed from cold storage. This work in SouthAfrica was carried out by persons who are known to this department to be highly trainedand entirely reliable. Furthermore, it was to the interest of South Africa to demonstratethat refrigeration was an effective safeguard, with the intention of making the experi-ments the basis of an appeal for admission of shipments of restricted fruits to the UnitedStates. It is, therefore, worthy of note that having determined the contrary to be thefact the South African authorities were prompt and frank in communicating this informa-tion to this department.In confirmation of the results obtained in South Africa, and as indicating clearly thefailure of refrigeration in a practical shipping test, reference may be made to the arrivalat the port of New York in 1926 of a large shipment of grapes from South America which had been kept under refrigeration at a temperature of approximately 340 F. during theperiod of 18 days en route. These grapes on arrival proved to be generally infested withliving fruit-fly larvo (Anastrepha) and were refused admittance.That commercial refrigeration of fruits and vegetables for storage or in transit Issubject to considerable variation as to uniformity of temperature maintained, as well asto large opportunity for error, has been clearly demonstrated over a considerbale periodof experimentation and examination of the subject by this department. No method hasbeen devised which will maintain a uniform temperature in the different tiers, either ina refrigerated car or compartment. The minimum temperature in the lower tiers mustbe maintained above the freezing point, and under this limitation the upper tiers will average fully 4' warmer than the lowest tier, with a result of losses which it has notbeen possible to avoid from more rapid ripening or even spoiling of the upper tiers of theshipment. Such variation in temuperat ires is apt to be especially marked under refrigera-tion in ocean transit, and an examination of the refrigeration " log " of vessels engaged infruit and vegetable carriage clearly indicates such variation. In addition to this varia-tion of temperature for different elevation of tiers is the variation in results, due tonature of packing and the arrangements for circulation of air within the refrigeratingclambers. The variation here discussed is entirely aside from, and supplemental to, theimportant consideration of the failure so far of refrigeration to kill 100 per cent offruit-fly larvp and pupa in commercial shipments.it view of ihis situa ion it would seem clear that refrigeration of possibly in-fe!:ted fruit can lot for the present be considered as a reliable safeguardagainst the Mediterranean or other fruit flies. and to authorize it prior to afull (klmionstration of its complete and thoroughgoing effectiveness in ordinaryeonunercial practice ight well open to m1lCe the entire fruit industry of theC. L. MLARTAT.rr,Chief, P(ant QUirant; c and Cwi trol AdinhistratiOlt.MEm)TEIUZANIF AN FIZUIT-FLY QUARANTINE A i MENDED[Press notleeiM'AY 24, 1929.Two mdm iuistra ive ;1mieiidmieilts ,() (Ile Mediterraneon fruit-fly quarantinewere promuI ga yesterday ( May 23) by the Secretary of Agriculture andbe ne ( ffective imlm11(ediat Ily.one of Iies' lrovi is for movement interstate of foreign fruits and vegetablesen terig the United Sa Ies through Florida ports. The other extends thetime for Ile slipmoett intersate of novcitrus fruits and host vegetables from

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1929] SERVICE AN) REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENT 109protective zones ill Florida up to and including Juie 15, with ;eI rovi oifor shipping grapes up to June 30. 1929.The provision for emtry of foreign fruits anid veget abi -, ch>etL i s atFlorida ports, the Departmeint of Agriculture points out, is il 'orr:t ii in-terlpretation of the qua ranin& as prohibiting imlovement of all fruiit ut ofthe State except in acCordanee with certain resterictions as to U;stin ndate. These restrictions wre intelnd(1d to apily olly to frlit 01 Floridiproduction.The extension of time for im i-ketin" vogetl le (:ops "ro\vI i t 3 pritieZones of Florida is iieesitaied by the backward -easol. Such ex'elliulthe department says, is impipral ive if the se crop are to di'tributed incommerce. A similar sitim-ion exists in the ease of the giape crop.This extension of time, the department explains, applies ejtAi'' ,e inFlorida designated as protective zones. inaely, zones whih are believed, asa result of intetisive in-peetions. not to have been reached by the fruit fly.Such action, it is contended, is further justified by the ilmrough eli'an-up inall the infested areas in Florida, and in fact by the coop ration (if all invtrest1in the state-wide clean-up.ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONSP. Q. C. A.-232 MAY 23, 1929.INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF IMPORTED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES VIA FLORIDA PORTER[Approved May 23, 1929; effective May 23, 1929]Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (Notic-eof Quarantine No. 68) the following administrative instructiono are i>uedwith respective to the movement from the State of Florida, or through thatState, of interstate shipments of imported fruits and vegetables:Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of bananas, avocados. orother fruits and for any vegetable entering the United States through Florida ports under the provisions of Quarantine 56 or other quarantines restricting the entry of fruits and vegetables into the United States without respect too therules and regulations under Quarantine 68 and amendments thereto )it aecouintof the Mediterranean fruit fly, conditioned upoin the observance of !uc: 1a fe-guards on the part of the shipper as may be required by the in ector toeliminate risk of spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly.C. L. MAIuMA'.Chicf, Plant Quarantine and Control Adm iistratioApproved:ARTIJUR M. HYDE.Secretary of Agriculture.ADMINISTRATION INSTRUCTIONSP. Q. C. A.-233 MA)23, 1929.PERIOD OF ShIPMENT OF NONCITRI'S FRUITS A ND HOsT VE GETAlOT FIZOM\ VIZe IECTIVE ZONES IN FLOIIDA EXTENIWI FON SEASoN 01 ][Approved May 2., 1929; errcTivet M yv 20. 1921Pending later amueiidiiielit of tle Medilerranew:I frait 1v qm rIiIinw ("N tieof Quirantine No. 6,) 11 fIllowing -:miiit r; IV' it riat on> : le i 'Ia'''with rospet to the iovemieilt of all noneitw f r It anl hIl" ' a'.al' 'ro win or movin g from prolete iye zo(me :Permi'its may 1)0 ihe i.isued )up to 1an1 iludit Junie 1 1 i29. fCr th i oipfnt fnoneitrus fruits and host vegetldt' from prnl ctie zonle to 1-e i te T* !:I Ionily to the D isict of ColumIbia iniiehidii l' mi Ybrd1 in Vitr.a ndidestination' in 11h(e Stakeof Maryland :ml Penisy V i' .ind S''id n 'hand east 1hereof when ii te judgimienmi fI the iWph't r -1'no mxnt d,not inivolve the rilk of spreadim the fruit il a:n cindi iinid ir uOnCompliance with such preel'ilO as to pinI,, ship!inc, n indisposal .1 culls and unshipped portions of Ile rI opI ion crl 4i brequired by the inspector: Prorided, That periits m 1y be i'sutd r Ih T hi

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110 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,ment of grapes as above up to and including June 30 under the conditionsherein already indicated.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine avd Control Administra-tion.Approved:ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.PUBLIC HEARING ON EXTENSION OF MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE TOOTHER STATES TO BE HELD JUNE 1[Press notice]MAY 28, 1929.A public hearing to consider the advisability of extending the Mediterraneanfruit-fly quarantine to cover each and every State of the United State will beheld in Washington, D. C., at 10 a. m., June 1, 1929, it was announced to-dayby the Secretary of Agriculture.The hearing will be before the Plant Quarantine and Control Administra-tion and the Federal Plant Quarantine Board of the Department of Agriculture,in the offices of the administration at 1729 New York Avenue NW.The object of this hearing is to provide a basis for the better enforcement ofrestrictions under Quarantine 68 and amendments thereto on movement ofhost fruits and vegetables originating in Florida. The particular objectat this time is, by regulation, to prevent any reshipments of such Floridafruits and vegetables from the areas of destination and utilization specified inthe quarantine and amendments thereto into other sections of the United States. It is intended also to furnish the basis for prompt handling of anypoints of infestation which may later be determined in other States.In this connection, attention is again called by the department to the factthat prior to the discovery of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Florida, betweentwo-thirds and three-fourths of the citrus crop of that State had already movedout through normal channels of distribution and dispersion. That suchmovement has involved a distinct risk has already been determined bythe finding of infested Florida fruit in some half a dozen States. Efforts tofollow up all such movements from Florida and to have all infested lotsdestroyed were instituted in cooperation with the States concerned at an earlyperiod in the campaign, and later have been intensified by the mobilization ofthe State and Federal Extension Service and the very great enlargement ofState forces.It is further pointed out that while a vigorous effort is being made, by re-peated and state-wide inspections, to locate all points of spread of the fruitfly in Florida and to destroy all fruit at such points, including a considerablearea around the determined infested groves, the fact remains that infestationsare being found at new points-so far all contiguous to or within areas alreadydetermined as infested. This situation was the basis for the amendment to thequarantine of May 16 prohibiting the movement from Florida of host fruitsand vegetables to the Southern and Western States where there is a distinctpossibility that this pest may become established and maintain itself.The action now proposed would strengthen the order of May 16 by protect-ing such Southern and Western States from reshipments from the North ofarticles the direct shipment of which from Florida is already prohibited.NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON JUNE 1, TO CONSIDER TILE ADVISABILITY OFEXTENDINO THE M)EIDITERRANEAN F1u IT-FLY QUARANTINE TO OTHER STATESMAY 28, 1929.The Secretary of Agricullure has information that the Mediterranean fruitfly, a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributedwithin and throughout the United States but recently discovered in the Stateof Florida, ha s been transported to other sections of this country in shipmentof fruits and vegetables from that State.It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of quarantiningeach and every Stat e of the United States aid of extending the provisionsof Federal Quarantine No. 68 to provide for such regulation of the interstatemovement of fruits and other articles as shall be necessary to prevent thespread of said Mediterranean fruit fly from any section of the United Stateswhich infested fruit may have reached.

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1929] SEItVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 111Notice is therefore hereby given that, in accordance with hth plant quaran-tine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of ('Iersapproved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), a public hearing will be held at10 a. m. on June 1, 1929, before the Plant Quarantine and Contiol Adnni> ra-tion and the Federal Plant Quarantine Board of the United States Departnmintof Agriculture in the offices of the said administration of 172! New YorkAvenue, N. W., Washington, D. C., in order that any person iltkrested in t1 leproposed quarantine action may appear and be heard either in person or by-attorney.The object of this hearing is to provide a basis for the better enf rcemnenlt ofrestrictions under Quarantine 68 and amendments theretn m( 'veliellt ofhost fruits and vegetables originating in Florida. The particular object at thistime is, by regulation, to prevent any reshipments of such Florida fruit< andvegetables from the areas of destination and utilization specified in the quarantine and amendments thereto into oithtr sections of the ignited St ates. It i
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112 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,apparent and he has urged all department inspectors to give wide publicityto the need for the practice and if possible to secure its general adoption. The reports of finding infested Florida citrus fruit received from otherStates mention only the finding and destruction of such fruit, Doctor Marlattsays, and make no mention of any clean-up of storage places and premises.Doctor Marlatt is anxious that fruit handlers, dealers, and the public gener-ally realize the necessity of thoroughly cleaning and disinfecting cars, storagerooms in refrigerating plants, boxes and other containers, and the immediatesurroundings, in shops or other places where such fruit has been kept.Risks of spreading the fruit fly and other pests can be very much reduced,Doctor Marlatt says, by making sure that all boxes and other containers arethoroughly cleaned, followed by very careful sweeping up of all dirt, dust,and trash which may be beneath the boxes. Such sweepings should be care-fully taken up and burned.Applications of oil, boiling water, or steam to all places likely to be infestedwith the larvie of the fruit fly are advisable.RE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY-ORCHARD AND PACKING-HOUSESANITATION URGED FoR ALL FRUIT SECTIONSP. Q. C. A.-235. JUNE 5, 1929.The Mediterranean fruit-fly situation in Florida has emphasized the greatdesirablity in all fruit sections, of clean-up of fallen fruit and the destruction under safe means of fruit dumps and rejects, and this is particularly trueof all commercial orchards and of packing houses. It is unnecessary topoint out the increase of risk from such dumps and rejects and fallen fruit in,orchards not only as to the Mediterranean fruit fly, but as to other commoninsect pests of the fruits. Such clean-up of orchards and safe disposition ofpacking-house culls is probably seldom made, but the necessity therefor isclearly apparent and you are urged to give wide publicity to this idea and,if possible, secure its general adoption.This is certainly a time when an accounting -should be taken of methodsof handling crops to safeguard against pests, but this is of special importancein relation to the present uncertainty as to the extent of spread of the Medi-terranean fruit fly.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE REVISED TO PROHIBIT RESHIPMENTSOF FLORIDA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM NORTHEASTERN STATES TOSOUTH AND WEST[Press notice]JUNE, 8, 1929.The Secretary of Agriculture announced to-day a revision of the Mediterra-nean fruit-fly quarantine effective immediately. The primary purpose of the-revision is to provide for the regulations, issued therewith, forbidding the re-shipment of Florida host fruits and vegetables from Northern and North-eastern States into the territory of the South and West into which directshipment from Florida is already prohibited. The revision is intended also to,furnish the basis for the prompt handling of any infestations which may laterhe determined in other States. The Secretary points out that the regulationsissued with this revision of the quarantine are merely supplemental to theregulations, and amendments thereto hitherto promulgated under the originaledition of the quarantine, which latter regulations remain in full force andeffect.Under the supplemental regulations issued with the revised quarantine, hostfruits and vegetables which have been produced in and moved from the Stateof Florida shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported into theSlates of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana,Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, SouthCarolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, or Washington, or into the Territory of PortoRico. It is further provided that host fruits and vegetables which have beenproduced in a "protective zone"-i. e., the zones immediately surroundinginfested zones-and moved into the area northeast of and including PotomacYards, Va., the District of Columbia, and the States of Maryland and Pennsyl-vania, shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported to points in the-United States outside the said northeastern area.

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1929] SERVICE AND I:EGULATUIDY ANNO UNCE1 NTS 113This revision places no restrictions on the ivterst ate nvement ft i ifested States of articles which have orilinated outside of Yl ri1a. l'This the only State definitely known at this time thave o v, k 11 .infested with the Mlediterranean fruit fly.MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINEQUARANTINE No. 6.-REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND hI'E A, '. -NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. >n tREVISEDt(Approved June 7, 1929; effective June 7, 1929)I, Arthur .Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture. having found lha In tinf *atnof the Mediterraniean fruit tly (Ccratitis capitata Wied. ,
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114 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regula-tions supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in an infested State, orTerritory, now or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary ofAgriculture as regulated areas, when in the judgment of the Secretary ofAgriculture, such limitations shall be adequate to prevent the spread of theMediterranean fruit fly " to other States, Territories, or the District of Columbia, and when the movement of the restricted articles intrastate from suchregulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the Mediterraneanfruit fly therefrom to other parts of the quarantined State or Territory andthence into interstate commerce.Restrictions Applying to Noninfested States, Territories, or the District ofColaunbiaHereafter, the different classes of articles enumerated above, originating inand moving from an infested State, Territory, or the District of Columbia toauthorized destination in a noninfested State, Territory, or the District ofColumbia, under the aforementioned rules and regulations, shall not be shipped,offered for shipment to a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, orallowed to be moved from the said noninfested States, Territories, and Districtsinto or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States.in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in therules and regulations hereinafter made and in amendments thereto.Done at the city of Washington this 7th day of June, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture,[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 68 (REVISED),(Approved June 7, 1929 ; effective June 7, 1929)Regulation 1The revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No.68, and the administrative instructions issued subsequent thereto, with respectto the interstate movement of restricted articles from the State of Florida andthe cleaning and disinfection of vehicles involved in such movement, shall re-main effective until further notice. The term "quarantined State" as usedtherein shall be construed to mean the State of Florida.Regulation 2. Reshipment from Noninfested States of Host Fruits and Vege-tables Originating in an Infested State or Area(1) Host fruits and vegetables which have been produced in and movedfrom the State of Florida shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise trans-ported into the States of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Georgia,Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma,Or gon, South Carolina, Texas, Tennessee, Utah, or Washington, or into the.Telritory of Porto Rico.(2) Host fruits and vegetables which have been produced in a protective-zone and moved into the area northeast of and including Potomac Yards, Va.,the District of Columbia, and the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania. shalinot Ithcr after be reshipped or otherwise transported to points in the United;States outside th e said northeastern area.(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement from noninfestedSltdes of articles other than host fruits and vegetables and railway cars andother velicles and containers, unless such articles have beon moved from ani nfested St ate ill violation of the rules and regulations supplemental to Noticeof Quaranti e No. (8 or any niendment thereto or revision thereof.(4) The term " noninfested States " as used in Notice of Quarantine No. 68(revised ) shall be construed to mean States other than Florida, and the term" inlfe-led State " as used therein shall be construed to mean the State ofFlorida." The interstate transportation of living Mediterranean fruit flies in any stage of devel-opienit and for any purpose Is prohibited under the provisions of the act approved Mar. 3,1905 (33 Stat. 1269).

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 115These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after June 7. 1 9.Done at the city of Washington this ith day of Jun, 1292.Witness my hand and the s al of the United States Department ofAgriculture.[SEAL.] ARTHUR N1. HYDE,Sccrelariy of Agriculture.NOTICE TO CoMMoN CARRIERSWASHINGTON, D. C. Juie ?, 1SIR: You are requested to date and sign the bLaink receipt below, indratingyour official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agrioulture in theinclosed penalty envelope, which requires no posta:'e.Notice is hereby given to the trani-portation comaitny you representi, asfollowsThat the Secretary of Agriculture, under aIuth rity rnferred oil him Iy 1vplant quarantine act of August 20, 112 (37 Stat. 115) as am:ndd. ha n prtoul-gated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. (I, on account f th Med!'iIrrana>fruit fly, effective June 7, 1929, and has i'Ssut d i ul s nd regula;ions u ppe-mental thereto. Under the important miollilirationis niae t th tl 1im it iordered (1) that ho.t fruits awl veget ab les hvliicl ha Yen i Iri (AIee 111:il i"oldmoved from the State of Florida ,' authorized destiiiatin in i rl ilerl and central States shall not thereafter be rehllipped or ohr rwie t;all t poted ithe States of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansa>. Caif~ornia, Gi )a. I (H , Lo;'iiana, Mississippi. Neva da, New Mexico, North Carolina. Okla homa, Oregon,South Carolina, Texas. Tennessee. Utah, or Washingt'n ,1 or ino tlie Territrrof Porto Rico; and (2) that host fruits and vet'etaldes wili h hive been rduced in a protective zone an(1 moved into the area northe st of and ie lingPotomac Yards, Va., the District of Columbia, aind the SIafes ot Marvlamll andPennsylvania, shall not thereafIter be reship)ped or (Itherwise trnsport ed topoints in the United States outside the said northeasler are .Under Iherevised quarantine the former restriction.S on the iiterstatte ienv, mize of re-stricted articles from Florida remain unchanged urnil further lt icC.A copy of the notice is inclosed herewith.Very respectfully,ARTHUR M. HIYE,Scecrct1(r.1 of .jrilIur,(Inclosures.)[Do not detach this receipt]Received this notice and the Notice of Quarantine No. 6S. revised I, vih rulPVtlesand regulations mentioned therein this day of 1929(Sigiaturv)f Ti tl )[Sent to all common carriers withIii and throu hout the Uni it' I Statc -.]No'rncEI To GhNvtl iwte Tin:I(l N\ >lELNotice is hereby given that Ilie Se(rdavu Aeriei~lttIre, lileo'r ;ithllowily (.,Illferred on him by the ldit Itiuaratin -e art of Atnust 20, 1912 (:7 Stat. 315).alended, has promuitlgated a revisi'i f Nuti je (Q1,arP lii e N t", fiolltof the Mediterranean fruit fly, effective June 7, 1929. aiid hi:i i ->md rule andregulations suppleienkal thereto. nd i le I m ortait ilu i 1 :i I1 L : 1this time it is ordered (I hat li't frii 11( 1.i xe Iable w ieh L e br nprodled l in and lioVed froi le St at 'f Florid t :Il1 hmori" ith Iinorthern and central St a i es s 140l n 11i4 1 th rIr > i11 i r I thi \i 1 ir oported int the Sia as of hol o IIi , Artiz4 A 1k1n )): ( w, A I i. iIdahlo, Loliisiat'i, Mississippi. Nev:Nla, New Mexiea. NI (si i JI ii IOregonl, south Carolinal. Tefxn , Tffnl. ,t v :r1s n nTerritoiy of Porto Ric(: ;nd 2 th;t h(2l frli l ai V-, .1 1: hbeenl prmldua' ill :1 :110iV I1 114 lmN-d in h -: 110il uelIdilng Poto mac \aurds. ':I. .1i Ditrict ( Ca ilm hin, O:I he I I

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116 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,Maryland and Pennsylvania. shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwisetransported to points in the United States outside the said northeastern area.Under the revised quarantine the former restrictions on the interstate move-ment of restricted articles from Florida remain unchanged until further notice.Copies of the said revised quarantine and of the rules and regulations sup-plemental thereto may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and ControlAdministration, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agricuture.[Published in the following newspapers:The Birmnigham News ----------------------------------Birmingham, Ala., June 18, 1929.The Arizona Republican --.----------------------------Phoenix, Ariz., June 16, 1929.Arkansas Gazette . ._----------------------------------Little Rock, Ark., June 18, 1929.San Francisco Examiner -. .----------------------------San Francisco, Calif., June 19, 1929.The Denver Post ....----------------------------------Denver, Colo., June 18, 1929.The Hartford Times .-. ._-------------------------------Hartford, Conn., June 17, 1929.The Evening Journal . .-. .-------------------------------Wilmington, Del., June 15, 1929.The Evening Star ----.--------------------------------Washingt on, D. C., June 15, 1929.The Florida Times-Union ..---------------------------Jacksonville, Fla., June 18, 1929.The Atlanta Journal _ ..--------------------------------Atlanta, Ga., June 18, 1929.Idaho Statesman _ .----------------------------------Boise, Id aho, June 19, 1929.The Chicago Daily News. ._.---------------------------Chicago, Ill., June 19, 1929.The Indianapolis News.-.-----------------------------Indianapolis, Ind., June 17, 1929.The Des Moines Register. .---------------------------Des Moines, Iowa, June 18, 1929.The Wichita Eaale ...---------------------------------Wichita, Kans., June 18, 1929.The Louisville Times .-------------------------------Louisville, Ky., June 18, 1929.The Times Picayune .-------------------------------New Orleans, La., June 18, 1929.Portland Press Herald .. ._------------------------------Portland, Me., June 18, 1929.The Sun ....-----------------------------------------Baltimore, Md., June 17, 1929.The Boston Herald ... ..--------------------------------Boston, Mass., June 19, 1929.The Detroit News -...---------------------------------Detroit, Mich., June 17, 1929.The Minneapolis Tribune ....---------------------------Minneapolis, Minn., June 18, 1929.Jackson Daily News. ...-------------------------------Jackson, Miss., June 13, 1929.The Kansas City Journal-Post -.-----------------------Kansas City, Mo., June 17, 1929.The Great Falls Tribune ...----------------------------Great Falls, Mont., June IS, 1929.The W orld-Herald ...---------------------------------Omaha, Nebr., June 18, 1929.Reno Evening Gazette ...------------------------------Reno, Nev., June 19, 1929.The Manchester Union Leader -----------------------Manchester, N. H., June 18, 1929.Trenton Evening Times _ ....----------------------------Trenton, N. J., June 17, 1929.New M exico State Tribune ..--------------------------Albuquerque, N. Mex., June 19, 1929.The World . _.-. .----------------------------------------. New York, N. Y., June 15, 1929.The News and Observer _. .----------------------------Raleig h, N. C., June 18, 1929.Grand Forks Herald. .....--------------------------------Grand Forks, N. Dak., June 18, 1929.The Toled o Blade -----------.---.----------------------Toledo, Ohio, June 18, 1929.The Oklahoma News _ ....-------------------------------Oklahoma City , Okla., June 19, 1929.The Oregon Journal .....--------------------------------Portland, Oreg., June 18, 1929.The Philadelphia Inquirer ...---------------------------Philadelphia, Pa., June 17, 1929.The Evening Bulletin _ ..------------------------------Providence, R. 1., June 18, 1929.The State _ .-. _ _ ..----------------------------------------Columbia, S. C. June 18, 1929.The Daily Argus-Leader .-. .----------------------------Sioux Falls, S. Dak., June 18, 1929.Nashville Tennessean .. ..------------------------------Nashville, Tenn., June 18, 1929.Fort Worth Star-Tele :ram. ...--------------------------Fort Worth, Tex., June 19, 1929.The Salt Lake Tribune _ ....-----------------------------Salt Lake City, Utah, June 19, 1929.The Burlington Free Press -._ ..--------------------------Burling ton, Vt., June 18, 1929.Richmond Times-Dispatch _ _ ..--------------------------Richmond. Va., June 18, 1929.The Seattle Times -. .---------------------------------Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1929.The Charleston Gazette _.-----------------------------Charleston, W. Va., June 16, 1929.The Milwaukee Journal ._ ...-----------------------------Milwaukee, Wis., June 18, 1929.Wyoming State Tribune-Leader _ _ .----------------------Cheyenne, Wyo., June 18, 1929.1ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONSEXTENSION OF SHIPPING PERIOD FOR FLORIDA EGGPLANTS AND PEPPERS(Approved June 14, 1929 ; effective June 14, 1929)P. Q. C. A.-236. JUNE 14, 1929.Pending later amendinent of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (Noticeof Quarantine No. 68) the following administrative instructions are issued withrespect to the movement of eggplants and peppers of all kinds under permit(see regulation 5, paragraph 4) from protective zones: P1ermis may be issued up to and including June 30, 1929 for the shipmentof eggplants and peppers of all kinds from protective zones to move interstateonly to the District of Columbia including Potomac Yards in Virginia and todestinations in the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania and States north and

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 117east thereof when the fields in which such vegetables are grown are so 1that in the judgment cf the inspector such inovement does not involve risk ofspreading the fruit fly and conditioned further upon the daily destruction ofall ripe or ripening eggplants or peppers in the field and their disposit ion il amanner satisfactory to the inspector. Such eggplants and peppers are t ' bepacked in the field: Provided, That all eggplants and peppers., crop remnantsand vines, immediately after the movement of the commercial crop i com-pleted, but not later than June 30, shall be cleaned from the fields and destroyedby burying with quicklime and covering with three feet of earth or by burniinu. C. L. 'MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quaran tine end Control Admhi-,tru 1 u, 1Approved:ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.COWPEAS RELEASED FROM RESTRICTION UNDER MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FiyQUARANTINE[Press notice]JUNE ,Instructions removing cowpeas from the list of host vegetable retricledunder the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine regulations have been i-ssued bythe Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. the United Salttt cZ Dopart-ment of Agriculture announced to-day.The department states that while other kind of beans are suseeptih1e tuinfestation by the fly, the type of bean known as the cowplxa is not recordedto have been infested in the past. Experinient.al studies have been czirried intunder which an attempt has been made to force the fruit flies to lay egrs incowpeas, but these attempts have not resulted in infest ati(JII. Tlii (xpwri-mental work is being continued and if at any time it is shown i Uav cOwpcNa'are not immune, they will again be placed under restriction.While cowpeas are not shipped commnercially from Florida, the ; T i t a knby the department is of importance, as it permits the planting of cowpras inthe infested zones, a measure which is valuable for the maintenance of thefertility of the soil. Cowpeas are also extensiv('lv used a a vect ableADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONSREMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS ON COWPEAS(Approved June 27, 1929; effective June 27, 1929)1. Q. C. A.-237. J u i: 1 92w.Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit-fly qua rantine regubL-tions (Notice of Quarantine No. 68) the following admini istrative inst rlu t i ln -are issued:In view of the absence of any record of Alediterranean fruit-fly in fe-tationin the type of bean known as cowpeas and the failure thins far to forceinfestation therein experimentaly, cowpeas are until further notice renivedfrom the list of host vegetables restricted under the Mediterranean fru it-Ily-quarantine regulations. The said regulations are amended by inserting tlewords " ( except cowpeas) " after the words " beans of all killd " where tlielatter terms occur in paragraph (Ii) of reguhition 1, and praraaiipi ii Iregulation 5.No restrictions will liereafter he enforced under this quarantine with respectto cowpeas either as to interstate iovenent, or the plamnting, growitiu, ortenlane of such cowpeas in infested or protective zones or elsewhere.Regulations affecting other kindS of beans remain in full force an1d e1c1as heretofore.C. L. ma.Chief, Plant Quarantine ande C-ntr-1AmnitaiApproved:ARTHUn M. IIYD:,Secretary of Agrioulture.

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118 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)ENTRY OF NARCISSUS BULBS FOR PROPAGATION IN THE FALL OF 1929P. Q. C. A.-223. APRIL 10, 1929.It is evident that the bulb growers of this country have now had ampleopportunity to import narcissus bulbs in sufficient quantity to meet propaga-tion requirements, and hence there is no further need for the present limit of 100,000 bulbs per variety.In order to reduce the pest risk to the minimum, it is ordered that, beginningwith the season 1929, importations of narcissus bulbs shall be limited to atotal of 25,000 bulbs in any one year. This total may include any number ofvarieties and permits. This limitation shall not apply to the Chinese sacredlily (narcissus), but the quantities of this variety authorized are to be in-dicated in the permit.On the ground that it is believed that the following varieties are adequatelyavailable in the United States to meet essential propagation needs and thatit is therefore unnecessary to accept the pest risk which accompanies their en-try, further permits shall be refused for the following varieties: Glory ofSassenheim, Laurens Koster, King Alfred, Paperwhite, Sir Watkin, Soleil d'Or,and Spring Glory.From present indications, it would appear that there will be no need forfurther importations for propagation stock of Gloriosa, Minister Talma, Pheas-ant's Eye (Poeticus recurrus) and Tresserve after the importing season 1929.On the basis of the applications now on file or those later received, specialpermits for the importation of narcissus bulbs in the fall of 1929 will be issuedas promptly as possible in accordance with the above limitations.The attention of all persons who are now growing narcissus bulbs importedunder special permit for propagation, namely, the imports of the crops of 1927and 1928, is called to the fact that before further permits can be issued tosuch persons, the administration must have on file either a map or a statementshowing the exact location where the bulbs are being grown. Moreover, theplantings of all such importations must be appropriately labeled with permitnumber so as to maintain their identity.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.PHONY PEACH-DISEASE QUARANTINE (NO. 67)GEORGIA AND ALABAMA QUARANTINED ON ACCOUNT OF THE PHONY PEACHDISEASE "[Press notice]MAY 6, 1929.The Secretary of Agriculture has announced the establishment of a quaran-tine, effective June 1, 1929, on the States of Georgia and Alabama to prevent thespread of the phony peach disease.Under the provisions of this quarantine, restrictions are placed on the inter-state movement from the regulated areas of peach and nectarine trees, peachand nectarine roots, and all other trees and shrubs grafted or budded on peachor nectarine roots. The areas affected cover 64 counties of central and westernGeorgia and 1 county of eastern Alabama as follows: Baker, Baldwin, Barrow,Bibb, Bleckley, Butts, Calhoun, Chattahoochee, Chattooga, Clarke, Clayton,Coweta, Crawford, Crisp, DeKalb, Dooly, Dougherty, Fayette, Fulton, Greene,Gwinnett, Hancock, Harris, Henry, Houston, Jackson, Jasper, Jones, Lamar,Laurens, Lee, Macon, Marion, Meriwether, Mitchell, Monroe, Morgan, Muscogee,Newton, Oconee, Oglethorpe, Peach, Pike, Pulaski, Putnam, Quitman, Randolph,Rockdale, Schley, Spalding, Stewart, Sumter, Talbot, Taliaferro, Taylor, Terrell,Troup, Twiggs, Upson, Walton, Washington, Webster, Wilkinson, and WorthCounties in Georgia ; and Lee County in Alabama.The shipment of peach, nectarine, and other restricted trees, or peach andnectarine roots interstate from the regulated areas will, under this quarantine,he conditione(I on the securing of a permit from the United States Departmentof Agriculture. Such permits are to be issued only to nurseries " within which and within 1 mile of which no inaction of the phony peach disease has existedfor at least two years prior to the proposed date of movement." Applications2 See notice of hearing, S. R. A. No. 97, p. 134.

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929j sER':VICE AND RlEGULA'IORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 119for nursery inspection are required to be filed with the Plant Quarantine anuControl Administration prior to July 1, and, except for 192!. at lea K one Ve':1preceding the proposed date of shipment. Shippers may secure copies uf t -juarantine regulations without charge by addressing the Plant Quarantine an 1Control Administration, United States Departiment of Agrie' iture, 1729 NewYork Avenue, Washington. ). C.The phoiiy pcwh disensa'e is ana infectious condition of the roet system which;auscs peach and nectarinie Irees, and other trees grafted or budded on liem-ior nectarine roots, to becoliie dwarfed and to produce abnoriilly mallet andpoorly flavored fruit. The infectious virus appears to be c( nfiniiei entirely tothe root system and no rest rictions therefore are placed on Itle Piovemenl 01fruit or of scionI. branches, and other parts of peach and ne tari'i trees witi.-'iut roots.The disease has been known for some years and has gradually spread until itis now found in 94) per cent of the commercial peach orchards of Georgia. Sur-;eys indicate its absence from other States, except av oie point in Almabma.An eradication campaign in the infected area is being undertaken by theFederal and State Departments of Agriculture, and tih nature of the infection a-uch that this plan off vs great promise of success.QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE PHONY PEACH DISEASENOTICE oF QUARANTINE No. 67(Approved April 30, 1929; effective June 1, 1929)1, A. M. Hyde, secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it ineces-sary to quarantine the States of Georgia and Alabama to prevent the spread (ifthe phony peach disease. a dangerous plant disease new to and not hereto-fore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quar-Antine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act ofCongress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly givellthe public hearing required thereby, I (10 quaralititie the said State ' ifGeorgia and Alabamna, effective on and after June 1, 1929. Itereafter, mailerthe authority of said act of August 20, 192, amended as aforesaid, no )ealltrees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots, or any kinds or varieties of,rees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots slall be shipped.offered for shipment to a comimoi carrier, received for transportation or trails-ported by a common carrier, or carried, traiislorted, moved, or allowed to lemoved from the said (juarantined States to any other Sta ,e r Territ ry orDistrict of the United States ili manner or method or under cot at ioiin, 4tlierthan those prescribed in the rules and regulations hercinallfter imo le aml illamendments thereto: Providcd. That the restrictions if Ihis quara atine andof the rules 811(d regulations stuppilmental thereto may be limited 0) ie atIIWin the quaranti ed States now or which tmay hereafter be desiignated by theSecretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when in the jud-ietit of tin'Secretary of Agriculture, such limitation shall be adeqIui te to) prevelti tilespread of the phony peach disca se to (other States and Territories. :n (hlethe movement of 11 w lrVct l articles interstate from such re-ilawd at r , isso safeguarded as to prevent the spread Of the said disease there rm I t a iiI t herparts of the quarantined 1States and thence into interstate cotnlnerce.Done at the city of Washin gton this 30th day of April, 1929.Witness myv hand ad tile seal of lie 'nited States I ep:i rIi li IAgricult tire.[IEAL-. AwRTviU \i l'lin.Scrf'tarj of \ ril/ arett ,s MN) REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOl'eI OF Ql' \1\N I INE No(A\ki)pioVed April :1o, 192 9; eflectivo, Jhine 1, 1929)REGULATION 1. t)EFINITIoNSFor tile purl(iise Of I ese regtilat ions ti he li llowM iIll" w11d-,shall be cost rued, resj ect ively, t mncan :(a) Phony peach (iisense: A coilniiicbl disease of I'd I lconliltilly kiwivil as phony peach (disease am(] elI:'aceril I I\trees, reduction of tle crop an1d certain ot het' sypt
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120 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,(b) Quarantined area: Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agricul-ture to prevent the spread of the phony peach disease.(c) Regulated area: Any area in a quarantined State which is now or whichmay hereafter be designated as such by the Secretary of Agriculture in accord-ance with the -proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 67.(d) Restricted articles: Peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarineroots, and all kinds and varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peachor nectarine roots.(e) Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREASConditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned withthe proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 67, the restrictions provided in theseregulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated in said noticeof quarantine will be limited to such movement from the areas in such Statenow or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREASIn accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 67, the Secretaryof Agriculture designates as regulated areas the following counties, includingall cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:Alabarna.-County of Lee.Georgia.-Counties of Baker, Baldwin, Barrow, Bibb, Bleckley, Butts, Cal-houn, Chattahoochee, Chattooga, Clarke, Clayton, Coweta, Crawford, Crisp,DeKalb, Dooly, Dougherty, Fayette, Fulton, Greene, Gwinnett, Hancock, Harris,Henry, Houston, Jackson, Jasper, Jones, Lamar, Laurens, Lee, Macon, Marion,Meriwether, Mitchell, Monroe, Morgan, Muscogee, Newton, Oconee, Oglethorpe,Peach, Pike, Pulaski, Putnam, Quitman, Randolph, Rockdale, Schley, Spalding,Stewart, Sumter, Talbot, Taliaferro, Taylor, Terrell, Troup, Twiggs, Upson,Walton, Washington, Webster, Wilkinson, and Worth.REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREASThe regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reducedas may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of anyextension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writingto the transportation companies doing business in or through the States inwhich such areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapersselected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areasaffected are located.REGULATION 5. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF PEACH TREES AND OTHER RESTRICTEDARTICLES FROM THE REGULATED AREAS(1) No peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots, or any kindsor varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine rootsshall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas toany point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by theUnited States Department of Agriculture.(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of peach 'ornectarine fruit, fruit pits, cuttings, scions, or other parts of peach or nectarinetrees without roots.(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of the articlesenumerated from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.REGULATION 6. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF PERMITS(1) Permits authorizing the interestate movement of restricted articles fromthe regulated areas into or through points outside thereof may be issuedunder either of the following conditions: (a) That the articles to be moved shall be shown by evidence satisfactoryto the inspector to have originated outside the regulated areas and not tohave been subject to infection within such areas.

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19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTs 121(b) That the articles, if originating within a regulated area, shall have becnproduced in a nursery within which, and within one mile of which. no ilif wtionof the phony peach disease has existed for at least two years" prior to theproposed date of movement.(2) Upon determination by the inspector that the articles concerned omplywith either of the conditions named, the inspector may issue tu the er weror shipper a permit and such number of shipping certificates as may honecessary for the movement of the said articles.(3) Outstanding permits and certificates may be withdrawn and further per-mits and certificates may be refused as to any grower or shipper whole has vio-lated any of these rules and regulations or who has falsely labeled or nislabc)celany shipment so as to evade any of these rules and regulations. or wv>ho liamade any false statement or representation in connection vith securing a per-mit or certificate. When any permit is thus withdIrawn and the perCI' tee :Nduly notified thereof, further use of the shipping certificates issued to -uchpermittee is prohibited.REGULATION 7. APPLICATION FOR PERMITS(1) Applications for the inspection of nurseries from which restr*Xted articlesare to be moved interstate to points outside the regulated areas under permitshall be filed with the Plant Quarantine and Control Adininistratil nI prior toJuly 1 at least one year (except for 1929) preceding the proposed date of ship-ment: Provided, That such period of one year shall not be required with re'pcctto applications submitted within 60 days after the effective date of the dcsina-tion as regulated area of the territory in which the nursery is located.(2) Applications for permiits for the reshipment from points within the re-u-lated areas of restricted articles grown by a permittee unler the conditionsprescribed in paragraph (1) (b) of regulation 6 may be filed by purchasers ufsuch articles at any time and shall be accompanied by a signed agreement bythe applicant agreeing to observe these regulations and the conEtions u:dkrwhich the permit is issued.REGULATION 8. MARKING REQUIREMENTSEvery car, box, bale, or other container of articles for which perimits are re-quired by these regulations shall be plainly marked with the name and adirewof the consignor and the name and address of the consignee, and shall bearsecurely attached to the outside thereof the shipping certificate (Forim 5S91prescribed in regulation G.REGULATION 9. INSPECTION IN TRANSITAny car, vehicle, basket. box, or other container moved intersia c or offeredto a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contain s or which lie in-spector has probable cause to believe contains articles the ioveenieit of N\ itis prohibited or restricted by these regulations. shall be subject to ilpecti1nby an inspector at any time or place.REGULATION 10. SHIPMENTS BY TIIE UNITED sTATEs DEPARTMENTS ' \ ;I4' i iaArticles subject to restriction in these regulations 111may beo in' cIt rtkeby the United States Departmnent of Agriculture for experincinta Ir I ciet il()rpurposes on such conditions wid 1inmder such safeguards as may be 1r1r,.by the Plant Quarantine and control l Administ ration. The coma iitnl r ot art ile-so loVed( shall bear, securely at t ached to t he out side t here'f. ;I al idlclit i i' atag from the Plant Quarantine and control l Administrat ion howiW coinliaiwith such conditions.These rules and regulations shall be effective on anud after June 1, 1, eLDone at the city of Washington this 30th day of April, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United St:te 1 'upartmatt ul Atiin ti[SEAL.] AnTi M I 01 With respect to shipnueits made prior to July 1, 1V)-0 i h1.season's Inspection may be accepted.

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122 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-JuneAPPENDIXPENALTIESThe plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), provides that nc person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor shall anycommon carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any personcarry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District of theUnited States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through anyother State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any otherclass of plants. fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, * * or any otherarticle * * specified in the notice of quarantine * * in manner ormethod or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary ofAgriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of theprovisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroyany certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretaryof Agriculture, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon con-viction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500 or by imprisonmentnot exceeding one year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretionof the court.STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTIONThe States of Georgia and Alabama have promulgated or are about to pro-mulgate quarantines restricting intrastate movement supplemental to theFederal quarantine. These State quarantines are enforced in cooperation withthe Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantineorders may be obtained by addressing United States Department of Agriculture,Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Washington, D. C.Early in June a subsidiary office will be established in the office of the Stateentomologist at Atlanta, Ga.NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERSWASHINGTON, D. C., April 30, 1929.SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicat-ing your official title, and mail this sheet to the Secretary of Agriculture in theinclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as fol-lows:That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approvedAugust 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amendedby the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, byNotice of Quarantine No. 67, effective on and after June 1, 1929, quarantinedthe States of Georgia and Alabama to prevent the spread of the phony peachdisease and has ordered that no peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots, or any kinds or varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded onpeach or nectarine roots shall be shipped, offered for shipment to a commoncarrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the said quarantinedStates in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribedin the rules and regulations supplemental to said quarantine or in amendmentsthereto.Very respectfully,ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agricaultur.[Do not detach this receipt]Recei v(led 1his ntice 'ad the copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 67, with rulesand regular itions imientioned therein this -_____day of ------------1929.(Signature(Title)[Sent to all common carriers doing business within and throughout the States otGeorgia and Alabama.]

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19291 6ERIVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEM\EN TS 123NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH .NEWSPAPERSNotice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, mlner anthorit\conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20. 1912 (37 Stat315), as amended, has, by Notice of Quarantine No. oT, effective June 1, 129quarantined the States of Georgia and Alabama to prevent the spread of thephony peach disease and has ordered that no peach trees, peach roots. nectarinetrees, nectarine roots, or any kinds or varieties of trees or shrubgrafted ol'budded on peach or nectarine roots shall be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from the said quarantined States in manner or method or under ren-ditions other than those prescribed in the rulc s and reguhtions made thereunder and amendments thereto. Copies of said quarantiie. and the rules andregulations supplemental thereto, may be obtained from the Plant Quarai meand Control Administration, Department of Ar culture. Washington, D. CARTHUR M. HYDE,Secrctatry of Atlpicl.ui[Published in the Atlanta Journal, Atlanta, Ga., June 15, 1 r:, and int Ili Ip'ikaNews, Opelika, Ala., June 19, 1929.]INSTRUCTIONs To PoSTMASTERSPosTOFFICE Di ARTMENT.TiiiRD A SSTSTANT POSTMASTER (ENERAL.Washingtou. May .LPPosTMAsTER.MY DEAR SIR: There is inclosed for your information aA guidance a copy ofQuarantine Order No. 67 of the United State' Departient of Agriculitnrc. onaccount of the phony peach disease, effiectiv June 1. 192).It will be noted that under Regulation 5. no pv-ei t Io-, peach POtS, Lee-tarine trees, nectarine roots or any kinds or varieties of t rees or shrubs gra ftedor budded on peach or nectarine roots, shall be imioved or allowed t1 be moveinterstate from the regulated areas to any po.nt outside tilereof unless a lwrnm itshall have been issued therefor by the United States Department ot Az gerict lure.No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of peach or nectarinefruit, fruit pits, cuttings, scions or other parts of peach or nectarine treeswithout roots. Under the provisions of panragraph 1. section 4t, Postal Law and Regula-tions, parcels containing any of the prohiliited trees, roots or shrubs may n itbe accepted for mailing from any point in the nre't quarantined by he Order unless the articles are acconlpanied wit h the required certilien t ' of the 1IinitedStates Department of Agriculture.Sincerely yours,R. S. [EGARt.h'lird A .iocKStallt PestmasIcer G,')1ir i i[Above Instructions sent to all postmiast( rs in 4 -r.ia and i 0Le CountX 1,1 iPINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTI NE (NO. 52)PINK-BOLLWORM REGULATED ARFA MODIFIVI[Prns notice]A portion of the itil tilierii half of ClmaWio E'e .liit\ , XI l e leb-aed \il>25 from the areas regulated under tlie Federal pink olluIIim' quarantine.cording to an anlioulicemllent b.\ ile Secr(' ary of Agricuilttre. Tin tmeinndiio.effective May 25, removes restri etions oI the i(er'laW mjiench f el! ohlint, cottonseed, and (eri :in other products from ihe a ia , i relt-cd'the boundary hle of the regulated trritorv n. 11eu izimntd >epanite T' hginning areas more logically than the line preiusls adopted. :cedIidia To I
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124 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,MODIFICATION OF PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINEAMENDMENT No. 3 " To RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OFQUARANTINE No. 52 (REvIsED)(Approved May 16, 1929 ; effective on and after May 25, 1929)Under authorIty conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37Stat. 315). as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat.1134, 1165). it is ordered that regulation 3 of the rules and regulations supple-mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), on account of the pink bollworm. which were promulgated July 9, 1927, be and the same is hereby amendedto read zs follows:REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREASIn accordance with the first proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised),the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas the followingcounties and parts of counties in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, including allcities. towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:Texas area.-The counties of Terrell, Presidio, Brewster, Pecos, Jeff Davis,Reeves, Ward, Loving, Culberson, Hudspeth, El Paso, Winkler, Andrews, Ector,Crane, Upton. Midland, Martin, Glasscock, and all those portions of Dawson,Borden, and Howard Counties lying south and west of the following describedboundary lines: Begininng at the west boundary line of Dawson County at thesouthwest corner of section 114 of block M; thence in an easterly direction onthe south line of sections 114, 89, 84, 71, 66, 53, 48, and 35 to the southeastcorner of said section 35; thence northerly on the east line of section 35 to thenortheast corner of said section; thence easterly on the south line of sections28, 27. 26. and 25 of block M, and of section 27 of block C41 to the southeastcorner of said section 27 of block C41; thence southerly 3 miles on the eastline of sections 7, 6, and 1 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5 to the southwestcorner of section 2 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5; thence easterly on thesouth line of sections 2 and 3 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5, and of sections12 and 11 of the Georgetown Railroad Co. block 35 to the southeast corner ofsection 11 of said block; thence southerly along the east line of sections 24and 21 of the D. L. Cunningham block 4 to the southwest corner of section 22of said block 4; thence easterly along the south line of section 22 of saidblock 4 and section 1 of the Georgetown Railroad Co. block 34 to the southeastcorner of said section 1; thence southerly on the east line of sections 6 and 7of the J. Poitevent block 2 to the southeast corner of said section 7; thenceeasterly on the south line of section 8 of the J. Poitevent block 2 and ofsections 9 and 10 of block 34, township 6 north, to the southeast corner ofsaid section 10; thence northerly along the east line of said section 10 to thenortheast corner of said section; thence easterly along the north line of section11 of block 34, township 6 north of the northeast corner of said section; thencesoutherly along the east line of said section 11 to the southeast corner ofsaid section; thence easterly on the south line of section 14 of block 34, township 6 north, to the southeast corner of said section; thence southeasterly alongthe meanderings of Dry Tobacco Canyon and the south fork of the ColoradoRiver across the boundary line between Dawson and Borden Counties to apoint in Borden County where the Big Spring-Gail public road crosses saidriver; thence in a southerly direction following the said Big Spring-Gail roadto a point 1 mile south of Morris schoolhouse in Howard County, the samebeing at intersection of the Vincent road; thence south along fence to MorganCreek: thence southeasterly along the meanderings of said Morgan Creek to the Howard-Mitchell County line; thence south along said county line to thesoutheast corner of Howard County.New Mexico area.-The counties of Chaves, Eddy, Otero, Dona Ana, Luna,Grant. and Hidalgo.Arizona area.-The counties of Cochise, Graham, and Greenlee.This amendment shall be effective on and after May 25, 1929, and shallcancel and supersede amendment No. 1 to the rules and regulations supple-mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 as revised.Done at the city of Washington this 16th day of May, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-culture.[SEAL.] R. W. DUNLAP,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.24 This amendment consists in the release of part of the northern half of Dawson County,Tex., from the areas formerly designated as regulated.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 125NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERSWASHINGTON, D. C., May 16.SI: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicatingyour official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in theinclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent. as fol-lows:That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approvedAugust 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine aet (37 Stat. 315), as amendedby the act of Congress approved March 4. 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165). has, byamendment No. 3 to the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice ofQuarantine No. 52 (Revised), on account of the pink bollworm, given noticethat regulation 3 has been amended, effective on and after May 25, 1929. toread as per copy inclosed.Very respectfully,R. W. DUNLAP,Acting Secretary of Agriculturc.(Inclosures.)[Do not detach this receipt]Received this notice and the copy of amendment 3 to the Rules and Regu-lations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 mentioned therein this.--day of-----------, 1929.(Signature) (Title) [Sent to all common carriers doing business in and through the State of Texas.]NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC TIlROUGH NEwSPAPERSW ASHINGTON. D. C., May i1. 1929Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconferred on him by the plant quarantine oct i1f August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),as amended, has promulgated an amendment, effective May 25. 1921), to the rulesand regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52. as revised, onaccount of the pink bollworm. This amendment modifies regulation 3 byreleasing part of the northern half of Dawson Cmunty. Tex., from the areasformerly designated as regulated. Copies of said amendment may he obtain dfrom the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. United States I)epurt-ment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.It. W. DUNLAP.Ac!inq 8cerctary of Agriculturo[Published in the Dawson County Journal, Lamesa, Tex., 'May 30, 1929.]WOODGATE-RUST QUARANTINE (NO. 65)INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTLRSTVIIIU A\ssi'TANTr l'srMAsTEKR GElNKIAL.WuxingonMall 1, Po9&POSTMAsTEER.MY DEAR SIR: There is inclose(I for your in x:mtin 'a11d guidance a Cpyof quarantine order No. 65 of the 'nited Sia as 1-part1mei 1f Agr ultare.on account of the Woodgate rust, together with i cqy of Anendmint No Ithereto, effective April 1, 1929, which prl-hibits thy miovemeni't uf Sct piieoand other hard pine from the counties of ClintfnI, Eex, Franklin. I la .Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, and St. Lx wreN. N Y.It will be noted that regulation 5 of the order abs 'lxt ely prviiito tle iment of Scotch pine and other hard pines or parts thereof from th: rd i darea into or through any point outside such area.

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126 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June.Under the provisions of paragraph 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regula-Tions, you will please be careful to see that no trees, branches, limbs or twigsof any variety of the pine trees mentioned in the order are accepted formailing at your office.Sincerely yours,R. S. REGARD,Third Assistant Postmaster General.MISCELLANEOUS ITEMSDOMINICAN REPUBLIC ADDED TO COUNTRIES WHICH MAY SHIP POTATOES TOTHE UNITED STATESEvidence has recently been submitted to the Department of Agriculture,through the State Department, that the Dominican Republic has met all ofthe general conditions set forth in regulation 2 of the regulations governingthe importation of potatoes into the United States, including the establishmentof the fact that it is free from the potato wart and other injurious potatodiseases and insect pests new to or not widely prevalent or distributed withinand throughout the United States. This administration is, therefore, now in position to issue permits for the entry of potatoes from the Dominican Republic.PARCELS CONTAINING PLANTS ACCEPTED IN VIOLATION OF JAPANESE BEETLEAND OTHER QUARANTINESTHIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,Washington, April 17, 1929.The United States Department of Agriculture has informed this. office thata large number of parcels of plants and plant products were accepted fortransmission in the mails during the past year in violation of the quarantinesestablished by that department on account of the Japanese beetle and otherinjurious insect infestations or plant diseases. The reports show that thewrongful acceptance in the majority of the cases was due to negligence ofwindow clerks to inquire as to the nature of the contents of the parcels when offered for mailing, or ignorance on the part of postal employees of the quarantine requirements.The Department of Agriculture states that this is a very serious matter,since failure to comply with the prohibitions and restrictions of quarantine orders is likely to result in the spread of injurious insect infestations andplant diseases and thus lead to disaster of the first magnitude, and that inaddition to the injurious effect on the agriculture of the region involved,would probably necessitate large Federal and State appropriations.Postmasters and postal employees are, therefore, admonished that all plantquarantine orders in effect in their respective States must be rigorously en-forced, careful inquiry being made to ascertain the nature of the contentsof parcels mailed, and close study made of the conditions governing allquarantines in effect in their particular State or county.Postmasters must see to it that all window clerks in their offices are thor-oughly instructed with respect to the requirements of the quarantines ineffect in their particular locality, and if any plant material should be ac-cepted in violation of such quarantines must take suitable action to prevent arepetition.R. S. REGARD,Third Assistant Postmaster General.CONVICTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACTThe following convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act werereported to the administration during the period April 1 to June 30, 1929:JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. W. E. Marshall & Co. (Inc.), New York,N. Y., in the interstate shipment of 1 calla, 1 amaryllis, and 2 large crintim

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 127bulbs from New York to a point outside the quarantined area, without inspec-tion and certification. the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25. (Plantquarantine case No. 363.)QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTSIn the case of the United States v. Maria Lucinda Padillo, Brownsville, Tex.,in attempting to smuggle in seven avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Manuel Caldera, Brownsville, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant was filed $5.In the case of the United States i-. Pedro Montes Cliavez. Brownsville, Tex.-in attempting to smuggle in 14 avocados and 4 mangoes from Mexico, the defend-ant was fined $5.In the case of the Unitod States v. Simon Flores, Brownsville. Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in six avocados and one mamey from Mexico, the defendantwas fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Fisk Nancy, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Jesus Martinez, Eagle Pass, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in six avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined S5.In the case of the United States v. E. W. Vertress, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempt -ing to smuggle in seven avocado seeds from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Mrs. I. M. Earnest, Laredo, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in six avocados from Mexico, the defendant \ as lintl $5.In the case of the United State r. Dan Skeens, McAllen, Tex., in attemptin-to smuggle in three avocados from Mexico, the defendant waz filed $5.In the case of the United States v. M. Melancon, Mission. Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in one mamey from Mexico, the defendant was Iined $5.In the case of the U7nited States r. A. S. Regna, Laredo. Tex. in atteniptinito smuggle in 28 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the ease of the United States v. Mrs. B. L. Cain., Brownsville. Tox. inattempting to smuggle in 17 mangoes from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States r. Jose Zamora, Brownsville. Tex., in attemlpt-ing to smuggle in four avocados from Mexico, the defendatit \vas fined 5.In the case of the United States v. Francisco Jinenez. Ezi-le Pass, Tex. inattempting to smuggle in 12 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Trinidad De Leon. Ea-le Pass. Tex., iiattempting to smuggle ill two mameys from Mexico, the defendant was fited $5.Ill the case of the United States r,,. Ignacio Puga, El Paso, Tex. in attemiptinl'gto sm4g!e in one avoeMdo from Mexico. the defendbant wvis fined $5.Ii the e of Ille Tnited States 1'. Felix Benaveutte. El P"Iso, Tex. in at-tempting to smug1le in fonr mangoes from Mexico. the defendant was flned $5.TI the case of the TTinited States q. David Orterna. El iaso. Tex._ in atl -ijt tingto smule-4 in i x man ve.s :I n I two a'ocados frim Mtxi c, the defenIait wafined $5.Ill thp (ae if the (rnitd SI :rt P. Gien Lewi'< ElI 't , x., in attemptingto smu--ile ill ,,V1 !nI I('l 11d Isght ad's frtim Mexico. the defenidaitwas fined $5.In the case of the United State, v. 1. Guajirdo. Enule Ptss. Ttx. in attempttimg to SmuLgle in sevel irtnces lrom Mexico. the deft ida t wa fined 55.TIn ile c:ese f ti, Initet Stfe< p. .Tesiv Ilerimanlez. E le' Pa'. Tex. illnattnmptingll mge n Ir h) illo fr-m Nl (xivo, theo defenldan1t wvas filled .In the case of tIl Un(itid Sate' r. Mari1 P. tie Li'pz. El Paso. Tlx. in at-temnpt into '11,502 I& 10 4lanI front Mexico, ihe defetldanIt was filled 55.i In lhe case hi hi Uniti Sfatt' '. Murwts Z.'ta. Ilidalhzti. Tex, in at tmIlipt1ng to smule inl 12 aNfios frvm Mexico. the defetida at wa fitted 41.Ti the (so ,f the rn r'd St at .Gatneva lPerez. lIidalgo. Tex., ill a I mpt-illL. to smn:glll( 1 ill five x'ucnTi sqrd' from MIxi(i. te deftTiant w i litii SsItt thu ;i'-su of thi' Tinted Sit es r V. G tozal's. Browvtivle. Tex .in :ttemtt-in' to snZLte iti fixe :avtdos frit Mu'xito. the defendant was tInei Ss.In the (*tlse of the Uit( States .C. Saetz. B rowinevill. T o. ii ittem) tinltil SmiumLe i ir ;ta los from Mxifii, ithe defeda was fie 5.it tilt, ew e ofth Uited .1ttes v.MS nlelz Il s mw sie T x i itempting to ,mutjltr(, in five :) vocados front Mexico, t le defendnt wn( I tind Z5.In the ~ewe (if the Unit d SQt '. Ueves .Satini'. Eaili Pai TA 11:tteiptini, to smu-gle it 2 (frigO5, 5 ivo(:to', and 4 platt Vrnm Mii TheAlefend:IIIt wa f0t! M.

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128 PLANT QUAREANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,In the case of the United States v. Juan Trejo, Eagle Pass. Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in two avocado seeds from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Malilde Alderete, Eagle Pass, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in three figs and two mangoes from Mexico, the de-fendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Manuel Bustamantes, El Paso, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Trinidad Zamora, El Paso, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in two avocados with seed from Mexico, the defendantwas fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Pedro Mercado, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in two sapotes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Esteban Ramirez, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Virginia Jasso, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Maria M. Moore, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in three avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. M. A. Capiro, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in six avocado seeds from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Felipe Rodriquez, Hidalgo, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Antioca Hinojosa, Hidalgo, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. L. E. Johnson, Laredo, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in three avocados and two mangoes from Mexico, the defendantwas fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Barbara Rodriquez, Laredo, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in 14 avocados and 9 mangoes from Mexico, the defend-ant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Maria E. de Elizondo, Laredo, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in 11 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Emideniciana C. de Ramirez, El Paso,Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four mangoes from Mexico, the defendantwas fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Aurelia Haro, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Ester Robles, El Paso, Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in five avocados and one mango from Mexico, the defendant wasfined $5.In the case of the United States v. James E. Harvey, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in four avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Maria Salazar, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in three mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Maria Hernandez de Munoz, El Paso,Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant wasfined $5.In the case of the United States v. Lorenzo Poblano, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in five avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the UnitedStates v. Clotilde M. de Moreno, El Paso, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in 2 mameys, I mango, and 2 sapotes from Mexico, thedefendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Miguel Barron, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to snuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Martin Campos, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendent was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. J. L. Arnold, El Paso, Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Jesus Medrano, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in four mameys from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Timotea Cruz, El Paso, Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in three sapotes and two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant wasfined $5.In the case of the United States v. Nemesia Gonzalez, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in three avocados from Mexico,; the defendant was fined $5.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 129In the case of the United States v. Dononciano Aguirre. El Paso. Tex., inattempting to smuggle in three mangoes from Mexico. the defendant wasfined $5.In the case of the United States r. Elena Casillas. El Paso, Tex. in attemp-ing to smuggle in six mangoes from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States r. Lucia Solis de Hernandez, El Paso. Tex.,in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico. the defend:ait wastined $5.In the case of the United States r. Clayton McCord. El Paso. Tex. in attempt-ing to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant ,vas fined S5.In the case of the United States r. Maria Carrasco, El Paso. Tex. in at-tempting to smuggle in four mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was lined $5.In the case of the United States r. Loui Bruce, El Paso, Tex. in attempting tosmuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $3.In the case of the United States r. W. M. Robinson, Hidalgo. Tex. in attempt-ing to smuggle in two mangoes and one avocado from Mexico. the defendant wafined $5.In the case of the United States r. Dr. C. M. Williamson. Hidalgo, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in 12 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was filed $5.In the case of the United States v. John Jaeaman, Laredo, Tex. in attemptingto smuggle in nine avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States r. L. Pena. Laredo. Tex., in attempting tosmuggle in two avocados and two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant wasfined $5.In the case of the United States r. W. M. Mosheim, Laredo, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in four mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was tined $5.In the case of the United States r. L. C. Fitzhugh, Larodo, Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in 11 mangoes and 5 avocados from Mexico. the defendant wasfined $5.In the case of the United States r. Geo. Alexander. Laredo. Tex., in attenptingto smuggle in four avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States r. J. A. De La Garza. Larcdo, Tex. in at-tempting to smuggle in 4 mangoes and 11 avoc'ados from Mexico. *Ii, defen-ant was fined $5.ORGANIZATION OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROLADMINISTRATIONC. L. MARLATT, Ch i f of Ad fifnisi-tV(tioo.S. A. ROHWER, Assist'lit ('h iuf.B. Co-ooN0., Biusiness _I a nafer.R. C. ALTHOUSE. Informational Officer.C. A. LOCKE, Executive Assixtant.H. T. CRONIN, Adiistra Ire A .sisn t.E. R. S\sscER, in Charge Fori(ln Plant QuarantinS. B. FRACKER, in C1arc D)on'4ic Plant uaranltinB. L. BoYDEN, in Field Charge Date-Scale Quaran i e i Hecadqa, te , Ildio.Calif.).L. H1. WoT11IEY, in Field Charge Euiro>c~an ( rn -No~ r Qurana I Hlud-U(r/terN, Estcin Sf cfion. Bostoii. Mass.; WeJter eo T d. Ohl I..B;URESSs. in Field Chlarqc Gil's.-3Ioth a 11 l1 o !-T! lb t ;a1rant1 u(Ileadquart rs. j10i-ros Jliqhlian d., Al a s.C. 11. IADLEY. in F ChargC J(Ipaese-Th b Qua ran in if (a1d.Camdn 1, X. J,.R. E. MCDONA L. in Fi'ld i(arl IinkflIuorm a 4 Tb(IC rPul r I Qantincs (l Had quarteri;. Sun Antonio. 'Tex.M. H. F'oiw. Act ing in Field Chiarqe lb xb an 'an it W mi9 rn a ii ad-quart(,rs. H ar-ingeni, Tcx. i.W1LuNION NEWELL, in F -1'id Charti Medif, rranan aj ;raFlorida l Hviquar( rs, Orlando, F4i.A. ('. BTivii. Bur au of lnitonori n 1 I u i 1 i) t1-M('dit( rrt! n' an Fruit-Ujy qi ara nine (,lbadqunrt r., Irnani, FlP. A. IDIA1\LE. in Field Ihrge ediirranean F1 I t 1 IT Iu ara(I JEmhen t and lns ction Work in States nth r :laa I ala 11Atlanta, Ga.).

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130 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [April-June,ADVISORY FEDERAL PLANT QUARANTINE BOARDC. L. MARLATT, Chairman.J. E. GRAF, Bureau of Entomology, Member.R. A. OAKLEY, Bureau of Plant Industry, Member.M. B. WAITE, Bureau of Plant Industry, Member.Forest Service, Member.11. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 192JFor sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, ). 1 --Price 1 cents.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA3 1262 09230 9169