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Service and regulatory announcements

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Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
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Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
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Serv. regul. announc. - U. S., Plant Quar. Control Adm.
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United States -- Plant Quarantine and Control Administration
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Washington, D.C.
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U.S. G.P.O.
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Quarterly
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English
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16 v. : ; 23 cm.

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Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
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serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

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S.R.A.--P.Q.C.A. no. 96 (July/Sept. 1928)-S.R.A.--P.Q.C.A. no. 111 (Apr./June 1932).
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Title from caption.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
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0888-7608 ( ISSN )
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351 ( ddc )

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Service and regulatory announcements
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Service and regulatory announcements

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Full Text


S. R1. A.-?. Q. C. A. No. 98 I- ued Stcmt(rber, 1929


UNIED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PLANT QUARANTINE AND) CONTROL ADMINISTRATION



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH, 1929



CONTENTS

Record of current work, January i to March 31, 1929--------------------------------1Pg
European corn-borer control----------------------------1
Japanese-beetle control------------------------------2
Quarantine issued on account of the Asiatic beetles-------------------3
Pink-bollworm control------------------------------3
Thurberla weevil--------------------------------5
Prevention of spread of the gipsy moth------------------------5
Prevention of spread of the satin noth------------------------6
Mexican fruit-worm eradication--------------------------6
Parlatoria date-scale eradication--------------------------6
Narcissus inspection ------------------------------------------------------------------ 7
White-pine blister-rust quarantine enforcement------------------------------------------- 7
Grain-rust control by means of barberry eradication ------------------------------------- 8
Woodgate rust---------------------------------8
Larch canker---------------------------------8
Quarantine and other official announcements-----------------------8
Asiatic-beetle quarantine (No. 66)---------------- --------------- 8
Five States and District of Columbia quarantined on account of two Asiae beetles (pre8
notice)------------------------------------------------------------------------- 8
Quarantine and regulations--------------------------------------------------------- 10
Blister-rust quarantine (No. 63) -------------------------------------------------------- 18
Notice to nurserymen shipping currant or gooseberry plants or 5-leaf pines (P. Q. C. A. 219)--. 18
District of Columbia plant regulations -------------------------------------------------- 19
Plant shipment regulations for the District of Columbia, revised (press notice) ------------ 19
Revised regulations governing the movement of plants, plant products, and other quarantined articles into an(l out of the District of Columbia ----------------------------- 19
European corn-borer quarant ine (domestic) (No. 43) ------------------------------------- 24
European corn-borer quarantine regulations extended to new areas (press notice) ---------- 24
Modification of European corn-borer quarantine (amendment No. 3 to regulations) ---------25
Japanese-be~etle quarantine (No. 48) ------------------- -------------------------------- 29
Japanese-beetle quarantine extended to Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia
Revised quarantine and regulations ------------------------------------------------- 30
Mexican fruit-worm quarantine (No. 64) ------------------------------------------------ 40
Harvesting period for grapefruit, oranges, and 1kuiquats is extended in Texas area regulated
on account of the Mexican fruit worm (press notice)--------------------------------- 40
Nursey stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37)--------------------------------------- 40
Instructions to collectors of customs, (T. D. 43163) ------------------------------------ 40
Flowers may be cut from field-grown bulbous iris imported under special permit (P. Q. C. A.
222).---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 40
Pluk-bollworin quarantine (No. 62) ---------------------------------------------------- 41
Change in leadership of pink-bollworm and Thurberia-weevil projects-------------------- 41
1929 amendment to Texas pink-bollworin law----------------------------------------- 41
Satinoth quarantine (No. .53) ------------------------------------------------------ 4
Instructions to postmasters -------------------------------------------------------- 43
Pussy-willow shipments banned in western Washington area (press notice)---------------- 43
Woodgate-rust quarantine (No. 65)----------------------------------------------------- 44
Woodgate-rust regulations amended (press notice) ------------------------------------ 44
Amendment of Woodgate-rust quarantine (amendment No. 1)-------------------------- 44
Terminal inspection of plants and plant productsPlants and plant products addressed to places in Wyoming-------------------------------- 45
Plants and plant products addressed to places in Mississippi ------------------------------- 46
Convictions for violations of thle plant quarantine act----------------------------------------- 46
Japaziese-beetle quarantine------------------------------------------------------------- 46
Blister-rust quarantine---------------------------------------------------------------- 47
Quarantines affecting Mexican products------------------------------------------------- 47
Organization of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration ----------------------------- 48



RECORD OF CURRENT WORK, JANUARY I TO MARCH 31,
1929

EUROPEAN CORN-BORER CONTROL

The :European corn-borer quarantine, wa1S am11ended onl Februlary 25 to bring under restriction tile areas found inifi-sttd in 192S. As stated in Ih( his'st iliw
64059-29_







2

of the announcements, the extent of new territory was less than in previous years, except in western New England. In addition to the townships added to the regulated area on account of the discovery of new infestations, all that part of Michigan not heretofore under restriction was included. Such action. was taken in order to simplify quarantine enforcement by utilizing the natural barrier of Lake Michigan against spread of infestation to the west. The corn borer had already reached the southern end of the lake.
A new corn borer law has been passed in Rhode Island, where the losses. were heavier last season than before, and clean-up campaigns there and in southeastern Massachusetts are now under way in an effort to, eliminate cornstalks before pupation takes place in May and June.
Quarantine enforcement measures during the quarter were confined largely to the certification of shelled corn in the central and western parts of the area and of perennial plants in eastern New England. This work will be shown in tabular form in a later issue.

JAPANESE-BEETLE CONTROL

REGULATED AREA EXTENDED

Under a revision of the Japanese-beetle quarantine and regulations, effective February 15, 1929, the regulated area was enlarged to include part oif one county in the State of Maryland as well as certain Dew territory in Connecticut, Delaware, and Pennsylvania. An additional regulated area consisting of the District of Columbia and part of the State of Virginia was also designated, but the restrictions on the latter area relate only to the interstate movement Of .nursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure and do not affect the interstate movement of farm products.
The rapidity with which this insect has spread since its original discovery in 1916 is indicated in Table 1, which was prepared by the Japanese-beetlecontrol office of the administration. In that table the figures from 1916 to 1923 show the areas actually known to be infested. Beginning with 1924, the discovery of isolated infestations at a distance from the center of infestation made it necessary to include within the regulated area certain intervening and apparently noninfested territory. In 1927 and 1928, respectively, certain of the isolated points discovered were not covered by the Federal quarantine, but were instead brought under State control as reported in the last issue of the Service and Regulatory Announcements. These facts must be taken into consideration in interpretig the figures shown in the table.

TABLE 1.-Areas infested and under regulation on account of Japanese-Bectle infestation, 1916 to 1928, inlusve
[All figures refer to square miles]

Nw Penn- Dela- New Con- MayDistrict Vir- Annual
Yer Jersey vsnia ware York necti- land ubi ginia- increase Toa
vania ~~cut lmi ii

1916----------- 0.96 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.96
1917 ------------2.80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.8 2.80
1918----------- 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.2 7
1919 ----------- 48 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 41 48
1920.------------ 92 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 55 103
1921---_ --------214 57 0 0 0 0 0 0 168 271
1922 ----------- 55% 217 0 0 0 0 0 0 502 773
1923 ----------1,745 697 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,669 2,442
1924 ----------3,976 1,105 41 0 0 0 0 0 2,680 5,122
1925 ----------4,704 1,302 41 0 0 0 0 0 925 6,047
1926 ------ 7,514 5,292 135 880 0 0 0 0 7,872 13,919
1927 ----- 7.514 9,829 135 1,992 357 0 0 0 5.908 19,827,
1928_ --------- 7,514 9,8,57 1,052 1,988 535 303 70 34 1,526 21,353

The area shown for each year is that known to he infested at the close of the year indicated and brought under regulation at that time. For example, as a result of the scouting of 1926 it was found necessary to add 7,S72 squai-re Miles to the area formerly under regulation, bringing the total regulated area at the close or 1926Wto1:,919. The figures shown for 1928, namely, 21,353, represent the regulated area. under the revision of, the quarantine effective February 15, 1929. The entire State of New Jersey has been included in the Japanese-beetle quarantine since 1926.







3

VIOLATIONS OF FEDERAL AND STATE JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINES
Eighty-nine reports of shipments of restricted articles from the Japanesebeetle regulated area to outside points in violation of Federal and State Japanese-beet.e quarantines were received and investigated during the quarter; of these, 81 were parcel post, 1 freight, and 7 were by express. The packages concerned were returned to the shipper in all cases except 1, which was destroyed at the request of the consighee, and 2 which were allowed to proceed to destination. In 9 instances, investigation showed that the shipment had been made in full compliance with the quarantine but that the inspection certificate had apparently become detached from the package. As reported on a later page, three convictions for violation of the quarantine were secured during the quarter.
QUARANTINE ISSUED ON ACCOUNT OF THE ASIATIC BEETLES

On March 2 the Secretary of Agriculture issued a notice placing under quarantine the States of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, and the District of Columbia to prevent the spread of the Asiatic beetle (Anomnala orientalis Waterhouse) and the Asiatic garden beetle (Aserica castanea Arrow). The regulations supplemental to the quarantine bring under control the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock and all other plants. and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure. The territory to which these restrictions apply comprises the vicinity of New Haven, Conn.; the southern tip of the State of New York including Long Island; all of New Jersey: eastern Pennsylvania; and an outlying point including the District of Columbia and the adjacent county of Arlington, and city of A.exandria, Va.
The Asiatic beetle (Anomala) has demonstrated possibilities as a lawn pest of a very menacing character, apparently much beyond that of the Japanese beetle or of any native species. Fortunately, it spreads very slowly on its own powers from any point of new infestation in lawns but there is special risk of artificial carriage and opportunity for wide movement and spread by carriage of the grubs either in the soil about plants or in other soil, manure, etc. In nurseries already reached by the pest, earth balls about p ants have been found to contain large numbers of the grubs, in which stage the insect passes the fall, winter, and spring. Restrictions under the quarantine are therefore placed on the movement of nursery stock and other plants for propagation and on sand soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.
The Asiatic garden beetle (Aserica) the second of these two pests. works in a similar manner, but in addition to being a lawn Ipest has demonstrated possibilities of serious injury in the beetle stage to foliage, although in the latter capacity it is of less moment so far than the Japanese beetle.
The quarantine restrictions in the territory covered are so similar to those invo ved in Japanese-beetle-control operations that the administration of the quarantine has been assigned to the same field organization, and a plan of joint certification, whereby a single Federal certificate will authorize movement under both quarantines, is in operation.

PINK-BOLLWORM CONTROL

No new pink-bollworm infestations were discovered in the 1928-29 cotton crop of the United States during the quarter. The infested area determined for the season was confined to Texas, where it was limited to the vicinity of Odessa and several points in the Pcs Valley i addition to the fields along the Rio Grande River between El Paso and Brewster Counties. ()nly 23 specimens were found outside the heavily infested Big Bend territory.
With the exception of the one infested field near Odessa in Ector County, the seven counties involved in the west-central Texas outlbroeak reported last seison appeared to be free from infestation. It will be reenalled that this area and the cotton plantings of southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona we-re made the subject of an active clean-up and eradiat ion program during the season of 1927-2$. Climatic conditions proved to be highly unfavorable to the insect, and this fact, together with the active clean-up measures, reduced the number of pink bollwornis to such a point that the inspectors did not succeed in finding them Possibly as to some areas the insert has, in frt. h ,n eradieated by this combination of natural and human agencies. Regulatory measures throughout the area must he maintained as heretofore, but contimiued failure to







4

discover the insect is, of course, a most hopeful indication of the ultimate' suc-. cessful termination of the eradication campaign.
The improvement or possible eradication in these. regions, so far as, they resulted from human activities, must be credited to field clean-up. work and seed sterilization. No noncotton zones were established and cotton production has continued without interference. In the Arizona and New Mexico areas at the conclusion of cotton picking in the fall of. 1927 the cotton plants .were removed from the fields and destroyed, and the seed was sterilized as, a part of the ginning process. In the west-central Texas area ginning had been practieally
-finished for the season when the infestations were found, but all seed produced in the area which had not already been crushed was either crushed or sterilized under Federal and State supervision during the spring of 1928. At the close of the season all gins and oil mills were thoroughly cleaned to destroy any seed which might harbor infestation.
The extent to which the infestation has varied from year to, year in the El Paso Valley where field-control measures and cottonseed-sterilization requirements are in effect is shown by a series of annual observations, taken on the Ivey-Dale. ranch. Each winter scouting is carried on on that property for 54 man-days. *The number of pink bollworms found by the scouts in that length of time by crop years is as follows: 1920, 5; 1921, 158; 1922, 74; 1923, 0; 1924, 3; 1925, 252; 1926, 2; 1927, 12; 1928, 0. The variation in this vicinity appears to be due to variation in weather conditions and irregularity in the applications of local clean-up, measures. The valley has an elevation of over 3,500 feet and is subject to relatively early frosts.
QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT

The supervisors of seed sterilization in cotton gins and of lint and linter fumigation report that 267,039 bales of cotton lint were ginned in the regulated area and 267,215 bales of lint and linters were fumigated from the beginning of the 1928 crop season to March 31, 1929. A synopsis of the work is, shown in Table 2. On March 31, 12 of the gins, 8 of the fumigation plants, and 9 of the oil mills shown in the table were still in operation. The others were being cleaned under the supervision of Federal inspectors..

T~imIE 2.-Cotton ginned and fumi'gated, in the pinic-bollworm, regulatedL areas,
September 1, 1928, to March. 31, 1929, 'incl'zsive

Lit Fumi- Lint i Lntr
State or country Gins inte gation fumi- Oil Lui-r
ginedplants gated gatll efmi

Number 'Bales Number Balem Nutmber BalesTexas--------------------------------------- 76 145, 051 6 162, 138 156 7,888
New Mexico--------------------------------- 41 80, 455 2 75, 801 "2, 3, 157
Arizona------------------------------------- 11 29, 790 1 13,995. 1 2, 202
Total---------------------------------- 128 255,296 9 251,934 18i 13, 247
Mexico (work under U. S. Department of Agriculture supervision), mainly, in Juarez Valley 9 11, 743 (1) 2,016 2 18 Grand total ---------------------------- 137 267, 039 9 253, 9501 20 13, 265

1Fumigation in Texas.

Fifteen road stations were operated to prevent the spread of the pink bollwvorm and the Thurberia. weevil at the localities in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona shown in previous announcements. At these stations 64,579 cars were stopped and inspected and over 25 per cent (16,386) were found to be carrying restricted articles. Inspectors confiscated 100 picking sacks, 402 mattresses, and pillows, seed cotton from 943 cars, and other articles from 50 cars. They passed 4,151 picking sacks (after cleaning or treatment where necessary) and 56,521 mattresses and pillows.

TEXAS PLANS TO COMPENSATE OWNERS FOR PINK-BOLLWORM LOSSES,

The Texas Legislature on February 12, 1929, passed the so-called Webb bill, "providing compensation for all losses incurred or expenses sustained by all persons, firms, or. corporations required to comply with the provisions of" the








Texas pink-bollworm act of 1021, and "providing for State ownership of funtiigation and sterilization plants." This bill, which is printed in full on paces 41-43, was signed by the governor on February 26. 1920. and it became kfective at once. No appropriation has yet been made to carry out the purposes of this bill, but it is not anticipated that this will affect the continuance of quarantine enforcement In the State.

THURBERIA WEEVIL

Field inspection for the Thurberia weevil is carried out by the Bureau of Entomology. According to a report from that bureau. the weevil population in all parts of the Santa Cruz Valley south of Tucson was greater in the 1928 crop than it has been in previous years, the heaviest infestation occurring in the southern end of the valley. The number of man-days scouting in Arizona amounted to 241.9, during which inspectors collected 471 weevils and observed 619 bolls which had been or were infested. The infestations were found in fields near Continental, Sahuarita, and Jaynes, also 7 miles south of Tucson and 10 and 15 miles, respectively, north of Wilcox. The gin, vacuum-fumigation, and oil-mill supervision data under this project are included in the report on pink-bollworm quarantine enforcement on a previous page.
PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF THE GIPSY MOTH
NEW JERSEY PROJECT

Conditions in the New Jersey area continued to be most encouraging during the period covered by this report. With the exception of two very old completely hatched egg clusters which were found in March near the site of an old gipsy-moth infestation, no sign of the gipsy moth has been found in the State during the fiscal year.
BARRIER ZONE AREA
In the barrier zone of western New England and eastern New York a number of new infestations have been found in western Massachusetts and northwestern Connecticut. The work is still in progress and a complete statement as to the barrier-zone situation in that area will be issued later. During the latter part of February and early March the barrier-zone treatment work and scouting activities were retarded for lack of sufficient funds to carry an adequate force of men, but the second deficiency bill, which passed Congress just before adjournment on March 4, carried an item of $50,000 for work in this zone, and intensive eradication operations in and around all the infestations found in the zone are planned for the final quarter of the fiscal year.
QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT
A total of 6,168 prospective shipments of forest products were inspected during the quarter, and of this number 5 were found infested with 37 gypsymoth egg masses. Prospective shipments of stone and quarry products in the number of 40,539 were inspected, and 14 of them found infested with 16 egg mDiasses. All egg clusters found were creosoted and entirely removed before certificates were issued. As indicating the close cooperation of nurserymen in keeping their properties free from moths, no infestations were found during the inspection of 3,323 shipments of nursery stock; 1.704 shipments of Christmas trees and greenery were also inspected and found free from egg masses. In addition to these figures, inspec-tors, of the Federal and State I)epairtlents of Agriculture, in cooperation, examined and certified G3 shipments of nursery stock and forest products originating in the territory in New Jersey regu-lated under a gypsy-moth (Iquarantine issued bly that State.
The figures given do not include the several thousand permits issued each month for the shipment of products which have been nminiuftctured. processed, or stored in such a manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted and for products which originate outside the infested area and while within the infestl areas have been stored and safeguarded in such a manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.







6

PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF THE SATIN MOTH

The possibility of spreading the satin moth to new localities through theagency of shipments of pussy-willow twigs in transit from western Washington to Eastern States was indicated by the interception last, year of a considerable quantity of such twigs at transit points.
The attention of Federal and State inspectors and postal employees was directed this season to the danger involved in such shipments, and -a press statement (see p. 43) was issued for publication in newspapers in the infested area. As a result fewer such parcels were intercepted at the transit inspection points than heretofore.

MEXICAN FRUIT-WORM ERADICATION

A close approach to, completion of the campaign for the total elimination of summer host-fruit trees is the most important development in the Mexican fruitworm area of Texas during the past three months. Of the nearly 37,000 peach, plum, guava, and similar trees present in Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy Counties in 1927, about 129, remained on March 31. This is a reduction of about 3,000 since January 1. The total absence of summer, host-fruit trees throughout this citrus-growifig area is expected to make impossible any establishment of the Mexican fruit worm in the territory concerned or to. bring about its prompt extermination should it be reintroduced.
In addition to eliminating deciduous fruit during the spring and summer, the residents of the regulated area are required to remove all citrus fruit (except lemons and sour limes) from the trees at the beginning of the host-free period. In 1928 that period was started on M~arch 1, but in 19-29 the seasonal development of the fruit was so retarded that the harvesting period was extended to March 30 under, an order issued lby the administration on January 31. The modification applies to this year only, and is not expected to, be repeated in 1930.
By the close of the shipping season on March 30 the number of carloads of fruit of the 1928-29 crop moved from the valley by freight totaled 1,671. In addition, 145,09-1 bushels of grapefruit, oranges, and kumquats were transported from the regulated area in trucks, 7,777 bushels by passenger cars, and eighty-one thousand one hundred and seventy 80-pound boxes by express.
Permits were issued to 2:2 additional packers during the 3-m-onth period, making a total of 269 for the season. These packers were issued 9{)7,249 individual-box shipping tags for the crop, year ended onl March 30, and 13,028 additional tags were issued to noncommercial shippers for the shipment of single boxes of fruit.
At the road station near, Encino, Tex., 15.950 vehicles were inspected, of which 6,212 contained fruit. Vehicles intercepted carrying uncertified fruit or culls numbered 2, trucks and 1,725S passenger cars. In order to be sure, that contrabrand fruit was not being detoured via Laredo, an inspector was again stationed at Roma for a part of February, but no quarantine violations were observed.
Over 2,000 citrus, groves a month are inspected in the valley, and from 97 to 98 per cent continue to be found free from weeds and fallen fruit. Certificates of inspection are withheld from the remainder until. they are cleaned up, in a satisfactory manner.
No fruit wvorms were found at any point ini the regulated area of Texas during the 3-month period, although infested fruit continues- to be found from time to time in the markets of Matamoros, Tainaulipas, Mexico.'

PARLATORIA DATE-SCALE ERADICATION

A continued improvement in the date-scale situation is observed as a 'result of the intensive operations now in progress. In the Coachella Valley the number of infested palms discovered has been reduced to about 0.1 per cent of those examined, and excellent progress is being made in the eradication of the Imperial, Valley outbreak discovered last year.

SThe discovery was made In April of some very slight infestation In the case of the fruit from certain districts picked in March. The evidence would seem to indicate that this f'riuit hecaineU infested from, the Mexican side due to the conditions referred to in the last paragrap~h. This incident clearly indicates the undesirability of again extending the lmrvesting periodl to include March and thus shortening by one month the host-free period.





7

NARCISSUS INSPECTION

Inspections of narcissus plantings are made by the State nursery inspectors of the States in which the bulbs are located, two inspections (field and storage) being required each year as a basis of certification. The number (,f growers
and the number of bulbs reported by the various State inspectors are shown in Table 3. With respect to the number of bulbs shown it should be stated that the growers estimate that not more than 20 to 30 per cent of the total number indicated is available for interstate movement during any one year.
Bulb-eelworm infestations were reported in the States of California, Kansas, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Washington and in the District of Columbia. The greater narcissus fly was reported in
California, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Washington. The lesser bulb
fly was reported in California, Illinois, Kansas, Maryland. Michigan, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island,
Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

TABLE 3.-Narcissus- bulb certification, calendar year 1928


Plantings Bulbs inspected Bulbs certified as un- Bulbs treated and
inspected inspect infested certified

State
Poly- Daffo- Polyan- Daffodil Polyan- Daffodil Polyan- Daffodil
anthus dil thus
types types thus types types thus types types types types

Alabama.......... ---------- 5 2 89,600 7,400 89,600 7,400 0 0
Arkansas.......... ---------- 0 1 0 15,200 0 15,200 0 0
California--------...- (2) (2) 33, 503, 840 10, 590, 872 (2) (2) (2) ()
Connecticut...... 0 2 0 45, 500 0 45,500 0 0
District of Columbia.............. -------------- 0 8 0 17,143 0 10,025 0 7,121
Florida........-----------. 90 2 57,964,050 50,000 57,964,050 50, 000 0 0
Georgia-----------3......... 32 1 2, 137,700 10, 000 1,337, 700 10, 000 800, 000 0
Illinois----------- .........- 1 13 1, 000 1,291,435 0 362, 535 1,000 844, 400
Indiana.. ----------........ 0 7 0 97,012 0 97,012 0 0
Kansas............ ------------ 0 3 0 15, 961 0 9,300 0 6,661
Louisiana--------......... 63 5 204,300 71,000 89,000 71,000 0 0
Maryland---------......... 0 4 0 1,055, 585 0 (2) 0 c0, 000
Massachusetts ...- 0 1 0 100 0 100 0 0
Michigan --------- 0 31 0 5, 031,227 0 924, 500 0 1,493, 750
Minnesota........ 0 1 0 20,000 0 0 0 20,000
Mississippi ....---- 6 2 65,000 50,200 65,000 50, 200 0 0
Missouri.......... ---------- 0 4 0 204,500 0 204,500 0 0
New Jersey------....... 0 9 0 2,205,928 0 2, 173, 928 0 32. 000
New York........ 0 28 0 12,817,381 0 828," 04 0 11,938,377
North Carolina... 6 20 676, 700 1, 601, 4<5 117, 700 102, 085 0 C5, 200
Ohio ........... 0 25 0 500,010 0 422,-861 0 0
Oregon-.......... 0 104 0 5, 547, 790 0 .49. 044 0 1, 198, 450
Pennsylvania ..... 0 4 0 113,000 0 26, 5(X) 0 75,00
Rhode Island..... 0 1 0 1,480,000 0 0 0 1,480,0
South Carolina..- .. 5 0 30, 828, 750 0 30, 828, 750 0 0 0
Tennessee......---------.. 0 1 0 320,000 0 320,000 0 0
Texas ...........------------- 5 2 6,641,000 4,140,000 6, 541,000 4,140,000 100, 000 0
Utah ............ 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Virginia .......-----------.. 1 19 15, 000 2, 644, 3(00 15,000 2,644, 300 0 0
Washington........ 0 159 0 42,171,313 0 19, 200 0 37, 626, C40
Wisconsin ........ 0 2 0 541, 00 0 0 0 ll,000
Total ......... 214 462 132,12G, 940 92, 6 55, 347 97,047, 800 13, 562,994 901, (000K ) 55, 38, 599

"Polyanthus" types refer to Paper Whites, Chinese Sacred Lily, Solil d'or and a few relatively rare varieties. These types are scarcely hardy in the North and are grown largely, as the table indicates, in the Southern States. The term "dalodil types" refers to the hardy trumpet daiodils of the North and also to such as Poetax, Pheasant's Eye, and others. The figures given are, in most cases approxinmations rather than exact counts.
Not reported by State inspectors.

WHITE-PINE BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT

The examination of nursery-stock shliplents in transit fo)r the spring shipping season of 192) Was begun late in F ebrmry ail was ill active alerill l i he
close of the quarter. The transfer points at which this vortk is ein, arried
out this season are New' York, Chicago, huaha, St. Paul, Kansas City, 1)enver,
Ogden, Portland, Spokane, and Seattle.
In addition to violations of the while-l pine blister rust quarantite, shipnets moving in violation of other Federal plant (uiiriratines are beig intreitee(1









and turned back. A complete statement of the interceptions, for' the season will be included in a later issue of the Service and Regulatory Announcements.

GRAIN-RUST CONTROL BY MEANS OF BARBERRY ERADICATION

A total of over 1,500,000 barberry bushes, including seedlings and, sprouts, was destroyed in 1928 in the campaign to prevent blacir stem rust epidemics in the grain-growing States, according to the annual report of the office in charge of that project.
This campaign is conducted by the Office of Cereal Crops and Diseases, Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with the State colleges of agriculture, 'the State departments of agriculture, and other agencies, in the 13 States of Colorado, Illinois, Indiana,'' Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. That bureau and the States named are responsible for all phases of the barberry-eradication project except the enforcement of the Federal quarantines against the interstate movement Of barberry and Mahonia plants.
The Bureau of Plant Industry reports as follows concerning the status of this work on December 31, 1928:
During the calendar year 1928 approximately 10.5 counties [in Illinois, Michigan, Montana, and Ohio] were covered in the first survey, and approximately 15 counties were surveyed a second time. Original bushes numbering 111,464 were found on 1,302 properties and 112,080 original bushes were destroyed on 1,395 properties in all surveys during the year. A total of 1,403,830 seedlings was found and a total of 1,404,230 seedlings was destroyed in the first survey, second survey, and resurveys. A grand total of 1,519,816 original bushes, sprouting bushes, and seedlings was found and a grand total of 1,520,832 was destroyed.
In the 10 years of the campaign from April 1, 1918, to December 31, 1928, an area equivalent to approximately 892 counties has been covered in the first survey of cities, towns, and farmsteads. Approximately 29 relatively unimportant counties remain to be surveyed a first time. These counties are in the southern part -of Illinois and in the northern peninsula of Michigan.
Approximately 249.5 counties of the counties covered by first survey have been sukvegd a second time. These comprise about 27 per cent of the total number of counties t at ultimately will be covered by the first survey.
In all, 17,592,224 original bushes, sprouting bushes, and seedlings have been found, and 17,587,276 original bushes, sprouting bushes, and seedlings have been destroyed during the entire campaign.
WOODGATE RUST

The Woodgate rust was found on Scotch pine at Cazenovia, N. Y., in December, 1928, and Notice of Quarantine No. 65 was accordingly amended, effective April 1, 1929, adding Madison County, N. Y., to the area regulated on account of this disease. The amendment is quoted in full on a later page. The known infected and regulated area now covers all that part of New York State north of and including Madison, Herkimer, Hamilton, and Essex Counties.

LARCH CANKER

Practically all the trees found to be infested with this disease are reported. by the Bureau of Plant Industry to have been destroyed. These included imported European larches, Japanese larches, native tamaracks, Douglas firs, and western yellow pines, growing in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The known infested properties numbered about 20, located in three different sections In the vicinity of Groton and Ipswich, Mass., and Providence, R. I.



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ASIATIC-BEETLE QUARANTINE (No. 66)
FIVE STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA QUARANTINED ON ACCOUNT OF TWO ASIATIC BEETLES
[Press notice]
MARcH 5, 1929.
Two Asiatic beetles related to the Japanese beetle are the subject of a quarantine promul-ated March 2 by the Secretary of Agriculture. The area quarantined comprises the vicinity of New Haven, Conn., the southern tip of





9

New York, including Long Island, all of New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania, and an outlying point involving the District of Columbia and the adjacent county of Arlington, Va. This quarantine is based on the pubic hearing conducted in Washington, September 24, 1928, and the details of regulation are based on several subsequent conferences with officials and persons in interest of the States concerned.
Following the hearing, the original determination by the department was to limit the quarantine on account of these beetles substantially to the areas which had been determined as infested, and an announcement to that effect was issued by the Secretary of Agriculture December 20, 1928. This announcement led to subsequent conferences with the department of State officials and others in interest, and the submittal of official requests from the States of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania that the area quarantined in these States should be enlarged to be conterminous with the area now covered under the Japanese-beetle quarantine. The object of such enlargement of area was to give a greater unrestricted field of operation for important nursery interests. The possibility that these pests may later prove to be more widely distributed than the inspections and surveys up to this time have disclosed was also urged as well as the consideration that the natural spread of these insects would involve such annual extensions of the infested area as very materially to lessen the benefits of a more strictly limited quarantine.
This request, together with the assumption of full responsibility for the enlarged area by the appropriate officials of these States, necessarily was the determining factor as to the extension of the quarantine inasmuch as Federal powers are limited to restrictions on interstate movement of the articles concerned, and therefore, any enforcement other than on State lines must be with State cooperation and under State police powers.
The regulations under the quarantine now promulgated on account of the Asiatic beetles are in general of the same nature as those recently revised and promulgated on account of the Japanese beetle. The important difference is the elimination from the Asiatic-beetie quarantine of all control of farm products, such elimination being deemed possible on account of the little, if any, risk of spread of the Asiatic beetles in the movement of such products. This limits the restrictions under this quarantine to nursery stock and other plants for propagation and to sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure. Special risk of artificial carriage and opportunity for wide movement and spread of the Asiatic beetles is by carriage of the grubs either in the soil about plants or in other soil, manure, etc. The field enforcement of this quarantine will be under the same direction as the similar enforcement of the Japanese-beetle quarantine with headquarters at Camden, N. J.
Two Asiatic beetles are concerned in this quarantine, namely, Anomala orientalis and Aserica castalnea, for which the common names are suggested, respectively, of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle. A third Asiatic beetle, Serica similis, was included in the notice of hearing but in the final analysis the importance of this insect did not appear to warrant quarantine action at this time.
The economic importance of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle is from the present outlook largely in their capacity to injure and (destroy lawns and grasslands. The Asiatic beetle has demonstrated ,possibilities as a lawn pest of a very menacing character, apparently much beyond that of the Japanese beetle or of any3 native species. Fortunately it spreads very slowly on its own powers from any p)int of new infestation in lawns and under aleiquate quarantine safeguards can be prevented, perhaps. for many years from spreading widely in the United States. Unfortunately, while predominantly a grass pest, feeding on the roots, it will spread into any sort of near-by vegetation and into cultivated nursery st ,ck. In nurseries already reached )by this l 'st earth halls about plants have been found to contain large numbers if the white grub, in which stage the insect passes the fall, winter, and spring. A consideration of the millions of home prosrties in this country, as well as parks and other places of public interest anld arouseiment, to say thing o(f ) possible damage to pasture lands, may well give a p1est such as this Asiatic beetle a greater public interest even than an enemy of an important field crop. The Asiatic garden beetle in addition to being a lawn pest has demonstrated possibilities of serious injury in the beetle stage to foliage, but in the latter capacity o(f less niwlint so far than the Japanese beetle.
64059-29- --2






10

The necessity for this quarantine seems to be clearly indicated by the demonstrated capacity of these -insects to cause continuing losses to all, home and estate owners and damage to lawns of any type as well as the po ssi ,bilities of injury to cultivated crops.

QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE ASIATIC BEETLE AND THE ASIATIC GARDEN BEETLE

No'rIoE OF QUARANTINE No. 66i
[Effective on and after March 15, 1929]

I, William ATi. Jardine, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the States of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, and the District of Columbia to prevent the spread of the Asiatic beetle (Anomala~ orientalis Waterhouse) and the Asiatic garden beetle (Aserica castan ea Arrow), dangerous insects new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, and the District of Columbia, effective on and after March 15, 1929. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants, and (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from any of said quarantinedl State's or District into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules, and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, such limitation shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the said beetles to, other States and Territories, and when the movemen t of the restricted articles intrastate from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to. prevent the spread of the said beetles therefrom to other parts of the quarantined States and thence into interstate commerce.
Done at the city of Washington this 2d day of March, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriml~ture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 6(6

[Effective on and after March 15, 1929]

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Beetles: The insects known as the Asiatic beetle (An orala orient aZis Waterhouse) and the Asiatic garden beetle (Aserica cast anea Arrow) in any stage of development.
( b) The terms infesteded" infestation," and the like relate to infestation with either of the beetles named.
(c) Quarantined area: Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the beetles named.
(d) Regulated area: Any area in a quarantined State or District which is now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the, Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 66.







(e) Nurscry and ornamental stock: Nursery. ornamental. and greenhouse stock and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers. or other portions of plants for ornamental use.
(f) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure: Sand. soil, earth. peat, compost, and manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connection with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.
(g) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure: Sand. soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so certified.
(h) Certified greenhouse: A greenhouse which has complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in regulation 5. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, or similar plots safeguarded and treated in manner and method satisfactory to the inspector.
(i) Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED ARFAS

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 66, the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant products and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas: Provided, That the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine may move interstate from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 66, the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the States, counties, townships, towns, cities, hundreds, and election districts, listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs, or other political sulbdlivisions within their limits:
Connectieut.-Towns of New Haven and West Haven, in New Havenl County.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
New Jersey.-The entire State.
New York.-Counties of Nassau, Rockland. and Suffolk (except Fishers Island) ; New York City (including the Boroughs of the Bronx. BIrooklyn, Manhattan, Richmond, and Queens) ; and the towns of Bedford, East Chester, Greenburg, Harrison, Lewisboro, Mamaroneck. Mount Pleasant. Mount Yernon, New Castle. New Rochelle. North Castle, Ossining. Pelham. Poundridge. Rye, Scarsdale, White Plains, and Yonkers, and those portions of the towns of Cortland anid Yorktown south of the Croton River in Westchester County.
Pennsylvania.-Counties of Berks, Bucks, Carbon, Chester, Columbia, Dauphin, Delaware, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery, Montour. Northampton, Northumberland, Philadelphia. and Schuykill: the townships of Upper Allen, Lower Allen, East Pennshoro, Hampden, Middlesex, Monroe, and Silver Spring, in Cumberland County : Rye. in Perry County; and the fAllowing township and cities in Lackawanna County and all territory southeast of said townships alid cities in said county, namely: Ransom. Scranton, Dickson City, Blakely, Archbald, Carbondale, and Fell.
Vir;inia.-County of Arlington and city of Alexandria.

REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS
The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced
as may be found advisable by the Sccretar~y of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and lhe areas alff eted thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies doing business inll or through the States in which such areas are located and by publication in newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the aroas affected are located.









BMULAT10N 5. RESTRIMONS, ON THE MOVEMENT OF NURSERY AND ORNAMENTAL STOCK

Section, A.-Pontrol of nzovement

Nursery and ornamental stock shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas into or through any point outside thereof unless a certificate' shall have been issued therefor by'the inspector except as follows:
(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of smooth bulbs of tulip, hyacinth, gladiolus, and narcissusa from the regulated areas, to points outside thereof.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped directly from the docks or freight yards of the port of entry in the original container and labeled as to each container with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, a statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and address of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.
(3) No restrictions, are placed on the interstate movement, between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, of cut flowers, and portions of plants without roots and incapable of propagation (such as branches and twigs of trees and shrubs, Christmas trees, holly, laurel, sphagnum moss, and dried portions of plants free from soil).
Section B.-Conditions of certiftcaV own

For the purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will be classified as follows:
(1) Class L-Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock in which neither grubs- in the soil nor beetles have been found, may be classified as Class 1. Upon compliance with the requirements of numbered paragraph (5) of this regulation nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipment from such premises to points outside the regulated areas without further inspection and without meeting the safeguards prescribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries or greenhouses of Class Ill."
(2) Class III.-Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of nursery and ornamental stack on which either grubs in the soil or beetles have been found will be classified as Class III. Such classification also may be given to nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock in localities known to be generally infested where beetles or grubs are found in the immediate proximity of such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or properties,. Upon compliance with numbered paragraphs (4) and (6) of this regulation nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipment from such premises to points outside. the regulated areas under any one of -the following conditions:
(a) That the roots, shall bei treated with carbon disulphide emulsion or by other approved means in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(b) In the case of plants in which the root -system is such that a thorough inspection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by washing or shaking.
W That it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse. (See numbered
paragraph (4) hereof.)

2As all the areas quarantined on account of these beetles are Included within the area quarantined on account of the Japanese beetle (see Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as revised), a special form of certificate will be used, showing compliance with both Quarantines 48 and 66.
8The interstate movement of narcissus bulbs is subject to the restrictions contained in the rules and regulations supplemental to, Notice of Quarantine No. 62, Narcissus Bulb Quarantine. 6
4Under the Japanese-beetle quarantine provision is made for three classes of nurseries, and they are designated as Classes 1, 11, and III, respectively. Only two classes are considered necessary under this quarantine, but since it covers largely the same territory it seems desirable, in order to avoid confusion, that they be designated as Classes I and III, the latter designation under both quarantines referring to infested premises.





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(3) Subivision of nursery properties for the purpose of classification.-In the case of nursery properties under single ownership and management but represented by parcels of land widely separated, such parcels may be independently classified either as Class I or Class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as may be required by the inspector. Similarly, unit nursery properties which would otherwise fall in Class III may be open to subdivision for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in Classes I or III when in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion of the nursery concerned.
(4) Greenhouses of Class III may be certified as prescribed in numbered paragraph (2) hereof, upon compliance with the following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:
(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes on premises in Class III shall be kept screened during the period of flight of the beetles, namely, between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, in manner satisfactory to the inspector.
(b) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken front areas in which Class III nurseries or greenhouses are located, or which may have been expo)sed to infestation, shall be sterilized or fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner and by method satisfactory to, the inspector. If such treated sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses it shall be stored in a tightly closed building or container.
(c) Plants potted in certified soil (see regulation 6) in nurseries or greenhouses of Class III and placed in outdoor screened frames during the period June 15 to October 15, inic!usive, may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipment to points outside the regulated areas under the following conditions: A careful inspection shall be made of the soil from not less than 10 per cent of the pots. The soil in and including an area Inot less than 3 feet wide surrounding the frames shall be treated not later than the preceding October 1 with arsenate-of-lead powder, applied uniformly at the rate of 1,5W pounds to the acre. The soil examination and treatment shall be made under the direction and supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(d) Plants potted in certified soil (see regulation 6) in nurseries or greenhouses of Class III and paced in beds in the open during the period October 16 to June 14 may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipment to points outside the regulated areas upon compliance with the following conditions p.rformed under the direction and supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to such inspector: A fine-mesh screen shall be so placed in the bottom of each pot as to prevent the entrance of beetle larvae through the draina e hole; the soil in beds on which the pots are placed shall have been treated not less than three months previous to the time the pots are paced in the beds with arsenate-of-lead powder applied uniformly at the rate of 1,500 pounds to tIhe acre, under the direction and supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector ; no pots shall be placed within 3 feet of soil which has not been treated; before pots are placed on treated beds careful soil examination shall be made of the beds and their freedom from infestation determined by the inspector: Provided, That the use of the fine-mesh screens ili such pots may be omitted when the soil treatment specified has been carried out on such beds for at least three consecutive years and so long as the soi: treatment is continued yearly thereafter iii accordance with the above requirements.
(5) Cut flowers, and other parts of plants without roots or soil and incapable of propagation, may be certified for interstate movement to points outside the regulated areas under either of the following conditions(a) When they have been inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.
(b) When they have been grown in a greenhouse of Class I or in a certified greenhouse of Class III and are transported under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the inspector prevent infestation. (See also section A (3) of this regiflation.)
(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain their classified status, shall comply with the following conditions:
(a) Purchases of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure within the regulated areas shall be restricted to articles which have been ,ertifled under these regulations as to each purchase and said certificate shall accompany the article when moved.






14

(b) Approval of the inspector sha.l be obtained before nursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure are received on their premises or moved from the openon their own premises into certified greenhouses.
(c) All sales or shipments of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure both to points outside the regulated areas, and to other classified, nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated areas shall be reported immediately an forms provided for that purpose.
(d) All purchases of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure secured from"' within'the regulated areas shah'b6 reported in writing immediately to the inspector.
Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to make the report or reports required by this regulation; and such denial of certification shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.
(7) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countrIes, and not reshipped directly from the docks or freight yards of the port of entry may be certified for interstate movement to points outside the regulated areaa when such stock has been inspected by an inspector, and found free from infestation.
(8) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be certified for reshipment from classified premises other than those on which they originated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route and, when found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of freedom from infestation.

REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF. SAND, SOIL, EARTH, PEAT, COMPOST, AND MANURE

Section A.-Control of movement

Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas into or through any point outside thereof unless a certificate shall have been issued therefor by the inspector, except that no restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand for construction purposes from the District of Columbia or from the regulated area of Virginia.

Section B.-Conditions of certification

Certificates for the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure from the regulated areas to points outside thereof may be issued under any one of the following conditions:
(a) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in the regulated areas, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been found.
(b) When the material consists of fresh manure and it has been determined by an inspector that no infestation could exist therein.
(c) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an inspector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground, and either is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an inspector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or when the cars and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(d) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphid under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. Such fumigation shall be a condition of certification of all sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with paragraphs (a), (b), or (c) hereof.

REGULATION 7. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES FROM INFESTATION WHILE IN TRANSIT

Nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure- moving interstate between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, shall be screened, covered, or otherwise protected in manner or method determined by




15

the inspector as necessary to prevent infestation of the articles listed. This requirement shall apply to each automobile, truck, wagon, car, and boat hauling such articles from the regulated areas to points outside thereof.

REGULATION 8. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION

Every car, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles listed, the interstate movement of which is restricted in regu-ations 5 and 6, shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee and shall bear a certificate showing the contents to be apparently free from infestation.
The inspection certificate in the case of carload and other bulk shipments shall accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining to such shipment, or in the case of truck or other road vehicle the certificate shall accompany the vehicle.
Misuse or transfer of certificates or use of void certificates is prohibited and may result in the refusal of further certification to the grower or shipper concerned.

REGULATION 9. CONDITIONS GOVERNING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES

Persons intending to move or allow to be moved interstate any of the articles the movement of which is restricted in regulations 5 and 6 shall make application for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment, specifying in the application the article and quantity to be shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the consignor, and name and address of the consignee.
Applicants for inspection shall assemble the articles at such points as the inspector may designate and to so place them that inspection may readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.
Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the articles enumerated can not be determined by the inspector, certification will be refused.
REGULATION 10. INSPECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved or offered for movement interstate which contains or may contain articles, the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by inspectors at any time or place.

REGULATION 11. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF TRUCKS, WAGONS, CARS, BOATS,
AND OTIIER VEHICLES BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATE

Trucks, wagons, cars, bouts. and other vehicles which have been used in transporting any article covered by these regulations within the regulated areas shall not thereafter be Imoved or allowed to be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly swept and cleaned by the carrier at the point of unloading or destination.
REGULATION 12. SIhIPMENTS BY THE UNITF) STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Demiartment of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes, on such cond(litions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tug from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration showing compliance with such conditions.
These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after March 15, 1929.
Done at the city of Washington this 2d (day of March, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States I)epartimetil of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] W. .1JAIiN
cere/a ru f rticul ure







16

PENALTIES

The plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912, (37 Stat. 315), provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any command carrier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into, or through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or any other article specified in the notice of quarantine in. maniiner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate -any of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall upon conviction thereof be punished by a fine not exceeding $500 or'by imprisonment not exceeding one year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.

STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

The States of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia have promulgated or are about to promulgate quarantines restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. These State quarantines are enforced in cooperation, with the Federal authorities.' Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained by addressing: United States Department of Agriculture, Beetle Control, Box 361, Camden, N. J.
Subsidiary offices are maintained in Shelton, Conn.; Glassboro, Trenton, New Brunswick, and Rutherford, N. J.-; New York, N. Y.; and Norristown, Lancaster, and Philadelphia, Pa.
Arrangements may be made for 'inspection and certification of shipments from the District of Columbia by calling Main 4650, Branch 174, the inspection house of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration,, Twelfth and B Streets NW., Washington, D. C.

GENERAL OFFICE OF STATES COOPERATING

Department of entomology, agricultural experiment station, Ne w Haven, Conn.
Bureau of statistics and inspection, department of agriculture, Trenton, N. J.
Bureau of plant industry, department of agriculture and markets, Albany N. Y.
Bureau of plant industry, department of agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.
Division of plant industry, department of agriculture and immigration, Richmond, Va.

(P. Q. C. A.-221.)

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE To ENFORCEMENT OF REGULATION 5,
QUARANTINE No. 66, oN ACCOUNT oF THE ASIATIC BEETLE AND THE ASIATIC
GARDEN BEETLE
[Effective on and after March 15, 19291
MARCH 2, 1929.
The purpose of this circular is to, give a more definite and exact interpretation of procedure to be followed in the enforcement of numbered paragraph 3 of regulation 5, section B. This paragraph reads as follows: I 'f
In the case of nursery properties under single ownership and management but represented by parcels of land widely separated, such parcels may be independently classified either as Class I or- Class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as shall be required by the inspector-. Similarly', unit nursery properties which would otherwise fall In Class III may be open to subdivision for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in Classes I- or III when in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion of the nursery concerned."






17

It is understood that the subdivision of unit nursery properties as provided for in the second sentence of the quoted paragraph shall be subject to the following conditions and limitations:
(1) The subdivision of the nursery containing the infestation shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature, such boundaries in the case of Anomala orientali8 to be approximately 100 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs, and in the case of Aserica castanea approximately 250 feet, or in the case of greenhouses or plants in frames for either of these insects such lesser distance as shall be approved by the inspector.
(2) Any such reduction in distance shall be conditioned upon the undertaking by the owner of the nursery concerned of clean-up operations satisfactory to the inspector, and upon any other local factors which might operate to eliminate risk of spread.
C. L. MARLATT.
1Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.


NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
Washington, D. C., March 2, 1 ..
Si: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as follo-ws: That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved Aug_.ist 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, by Notice of Quarantine No. 66, effective on and after March 15, 1929, quarantined the States of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, to prevent the spread of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle, and has ordered that, (1), nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants, and, (2), sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the said quarantined States or District in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the ru le and regulations supplemental to said quarantine or in amendments thereto.
Copy of the notice is inclosed herewith.
Very respectfully,
W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
(Inclosures.)

[Do not detach this receipts]

Received this notice and the copy of Notice of Quarantine No. G3 vith rues and regulations mentioned therein this day of 1929.
(Signature)
(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.].


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC TnioUGI NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUE OFrICE~ OIF TIlE SECRET ARY,
1Vashington, 1). C., MIarch 2, 1929
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, uwider authoirity c '". ferred on him by the plant quarantintie act of Augun 20, 1902 '7 St. 315
64059-29---3







18

as amended, has by Notice of Quarantine No. 66, effective March 15, 192D, quarantined the States of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, to prevent the spread of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle, and has ordered that (1) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants, and (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from said quarantined States or District in manner or method Or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations made thereunder and amendments thereto. Copies of said quarantine, and the rules and regulations supple.mental thereto, may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
W. MI. JARDINA
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: Hartford Times, Hartford, Conn., March 14, 1929 ; Evening Star, Washington, D. C., March 15, 1929 ; Trenton Evening, Times, Trenton, N. J., March 15, 1929; The World, New York, N. Y., March 15, 1929; Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pa., March 13, 1929; Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., March 13, 1929.]


BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINE (No. 63)

P. Q. c. A.-219

NOTICE TO NURSERYMEN SHIPPING CURRANT OR GOOSEBERRY PLANTS OR FIVELEAF PINES
JANUARY 25, 192.

BLISTER-RUST CONTROL AREAS ESTABLISHED IN CONNECTICUT

The State of Connecticut has recently set aside several areas as blister-rust control areas, within which the growing or possession of currant and gooseberry plants is prohibited (State Quarantine Order No. 17, effective October 1, 1928). As a result of this measure, the control-area permit requirements of Federal Quarantine No. 63 are now applicable to the State of Connecticut, and accordingly no currant or gooseberry plants or fiveleaf pines may be shipped into any part of the State unless a control-area permit is. attached to the container (see regulation 4a). Application for such permit should be addressed to the State entomologist, agricultural experiment station, New Haven, Oonn., and should state the kind of plants to be shipped and the names and addresses of consignor and consignee.
The control areas consist of 1,500-foot zones surrounding certain white-pinegrowing nurseries at Cromwell, Stratford, Woodmont, Deep River, New Canaan, Cheshire, Southport, Yalesville, Waterford, and West Hartford.
The list of States which have legally established blister-rust control areas at the present time, and the address of the officer in each State to whom application for permit should be made, are given below: Connecticut --------------State Entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Station, New
Haven, Conn.
Idaho ------------------- Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Boise, Idaho.
Maine ------------------Forest Commissioner, Augusta, Me.
Maf sachusetts ------------- Director, Division of Plant Pest Control, Statehouse, Boston,
Mass.
Michigan ---------------- Inspector in Charge, Orchard and Nursery inspection, Bureau
of Agricultural Industry, Lansing, Mich.
New Hampshire ----------- State Nursery Inspector, Durham, N. H.
New York --------------- Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Albany, N. Y.
Rhode Island ------------State Entomologist, Kingston, R. I.
Washington and Oregon may establish such control areas in the future, and it is recommended that those desiring to ship Ribes or fiveleaf pines into these States should request definite information on this point from the proper officers in advance of shipment. Concerning consignments into Oregon address the Secretary, State Board of Horticulture, Portland. For shipments into Washington, address the Supervisor of Horticulture, Olympia.
IT. C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Admninistration.





19

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PLANT REGULATIONS
PLANT-SHIPMENT REGULATIONS FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA REVISED
[Press notice]
APRIL 1, 1929.
Revised rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and out of the District of Columbia became effective to-day (April 1), according to an announcement by the United States Department of Agriculture.
The new regulations make little, if any, change in the present practice of the department in certifying nursery and greenhouse stock shipped to points outside the District. The purpose of the revision is to bring up to date those parts of the regulations which involve special plant quarantines, particularly those relating to Japanese, Asiatic, and Asiatic garden beetles, as the District is under special quarantine on account of these pests.
All nursery stock and similar plant material intended to be shipped to points outside the District is required to be presented at the inspection house of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Twelfth and B Streets NW., for inspection at the time of shipment. Incoming stock is also delivered to the inspection house, unless it is released at the railway station or elsewhere by an inspector of the department.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS,
PLANT PRODUCTS, AND OTHER QUARANTINED ARTICLES INTO AND OUT OF
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
[Approved March 29, 1929; effective April 1, 1929]

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

This revision of the rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and out of the District of Columbia involves little, if any, change in the present practice of the department in making inspection and certification of such materials. The form and phraseology have been modified somewhat to provide for compliance with several special quarantines relating to such articles.
C. L. MALArrT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
I, R. W. Dunlap, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that, in order to control and eradicate and to prevent the dissemination of dangerous plant diseases and insect infections and infestations in, into, and out of the District of Columbia, it is necessary to make and promulgate the following rules and regulations:
Now, therefore, under the authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended. I do order that no plants or plant products or articles whose movement is restricted by Federal plant quarantines shall be moved or allowed to be moved, shipped, transported, or carried by any means whatever into or out of the District of Columbia, except in compliance with the said rules and regulations and such other rules, regulations, and notices of quarantine as may be promulgated under the authority of the said act.
RFOULATION 1. DEFINITION

The words "plants and plant products whenever used in these re u:ations shall include all greenhouse and field-erown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits, and other seeds of fruit anid orlmalental trees and shrubs, and other plants and plant prl-lucts.

REGULATION '. UNRESTRICTED PLANTS AN PLANT PlOD)lCTS

The following classes of plants fand p'Unt pro lucts, not m iuding, Iow ver. those which are covered by special quarantine anid other rstrictive .rdtrs 1mw in force, nor such as may hereaifter be made the subject of spci: l qli:1rait tIes. mafly be Illoved it(I or oult of the I )ist rit of I('u1m1ia without re i vi i t






20

(a) Fruits, vegetables, cereals, and other plant products transported for food, medicinal, or manufacturing purposes.
(b) Cut flowers, Christmas trees, and other parts of plants' without roots and free from soil.
(c) Domestic-grown seeds of all kinds.
(d) Field, vegetable, and flower seeds of foreign origin.

Shipment of ]plants and plant products and other restricted articles into the District of Columbia

REGULATION 3. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

Except as provided in regulation 2, plants and plant products and articles whose movement is restricted by Federal plant quarantines may be admitted into the District of Columbia only upon compliance with the following requirements:
(a) Each package must have attached to the outside thereof a certificate of inspection indicating that the nursery from which the plants were taken was inspected within one year prior to the date of shipment and signed by the State nursery or horticultural inspector of the State or Territory or country from which the plants or plant products were shipped.
(b) The package, bundle, or other container must be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor, and the, name and address of the consignee, and with the nature of the contents.
(c) No package, bundle, or other container conveying restricted plants or plant products shall be delivered to the consignee in the District of Columbia by any common carrier until its delivery is authorized by an inspector of the P]ant Quarantine and Control Administration.
(d) Articles coveVed by special quarantines and other restrictive orders may be admitted only on compliance with such orders.

REGULATION 4. PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO THE DEI IARTMENT 'OF AGRICULTURE

All plants and plant products prohibited, restricted, or unrestricted, addressed to the United States Department of Agriculture, shall be delivered only to the inspection house of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration (Twelfth and B Streets NW.).

REGULATION 5. SHIPMENTS WHICH FAIL TO COMPLY WITH REGULATIONS

Any plant or plant product or other article transported into, the District of Columbia in violation of these regulations or of any notice of quarantine,5 or any restrictive order promulgated under the authority of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, or of any rule or regulation supplemental to such quarantine or order, shall be subject to destruction, treat.ment, or return to the point of origin at the expense of the owner or shipper unless released by an inspector of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

Shipment of plants and plant product& out of the District of Columbia

REGULATION 6. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

Except as provided in regulation 2, plants and plant products and articles, whose movement is restricted by Federal plant quarantines shall nat be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the District of Columbia to any point outside thereof unless a certificate or a permit shall have been issued therefor by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. Each car, box, bale, or other container so moved shall have attached to the outside thereof the in15 See list of domestic quarantines in Appendix B.







21

spection certificate or permit required hereby, and no common carrier or other person shall accept for shipment or remove such articles from the District of Columbia unless such certificate or permit is so affixed.
REGULATION 7. CONDITIONS OF CERTIFICATION

Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement of plants and plant products when such articles have been inspected and found apparently free from plant disease and insect infections and infestations and when such shipment is found to comply in full with all other quarantine regulations and restrictive orders applicable thereto.

REGULATION 8. PLACE AND TIME OF INSPECTION

Plants and plant products other than those listed in regulation 2 which are to be shipped out of the District of Columbia must be presented at the inspection house of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration (Twelfth and B Streets NW.), for inspection at the time of shipment, unless otherwise authorized by an inspector of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. In cases of large shipments, arrangements may be made for inspection at other places by calling Main 4650, Branch 174, or addressing the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Application for inspection of narcissus bulbs, fiveleaf pines, currants and gooseberry plants, and other articles, the movement of which is restricted by quarantine regulations or other restrictive orders, shall be made at a season of the year and sufficiently in advance of the contemplated date of shipment to provide for compliance with such regulations.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after April 1. 1929, and shall supersede the rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and out of the District of Columbia, promulgated August 26, 1920.
Done at the city of Washington this 29th day of March, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] R. W. DuNLAP,,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


APPENDIX A

Authority for the above regulations is given in the amendment to the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912, contained in the act making appropriations for the Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1921, approved May 31, 1920. This amendment was as follows:
SEc. 15. That in order further to control and eradicate and to prevent the dissemination of dangerous plant diseases and insect infections and infestations no plant or plant products for or capable of propagation, including nursery stock, hereinafter referred to as plants and plant products, shall be moved or allowed to be moved, shipped, transSorted, or carried by any means whatever into or out of the District of Columbia, except In compliance with such rules and regulations as shall be prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture as hereinafter provided. Whenever the Secretary of Agriculture, after investigation shall determine that any plants and plant products in the District of 'Columbia are infested or infected with insect pests and diseases and that any place, :articles, and substances used or connected therewith are so infested or infected, writioten notice thereof shall be given by him to the owner or person in possession or control thereof, and such owner or person shall forthwith control or eradicate and prevent the dissermination of such insect pest or disease and shall remove, cut, or destroy such infested and infected plants, plant products, and articles and substances used or connected therewith, which are hereby declared to be nuisances, within the time and in the manner r qui ied in said notice or by the rules and regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture. Whenever such owner or person can not be found, or shall fal1, neglect, or refuse to comply with the foregoing provisions of this section, the Secretary of Agriculture is hereby authorized and required to control and eradicate and prevent dissemination of such insect pest or disease and to remove, cut, or destroy infested or infected plants and p)aut products and articles and substances used or connected therewith, and the United States slhall have an action of debt against such owner or persons for expenses incurred by the Secretary of Agriculture in that behalf. Employees of the Federal Horticultural Board are hereby authorized and required to inspect places, plants, and plant products and rtilS and substances used or connected therewith whenever the Secretary of Agriculture shall determine that such inspections are necessary for the purpoesoi this section. For the









purpose of carrying out the provisions and requirements of this section and of the rules and regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture made hereunder, and the notices given pursuant thereto, employees of the Federal Horticultural Board shall have power with a warrant to enter into or upon any place and open any bundle, package, or other container of plants or plant products whenever they shall have cause to believe that infections or infestations of plant pests and diseases exist therein or thereon, and when such infections or infestations are found to exist, after notice by the Secretary of Agriculture to the owner or person in possession or control thereof and an opportunity by said owner or person to be heard, to destroy the infected or ii~fested plants or plant products contained therein. The police court or the municipal court of the District of Columbia shall have power, upon information supported by oath or affirmation showing probable cause for belipvin g that there exists in any place bundle, package, or other container in the District of Columbia any plant or plant product which is infected or infested with plant pests or disease, to issue warrants for the search for and seizure of all such plants and plant products. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of Agriculture, and he is hereby required, from time to time, to make and promulgate such rules and regulations as shall be necessary to carry out the purposes of this section, and any person who shall move or allow to be moved, or shall ship, transport, or carry, by any means whatever, any plant or plant products from or Into the District of Columbia, except in compliance with the rules and regulations prescribed under this section, shall be punished, as is provided in section 10 of this act.

APPENDIX B

DOMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINES RELATING TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

The following list includes domestic plant quarantines issued prior to April 1, 1929. Under regulation 5, as given on a preceding page, any plant or plant product or other article transported into the District of Columbia in violation of the quarantines listed below, as well as any quarantines issued subsequent to the date hereof, shall be subject to destruction, treatment, or return to the point of origin at the expense of the owner or shipper, unless released by an inspector of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration." Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement from the District of Columbia of articles whose movement is restricted by such quarantines only whenn such shipment is found to comply in full with all ***quarantine regulations and restrictive orders applicable thereto."
Date palms.-Quarantine No. 6: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and 'regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement of date Palms and date-palm offshoots from Riverside County, Calif., east of the San Bernardino, meridian; Imperial County, Calif.; Yuma, Maricopa, and Pinal Counties, Ariz.; and Webb County, Tex., on account of the Parlatoria scale (Parlatoria blanchardi) and the Phoenicococcus s 'cale (Phoenicococcus marlatti).
Black-stem rust.-Quarantine No. 38, as amended: Prohibits the movement interstate to any point outside of the quarantined area of the common barberry (Berberis vulgaris) and its horizontal varieties, as well as certain other species of Berberis and Mahonia, on account of the black-stem rust of wheat,, oats, barley, rye, and many wild and cultivated grasses.
European corn borer.-Quarantine No. 43, revised: Prohibits,. except as provided in the rules and regulations; supplemental thereto, the movement interstate to any point outside of the quarantined area of (1) corn and brooxncorn (including all parts of the stalk), all sorghums, Sudan grass, celery, green beans in the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, oat and rye straw as such or when used as packing, cut flowers, or entire plants! of chrysanthemum, aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock, and cut flowers or entire plants of gladiolus and dahlia except the bulbs thereof without stems, from the State of Rhode Island and from infested areas in Maine, New Hampshire (eastern section), Massachusetts (eastern section), Connecticut (eastern section), and f rom Fishers Island in Suffolk County, N. Y., and (2) corn and broomcorn (including all parts of the stalk), all sorghums, and Sudan grass from infested areas in Vermont, New Hampshire (western section), Massachusetts (western Section), Connecticut (western section), New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, and West Virginia.
Gipsy moth and brown-tail moth.-Quarantine No. 45: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement interstate to any point outside of the infested area, or from points in the generally Infested area to points in the lightly infested area, of stone or quarry products,,






23

and of the plants and plant products listed therein. The quarantine covers all the New England States.
Japanese beetle.-Quarantine No. 48, revised: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement interstate to any point outside of the State of New Jersey and the regulated areas of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. and the District of Columbia of (1) farm, garden, and orchard products of all kinds; (2) grain and forage crops of all kinds; (3) nursery, ornamental, aio. greenhouse stock, and all other plants; and (4) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost. and manure.
Pink bollworm.-Quarantine No. 52, revised: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement. from the regulated areas of Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico of (1) cotto*, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products or which are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and if contaminated with cotton, any other articles.
Satin moth.--Quarantine No. 53, revised: Prohibits the interstate movement to points outside of the regulated areas in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Washington of all species or varieties of poplar and willow trees or parts thereof capable of propagation.
Thurberia weevil.--Quarantine No. 61, revised: Prohibits the interstate movement of Thurberia, including all parts of the plant, from any point in Arizona, and prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from the regulated area of Arizona of (1) cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, and cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products, or which are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and if contaminated with cotton, any other articles.
Narcissus bulb.-Quarantine No. 62: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from every State in the continental United States and the District of Columbia of narcissus bulbs on account of certain injurious bulb pests, including the greater bulb fly (Merodon equestris Fab.), the lesser bulb fly (Eumcrus strigatus Fallen), and the bulb eelworm (Tylenchus dipsaci Kuehn).
White-pine blister rust.--Quarantine No. 63: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from every State in the continental United States and the District of Columbia of 5-leaf pines (Pinus) or currant and gooseberry plants (Ribes and Grossularia, including cultivated or wild or ornamental sorts).
Mexican fruit wo i..-Quarantine No. 64: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement fron the regulated area of Texas of fruits of all varieties.
Woodgate rust.--Quarantine No. 65: Prohibits the interstate movement from the regulated area in the State of New York of trees, branches, limbs or twigs of Scotch pines (Pinus sylvestris), Canary Island pine (P. cani nis 1. ash pine (P. caribaea), Japanese red pine (P. densiflora), Corsicaln pine (P. nia1fn poiretiana), stone pine (P. pinea), western yellow pine (P. ponducrosa ). Montery pine (P. radiata), loblolly pine (P. taeda), or Jersey pine (1P. ririinina) or any variety thereof, or of any species or variety of hard pine hereafter found to be susceptible to the Woodgate rust.
Asiatic beetle anid Asiatic garden beetle.-Quarantine No. 6(;: Prohibits. except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto. tli(e ijtlstate movement from the State of Newv Jersey and from 11the10 regulated areas f Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, and the 1)ist rict of ('1,lutmbia of (1) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants, amn 12) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.






24

NOTICE TO COMMON CAnRIES
APRIL 10, 1929.
SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title and return this letter to the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act app roved August, 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has, revised the rules and regulations governing the movement of plants, plant prod-' ucts, and other quarantined articles into and out of the District. of Columbia, effective April 1, 1929, and has ordered that no plants or plant products or articles whose movement is restricted by Federal plant quarantines shall be moved or allowed to be moved, shipped, transported, or carried by any means whatever into or out of the District of Columbia, except in compliance with said rules and regulations and such other rules, regulations, and notices of quarantine as may be promulgated under the authority of said act.
A copy of the order, with the rules and regulations. thereunder,, is enclosed.
Respectfully,
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Adrnini st ration.
(Inclosure.)


(Do not detach this receipt)

Received this notice and the copy of the Revised Rules and Regulations Governing the Movement of Plants, Plant Products, and Other Quarantined Articles,,. Into and Out of the District of Columbia this ------ day of----------- 1929.
(Signature) .-- - - - - -- - -
(Title)..............................
f Sent to all common carriers doing business In or through the District of Columbia]


EUROPEAN CORN'-BORER QUARANTINE (DOMESTIC), (No. 43)
EUROPEAN CORN-BORER QUARANTINE REGULATIONS EXTENDED TO NEW AREAS
[Press notice]
FEBRUARY..27, 1929.
Under an amendment to the European corn-borer quarantine regulations issued to-day by the Secretary of Agriculture, certain new territory, mainly that found infested with this insect during the past season, is added to the regulated area, effective March 1, 1929. At the same time, the requirement of certification is discontinued with respect to, packages of shelled corn weighing
2 pounds or less.
The 2-generation area is enlarged to include 28 new towns in Middlesex, New London, and Windham Counties, Conn.; 1 in Worcester County, Mass.; 4 In Cumberland and Sagadahoc Counties, Me.; and 8 in Carroll, Cheshire, and Grafton Counties, N. H. Throughout this area inspection and. certification will now be required with respect to shelled corn (except in packages of 2 pounds or less), the cleaned seed of broomcorn and of sorghums'and Sudan grass, celery, green beans in the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, oat and rye straw as such or when used as packing, cut flowers and entire plants of chrysanthemum, aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock, gladiolus, and dahlia.
The additional territory in the 1-generation or western area Is more extensive. It consists of 7 towns in Cheshire and Sullivan Counties, N. H.; all of Addison, Chittenden, Franklin, Grand Isle, Rutland, and Windham Counties, and 35 towns in Bennington, Lamoille, Orleans, Washington, and Windsor Counties, Vt.; 66 towns in Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, aind Hampshire Counties, Mass.; 1 town in Hartford County, Conn.; all of Carbon, Mifflin, Monroe, Pike, and Wayne Counties, and 31 towns In Columbia, Greene, Montour, Northumberland, and Schuylkill Counties, Pa.; 6 towns In Marshall








County, W. Va.; 131 towns in Belmont, Clarke, Darke, Fairfield. Fayette, Greene, Guernsey, Madison, Miami, Montgomery, Muskingum, Perry, and Pickaway Counties, Ohio; 60 towns in Delaware, Fulton, Grant, Huntington, Jay, Kosciusko, Laporte, Marshall, Randolph, Starke, St. Joseph, and Wells Counties, Ind.; and all of the heretofore unregulated portions of the State of Michigan.
The requirements for the 1-generation area provide for the inspection and certification of shelled corn (except in packages of 2 pounds or less) an( cleaned seed of broomcorn and of sorghum and Sudan grass only, as the strain of the borer found in that region does not attack flowers and vegetables.
The shipment of ear corn, cornstalks, and other parts and debris of corn, broomcorn, sorghum, and Sudan-grass plants from the regulated areas to or through points outside thereof is prohibited.
The actual spread of the borer during the past year, except in the New England States, has been less than during previous seasons. In Indiana, however, it has found its way west to the shore of Lake Michigan, and that fact, added to its spread in the Upper Peninsula of the State of Michigan, is the cause of the extension of the quarantine to cover that entire State.


MODIFICATION OF EUROPEAN CORN-BORER QUARANTINE
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The amendment which follows modifies regulations 3 and 5 of the European corn-borer quarantine by (1) adding certain territory to the regulated areas, and (2) discontinuing the requirement of certification with respect to packages of shelled corn weighing 2 pounds or less.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.


AMENDMENT NO. 3 TO RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 43 (SIXTH REVISION)
[Effective on and after March 1, 1929]
Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20. 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulations 3 and 5 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision), on account of the European corn borer, which were promulgated December 29, 1927, be, and the same are hereby, amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS
In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the States, counties, townships, towns, and cities listed below, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits.

Two-Uencration area
Massachusetts easterni section).-Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes. Essex, Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, and Suffolk; and Ashburnham, Barre, Berlin, Blaickstone, Bolton, Boyiston, Clinton, Douglas, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton, larvard. Holden, Hlopedale, Hubbardston, Lancaster, Leomininster, Lunenburg, Mendon, Milford. Millbury, Millville, Northboro, Northbridge, Princeton, Rutland, Shrewsbury, Southboro, Sterling, Sutton, Upton. Uxbridge, Westboro, West Boylston, Westminster, and Worcester, in Worcester Counts.
New Hampshlire (eastern section.)--Counties of Belknap, Ilillsho'ro. Merrimack, Rockingham, and Strafford; and Brookfield, Conway, Eaton, Ellinghanm, Freedom, Madison, Moultonboro, (.ipee. Sandwich, Tamworth. Tut onboro, Wakefleid, and Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; Rindge and Stioddard, in Ches'hire County; Alexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater, Bristol, Caimpt'on, Cann., Groton. Hebron, Holderness, Lymne, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.






26

Mative.-County of York; and Baldwin, Brunswick, Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland, Falmouth, Freeport, Gorham, Harpswell, Portland, Scarboro, Sebago, South Portland, Standish, Westbrook, Windham, and Yarmouth, in Cumberlandi County; Porter, in Oxford County; Bath, Bowdoin, Bowdoinham, Richmond,. Topsham, and West Bath, in Sagadahoc County.
Rhode Island.-The entire State.
Connecticut (eastern section).-Clinton, East Haddam, Essex, Old Saybrook, Saybrook, and Westbrook, in Middlesex County; Bozrah, East Lyme, Franklin,. Griswold, Groton, Ledyard, Lisbon, Lyme, Montvidle, New London, North Ston-ington, Norwich, Old Lyme, Preston, Salem, Sprague, Stonington, Voluntown, and Waterford, in New London County; Canterbury, Killingly, Plainfield, Putnam, Scotland, Sterling, Thompson, and Windham, in Windham County.
New York.-Fishers Island in Suffolk County.

One-generation area
New Hampshire (western section).-Alstead, Chesterfield, Hinsdale, Walpole, and Westmoreland, in Cheshire County; Charlestown and Langdon, in Suliivan County.
Vermont.-Counties of Addison, Bennington, Chittenden, Franklin, Grand Isle, Rutland, and Windham; and Belvidere, Cambridge, Johnson, Morristown, and Waterville, in Lemoille County; Jay, in Orleans County; Warren, in Washington County; Andover, Baltimore, Bridgewater, Cavendish, Chester, Hartland, Ludlow, Plymouth, Reading, Rochester, Springfield, Weathersfield, Weston, West Windsor, Windsor, and Woodstock, 'in Windsor County.
Massachusetts (western section).--County of Berkshire; and Ashfield,. Bernardston, Buckland, Charemont, Colerain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, Leyden, Monroe, Montague, Northfield, Orange, Rowe, Shelburne, Sunderland, and Whately, in Franklin County; Agawam, Blandford, Chester, Chicopee, East Longmeadow, Granville, Holyoke, Longmeadow, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, Springfield, Tolland, Westfield, and West Springfield, in Hampden County; Chesterfield, Cunnington, Easthampton, Goshen, Hatfie-d, Huntington, Middlefield, Northampton, Plainfield, Southhampton, Westhampton, Williamsburg, and Worthington, in Hampshire County.
Connecticut (western section) .-Suffield, in Hartford County.
New York.-The entire State (except Fishers Island, in Suffolk County).
New Jersey.-Woodbridge, in Middlesex County; and Bayonne, Jersey City, Hoboken, Weehawken, North Bergen, Union City, West New York, Guttenberg. and Secaucus, in Hudson County, being all that part of said county east of the Hackensack River and Newark Bay.
Pennsylvania.-Counties of Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Blair, Bradford, Butler, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Center, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, 0olumbia, Crawford, Elk, Erie, Forest, Indiana, Jefferson, Lackawanna, Lawrence, Luzerne, Lycoming, McKean, Mercer, Mifflin, Monroe, Montour, Pike, Potter, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Union, Venango, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Westmoreland, and Wyoming; and Bedford, Bloomfield, Broad Top, Colerain, East Providence, East St. Clair, Harrison, Hopewell, Juniata, Kimmel, King, Liberty, Lincoln, Monroe, Napier, Snake Spring, South Woodbury, Union, West Providence, West St. Clair, and Woodbury, in Bedford County; Brownsville, Bullskin, Connellsville, Dunbar, Franklin, Georges, German, Jefferson, Lower Tyrone, Luzerne, Menallen, Nicholson, North Union, Perry, Redstone, Salt Lick, South Union, Springfield, Stewart, Upper Tyrone, and Washington, in Fayette County; Aleppo, Center, Cumberland. Franklin, Greene, Jackson, Jefferson, Monongahela, Morgan, Morris, Richhill, Washington, Wayne, and Whitley, in, Greene County; Barree, Brady, Carbon, Cass, Franklin, Henderson, Hopewell, Jackson, Juniata, Lincoln, Logan, Miller, Morris, Oneida, Penn, Porter, Shirley, Smithfield, Spruce Creek, Tod, Union, Walker, Warriorsmark, West, and Wood, in Huntingdon County; Coal, Delaware, East Cameron, East Chillisquaque, Gearhart, Lewis, Little Mahanoy, Lower Augusta, Mount Carmel, Point, Ralphe, Rockefeller, Rush, Shamokin, Turbot, Upper Augusta, West Cameron, West Chillisquaque, and Zerbe, in Northumberland County; Butler, Delano, East Union, Kline, Mahanoy, North Union, Rush, Ryan, Union, and West Mahanoy, in Schuylkill County; Allegheny, Black, Brothersvalley, Conemaugh, Fairhope, Jefferson, Jenner, Larimer, Lincoln, Lower Turkeyfoot, Middlecreek, Milford,







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Northampton, Ogle, Paint, Quemahoning, Shade, Somerset, Stonycreek, Summit, and Upper Turkeyfoot, in Somerset County.
We8t Virginia.-Counties of Brooke, Hancock, and Ohio; and Cameron, Clay, Sand Hill, Union, Washington, and Webster, in Marshall County.
Ohio.--Counties of Allen, Ashland, Ashtabula, Auglaize, Belmont, Carroll, Champaign, Clark, Columbiana, Coshocton, Crawford, Cuyahoga, Defiance, Delaware, Erie, Fairfield, Franklin, Fulton, Geauga, Guernsey, Hancock, Hardin, Harrison, Henry, Holmes, Huron, Jefferson, Knox, Lake, Licking, Logan, Lorain, Lucas, Madison, Mahoning, Marion, Medina, Mercer, Miami, Morrow, Muskingum, Ottawa, Paulding, Pickaway, Portage, Putnam, Richland, Sandusky, Seneca, Shelby, Stark, Summit, Trumbull, Tuscarawas, Union, Van Wert, Wayne, Williams, Wood, and Wyandot; and Adams, Allen, Brown, Franklin, Greenville, Jackson, Mississinawa, Monroe, Patterson, Richland, Wabash, Washington, Wayne, and York, in Darke County; Jasper, Jefferson, Madison, Marion, Paint, Wayne, and Union, in Fayette County; Bath, Beaver Creek, Cedarville, Miami, Ross, and Xenia, in Greene County; Butler, Harrison, Mad River, Van Buren, and Wayne, in Montgomery County; Bearfield, Clayton, Harrison, Hopewell, Jackson, Madison, Pike, Pleasant, Reading, and Thorn, in Perry County.
Michigan.-The entire State.
Indiana.--Counties of Adams, Allen, De Kalb, Elkhart, Huntington, Jay, Kosciusko, Lagrange, Marshall, Noble, St. Joseph, Steuben, Wells, and Whitley; and Liberty, in Delaware County; New Castle, in Fulton County; Van Buren, in Grant County; Cass, Center, Clinton, Cool Spring, Galena, Hanna, Hudson, Johnson, Kankakee, Lincoln, Michigan, New Durham, Noble, Pleasant, Prairie, Scipio, Springfield, Union, Washington, and Wills, in LaPorte County; Franklin, Green, Greensfork, Jackson, Monroe, Stony Creek, Ward, Wayne, and White River, in Randolph County; Center, Davis, Jackson, North Bend, Oregon, and Washington, in Starke County; Chester, Noble, Lagro, Paw Paw, and Pleasant, in Wabash County.

REGULATION 5. CONTROL OF THE MOVEMENT OF RESTRICTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
The articles enumerated in Notice of Quarantine No. 43, (sixth revision), shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas into or through any point outside thereof, nor from the 2-generation area to the 1-generation area (as designated in regulation 3), nor from the 1-generation area to the 2-generation area, unless a certificate or a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except as follows:
(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of celery, green beans In the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, oat and rye straw as such or when used as packing, cut flowers and entire plants of chrysanthemum, aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock, gladiolus, and dahlia, moved from the regulated areas of New Hampshire (western section), Massachusetts (western section), Vermont, Connecticut (western section), New York (except Fishers Island)," New Jersey, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana. Restrictions on the movement of the plants named in this paragraph relate only to the regulated areas of Massachusetts (eastern section), New Hampshire (eastern section), Maine, Rhode Island, and Connecticut (eastern section), and to Fishers Island in Suffolk County, N. Y.
(b) No restrictions are, placed on the interstate movement of celery, green beans in the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, and oat and rye straw as such or when used as packing, moved between the dates of January 1 and Ma1y 31. inclusive.
(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of bulbs and roots of dahlias and gladioli without stems.
(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movenoit of packages of shelled corn weighing 2 pounds or less.

OCertain parts of the corn-borer regulated areas of New York, New Jersey, awil 1enn sylvania are also within the areas regulated on account of the Japanese beetle in Notice of Quarantine No. 48. Those desiring to ship horticultural and agricultural products from these regions should consult that quarantine for details.







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(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any of the articles enumerated when they shall have lheen manufactured, processed, or treated in such a manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.
(f) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any of the articles enumerated moved from an area not under regulation through a, regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.
(g) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of 'the articles enumerated between points within the same regulated area, provided such articles do not pass; through any point outside the regulated area in which they originated.
The restrictions on the movement of corn and broomcorn (including, all parts of the stalk), all sorghums, and Sudan grass shall apply throughout the year and shall relate to interstate movement from each area designated as regulated into or through any point outside thereof. No cornstalks, ears, or other parts or debris of corn or broomcorn plants or sorghums or Sudan grass, originating within a regulated area (except certified clean shelled corn and certified clean seed of broomcorn and of sorghums and Sudan grass), shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from such area, and no certi-ficates will be issued authorizing such movement.
The articles enumerated in Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision), shall not be moved or allowed to be moved into the State of Maine from any point in the regulated areas outside that State unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except as provided in paragraphs (b) to. (f), inclusive, of this regulation.
This amendment shall be effective on and after March 1, 192.9, and shall cancel and supersede amendments No. 1 and No. 2 to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision).
Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of February, 1.929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agricu*ltutre.


NOTICE To COMMON CARRIERS

FRUARnY 25, 1929.
SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return this letter to, the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty, envelope, which requires no postage. :Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, by amendment No. 3 to, the rules and regulations supplemental to, Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision), on account of the European corn borer, effective -on, and after March 1, 1929, given notice that regulations 3 and 5 have been amended to read as per copy inclosed.
Very respectfully,
W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
(Inclosures.)

[Do not detach this receipt]
Received this notice and the copy of amendment No. 3 to the, rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision), mentioned therein this ------ (lay of ------- 1929.

(Signature)
------------------------------------------(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers doing business In or through the quarantined area.]





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NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLc THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

FEBRUARY 25, 1929.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision), on account of the European corn borer, effective March 1, 1929. This amendment modifies regulations 3 and 5 by (1) adding certain territory to the regulated areas, and (2) discontinuing the requirement of certification with respect to packages of shelled corn weighing 2 pounds or less. Copies of said quarantine may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: Hartford Times, Hartford, Conn., March 14, 1929; Indianapolis News. Indianapolis, Ind., March 18, 1929; Portland Press-Herald, Portland, Me., March 15, 1929; the Boston Herald, Boston, Mass., March 15. 1929; the Detroit News, Detroit, Mich., March 15, 1929; Manchester Union Leader, Manchester, N. H., March 11, 1929; Trenton Evening Times, Trenton, N. J., March 8, 1929; the World, New York, N. Y., March 9, 1929; the Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio, March 15, 1929; Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pa., March 9, 1929; Evening Bulletin, Providence, R. I., March 9, 1929; Burlington Free Press, Burlington, Vt., March 20, 1929; Charleston Gaze:te, Charleston, W. Va., March 9, 1929.]


JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE (No. 48)
JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE EXTENDED TO MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
[Press notice]
JAxNUARY 29, 1929.
The Secretary of Agriculture to-day announced a revision of the Japanesebeetle quarantine, effective February 13, extending the reguated area and modifying the regulations governing the interstate movement of farm products, nursery stock, and certain other materials, including sand, soil, earth, pleat, compost, and manure.
Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia are now brought under the provisions of this quarantine for the first time. New territory laced ilj the regulated area includes Cecil County, Md. (except the voting district of Cecilton) ; the entire District of Columbia; the city of Alexandria and Arlington County, Va.; all of Delaware north of Sussex County and the town of Milford in that county; Rye Township in Perry County, Pa.; and 11 townships in the southern part of New Haven County, Conn.
Provisions of the quarantine require inspection and certification of f:irmil products during the summer from June 15 to October 15, inclusive, except that the following articles are exempted: Potatoes and sweet potatoes when free from soil, watermelons, dried fruits, dried vegetables, seeds, grains, mushrnooms, onion sets, broomcorn, and, when used for packing articles other than fruits and vegetables, hay and straw.
Interstate movement of farm products from the District of Columbiai and from the regulated part of Virginia, however, is to be unrestricted for the eason 1929, owing to the slight degree of infestation in these areas.
Inspection and certification are also required for nursery, orilnmelital. iand greenhouse stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, ,r other port 11ions of plants for ornamental use. These restrictions on nursery ad ortamnental stock and other plants apply throughout the year, except that in the raw of cut flowers and portions of plants without roots and incapable of ;ropga linl they are in effect only during the sUnllier months from Juline 15 to( )kt 10,5. inclusive. Smooth ulbs of tulips, hyacinth, gldilus, and Iureisus are corn pletely exempted from the certification requirements throuhoit lie Nar.
All sand, soil, earth, penat, compost, and manure before being 1o10Hd iiter-it from any point in the regulated area into or through any outside 1, i nin ucertified, except that no restrictionls are placed on the intrstniae movelleit 4 sand for construction puri)oses from the District of Colun ia or fr,'m tiu regulated areas of Virginia.






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Shippers are required to make application for inspection sufficiently in advance of the probable date of shipment, and to clean all trucks, wagons, Qars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in transporting regulated articles before they are again moved interstate after such use. During the beetle-flight period in the summer-that is, from June 15 to October 15, inclusive-farm products, nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure moving interstate are required to be screened, covered, or otherwise protected to prevent infestation of these articles. This requirement appliesto all autoomobiles, trucks, wagons, cars, and boats hauling such articles from the regulated area to points outside.
Changes made in the, regulations in the new revision include, in addition to the extension of territory, a slight modification in the regulations affecting Class III nurseries and a new requirement whereby shippers of farm products from New York City are brought under the same certification regulations as those which apply to the remainder of the main regulated area.
With respect to certain isolated points of Japanese-beetle spread, including Hagerstown, Frederick, Cambridge, and Delmar, Md.; Lewistown and Sayre, Pa.; Hartford and New London, Conn.; Springfield, Mass.; and Delmar,'Del., no Federal order has been issued. The Secretary of Agriculture approves the policy of treating these areas as separate control units, conditioned upon cooperation by the States concerned acceptable to the department providing for
(a) nursery control under State quarantines but with Federal supervision and (b) the enforcement of clean-up operations to reduce or if possible as to certain points to eradicate the pest.
The clean-up operations referred to consist of soil treatment of areaa known or believed to be infested with the larvae and the collection of beetles during the next summer by use of traps or by hand. The Secretary points out that under these controls the security against spread from such outlying points may be even more satisfactory than in the general area under the Japanese-beetle quarantine. At the same time the benefit of active cooperation by the States, towns, and individuals concerned will be secured and the clean-up program may be expected greatly to reduce the numbers of beetles and practically to eliminate the kind of spread which it is impossible to control with any large measure of success under quarantine regulations.
Copies of the quarantine and regulations may be secured by addressing the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.


QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF JAPANESE BEETLE-REVISED REGULATIONS UNDER QUARANTINE NO. 48

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

This revision of Quarantine 48 and the regulations supplemental thereto include' substantially the following changes of interest to shippers: The foruter regulated area is enlarged to include part of one county in the State of Maryland, as well as certain new territory in Connecticut, Delaware, and Pennsylvania; an additional regulated area consisting of the District of Columbia and part of the State of Virginia is designated, but the restrictions placed on the latter area relate only to the interstate movement of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure; shipments of farm products from New York City are brought under the same certification requirements as apply to the remainder of the main regulated area; a slight modification is made in the regulations affecting Class III nurseries; and regulations 5, 61 and
7 have been rearranged in the interest of simplification.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief of Administration.

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 48. (SIXTH REVISION)
[Effective on and after February 15, 19291
I, William M. Jardine, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that It Is necessary to quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia and the District of Columbia to





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prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newm.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, and the District of Columbia, effective on and after February 15, 1929. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) farm, garden, and orchard products of all kinds; (2) grain and fortge crops of all kinds; (3) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants; and (4) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from any of said quarantined States or District into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions
-of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when. in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, such limitation shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle to other States and Territories, and when the movement of the restricted articles intrastate from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle therefrom to other parts of the quarantined States and thence into interstate commerce.
Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of January, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


RULES AND REGULATIONS (SEVENTH REVISION), SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 48
lEffective on and after February 15, 1929, and superseding the regulations heretofore issued under the Japanese-beetle quarantine]

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Japanese beetle: The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newn.), in any stage of development.
(b) The terms infested, infestation, and the like, relate to infestation with the Japanese beetle.
(c) Quaraintined area: Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.
(d) Regulated area: Any area in a quarantined State or District which is now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as revised.
(e) Farm products: Those products included in Notice of Quarantine No. 4,i under items (1) and (2) ; namely, farm, garden, and orchard products of all kinds; grain and forage crops of all kinds.
(f) Nursery and ornamental stock: Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants for ornamental use.
(g) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure: Sand, soil, earth, peat. compost, and manure of any kind, and as to either hulk movement or in cotinection with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.
(h) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, cornpost, and manure: Sand, soil, earti. peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector :is unimifested aild so certified.






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(i) Certifiedl greenhouse: A greenhouse which has complied to the satisfaction -of the inspector with the conditions imposed in, Regulation 6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, or similar plots safeguarded and treated in manner and method satisfactory to the inspector.
()Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (sixth revision), the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant products and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas: Provided, That the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine may move interstate from an area not, under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.
REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (sixth revision), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the States, counties, townships, towns, cities, hundreds, and election districts listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions within their limits:
Connecticut.-Towns of Bridgeport, Darien, Easton, Fairfield, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk, Shelton, Stamford, Stratford, Trumbull, Weston, Westport, and Wilton, in Fairfield County; Ansonia, Derby, East Haven, Hamden, Milford, New Haven, North Haven, Orange, Seymour, West Haven, and Woodbridge, in New Haven County.
Delaware.-Counties of New Castle and Kent, and the town of Milford, in Sussex County.
District of Columbia.-The entire District.
Marylan.--County of Cecil, omitting that part of said county south of the Bohemia River, namely, election district No. 1 (Cecilton).
New Jersey.-The entire State.
New York.-Counties of Nassau, Rockland, and Suffolk (except Fishers Island) ; New York City (including the Boroughs of- Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Richmond, -and Queens) ; and the towns of Bedford, East Chester, Greenburg, Harrison, Lewisboro, Mamaroneck, Mount Pleasant, Mount Vernon, New Castle, New Rochelle, North Castle, Ossining, Pelham, Poundridge, Rye, Scarsdale, White Plains, and Yonkers, and those portions of the towns of Cortland and Yorktown south of the Croton River, in Westchester County.,
Pennsylvania.-Coun ties of Berks, Bucks, Carbon, Chester, Columbia, Dauphin, Delaware, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery, Montour, Northampton, Northumberland, Philadelphia, and Schuylkill; the town-. ships of Upper Allen, Lower Allen, East Penusboro, Hampdien, Middlesex, Monroe, and Silver Spring, in Cumberland County; Rye, in Perry County.; and the following townships and cities., in Lackawanna, County, and all terr 'itory ,southeast of said townships and cities in said county, namely, Ransom, Scran.ton, Dickson City, Blakely, Archbald, Carbondale, and Fell.
Virg nia.-County of Arlington, and city of Alexandria.

REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction andi the areas affected thereby will be given in writing, to the transportation companies doing business in or through the States in which such areas ai-e located and by publication in newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.

REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF FARM PRODUCTS
Sect ion A.-Control of movement
Farm products shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas into or through any point outside thereof






33

unless a certificate shall have been issued therefor by an inspector except as follows:
(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of farm products between October 16 and June 14, inclusive.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of the following products at any time of the year: Potatoes and sweet potatoes when free from soil, watermelons, dried fruits, dried vegetables, seeds, grains, mushrooms. onion sets, broomeorn, and when used for packing articles other than fruits and vegetables, hay and straw.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of farm products from the District of Columbia nor from the regulated area of Virginia.

Section B.-Condtions of certification

Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement of farm products to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15. inclusive, under any one of the following conditions:
(1) When the farm products have actually been insp cted by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will 1be limited and their location determined by shipping needs, and further conditioned on the establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspctuon. Such inspection may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspeIctor during 1eriods of general or unusual flight of the beetles.
(2) When the farm products have been handled or treated under the sulwprvision of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any
infestation.
(3) When the farm products have originated outside of the regulated areas and are to be shipped directly from the freight yards or unloading docks, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reshipment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only for shipment from markets which are not subject to infestation within the market.
(4) When the farm products were grown in districts where the fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points outside the regulated area.

REGULATION G. RESTRIMIONS ON THIE MOVEMENT OF NURSERY AND ORNAMENTAL STOCK

Section. A.-Control of moiu ment

Nursery and ornamental stock shall not be moved or allowed to be moved( interstate from the regulated areas into or through any point outside thereof unless a certificate shall have been issued therefor by the inspector. except as follows:
(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of smooth bulbs of tulip, hyacinth, gladiolus. and narcissus from the regulated areas to points outside thereof.
(2) No restrictions are placed ont the interstate niovemient of nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped directly from the d(locks or freight yards of the I)rt of entry in the original (ontainer and labeled as to each container with a copy certificate of the country froimi which it was exported, a statement of the general nature ad quantity of the contents, the name and address of the 1nsignee. anl the country and locality where grown.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate miovemient between Oc'tober 16 and June 14, inclusive, of cut flowers and portions of pllants without roots and incapable of propagation (such as branches and Iwi s of trees and shrubs, Christmas trees, holly, laurel, sphagnum moss. and dried portions of plants free from soil).

'The interstate movement of narcissus bulbs is subject to the restrictions contains in the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quaranitine No. t2, Narcissus Bulb Quarantine.







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Sect ion~ B .-Conditions of certification.

For the purpose of certification of -nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will be classified as follows:
(1) Class 1.-Nurseries, greenhouses, 'and other premises concerned in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock in districts included in the regulated areas but in which districts neither grubs in the soil, nor beetles have been found may be classified as Class I. Upon compliance with the requirements of section 6 of this regulation nursery and ornamental 'stock may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipment from such premises to points outside the regulated areas without further inspection and without meeting the safeguards prescribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries or greenhouses of Classes II and III.
(2) Class 11.-Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock in districts recently or scantily infested by the beetle, but in which nurseries or greenhouses no beetles have been found and in which it has not been possible to determine any soil invasion will be classified as Class 11. Upon compliance with the requirements of sections (4) and (6) of this regulation nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipment from such premises to points outside the regulated area upon determination that the stock concerned is free from infestation. Such determination may be made, either (a) by complete removal of the soil from such stock; or (b) by inspection of the outside of the soil ball and removal and inspection of the upper 4 inches of the soil therefrom; or (c) in the case of plants, (such as azaleas), which would be injured by such removal, by inspection and removal of the soil from 5 per cent of the plants and by intensive examination of the soil in the block concerned; or (d) by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse. (See sec. 4 hereof.)
(3) Class III.-Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerne'1 in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the soil 'or beetles occur or located in districts known to be generally infested will be classified as Class Ill. Upon compliance with sections (4) and (6) of this regulation, nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipment from such premises to points outside the regulated. area under any one of the following conditions:
(a) That the roots shall be treated with carbon disulphide. emulsion or by other approved means in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or (b) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough inspection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by washing or shaking; or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse. (See sec. 4 hereof.)
In the case of nursery properties, consisting of separate units operated independently, such, units may be considered for, the purpose of rating in Class II or Class III, as though they were independent nurseries, when in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by the recent or scanty infestation of the district concerned, upon compliance with such conditions as the said inspector may require.
(4) Greenhouses of Class II or, Class III may be certified as prescribed in paragraphs (2) and (3) hereof, upon, compliance with all the following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to, all potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldfrilmes, and similar, plots:
(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes on premises in Class II or Class III shall be kept screened during the period of flight of the beetle-niamely, between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, in manner satisfactory to the inspector.
(b Prior to introduction into nurseries or~ greenhouses, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from areas in which Class II Or Class III nurseries or greenhouses are located, or which mnay have been exposed to, infestation, must be steril ized or fumigated under the direction and supervision of and in manner andi by method satisfactory to the inspector. If such treated sand, soil, earth, peait, conmpost, or' manure is not to be iininediately used in such greenhouses it must be stored. in a tightly closed binding or container.







35

(c) Plants potted in certified soil (see regulation 7) in nurseries or greenhouses of Class II or Class III and placed in outdoor screened frames during the period June 15 to October 15, inclusive, may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipment to points outside the regulated area under the following conditions: A careful inspection shall be made of the soil from not less than 10 per cent of the pots. The soil in and including an area not less than 3 feet wide surrounding the frames shall be treated not later than the preceding October 1 with arsenate-of-lead powder applied uniformly at the rate of 1,500 pounds to the acre. The soil examination and treatment shall be made under the direction and supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(d) Plants potted in certified soil (see regulation 7) in nurseries or greenhouses of Class II or Class III and placed in beds in the open during the I)eri(l October 16 to June 14 may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipment to points outside the regulated area upon compliance with the following conditions performed under the direction and supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to such inspector : A fine-mesh screen must he so placed in the bottom of each pot as to prevent the entrance of beetle larvVe through the drainage hole; the soil in beds on which the pots are placed must have been treated not less than three months previous to the time the pots are placed in the beds with arsenate-of-lead powder applied uniformly at the rate of 1,500 pounds to the acre, under the direction and supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; no pots shall be placed within 3 feet of soil which has not been treated; before pots are placed on treated beds, careful soil examination shall be made of the beds and their freedom from infestation determined by the inspector: Provided. That the use of the fine-mesh screens in such pots may be omitted when the soil treatment specified has been carried out on such beds for at least three consecutive years and so long as the soil treatment is continued yearly thereafter in accordance with the above requirements.
(5) Cut flowers and other parts of plants without roots or soil and incapable of propagation may be certified for interstate movement to points outside the regulated area, either (a) when they have been inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation, or (b) when they have been grown in a greenhouse of Class I or in a certified greenhouse of Class II or Class III and are transported under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the inspector prevent infestation. (See also sec. A (3) of this regulation.)
(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain their classified status. (a) shall restrict their purchases of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure within the regulated area to articles which have been certified under these regulations as to each purchase and the said certificate shall accompany the article when moved: (b) shall obtain approval of the inspector before sueli articles are received on their premises or moved from the open on their own premises into certified greenhouses and (c) shall report immediately on forms provided for that purpose :ill heir sales or shipments of such articles both to points outside the regulated area and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated area. They shall also report immediately in writing all purchases of such articles secured from within the regulated area. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to make the report or reports required by this regulation, and su.h denial of certification shall continue until the information so omitted ha been supplied.
(7) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign count tries and( not reshipped directly from the docks or freight yards of the po)rt of entry mayv be certified for interstate movement to points outside the regulated areas when such stock has been ispected( by an inspector and found free from iii festation.
(8) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated ar'as aml certified stock originating in classified nurseries or gr hos may Ie certified for reshipment from classilied premises ofher than those on which thely oriinated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguardi' f such stock from ifestation at the point of reslhipiment and ('1n route atnl. when found advisable by the inspector, after reinsIection anld determination oft' free dom from infestation.







36

REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF SAND, SOIL, EARTH, PEAT, COMPOST, AND MANURE

Section A.-Control of m.ovenent

Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas into or through any point outside' thereof unless a certificate shall have been issued therefor ,by the inspector, except that no restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand for construction purposes from the District of Columbia or from the regu-, lated area of Virginia.

Section B.-Conutitions of certification

Certificates for the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure from the regulated areas to points outside thereof may be issued under any one of the following conditions:
(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in the regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been found.
(2) When the material consists of fresh manure and it has been determined by an inspector that no, infestation could exist therein.
(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an iDspector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below' the surface of the ground and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or (b) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an inspector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the cars and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.
(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphid under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. Such fumigation will be required as a condition of certification of all sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure except such as is loaded and shipped in comipliance with paragraphs (1), (2), or (3) hereof.

RtEGULATION 8. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES FROM INFESTATION WHILE IN TRANSIT

Farm products, nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure moving interstate between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, shall be screened, covered, or otherwise protected in manner or method determined by the inspector as necessary to prevent infestation of the articles listed. This requirement shall apply to each automobile, truck, wagon, car, and boat hauling such articles from the regulated area to points, outside thereof.

REGULATION 9. MARKETING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE
TRANSPORTATION

Every car, vehicle, box,, basket, or other container of the articles listed, the interstate movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and '7, shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee and shall bear a certificate showing the contents to be apparently free from infestation.
The inspection certificate in the case of carload and other bulk shipments shall accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining to such shipment, or in the case of truck or other road vehicle the certificate shall accompany the Vehicle.
Misuse or transfer of certificates Or use of void certificates is prohibited and may result in the refusal of further certification to the grower or shipper concerned.

REGULATION 10. CONDITIONS GOVERNING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES

Persons in tending to move or allow to be moved interstate any of the articles the movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7 shall make appli-







37

cation for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment, specifying in the application the article and quantity to be shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the consignor, and name and address of the consignee.
Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at such points as the inspector shall designate and to so place them that inspection may readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.
Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the articles enumerated can not be determined by the inspector certification will be refused.
REGULATION 11. INSPECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved or offered for movement interstate which contains or may contain articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations shall be subject to inspection by inspectors at any time or place.

REGULATION 12. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF TRUCKS, WAGONS, CARS, BOATS,
AND OTHER VEHICLES BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATE

Trucks, wagons, cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in transporting any article covered by these regulations within the regulated areas shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly swept and cleaned by the carrier at the point of unloading or destination.

REGULATION 13. SHIPMENTS BY TilE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration showing compliance with such conditions.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after February 15, 1929, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated March 21, 1927, as amended.
Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of January, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of thie United States Department of Agriculture.
[SE-L.] W. Al. JARDINE.
Secretary of AgricultuCre.


PENALTIES

The plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, ? * or any other article * specified in the notice of quarantine * in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person. who shall violate :ny of the provisions of this act, or who shail forge, coiunterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Stecretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdenieaniior, anid shall upon conviction thereof be punished by a fine not exceeding $500 or )by imprisonment not exceeding one year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.







38

STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

The States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey,'New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia have promulgated or are about to promulgate quarantines restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. These State quarantines are enforced in cooperation with the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained by addressing: United States Department of Agriculture; Japanese Beetle Control, Box 361, Camden, N. J.
Subsidiary offices are maintained in Shelton, Conn.; Wilmington, Del.; Baltimore, Ald.; Glassboro, Trenton, New Brunswick, and Rutherford, N. J.; New York, N. Y.; and Norristown, Lancaster, and Philadelphia, Pa.
Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments from the District of Columbia by calling Main 4650, Branch 174, the inspection house of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Twelfth and B Streets NNV'., Washington, D. C.

GENERAL On-ICES OF STATES COOPERATING

Department of entomology, agricultural experiment station, New Haven, Conn.
Department of agriculture, Dover, Del.
Department of zoology and entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.
Bureau of statistics and inspection, department of agriculture, Trenton, N. J.
Bureau of plant industry, department of agriculture and markets, Albany,, N. Y. -4
Bureau of plant industry, department of agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.
Division of plant industry, department of agriculture and immigration, Richmond" Va.

P. Q. C. A.-220

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE To ENFORCEMENT OF REGULATION 6,
QUARANTINE 48 (SIXTH REVISION), ON ACCOUNT OF THE JAPANESE BEETLE

FEBRUARY 219 1929.
The purpose of this circular is to give a more definite and exact interpretation of procedure to. he followed in the paragraphs concerned of regulation 6, Quarantine 48 (sixth revision, effective February 15, 1929).
Under section Bi (3) the first sentence of the first paragraph is to be interpreted for purposes of enforcement as follows:
Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the soil or beetles have been found will be classified as Class III. Such classification also may be given to- nurseries, etc., in localities- known, to be generally infested where beetles or grubs are found in the immediate proximity of such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or properties."
The final paragraph of this section is to be interpreted for administrative purposes as follows:
In the case of nursery properties under single ownership and management, but represented by parcels of land widely separated, such parcels may be independently classified either as Class II or Class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as shall be required by the inspector. Similarly, unit nursery properties, which would otherwise fall in Class III, may be open to subdivision, for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in Classes II or III, when in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion of the nursery concerned: ProvIded, That the subdivision containing the infestation shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which shall be approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs."
Inasmuch as all nurseries, or subdivisions thereof, to be in Class II must be uninfected with beetles or grubs, the requirement of screening openings in greenhouses and cold frames in such nurseries as prescribed in regulation 6, section B (4), will be made optional with the nurseryman in question.
C. L. MAmATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.




39

NOTICE To COM MON CARRIERS
JANUARY 25, 19249.
SIB: YOU are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent. as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4. 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, by Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (sixth revision), effective on and after February 15, 1929, quarantined the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland. New Jersey, New York. Pennsylvania. Virginia, and the District of Columbia. to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle, and has ordered that (1) farm, garden, and orchard products of all kinds: (2) grain and forage crops of all kinds; (3) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants; and (4) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be shipped. offered for shipment to a conmmnon carrier. received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved interstate from the said quarantined States or District in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the revised rules and regulations supplemental to said quarantine or in amendments thereto.
Copy of the notice is inclosed herewith.
Very respectfully,
W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
(Inclosures.)

[Do not detach this receipt]
Received this notice and the copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 4.8, (sixth revision), with revised rules and regulations mentioned therein this day of -----------, 1929.

(Signature)
(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]


NOTICE TO GENERAL PuBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
JANUARY 25, 1929.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20. 1912 (37 St:t. 315), as amended, has by Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (sixth revision ). effective February 15, 1929, quarantined the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and the 1'istrict of Columbia, to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle, and has ordered that
(1) farm, garden, and orchard products of all kinds; (2) grain and forage crops of all kinds; (3) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants; and (4) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be shipme(l, offered for shipmenllt to a coniulln carrier, received for trainslortation or transl)rted by a common carrier, or ( carried, transported. mIoved,. or allowed to be moved interstate from the said quarantined States or D)istrict in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed il tIhe revised rule and regulations made thereunder and amendments thereto. Copies of said quarantine and revised( rules and regulations may he obtained frolm the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Department of Agriculture. W'asihington, D. C.
W. M1. J \RI N:.
N cretalry of A tyricil t u re.
[Published in the following newspapers: Hartford Timnis. Ilartford, Cnn Jnuniry 2,. 1929. Evening Journal, Wilnington, Del., February 6. 1929; Washington Eeing Star, Washington. 1). C., Februari'y 7, 1929; Trenton Evening Times. Trnton, N ... February 7, 1929; The World, New York, N. Y., February 7, 1929; Plhiladelphia In quirer. l'hlladelphia, Pa.. February 7, 1929; Cecil Whig, Elkton, Md., February 9, 129. Alexandria Gazette, Alexandria, Va.. February 6, 1929.1







40

MEXICAN FRUIT-WORM QUARANTINE (No. 64)
HARVESTING PERIOD FOR GRAPEFRUIT, ORANGES, AND KUMQUATS IS EXTENDED
IN TEXAS AREA REGULATED ON ACCOUNT OF THE MEXICAN FRUIT WORM
[Press notice]
JANUARY 31, 1929.
The United States Department of Agriculture announces that, under the authority given in the regulations supplemental to the quarantine on account of the Mexican fruit worm, the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration has approved the action of the State of Texas in fixing, for the present season, March 30 as the date on which grapefruit and certain other fruits must be removed from the trees in the Mexican fruit-worm regulated territory. The host-free period prescribed in the regulations will begin on March 31, and no fruits susceptible to infestation by the Mexican fruit worm, such as grapefruits, oranges, kumquats, peaches, apples, guavas, and others, will be permitted to develop in orchards or to exist elsewhere within the regulated area after that date.
The date fixed for this season is one month later than the beginning of the host-free period in 1928. This change is made at the urgent request of orchard owners and other interests concerned, and was recommended by the State Department of Agriculture of Texas. The grapefruit and oranges this season are ripening later than usual, due to rains occurring late -in September and early in October, with the result that not much more than half of the crop has been moved out to date. The wholehearted cooperation of the residents in the regulated area has resulted in the practically complete elimination of secondary host-fruit trees, thus greatly reducing the possibility of any Mexican fruit-worm infestation becoming established.


NURSERY-STOCK, PLANT, -AND SEED QUARANTINE (No. 37)

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
[T. D. 431631

QUARANTINE AGAINST THE; IMPORTATION OF NURSERY STOCK, PLANTS, AND S S

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 37, WITH REVISED REGULATIONS-EFFECTIVE ON AND Ak NOVEMBER 19 1928

WASHINGTON, D. C., January 22, 1929.. To Collector of Customs avd Others Concerned:
The appended copy of a new edition, issued by the Department of Agriculture, of Quarantine No. 37, with revised regulations, applicable to nursery stock, plants, and seeds from certain foreign countries, is published for the information and guidance of customs, officers and others concerned.
It is stated by the Secretary of Agriculture, in a letter dated December 28, 1928, that This edition supersedes all previous editions and amendments,. The principal changes are indicated in the introductory note and, as pointed out therein, this is substantially a reprint rather than a revised edition. Java and Mexico have been added to the. countries listed under Appendix B as having provided for inspection and certification in conformity with the requirements of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912."
E. W. CAMP,
Commissioner of Customs.
[Then follows the text of the quarantine and regulations.]

P. Q. C. A.-222
FLOWERS MAY BE CUT FROM FIELD-GROWN BULBOUS IRIS IMPORTED UNDER SPECIAL PERMIT
MARCH 28, 1929.
Persons propagating bulbous iris under special permits are advised that the cutting of flowers (mot foliage) from field plantings of such bulbs is hereafter permitted. This decision is based on the advice of the horticultural




41

specialists of the department that the judicious cutting of flowers (not foliage) from fleld-grown bulbous iris will not materially reduce the propagation results.
It should be distinctly understood, however, that this action does not modify in any way, other than as to the cutting of flowers, the conditions of release of bulbous iris imported for propagation under special permit as indicated in HB-194, revised July 28, 1927, Utilization of Plants Entered for Propagation.
C. L. MARLAIT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.


PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (No. 52)

CHANGE IN LEADERSHIP OF PINK-BOLLWORM AND THURBERIA-WEEVIL PROJECTS

JANUARY 16, 1929.
To fill a long-felt need of a special assistant to the officer in charge of the Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, in order that closer contact may be maintained with the field stations under that project, George G. Becker will, in the near future, be transferred to Washington. Mr. Becker has been in charge of the field direction of the work under the pink-bollworm and Thurberia-weevil projects since July 1, 1926. His former duties in connection with these projects have to-day been assumed by R. E. McDonald.
Mr. McDonald was the State entomologist of Texas for a number of years, and more recently was an agent of this administration. To Mr. McDonald is largely due the credit for the whole-hearted cooperation which the State of Texas has given to the department's efforts to eradicate or control the pink bollworm since the discovery of this pest in that State. His extended experience with cotton insects, his close association with this work in Texas during all these years, and his familiarity with all phases of the project and with the past policies of the department peculiarly qualify him for the duties to which he has now been assigned.
C. L. MAArr,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.


1929 AMENDMENT TO TEXAS PINK-BOLLWORM LAW8
[Approved February 26, 1929]
AN ACT To amend Articles 74 and 75 of Chapter 3, Title 4 of the Revised Civil Statutes of 1925 providing the conditions under which the pink boll worms are to be found; providing compensation for all losses incurred or expenses sustained by all persons, firms or corporations required to comply with the provisions of Chapter 3 of Title 4 of the Revised Civil Statutes of 1925; and enlarging the powers of the Compensation Claim Board ;' providing for State ownership or lease of fumigation and
sterilization plants; and declaring an emergency.
Be it enacted by the Legislature of the AState of Texas:
SBCTION 1. That Article 74 of Chapter 3, Title 4 of the Revised Civil Statutes of 1925 be amended so as to hereafter read as follows:
"ARTICL 74: Whenever the Commissioner of Agriculture shall deem it necessary to the protection of the cotton industry of Texas that the growing of cotton within any area of the State, except as provided for in the preceding articles hereof, be placed under supervision, or that cotton growing be prohibited as a means of aiding in the control and eradication of the pink boll worm, he shall cause to be made a thorough examination of such area by a competent and experienced entomologist, who shall, after going upon the premises and after making an examination in person, report the result thereof to the Commissioner of Agriculture. Should this report express the conclusion that pink boll worms exist in such numbers as to constitute a serious menene within the territory under Investigation, the Commissioner of Agriculture shall certify this report to the Governor, who shall cause the Pink Boll Worm Commission hereinatter provided for, to hold a hearing at some central and easily accessible point within the area under investigation; due notice of the time and place ofsuch hearing shall be publislid in some newspaper in or near the county or counties under investigation, at least ten days before such hearing. The Commissioner of Agriculture shall present to the Commission a statement setting forth the following facts:
1. The name of the entomologist making the examination on behalf of the State Department of Agriculture.
2. The date when such examination was made.
"3. The locality where the pink boll worm is alleged to exist.

OThe Texas pink bollworm law as passed In 1921 will he found in the Service and Re latory Announcements of the Federal Horticultural Board, No. 71 (July-December
1, pages 109-114). In the amendment printed here the terms Artlcles 74 and T5 refer to sections 8 and 9 respectively of the bill as printed at that time.







42

4. That the inspector invited the owner of the land or his agent or representative to accompany him on the inspection trip, and that the owner or his representative accompanied him or declined to do so.
11 5. Any other information deemed necessary by the Commission for the discharge of its duties under the provisions of this Chapter.
Such statement shall be verified by oath of the person making the same and shall be filed and preserved in the office of the Commissioner of Agriculture and be open to the inspection of the public. Said Pink Boll Worm Commission shall make a report to the Governor immediately after the heariDg. Should this report and recommendation be for the prevention of the planting of cotton in any Area and for the establishment of a non-cotton zone, such recommendation shall specify the area to be embraced in the proposed Don-cotton zone. Upon receipt of this report, the Governor shall declare the growing of cotton within such area as may' be recommended by the Pink Boll Worm Commission a public menace, and thereafter it shall be unlawful to plant, cultivate or grow cotton, or to allow cotton to grow within, such zone, such proclamation of the Governor to remain in effect until the Pink Boll Worm Commission, herein provided for, shall have certified that the condition of menace no longer exists. In the event of the establishment of any non-cotton zone authorized by this Chapter, all persons prevented from producing cotton in the non-cotton zones shall be entitled to receive compensation from the State in the measure of the actual and necessary losses sustained thereby. In all regulated or restricted areas now established or that may hereafter be established, all persons, firms or corporations required to comply with said regulations or restrictions imposed upon them by law or any constituted authority shall be entitled to receive compensation for the actual losses sustained and for all actual expenses incurred by reason of said restrictions or regulations. From and after July :1, 1929, the State shall own or lease and operate all fumigation and sterilization plants and shall operate same without cost to the cotton grower or gin, compress or mill owner. The Compensation Claim Board, herein provided for, shall have full power and authority to determine the amount of compensation to such persons, firms or corporations. In determining the actual and necessary losses, the Compensation Claim Board shall take into consideration the value of the average yield of cotton and other crops second in economic importance thereto in that vicinity; the total amount of land planted to crops during the'year for Thich compensation is claimed; the percentage of such land customarily planted in cotton in that vicinity, and such other factors as they deem essential. The words 11 cultivated crops as used above shall not be construed to include any small grain crops, hay or pasture crops which are not cultivated during the growling season. No person shall be entitled to compensation who does not in good faith obey the proclamation of the Governor establishing such non-cotton or regulated zone. Should the report of the Pink Boll Worm Commission express the conclusion that it will not be dangerous to the cotton industry of Texas to permit the growing of cotton within such district under such rules and regulations as it shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the pink boll worm, the Governor shall proclaim such area as may be set out in the report of the Pink Boll Worm Commission a regulated zone, in which it shall be unlawful to plant, cultivate and market cotton except under such rules and regulations as shall be promulgated therefore by the Commissioner of Agriculture, which may include the planting of seed from non-infested territory, ginning at designated gins, milling or disinfecting of all seed products within such zone, marketing, cleaning of fields, and such other rules as may be found necessary ; provided that no ginner shall be authorized to gin cotton from regulated zones unless he shall disinfect all seed under such rules as the Commissioner of Agriculture shall prescribe. Such proclamation of the Governor, establishing. such regulated zone shall remain in effect until the Pink Boll Worm Commission, shall have certified that the menace no longer exists."
SEC. 2.- That Article 75 of Chapter 3, Title 4 of the Revised Civil Statutes of 1925 be amended so as to thereafter read as follows:
"Article 75. The Guovernor shall appoint a Compensation Claim Board for the State, who shall serve until relieved therefrom by the Governor, whose duty it shall be determined in the manner herein provided the measure of compensation due persons prevented from growing cotton and the damages sustained by persons having cotton condemned and destroyed as provided for herein. and losses sustained or expenses incurred by all persons, firms or corporations in such regulated or restricted areas. The said Board shall be composed of three citizens of the State residing outside any area under quarantine under the provisions of this law, at least two of whom are actually engaged in the production of cotton. Before entering upon their duties, the members of the Board shall take the official oath, and shall organize by electing one of its members chairman and the Commissioner of Agriculture shall act as ex-officio secretary. The concurrence of two members of the Board shall constitute legal action. The Compensation Claim Board shall conduct a public hearing in the county or counties from which the claims for compensation have been filed, due notice of which hearing shall be given by publication in some newspaper published in or near the county or counties in which the claimant resides, not less than ten days before the date of such hearing, and by mailing from the office of the Commissioner of Agriculture a letter to each claimant, not less than ten days before the date of such hearing, which notices shall state the time and place of each hearing. Every such claim for compensation from the State shall be made under oath, attested by two citizens of the county in which the claimant resides, upon blanks to be furnished by the Commissioner of Agriculture.
Every such claim Rhall state:
1. '1 name and the post office of the claimant.
2. The location of the farm u on which the claim is based.
C4 3. The total acreage of all curtivated crops produced in the year in which such claim Isyresented.
4. All other information deemed essential by the said Compensation Claim Board for the performance of the duties developed upon them by this law,Each allotm(,nt of compensation shall be evidenced by a written order, entered in' a permanently bound book kept by the Board in the office of the Commissioner of AgriCulture, and a certified copy of each allotment sliall be given the claimant. If any claimant is dissatisfied with the action of the Claim Board on his claim he shall have the right within six months after the decision of the Claim Board to m4ke application to the District Court of the county of which lie is a resident or in which his cotton was







43

destroyed or in which he was prevented from growing cotton or in the county where actual losses were sustained or actual expenses were incurred and have the action of the Claim Board reviewed by such District Court. If the State, acting through the Commissioner of Agriculture, is dissatisfied with any such decision of the Claim Board, it shall likewise have the right to resort to said court for such review."
SEc. 3. The fact that there is now no law providing compensation to persons, firms or corporations sustaining losses and incurring expenses by reason of the operation of Chapter 3, Title 4, Revised Civil Statutes of Texas of 1925, in regulated areas creates an emergency and an imperative public necessity that the Constitutional Rule requiring bills to be read on three several days be suspended, and said Rule is hereby suspended, and that this Act be in force and take effect from and after its passage, and it is so enacted.


SATIN-MOTH QUARANTINE (No. 53)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

JAN' ARY 5. 1921i).
MY DEAR SIR: There is inhlosd for your information and guidance a copy of revised quarantine ord(ler No. 53. effective January 1, 1929, on account of the satin moth, the purpose of which is to extend the quarantined areas in the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire. and Vermont.
Quarantine Order No. 53 prohibits the movement from any point in the regulated area into or through any point outside thereof of poplar and willow trees and parts thereof capable of propagation.
Sincerely yours,
R. S. RELR.,
Third Assistant Postmaster Gcneral.


PUSSY-WILLOW SHIPMENTS BANNED IN WESTERN WASHINGTON AREA
[Press notice]
JAN TARY 31. 192}.
Residents of western Washington are requested to cooperate with tlie United States Department o(f Agriculture by refraining from any eftforts to ship l)pussy willows to other parts of the country, says a statement issue to-day from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. Cheerful acceptance of a necessary regulation will help to prevent the spread of the satin moth, and will alo relieve the administration from the necessity of imposing penalties for violal ions.
During January and February the luxuriant growth of pussy willows in the Puget Sound region has been a subject of astonishment and admiration to travelers and new residents from the Eastern and Northern States. What (ouldl be more natural," the administration comments, than to cut a bundle ,f decorkntive pussy-willow twigs to send to friends in the snow-covered New England awild upper Mississippi Valley States."
"The shipment of parcels of these twigs has been a common practice and until recent years was unobjectionable," says the statement. In 1925. however, the satin moth, an enemy of poplar and willow, was discovered in Kini County, Wash., and several counties to the north situated between PIuget Slutd and the Cascade Mountains. It was necessary for the United Stat us I)Nparmert of Agriculture to establish a quarantine )pro(hil)iting the movement of l.1ar anI willow trees and cuttinus capable of propagation from any Part of the infested area. Later, after the sati mioth spread, the quarantine was extended, and it now prohibits the movement of these trees and cuttings from all parts of he State of Washington west of the Cascade Mountains; namely.. Whatrn, Skagit. Snohomish, King, Perce. Lewis, and Skamania Counties, and all the territ or between those counties and the Pacific Ocean.
"The satin moth is a serious Ili'st of poplar and willow trees and if introduced into certain parts of the Plains States, where these species are lte most Ip8pular and inll some places the only satisfactory soUrce of shade, \ lilhi ui doubtedly case a high d(legree of damage. The silver poplur is a fas ,ite host plant. Where the moths become numerous, other varieties of Polar an, al'o willows are attacked more alnd more coilionly. The inecl drives is name from the white satinlike appearance of the adult moths. The f,ale lay heir eggs on the poplar and willow trees in the late summer :ad thie, 'oi hat ch






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into small larvae. The latter pass the winter concealed in the crevices of the bark, in webs so hidden and inconspicuous as often to escape' even the most careful inspection. On account of the practical impossibility of satisfactorily determining whether poplars and willows are free from infestation, the movement of these plants and cuttings from any of the infested areas into or through any other State or territory of the United States is prohibited by the Federal quarantine.
Postmasters and the agents of transportation companies are instructed to refuse to accept such articles for transportation; and if accepted they are subject to interception by inspectors of the Department of Agriculture, en route or at destination, and the shipper is subject to prosecution."


WOODGATE-RUST QUARANTINE (No. 65)
WOODGATE-RUST REGULATIONS AMENDED

[Press notice]
MARCH 15, 1929.
The quarantine regulations on account of the Woodgate rust, a dangerous disease Attacking Scotch pine and several other hard pines, have been amended to include Madison County, N. Y., according to an announcement by the United States Department of Agriculture. The amendment becomes effective on April 1, 1929. The entire area now under quarantine on account of this disease comprises the following counties in the State of New York: Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, and St. Lawrence.
This quarantine prohibits the movement of Scotch pine and certain other hard pines from the above counties to points outside the State.


AMENDMENT OF WOODGATE-RUST QUARANTINE

INTRoD~UcTORy No'rE

The amendment which follows adds Madison County, N. Y., to the area designated as regulated on account of the Woodgate rust.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
AMENDMENT No. 1 TrO RULES AND RLEQIUATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To No'ricE oF QUARANTINE No. 65
(Effective ,on and after April 1, 1929)

Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 65, on account of the Woodgate rust, which were promulgated October 18, 1928, be, and the same Is hereby, amended to read as follows:

IWGULATION 3. RMGULA TED AREAS

In accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 65, the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated area the counties of Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, and St. Lawrence, In the State of New York, including all cities, towns, township and other political subdivisions within their, limits.
This amendment shall be effective on and after April 1, 1929.
Done at the city of Washington this 9th day of March, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEnAL.] R. W. DUTNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.







45

NOTICFA TO COMMON CARRIERS
MNARCI 9, 1929.
SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, by amendment No. I to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 65, on account of the Woodgate rust, effective on and after April 1, 1929, given notice that regulation 3 has been amended to read as per copy inclosed.
Very respectfully,
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
(Inclosure.)

[Do not detach this receipt]

Received this notice and the copy of amendment 1 to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 65 mentioned therein this day of -----------, 1929.
(Signature)
(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers in the State of New York.]


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC TitROUGH NEWSPAPERS

MARCH 9, 1929.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 65, on account of the Woodgate rust, effective April 1, 1929. This amendment extends the regulated area to include Madison County, N. Y. Copies of said amendment may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in Oneida Dispatch, Oneida, N. Y., March 22, 1929.]


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO PLACES IN WYOMING
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER (ENR.AI,, Washington, Fcbiru r! ii. 12.
The State of Wyoming has established places for terminal inslwction under the provisions of the act of March 4, 1915, embodied in section 46,S, l'tstal Laws and Regulations, of the following plants and plant products
"All field-grown woody plants, or cuttings or scions thereof, inctitling 'cut flowers; and all strawberry plants: J1rovidcd, That said list of l~iats 111d plant products shall not apply to any nursery stock which bears a Wyoiniiig tag certifying that the nursery stock is being shipped fr(m a nursery licensed to do business in Wyoming for the current season, nor to t.ee nild fiel sels, bulbs, and hothouse or field-grown herbaceous platits."






46

All postmasters are therefore informed that packages containing any plants or plant products addressed to places in the State of Wyoming may be accepted for mailing only when plainly marked so, that the contents may be readily ascertained by an inspection of the outside thereof. The law makes the failure so to mark such parcels an offense punishable by a fine of not more than $100.
Postmasters within the State of Wyoming shall be governed strictly by the provisions of paragraphs 3, 4, 5, and 6, section 468, Postal Laws and Regulations, in the treatment of all packages :addressed for delivery at their offices containiinglany of the plant's or plant products above described as subject to terminal inspection.
Inspection service is maintained at the places in Wyoming named below, and all postmasters in that State shall, after receiving the required postage therefor, under the provisions of section 468, Postal Laws and Regulations, send to the nearest inspection point each package containing plants or plant products subject to terminal inspection:
Sheridan.
Casper.
Laramie.
Owing to the perishable character of plaits and plant products the packages containing such matter must be given prompt attention.
Any failure of compliance with the foregoing instructions or with the provisions of section 468, Postal Laws and Regulations, coming to the attention of any postmaster. should be reported to the Third Assistant Postmaster General, division of classification.
R. S. RtEGAR,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO PLACES IN MISSISSIPPI
THIRD AssIsTANT POSTMAsTER. GENERAL, Washhgton, March 9, 1929.
Postmasters in the State of Mississippi are informed that provision has been made for the terminal inspection of plants and plant products at Wiggins, so that the complete list of such terminal inspection points in Mississippi is as follows:
A. & M. College. Holly Springs. Pascagoula.
Biloxi. Houston. Poplarville.
Brookhaven. Jackson. Senatobia.
Cleveland. Laurel. Starkville.
Corinth. Meridian. Tupelo.
Durant. Moss Point. West Jackson.
Grenada. Natchez.' Wiggins.
Gulfport. Ocean Springs. Yazoo City.
Upon receiving the required postage as prescribed by paragraph 3, section 468, Postal Laws and Regulations, parcels containing plants and plant products subject to terminal inspection should be sent to the inspection point nearest the office of address.
R. S. REGAR,
Thirdt Assistant Postmaster General.


CONVICTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT
The following convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act were reported to the administration during the period January 1 to March 31, 1929:

JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States 'v. Maud A. Corbett, Wandel Dahlia Gardens, Matawan, N. J., in the interstate shipment on F ebruary 23, 1928, of 22 .dahlia tubers and 3 dahlia clumps to San Gabriel, Calif., a point outside the regulated area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $5. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 356.)






47

In the case of the United States v. Wilbur S. Fargo (trading as The Growers' Sales Co.), Clinton, N. J., in the interstate shipment on October 27, 1928, of 1 rose bush to St. Louis, Mo., a point outside the regulated area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $50. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 362.)
In the case of the United States v. Edward Cirillo, New Haven, Conn., in the interstate transportation on July 17, 1928, of 42 bushels of green corn and 5 baskets of beans in the pod from an infested area in New York to New Haven, Conn., a point outside of the regulated area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $75. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 361.)
BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States v. the Barteldes Seed Co., Lawrence, Kans., in the interstate shipment in March, 1928, of 3 black currant plants in violation of the regulations, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 354.)
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States v. Antonio Sa!azar. El Paso, Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in 3 stalks of sugar cane from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States r. Louis Carbajal. El Paso. Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in 1 piece of sugar cane from Mexico, the defendant was fined 85.
In the case of the United States v. John E. Moseley, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 1 avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Tiburcia Ro(jas, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 7 pieces of sugar cane and 1 orange from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. R. E. de la Garza, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 8 stalks of sugar cane from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. J. M. Bonillas. Nogales. Ariz.. in attempting to smuggle in 23 pomegranates, 99 sweet limes, 3 grapefruit. 2'8 orange ,. 12 pieces of sugar cane, and 1 box of plants front Mexico, the defendant was fined $10.
In the case of the United States v. Matias Flore, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 4 avocados from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Alberto Alvarez, Douglas, Ariz.. in attempting to smuggle in 37 oranges from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Valentina Rivera vda de Avila, El Pso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 21 pieces of sugar cane from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the Iilited States v. Enrique Martinez. El Paso, Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in 1 mamiey from Mexic(o, the defendant was fined 85.
In the case of the United States '. Alejandra Perez. El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 2 stalks of sugar cane from Mexico, the defendant wasN fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Maria Sepulveda. El Pas.(, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 1 apple and 1 sweet lime front Mexico, the deftIdallt was fined $5.
In the case of the United States r. Jose J. Doming z. El P;o,. Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 4 avocados from Mexico. the eOlidanit was lined <5.
In the case of the 17United States r. Francisa Alanis. El Pao. Tex. in ttempting to smuggle in 5 pieces of sugar cane and 1 orange from Mxic, ihe, defendant was fined $5
In the case of the United States v. Amanda Martinez. Nogales, Ariz., In attempting to smuggle in 6 oranges from Mexico. the defenlant was tined .S5.
In the case of the United States r. I)aniel Marti ex. Enle I'Ms. Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in 10 pieces of sugar Ilnue from Mexico, thel dlefendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Antonio Estrada and wife, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 26 plants and 5 swet potatoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Il BI NIIHinll LIIl l iiIII UH 11111 1111 1111111

48 3 1262 09230 9318

In the case of the United States v. J. M. Azios, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 3 plants from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States ,v. Vicente Ayala, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 93 oranges from Mexico, the defendant was fined $15.
In the case of the United States v. Amelie Montes, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 26 oranges from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Calletano Carillas, Nogales, Ariz., in attempting to smuggle in 48 guavas, 26 limes (sweet), and 2 oranges from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.

ORGANIZATION OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION

C. L. MARLATT, Chief of Administration. S. A. RoHwER, Assistant Chief. B. CONN oR, Business Manager. R. C. ALTHOUSE, Informational Officer. C. A. LOCKE, Executiave Assistant. H. T. CRONIN, Administrative Assistant. E. R. SASSCER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gipsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine,
(Headquarters, Melrose Highlands, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge European Corn Borer Quarantine (Headquarters, Eastern Section, Boston, Mass.; Western Section, Toledo, Ohio).
C. H. HADLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine (Headquarters,
Camden, N. J.).
R. E. McDoNALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quaran-tines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BoYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scald Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOiDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Worm Quarantine (Headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
ADVISORY FEDERAL PLANT QUARANTINE BOARD

C. L. MARLATT, Chairman. J. E. GRAF, Bureau of Entomology, Member. R. A. OAiKLEY, Bureau of Plant Industry, Member. M. B. WAITE, Bureau of Plant In dustry, Member.
Forest Service, Member.























U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1929




Full Text

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S. R. A,-P. Q. C. A. No. 18 V)_'" :UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUREPLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATIONSERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSJANUARY-MARCH, 1929CONTENTSPageRecord of current work, January 1 to March 31, 1929.------------------------------------1European corn-borer control. ..----------------------------------------------------------1Japanese-beetlecontrol-. . ... ... ..-------------------------------------------------------Qnaraintine issued on account of the Asiat ic beetles. .---------------------------------------3Pink-bollworm control ----------------------------------------------------------Thurberia weevil.--.---------------------------------------------------------------Prevention of spread of the ipsy moth.-----------------------------------------2Prevention of spread of the satin moth.-------------------------------------------------6Mexican fruit-vorm eradication ..--------------------------------------------------------6Parlatoria date-scale eradication.----.-. .--------------------------------------------------Narcissus inspect ion. ...-. .....------------------------------------------------------------7White-pine blister-rust quarantine enforcement .-. ...---------------------------------------Grain-rust control by means of burberry eradication. .--------------------------------------sWoodgate rust -. . ....---------------------------------------------------------------------SLarch canker.--. .---------------------------------------------------------.--------------Quarantine and other official announcements --------------------------------------------Asiatic-beetle quarantine (No. 60).----.-.--.-------------------------------------------.----Five States and District of Columbia quarantined on account of two Asi:u ic beeiles (press notice) -.--. -----------------------------------------------------------------------Quarantine and regulations ..------------------------------------------------------10Blister-rust quarantine (No. 63) -------------------------------------------------------I sNotice to nurserymen shipping currant or goose berry plT nts or 5-leaf )ines (P. Q. C. A. 219 --isDistrict of Columbia plant regulations-.-.----------------------------------.------------19Plant shipment regulations for the District of Columbia, revised (press notice)----------19Revised regulations governing the movement of plants, plant product s, and other quar-antined articles into ani out of the District of Columbia ..-----------------------------19European corn-borer quarantine (domtie) (No. 41).-------------------------------------24European corn-borer quarantine regulations extended to new areas (press notice).---------24Modification of Eur. pean corn-borer quarantine (amendment No. 3 to regIlatioS). --------2Japanese-beetle quarantine (No. 4S)------------------------------------29Japanese-beetle quarantine extended to Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia(press notice) -----------------------------------------------------------------29Revised quarantine and regulations. ..-------------------------------------------30Mexican fruit-worm quarantine (No. 64). ....----------------------------------------------40harvesting period for grapefruit, oranges, and kunquats is extended in Texas area regulatedon account of the Mexican fruit worm (press notice) . .-.-------------.---40Nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37). .. ..--------------------------------------40Instructions to collectors of customs, (T. 1). 4363---------------------------.---.-. .40Flowers may be cut from field-grown bulbous iris imported under special permit (P. Q, C, A.222). .-------------------------------------------------------------------------40Pink-bollworm quarantine (No. 52) ---------------------------------------------------41Change in leadership of pink-bollworm and Thurberia-weevil projects---------------411929 amendment to Texas pink-bollworm law ---------------------------------------41Satin-moth quarantine (No. 53) -----------------------------------------------------43Instructions to postmasters .-----------------------------------------------43Pussy-willow shipments banned in western Washington area (press notice)-------------43Woodgate-rust quarantine (No. 65) -------------------------------------------------44Woodgate-rust regulat ions amended (press notice)4------------------------41Amlendmlnent of Woodgate-rust quorantine (amendmient No. 1) 44-----------------------Terminal inspection of plants and plant products -Plants and plant products addressed to places n WyOming ---------------------------------45Plants and plant products addressed to places in Mississippi -------------------------6Convict ions for violations of t tie plant quarantine act -----------------------------------------46Japanese-beetle quarantine --------------------------------------------------6Bist er-rust quarant ine _ -------------------------------------------------47Quarantines allecting Mexican products -----------------------------------------Organization of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration 4-----------------------4SRECORD OF CURRENT WORK, JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31,1929EUROPEAN CORN-BORER CONTROLThe EuInq)ean corn ioier quarwiti e was nt nidvtd e)li February 21o briin:under restri1on the arenas iuind infost-o in 1925 A,; st itei in tihe I:it is'sueO4W&i -2 J-I

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2of the announcements, the extent of new territory was less than in previousyears, except in western New England. In addition to the townships added to the regulated area on account of the discovery of new infestations, all that partof Michigan not heretofore under restriction was included. Such action was taken in order to simplify quarantine enforcement by utilizing the natural bar-rier of Lake Michigan against spread of infestation to the west. The cornborer had already reached the southern end of the lake.A new corn borer law has been passed in Rhode Island, where the losses wereheavier last season than before, and clean-up campaigns there and in southeastern Massachusetts are now under way in an effort to eliminate cornstalksbefore pupation takes place in May and June.Quarantine enforcement measures during the quarter were confined largely tothe certification of shelled corn in the central and western parts of the areaand of perennial plants in eastern New England. This work will be shown intabular form in a later issue.JAPANESE-BEETLE CONTROLREGULATED AREA EXTENDEDUnder a revision of the Japanese-beetle quarantine and regulations, effectiveFebruary 15, 1929, the regulated area was enlarged to include part of onecounty in the State of Maryland as well as certain new territory in Connecticut,Delaware, and Pennsylvania. An additional regulated area consisting of theDistrict of Columbia and part of the State of Virginia was also designated, butthe restrictions on the latter area relate only to the interstate movement ofnursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manureand do not affect the interstate movement of farm products.The rapidity with which this insect has spread since its original discoveryin 1916 is indicated in Table 1, which was prepared by the Japanese-beetle-ctntrol office of the administration. In that table the figures from 1916 to1923 show the areas actually known to be infested. Beginning with 1924, thediscovery of isolated infestations at a distance from the center of infestationmade it necessary to include within the regulated area certain intervening andapparently noninfested territory. In 1927 and 1928, respectively, certain ofthe isolated points discovered were not covered by the Federal quarantine, butwere instead brought under State control as reported in the last issue of theServi(-e and Regulatory Announcements. These facts must be taken into con-,sideraition in interpreting the figures shown in the table.TABLE 1.-Areas infested and under regulation on' account of Japanese-Beetleinfestation, 1916 to 1928, inclusive[All figures refer to square miles]New PennDelaNew ConalryDistrict VirAnnualJerse syl7 Yr Xork nectiDitrc id AnnuoTotalYeaniaJersey ctare Yt ne lu bia ginia increase1916 ------------0. 911 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.9617 2---------.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.8 2.80191(1 0 0 --0 0 0 4.2 7191 -----------4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 41 481920 -----92 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 55 1031921-----214 57 0 ( 0 ( 0 0 168 271922I 6 217 0 0 0 0 0 0 502 773:__ 1, 715 697 0 0 0 0 0 1, 6(9 2,4421924. 3, 97; 1, 105 41 0 0 ( 0 0 2, 680 5,1221925 -----------14,704 1,302 41 0 0 0 0 0 925 6,0471926_ 7, 514 5, 292 1:1 .,o (No 0 0 7,872 13,9191927 7. 514 9, 829 135 1, 992 357 0 0 0 5,908 19, 827192 7, 514 9, S57 1, 052 1, 9SS 135 303 70 31 1, 526 21, 353'ihe ra sihowii for acl year is that k nowni to be in fested i the clo v of the year indicated and brought1tn1der regu Ia tion at that time. For exaniple, as a result of the scouting of 1926 it was found necessary toadd 7,1s2 s'qt tre miiles to the :tre:i formiterly uider regiflation, briingiig the total reguhited area at the closeof 192G '; 1:3,919. Tihe figures shoiwi for 192S, niatel y, 21,353, represent t he regulated area under the revisionof IIte I t1ant in effeetive Flebriviry 15, 1929. The entire State of New Jersey has been included in theJapinese-heetle (1ttr:initine sincoe 1926.

PAGE 3

.; .Jl pr: l 14 1L1ilt[f. t III1 4.1 141, ).,) 1l1 j ' poi 11 ltItll j4 4SI II I I 'AM I f I }iLOL{? 1 1 14i~i-.l:.~II1 ~h~j 1:[I12~11 --I)I4 1: 11u ilu [)it t 1.:atl Iii mfp l I I mphlim wI4. 's~l pp f )1 .I ~Ui.4 i 4 I : ui N1 vIII H ~ 1 1 )1:0.11! 01110s, Ol s I" I Illoi I ~I4,J I I illII)00,I'1411 -,.1 1,l 4 IN l I II :11IVl I 11110(l I. I p11 S oP I sI11.1 o.%%11(4)(1 j1i41 jo .1)( 1 111111104111 po,3.4I I I,4.1 4JlL1)1 ,li 11.Xf~ .I I'M 0 i111 I I!M4 .1011 1o-oI )I .I s11{j pim 1.'~~I'I Z I II I f i x 1:. I, 1 I HI I I".14 111 : 4111 -I I I [.N )AII I: I II ff l.~ I t US 01{ 1 dj)1111M~).IOM V11011.Ij: 11.1%) SRV41l Ill( s j)IIU 01*)Iidj\ Aki),k 11.10)1SdAM11 118 Jo siiIII IHd 144JX041[1 411 pul, vo.l n "fj '11 :11 poIill[100.1 1)(II1 ) !U >J1 00.1.11 )XJJ~ (f 4.1 ()po l tl H1144'' 1-.i f) j)(41 I444'P I~ .Ill' po~4f O. J .\ 11 1!1.l.k.iI S0)!111110).) 10\04s0 ', %o .1 11 44! o Il ()1 4-iial I!sojv> )1IT 111.1i 1 f$'1.I~UIdIt( I It" 4 Z11(4. I L I I11111 I PM AO} l 4VM11k I S1X1)10 1 1'B). I1 1 ( )\ (11 Id I i I II.4841jI 411.11~l1~~. 4) 411:l4~.1d0.) .\d)41 1)1ml 14 11 Ill s1 1-s1m' Ilm d l l 11p H l xl) ij t11,111,Ai 11 0 IJ011 Il I jl 04~)1101Jf ! 11 :1 1)H 1 T I S V S) 1 0.0 *~d I 1010 1 0Jjoul jo111,1 1, pull, 'uo 11UU 01ii'a t4l80114011s o1j4 11! AIl1110)I s J4 Sd Wil"11i(115JUsiUS (o .p"ilif 0t!1:Z~l.11 *'Aoko S 111:1 .I.410 1 141 Ill JS lS.111 J) ttd1 0ib off ii114 l~)I:L ~.IPJ).~41 Io.U 11!11.III)01111 .1')fJ ltl 01114.4<1I'Ml ji1L(1 1)11 j t4IIlii~ polld .11 1110t l ",I( 101{ 1.'(0 III .14 iiu l 1L4(I TI lit U! .IO 11iJH 0 1;iJ)T It( I)I .o(1 I O1doI I ii oj s lul"11 I(I 11(41 o p1illd 11asa1l Ajdl -1101 IH 1011'0JJ U >.IA'4(It) poor1Ipt 01f4 4IH' 01 1 0,l1)114Xtq I.41 f11:1d l .1bI [PII Jd0 .Pj) 7II)1d1 .A U .1't , jt Vi1Xj \' O,-1 .)s I( 1) 1411: Is )7~1l.~ Io ptII -,Ia 74(11o 111.P[1 j4j 1)01 0 PI' 11111 1111)0j.P4) 4'10.14(10(l OA[ 1I u l141141.1tt 411) IH ,I )il -I \jX~i 1, 1 1.ldisP. P.'0 .1A~\ 31 fU 1~PJ.~IWJ.1IfHj)l 4.10o*idsN .114 d Ip l Sfll dijr O 1!1111 11:101)5 .1l1110, 'HO0APIS SA'4.011 Ji0 t SHAXIIT di[ 101.1I1',U0) Illdd A TI o ju1480. Sill, .'.1AX0oT{ uP408 AVjld)i )1 'L 4101PtJ lit)S)8.tU,' T JO At)U0XU1 l 101410)Jd1IIU 7111.11 ~t I11:1I) 1 4 141J I,) Ipti Spd1Ud 115 11111171.-)-"I oIMIj0 ( [ A.A.I 1'/l (0~1/.) '.i ~ 1v ) 'l, so Ill).1~ .)14Pso IV po)1J.4 141WIP ( 4Sl ( 111 o 7l-) 1 400)!. bu IjU1'I ) O 0(11 1 -kV01 N1) .J1(d,1(18 ll 41I0Ad.111 I.IN 04 Slift11)) oo 401.1481(1 o)lp 1)UP I'lP!UUiJlA.10)11 )1OI[ld 00I10111pil 1)1188! 0.I1 110!~ M.' X.1401)TojigIpTT? ()Ill4. Po ll)111110'U!JfLPI A0JHOS AlOA 011411.IP Id 00 S[Jo i Si4fTI 1801 40!A11(4.)OS 00.1~~~J .ot ,1 J~ t ~1.0IJ5~XZ4I S1411 )1.P0)01400 X{11PII 1P'aS04P.J1.1l 04(81! 0lam L4 pill44 4Ioio 1vaIPJUI 0114o IjAX O1I(IliiuOO IjuflJ U! ilIi'*d~ pul 11011111 0114-J pulfJ P~1l 111u.t~l ISOII *80011P48111 '3q UJ o!14180p444ptitt1I 04 P).1111Hul oqjO IOIA -UP'01M11001 O sn, 111 IP PSOJJ811!1.)Ptp 411 pi0J1X, A, O 1-, 0111 4li.J0 4-(1l10.(I10A M PT 014 Mu'JO041:4 -lII)111j1IUIOPOA, 4-N.0 Ui1I 1 4104 psfo0 O 1))PU0I 14.1;-osoinup 14l oio 11u1 sponssi Pd40njln8)p2 JO 41101141118 8410 0I1avi USarN11NfDIV ISV llJ 3r13-sNdv 3L~IVJ.S UNO (IVUISSI aO SNOLLYIO

PAGE 4

4discover the insect is, of course, a most hopeful indication of the ultimate suc-cessful termination of the eradication campaign.The improvement or possible eradication in these regions, so far as they re-sultel from human activities, must be credited to field clean-up work and seedsterilization. No noncotton zones were established and cotton production hascontinued without interference. In the Arizona and New Mexico areas at theconclusion of cotton picking in the fall of 1927 the cotton plants were re-moved from the fields and destroyed, and the seed was sterilized as a part ofthe ginning process. In the west-central Texas area ginning had been practicallyfinished for the season when the infestations were found, but all seed producedin the area which had not already been crushed was either crushed or sterilizedunder Federal an(l State supervision during the spring of 1928. At the close ofthe season all gins and oil mills were thoroughly cleaned to destroy any seedwhich might harbor infestation.The extent to which the infestation has varied from year to year in the ElPaso Valley where field-control measures and cottonseed-sterilization require-ments are in effect is shown by a series of annual observations taken on theIvey-Dale ranch. Each winter scouting is carried on on that property for 54man-days. The number of pink bollworms found by the scouts in that lengthof time by crop years is as follows: 1920, 5; 1921, 158; 1922, 74; 1923, 0; 1924,3; 1925, 252; 1926, 2; 1927, 12; 1928, 0. The variation in this vicinity appears tobe due to variation in weather conditions and irregularity in the applications oflocal clean-up measures. The valley has an elevation of over 3,500 feet and issubject to relatively early frosts.QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENTThe supervisors of seed sterilization in cotton gins and of lint and winterfumigation report that 267,039 bales of cotton lint were ginned in the regulatedarea and 267.215 bales of lint and linters were fumigated from the beginning ofthe 1928 crop season to March 31, 1929. A synopsis of the work is, shown inTable 2. On March 31, 12 of the gins, 8 of the fumigation plants, and 9 of theoil mills shown in the table were still in operation. The others were beingcleaned under the supervision of Federal inspectors.TABLE 2.-Cotton ginned and fumigated in the pink-bollworrn regulated areas,September 1, 1928, to, March 31, 1929, inclusiveLint FumiLint Oil Linters State or country Gins int gation fumimills fumi-ginned plants gated gatedNumber Bales Number Bales Number BalesTexas. ...--------------------------------------76 145,051 6 162,138 15 7,888New Mexico-.--------------------------------41 80,455 2 75,801 2 3,157Arizona ..-------------------------------------11 29,790 1 13,995 1 2,202Total -.---------------------------------128 255,296 9 251, 934 18 13,247Mexico (work under U. S. Department of Agri-culture supervision), mainly in Juarez Valley 9 11,743 (1) 2,016 2 18Grand total----.------------------------137 267, 039 9 253, 950 20 13, 265I Fumigation in Texas.Fifteen road stations were operated to prevent the spread of the pink boll-wvorin an(l the Thurberia weevil at the localities in Texas, New Mexico, andArizona shown in previous announcements. At these stations 64,579 cars werestopped and inspected and over 25 per cent (16,386) were found to be carryingrestricted articles. Inspectors confiscated 100 picking sacks, 402 mattresses andpillows, seed cotton from 943 cars, and other articles from 50 cars. They passed4,151 picking sacks (after cleaning or treatment where necessary) and 56,521mattresses and pillows.TEXAS PLANS TO COMPENSATE OWNERS FOR PINK-BOLLWORM LOSSESThe Texas Legislature on February 12, 1929, passed the so-called Webb bill,providing compensation for all losses incurred or expenses sustained by allpersons, firms, or corporations required to comply with the provisions of" the

PAGE 5

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6PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF THE SATIN MOTHThe possibility of spreading the satin moth to new localities through theagency of shipments of pussy-willow twigs in transit from western Washingtonto Eastern States was indicated by the interception last year of a considerablequantity of such twigs at transit points.The attention of Federal and State inspectors and postal employees wasdirected this season to the danger involved in such shipments, and a pressstatement (see p. 43) was issued for publication in newspapers in the infestedarea. As a result fewer such parcels were intercepted at the transit inspectionpoints than heretofore.MEXICAN FRUIT-WORM ERADICATIONA close approach to completion of the campaign for the total elimination ofsumnner host-fruit trees is the mo.t important development in the Mexican fruit-worm area of Txas during the past three months. Of the nearly 37,000 peach,plum, guava, and similar trees present in Cameron, Hidalgo, and WillacyCounties in 1927, about 129 remained on March 31. This is a reduction ofabout 3,000 since January 1. The total absence of summer host-fruit trees throughout this citrus-growifng area is expected to make impossible any estab-lishinent of thc Mexican fruit worm in the territory concerned o' to bring aboutits prompt exteriniation should it be reintroduced.In addition to eliminating deciduous fruit during the spring and summer,the residents of the regulated area are required to remove all citrus fruit(except lemons and sour limes) from the trees at the beginning of the host-freeperiod. In 1928 that period was started on March 1, but in 1929 the seasonaldevelopment of the fruit was so retarded that the harvesting period was extendedto March 30 under an order issued by the administration on January 31. Themodification applies to this year oily, and is not expected to be repeated in1930.By the close of the shipping season on March 30 the number of carloads offruit of the 1928-29 crop moved from the valley by freight totaled 1,671. Inaddition, 145,091 bushe's of grapefruit, oranges, and kumquatos were transportedfrom the regulated area in trucks, 7,777 bushels by passenger catrs, and eighty-onethousand one hundred awd seventy 80-pound boxes by express.Permits were issued to 22 additional packers during the 3-month period, making a total of 269 for the season. These packers were issued 907.249 indi-vidnal-box shipping tags for the crop year ended oil March 30, and 13,028 addi-tional tags were issued to noncommercial shippers for the shipment of singleboxes of fruit.At the road station near Encino, Tex., 15.950 vehicles were inspected, of which6,212 conta iined fruit. Vehicles intercepted carrying uncertified fruit or cullsn bmbered 2 trucks and 1,725 passenger cars. In order to be sure that contra-branid fruit was not being detoured via Laredo, an inspector was again stationedat Roia for a part of February, but no quarantine violations were observed.Over 2,000 citrus groves a month are inspected in the valley, and from 97 to98 per cent continue to, be found free from weeds and fallen fruit. Certificates ofinslwction are withheld from the remainder until they are cleaned up in asatisfactory manner.No fruit worms were found at any point in the regulated area of Texas duringthe 3-month period, although infested fruit continues to be found from lime toNine in the markets of Matamoros, Tainmulipas, Mexico.'PARLATORIA DATE-SCALE ERADICATIONA coitntieud improvement in the date-scale situation is observed as a resultof 111o initellsive ol)era tions now ill progress. In the Coachella Valley the num-ber of invested palmiis discovered has been re(Iuced to :1bout 0.1 pter cetul of thoseexamined, a'1!d excellent progress is being made in the eradication olf the In-plerial Valley olbreak discovered last year.1 T Ie discovo-rY was 1)18 le in April ol some Very sli -ght infestation in tihe case of thefruit frolmn C(rta in districts picked ill MAr,1.ThIeI evide ce wOild seem to indicate thatitis frui be me inef' tested fromti Ile MexiCaiu side (1110 to th( conditions referred to inthe last ur arah. 'lis incidents clearly indicates the mndesiribility o igaiii extendingIlie h1ari vest Iug period to include March and ithus shortening by one month the host-free1>eriod.

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7NARCISSUS INSPECTIONInspections of narcissus plantings are made by the Stwtnur-erY in-pec orof the States in which the bulbs are located, two inspections I field a id StOra')being required each year as a hisis (If certific,-iti*ail. TliQ 1mbr (u: 1'( 1 NrV w Vand the number of bulbs reported by the various State in-iJactor: are ia41a wnin Table 3. With respect to the imniber of bulbs shiow it should e s1ta tiatthe growers estimate that not more than 20 to -0 per (e*nt of ilhe tal iminberindicate I is available for interstate lnl vt'mn.nt hr:i1 any (11(e year.Bulb-eolworm infestations were reported in the States of Califarnia. Kni' ,Michiai, New York, North Carolina. Ohio, Rhode Island, aed Wa'IuiliaaTaaland in tlie District of Columbia. The greater narcissus fly wm rep rted inCalifornia. New York, Oregon, Rhode Island. and Wash inga. 'The 1(--er hull)fly Was 1'(ported in California, Illinois, Kansa. Malrvlalnd. Mn'ehhia,1 Nuw .Jr-sey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, (ri>goi .I n iivani, Rl 'Ialtd,Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.TABLE 3.--Yarc1i.sm.s-b u/b cc'tifica tion. calci 1(r yc((ir 1928P1 ntings Bulbsal" c(rt ifa' :as tlBulbas tro ' d malrinsecalBulbs inisp-ectedlinspected if tlar wSt atePoy-D lia PolyaniDalffwli I PodyanDP foi ,Ianthus; dil tuthus types t pes thls typ I tyaas ty sA ------------2 89, COO 7, 400 , (0f) 7, 400 0 0A k-n--s -0 1 0 15,200 -1, 200 0-aha rn-i(<) (2) 33, 503, S40 10, .50, ~2 -0 (7C'wait ----ut 0 2 0 45, 500 0 45, 500 0 0i ------. -0 S 0 17 14C 0 10, 025 0 7, 121F--ia ----.-. 0 2 57,9641,050 50.(0) 57,04, 0 ) 50, 0) ) 0g ---------32 1 2,1317, 700 10,000 1, 337, 700 10,I!a 0.) ) 0lin ..------------1 13 1,000 1, 291, 131) 0 3#2. 7 5 1,001 l.,I-Id -.-----0 7 0 97,012 0 07 (112 0 0Kansa -----------0 3 0 1,.7a", 0 ", >10w "' 1.ui'ian .---------63 5 204, 3WX 71. 000 x9, 000 71,00) 0 0Mary n -----.------0 4 0 1,055 5 ( --Ra 70 7 0--0 1 0 1)0 1 100 0 aV Ih a . .0 1 0 5,031.227 921. 71 0 1,43,77ainn--a -. -1 ) 20,00. I ) 1 20.(00Al ivQsi]1i ) 2 f5, 000 50, 200 0, 51) 2)) I 0-i---i0 4 0 201,7 ) 0 2017,00 0 0New 9r\ 0 0 2, 205, 92 s 2, 17:1, 2-, 2. aNaw rk 0 29 0 12,,17,>1 1) IT,, I a 1, :,.N 1rh : r r 2( f7a, 7621W 1. v'), 4"117, 1I0) 02, II a -, 201)O a ----0 5 25 0 1)10 0 122, 2 1 I I---n 0 101 0 5, 517, l1l 0 a aI( 1 .1, 0 1Pmm ylv n bo0 0 1 !3, 000 0 ", P(I 0-,o0 1 0 1, 10(1 I 0(0 0 1,r0 M, al2a , 77j0 0 :; s-, I I (1 0Tnaea I 1 15 ,0 2 ,00) 1 2 .4T5 2 6, 13411, -00 1, 1 1l, ()o() G 11, 000 1 .11, 0. , 7 a Uth0 1000 0 0a i ia 1 19 1 I, 000 2, 611, 30 15, a0) 2 .1 0W ashigton0 15 ,17 1, :;5 I a u0 3,2,Wicnsn0 2 0 _l1,.000 0 00 5 ,0T~~i I .214 .lf;2 1.32, 126;, 940 '2, 7, ,7 7,07 al 1.a2,'! Lal140 ., \,[0Sauth) r la i ' ta' Th'Ia I a m "Iid a ! i lt " rI er a ta ". T h ha rdeax aaaay' trule d Ifd u I. a I !1 N ,han .Ptc l ' lic h'a I' ro'! a, 1 a .>',Not raparalla b ( ta'tae ins".aeataals.WHITE 'j-PI NE 1LisTii;-RI 'T QI A IANiNE E NF SICEENTThe ox1I1m111 ti ln o Ilur y ak hi 1ia Imlt N 1! n i faatr ha'w tPi -1Nippl a ill's&'1'()n 4) 1 29 w) b\ e gt1,.11 Lila in 111I bra'111 ry a!d~ "' w as ina a I \a'a a''ralia II 81 hLac1 s15 of thw (Illarter. 'Ill I 131 rl'a ,,r ' waNh, ih Ili NIw'lk i bIn a c !')r idout this seasmi 're New York, Clhi('iv Ilnala, S'. 'al, Nan '. 'iiy, lllieaa1,Oglel, i ortland, Sakaallal n, and Sealle.In additional to violations (4 the wilw pinit bli ,tcr rlust quw rat in -1ih ipm lnsm'loving"' ill violations 44 44hwr Vedcrdl plit (11ara1tinlis :1r,( 11(inlitrcp

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8and turned back. A complete statement of the interceptions for the seasonwill be included in a later issue of the Service and Regulatory Announcements.GRAIN-RUST CONTROL BY MEANS OF BARBERRY ERADICATIONA total of over 1,500,000 barberry bushes, including seedlings and sprouts,was destroyed in 1928 in the campaign to prevent black stem rust epidemicsin the grain-growing States, according to the annual report of the office incharge of that project.This campaign is conducted by the Office of Cereal Crops and Diseases,Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of Agriculture, in co-operation with the State colleges of agriculture. the State departments ofagriculture, and other agencies, in the 13 States of Colorado, Illinois, Indiana,Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, SouthDakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. That bureau and the States named areresponsible for all phases of the barberry-eradication project except theenforcement of the Federal quarantines against the interstate movement ofbarberry and Mahonia plants.The Bureau of Plant Industry reports as follows concerning the status of thiswork on December 31, 1928:During the calendar year 1928 approximately 10.5 counties [in Illinois, Michigan,Montana, and Ohio] were covered in the first survey, and approximately 15 countieswere surveyed a second time. Original bushes numbering 111,464 were found on 1,302properties and 112,080 original bushes were destroyed on 1,395 properties in all surveysduring the year. A total of 1,403,830 seedlings was found and a total of 1,404,230seedlings was destroyed in the first survey, second survey, and resurveys. A grand totalof 1,519,816 original bushes, sprouting bushes, and seedlings was found and a grand totalof 1,520,832 was destroyed.In the 10 years of the campaign from April 1, 1918, to December 31, 1928, an areaequivalent to approximately 892 counties has been covered in the first survey of cities,towns, and farmsteads. Approximately 29 relatively unimportant counties remain to besurveyed a first time. These counties are in the southern part of Illinois and in thenorthern peninsula of Michigan.Approximately 249.5 counties of the counties covered by first survey have been surveyeda second time. These comprise about 27 per cent of the total number of counties thatultimately will be covered by the first survey.In all, 17,592,224 original bushes, sprouting bushes, and seedlings have been found,and 17,587,276 original bushes, sprouting bushes, and seedlings have been destroyed duringthe entire campaign.WOODGATE RUSTThe Woodgate rust was found on Scotch pine at Cazenovia, N. Y., in Decem-ber, 1928, and Notice of Quarantine No. 65 was accordingly amended, effectiveApril 1, 1929, adding Madison County, N. Y., to the area regulated on accountof this disease. The amendment is quoted in full on a later page. The knowninfected and regulated area now covers all that part of New York State northof and including Madison, Herkimer, Hamilton, and Essex Counties.LARCH CANKERPractically all the trees found to be infested with this disease are reportedby the Bureau of Plant Industry to have been destroyed. These included im-ported European larches, Japanese larches, native tamaracks, Douglas firs, andwestern yellow pines, growing in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The knowninfested properties numbered about 20, located in three different sections inthe vicinity of Groton and Ipswich, Mass., and Providence, R. I.QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSASIATIC-BEETLE QUARANTINE (No. 66)FIVE STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA QUARANTINED ON ACCOUNT OFTWO ASIATIC BEETLES[Press notice]MAR-o 5, 1929.Two Asiatic beetles related to the Japanese beetle are the subject of aquarantine promulgated March 2 by the Secretary of Agriculture. The areaquarantined comprises the vicinity of New Haven, Conn., the southern tip of

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9New York, including Long Island, all of New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania, andan outlying point involving the District of Columbia and the adjacent county ofArlington, Va. This quarantine is based on the pub-ic hearincondu.:ted inWashington, September 24, 1928, and the details of regulation are basel onseveral subsequent conferences with officials and persons in interest of theStates concerned.Following the hearing, the original determination by the department was tolimit the quarantine on account of these beetles substantially to the areaswhich had been determined as infested, and all announcement to that effectwas issued by the Secretary of Agriculture December 20, 1928. This announce-ment led to subsequent conferences with the department of State officials alndothers iii interest, and the submittal of official requ sts from the States of NewYork, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania that the area quarantined in these St atoSshould be enlarged to be conterminous with the area now covered under iiieJapaneso-beetle quarantine. The object of such enlar-ement of arca was togive a greater unrestricted field of operation for impornint nursery interests.The possibility that these pets may later prove to be more widely distributedthali the inspections and surveys up to this time Lave disclose id was also urgedas well as the consideration that the natural spread of these insect s wiull in-volve such annual extensions of the infested area as very materially to lessenthe benefits of a more strictly limited quarantine.This request. togeth( r with the assumption of full responsibility vfr :heenlarged area by the appropriate officials of these States, necessarily wa ihedetermininL factor as to the extension of tho quarantie iniasmuch i; 1s Federalpowers are limited to restrictions oh int< rstate movement of the article c -cerned, alnl therefore, any enforeenwnt other than on State lines itiust be withState cooperation and under State police powers.The regulations under the quarantine now promulgated on account of iheAsiatic beetles are in general of the same nature as those recently revisel aindproiulated on account of the Japanese bet tle. The important different is theelimnination from the Asiat ie-beetie quarantine of all control of farm produts.such elimination being deemed possible Onl account of the little. if ally, risk ofspread of the Asiatic beetles in the movement of such products. This limitsthe restrictions under this quarantine to nursery stock andl other plants forpropagation and to sand, soil, earth, peat, compost. and mianure. Sloeial ri ,kof artificial carriage and opportunity for wide mnoNv mcit r and spread of tlieAsiatic beetles is by carriage of the grubs either in the soil about plants or inother soil, manure, etc. The field elnftorcement Of this quairantine will be1 underthe same direction as the similar enforcement of the Japanee-btet he quara en liewith headquarters at Camden, N. J.Two Asiatic beetles are coicerned in this (jilarantine. timely. -inwmalaOrien-lin and Aserica castaniica. for which lte commit tames art sugleste I,respectively, of the Asiatie beetle and the Asiatic gardeii beetle. A third Asiaticbeet JO, scrica Sinlilbi, was incl uded in the ice if Iie rin g but in tie ina1analysis the importance of this ii ect di( i appear t warrant quart iieaction It this time.The ecolmilllc iniportance of the A';iatic beetle ad lie AIiatie iardein hee le isfront the preeiit outlook la rgely itn their eap:tcity to iljure ind ii'rry lawnsanT grasslands. The Asiatic beetle has deiin'nst VNt'd p' ':-ibilities as :i lawnpest of a vITy I mImeilg character, apparently m1 u ch ynnd tlt oF Ill 0Jpoiebeetle or of aly natiVe peeies. Fortnt illely it sveal" Very slowly en it, ewpowers from any pit of new iltfe-t ati 'n ii llwnv i'. d : n111 ir :11 leijitat e qu r-antine safeguards ai i he prevented, lIrmaii', 1\ iayiV VearI tihl eadihiwidely in the suited Slates. 1*IilfortltiIttety. while predoniiIIantly : 1ras jt.feedi g on the roots, it \\ill ireid int any *ort i nar y vt et ttinIl '11nd intocultivated lulreery >teck. In turseIes al redy reached by this i1st carthii hallsabout plantsl have bien foleijd to cetitaii loire lullizuher: I the white rh. illwhi stage the insect Ixsles the fall, winter. ad >pr:in. A cotnileraiii, ofthe millions of home prierties in this eiinl ir, as well s jarks and it herplawc-, of ulltero--t :Ild 41m' 11() t s y no hi g f ible o a opIa t ure lands, uiiy well gi\e a Iust 11uc a thiS At i ietle a greaer II( 1ulinterest eve I th 1nIt (n eiirNim off an inllmr nit field rp. TIe As iIIi, Ir Ileetle ill addlitioz Ito heing a bI I p t Ias IemisI!, Irated t i biiIuilii i ( ,injury in the hetle sta.t to 1oii3ge, btt i. t he hitr liity if le0) fl m LrwIYso far than the fJapanese beetle.G1059 ---2

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10The necessity for this quarantine seems to be clearly indicated by the demon-strated capacity of these insects to cause continuing losses to all home andestate owners and damage to lawns of any type as well as the possibilities ofinjury to cultivated crops.QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE ASIATIC BEETLE AND THE ASIATIC GARDENBEETLENOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 66[Effective on and after March 15, 1929]I, William M. Jardine, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it isnecessary to quarantine the States of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York,Pennsylvania, and Virginia, and the District of Columbia to prevent the spreadof the Asiatic beetle (Anomala orientalis Waterhouse) and the Asiatic gardenbeetle (Aserica castanea Arrow), dangerous insects new to and not heretoforewidely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quarantineact of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress ap-proved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the publichearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Connecticut, NewJersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, and the District of Columbia,effective on and after March 15, 1929. Hereafter, under the authority of saidact of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) nursery, ornamental, andgreenhouse stock, and all other plants, and (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,and manure shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier,received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried,transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from any of said quarantined Statesor District into or through any other State or Territory or District of theUnited States in manner or method or under conditions other than those pre-scribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regula-tions supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined Statenow, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture asregulated areas, when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, suchlimitation shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the said beetles to otherStates and Territories, and when the movement of the restricted articles intra-state from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread ofthe said beetles therefrom to other parts of the quarantined States and thenceinto interstate commerce.Done at the city of Washington this 2d day of March, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE,Secretary of Agriculture.RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 66[Effective on and after March 15, 1929]REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONSFor the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and termsshall be construed, respectively, to mean:(a) Bectles: The insects known as the Asiatic beetle (Anomala orientalisWaterhouse) and the Asiatic garden beetle (Aserica castanca Arrow) in anystage of development.( b) The terms " infested," " infestation," and the like relate to infestationwith either of the beetles named.(c) Quarantined area: Any State or District quarantined by the Secretaryof Agriculture to prevent the spread of the beetles named.(d) Regulated arca: Any area in a quarantined State or District which isnow, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agri-culture in accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. GG.

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11(c) Xiursry aaid (ra()micn/al stock: Nur-'ey. urIamntal, 1w1 &weinl.U'estock and all other plinits, plant r, lot-. out flowers r hoth p rti jI 't phlaIfor ornamental use.( ) Sand, soil, earth, peat, conpowt. and m nam e: Sztn11. ii. a h. pe;1,compost. and maniu-e of any kind and az to either bulk iivo1men-t i r ii in io-tion vith farm products or nursery and or-namiental stock.( g) (Crtified sand, soil, Carth, peat, compoKt, and manuu: Sand. >o il, (Alh,peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as ulilfe tcd aLd 11m1the areas ill such State niow or hereafter designated by the Secrotar ul A(r) -culture as regulated areas: Procided, That the articles enumierated in sai :1 IIIof quarantine may move intelstate fr'm lnill area 1111t under 1retUbIitii thrijia regulated area wien such movement is on a through bill of lading.RlGULATION :). REX;ULATED AREASIn accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 66, the Secretaryof Agriculture designates a! regulate d area fIr the purpose of the-e r unla t Isthe State-, counties. townships, towns. cities, hundreds, and election li-itriots,listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subldiviuionswithin their limitsCn nccticu(.--Towni of New Haven and West Hav, ii in New IIvei & >ooint y.District of Colbia.-Tlie entire District.Acwif JrXc!y.--Thi entire State.XNcu York.-Counties of Nassau. RIckland. and SuiffBlk (excPt Fihir-Island) New York City (iniclulilg the 8orou2A I the Bronx. Broklyn I, IIan-hattan, Richmond, and Queens) ; and the towiIs Of Bedford. Eat ChEestr,Greenburg, garrison, Lewi1m Iro. Manarilneck. Mount ill'aiani MInt Veon1n.New Castle. New R 'chielle. Northl Castle,( ssinin, Pelliaim. l u1rite. live,Scarsdale. White Plainis. and Yonkers. and tho,-e iltions ()f tOe (NllVi Of C(ot-land an1d Yorktmii south of thw Clr(1otI Iiver ill Westrhct"'Ie( Inty.Pen iNsl ra 1iol.--CwInties of Perks, Bucks, Carbon, C hoster. ColiumIniin, Dallphi l,Delaware. Lancaster, Leba(nion. Lehigh, Luzerne, Mi nroe. Mont-g(mery. Moitour,Nortlianmpton, Nor!thumberland. Philadelphia. and Schiiykill the towl>1hips ofUper Allen, Lower Allen '. East PeinniibIwr, 1lanipdeni, Mid1lle'ex. Monrn ' andSilver Spring, in (unmerland County : Rye, in Pery County ; and I te fIllow ingtown-hilp'. and cIies in Lackawanna CX1untly :11d all aerrilrIy (catih t "aidtownships a1d cities ill said county, namely: ilan-oi. Scrantn, Oick ektun City,Blakely. Arihlibald, Carbondale. and Fell.Viryiuia. C'olin.1! o4 Arlington and city Of Alexandria.RJEGtULATION 1. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREASTlh reuhiatell area ! deoigiated in re--1lh1111 : inay be extelled (w dneda Il-, lb 1e folun(d advisable Iv thle S're Tar1y ot Airioulure. I(ilt ,i1 of unyex! 0ion or red l ion a1l the area a cted thereby will l iVel ill writi:gto th tr-anlsporatifn co pa ie dodingblusiless ill (rtr u h h t e n'which 'lueih areas are located and by Ipublielllioli ili T1ewvspapers selected by theSecretat ry of Agruotil I tulre \\ it hill I he St at 0-ill whI 1 Le aras al fect ed areI ((.II Ied.

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12REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF NURSERY AND ORNAMENTALSTOCKSection A.-Controt of movement Nursery and ornamental stock shall not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from the regulated areas into or through any point outside thereofunless a certificate 2 shall have been issued therefor by the inspector except as follows:(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of smooth bulbsof tulip, hyacinth, gladiolus, and narcissus' from the regulated areas to points outside thereof.(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery andornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped directly fromthe docks or freight yards of the port of entry in the original container and labeled as to each container with a copy certificate of the country from whichit was exported, a statement of the general nature and quantity of the con-tents, the name and address of the consignee, and the country and localitywhere grown.(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement, between October16 1nd June 14, inclusive. of cut flowers, and portions of plants without rootsand incapable of propagation (such as branches and twigs of trees and shrubs,Christmas trees, holly. laurel, sphagnum moss, and dried portions of plantsfree from soil).Section B.-Conditions of certificat onFor the purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries,greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock willbe classified as follows:(1) Class I.--Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in themovement of nursery and ornamental stock in which neither grubs in the soilnor beetles have been found, may be classified as Class I. Upon compliancewith the requirements of numbered paragraph (5) of this regulation nurseryand ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipmentfrom such premises to points outside the regulated areas without further ins1ection and without meeting the safeguards prescribed as a condition of inter-state shipment of plants originating in nurseries or greenhouses of Class III.'(2) Class III.-Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in themovement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the soilor beetles have been found will be classified as Class III. Such classificationalso may be given to nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned inthe movement of nursery and ornamental stock in localities known to begenerally infested where beetles or grubs are found in the immediate proximityof such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or properties. Upon compliancewith numbered paragraphs (4) and (6) of this regulation nursery and orna-mental stock may be certified by the inspector for interstate shipment fromsuch premises to points outside the regulated areas under any one of the fol-lowing conditions:(a) That the roots shall be treated with carbon disulphide emulsion orby other approved means in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.(b) In the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thoroughinspection may be ma(de, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stockby washing or shaking.(c) That it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that theplants eoncerneld were produced in a certified greenhouse. (See numberedparagraph (4) hereof.)2As all the ireas quarantined on account of these beetles are included within the areaquarantimed on account of the Japanese beetle (see Notice of Quarantine No. 48, asrevised), a special form of certificate will be used, showing compliance with bothQuaran1t Iuines 48 ind 06.3'The int rstate movement of narcissus bulbs is subject to the restrictions contained inthe rules and regulations supplemental to, Notice of Quarantine No. 62, Narcissus BulbQ uara itine.4 Inder the lJapanese beetle quarantine provision is made for three classes of nurseries,and th(y are designated as Classes I, II, and III, respectively. Only two classes are con-sider-ed necessary under this quarantine, but since it covers largely the same territory itseems desirable, in order to avoid confusion, that they be designated as Classes I and III,the Jalter desigutation under both quarantines referring to infested premises.

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PAGE 14

14(b) Approval of the inspector shall be obtained before nursery and orna-mental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure are received on theirpremises or moved from the open on their own premises into certified green-houses.(C) All sales or shipments of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth,peat, compost, and manure both to points outside the regulated areas, and toother classified, nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated areas shall bereported immediately on forms provided for that purpose.(d) All purchases of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat,compost, and manure secured from within the regulated areas shall be reportedin writing immediately to the inspector.Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to make the reportor reports required by this regulation; and such denial of certification shallcontinue until the information so omitted has been supplied.(7) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not reshipped directly from the docks or freight yards of the port of entry may becertified for interstate movement to points outside the regulated areas whensuch stock has been inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.(8) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areasand certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may becertified for reshipment from classified premises other than those on which theyoriginated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding ofsuch stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route and, whenfound advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination offreedom from infestation.REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF SAND, SOIL, EARTH, PEAT.COMPOST, AND MANURESection A.-Control of movementSand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowedto be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas into or throughany point outside thereof unless a certificate shall have been issued thereforby the inspector, except that no restrictions are placed on the interstate move-ment of sand for construction purposes from the District of Columbia or fromthe regulated area of Virginia.Section B.-Conditions of certificationCertificates for the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,and manure from the regulated areas to points outside thereof may be issuedunder any one of the following conditions:(a) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included inthe regulated areas, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have beenfound.(b) When the material consists of fresh manure and it has been determinedby an inspector that no infestation could exist therein.(c) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an in-spector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground,and either is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or isloaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an inspectorthat no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or when the cars and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of and in manner andby method satisfactory to the inspector.(d) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphid under thesupervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.Such fumigation shall be a condition of certification of all sand, soil, earth,peat, compost, and manure, except such as is loaded and shipped in compliancewith paragraphs (a), (b), or (c) hereof.REGULATION 7. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION OF R1ESTRICTED ARTICLESFROM INFESTATION WHILE IN TRANSITNursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth, peat, c(fomnpost, andmanure moving interstate between Jne 15 and October 15, inclusive, shall bescreened, covered, or otherwise protected in manner or method determined by

PAGE 15

15the inspector as necessary to prevent infestation of the articles listed. Thisrequirement shall apply to each automobile, truck, wagon, car, and boat haul-ing such articles from the regulated areas to points outside thereof.REGULATION 8. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATETRANSPORTATIONEvery car, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles listed, theinterstate movement of which is restricted in regulations 5 and 6, shall beplainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee and shall bear a certificate showing the contents to beapparently free from infestation.The inspection certificate in the case of carload and other bulk shipmentsshall accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, menmorandum, or bill oflading 1pertaining to such shipment, or in the case of truck or other road vehiclethe certificate shall accompany the vehicle.Misuse or transfer of certificates or use of void certificates is prohibited andmay result in the refusal of further certification to the grower or shipperconcerned.REGULATION 9. CONDITIONS (OVER NING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF CERTIFI(ATESPersons intending to move or allow to be noved interstate any (,f the articlesthe movement of which is restricted in regulations 5 and G shall make applica-tion for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of the probabledate of shipmient, specifying in the application the article and quantity o beshipped, method of sIdinment, name and address of the consignor, and niame andaddress of the consignee.Apl.licants for inspection shall assemble the articles at such points as theinspector may designate and lo so place them that inspection may readily bemade ; if not so placed. inspection may be refused. All charges for storage,cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the services of the inspector,shall be paid by the shipper.Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the articlesenumerated n not be determined by the inspector, certification will berefused,RF(;ULATION 10. INSPECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES IN Ti TRANSITAny cnr, vehicle, basket, box, or other colitainer noved 1 01 offered for niNve-ment interstate which contains or may contain articles, the Ivement of whimiis prohibited Or restricted by these regula tions, s11all be subject to i nspectin)1l byinspectors at ally time or 1)l ace.REGULATION 11. THOROUGh CLEANING IEQUIRIED OF Tlrt-CKs, WAGONs, C\I's, BoATS,AND oTI IER VEhICLES BEFoRE MOVING INTERSTATETrucks, wagos, cars, boats, aId other vehicles wvli'hic lmivo b ieen uI(] iltransport iug any article covered by these re-ulai ioris wit hin tite remmhited nrshall not Ihereafter be moved or lllowel i be movel interstate 1unil t hey havebeen thor-oughly swOlpt ;t:n1d cleaned by Ilie (-iitrier at tlihe point if unload inlg ordestiln t io1.REOUL'\TION 12. sil PJ,ENTs BY THE INI'D STATES DEPAuTxENt' OF AGz1TirlZYArticles stl),ject to est riictioU ill I -e re-uhlitio" Inuay be tiluved interstan' bythe I tited States I epartimlnit of Agriculltu1re for cxperimienlkal or' scietitie prIposes, on such (Tcmlditioluls and Itiider >itcl >;tfe-uanls as Iny be prescrilwd by litePh111nt QU:t fnlit itie : rid ('out rol A'n t r8 lOll. The cotlt :n11 r O t art iele' sIinovel shall bear, securely a:taclied to Ibe i outside thereof. aui iden ifvill t;I,fronm the Plant Qua ant ine and ( 'ont rol Adlinist rat io )II slhowinl co ltalle witsuch cottditions11.FThlese rules and1rghitiins shall he e ffeclive on :ind aft or Alarcih 15, 1929.Doie at the city of Washlinrl1oti Itis 2d day of M:r&'l, 1929.WXit hess Iy hiaid ant1 ite seal of 1ohe 1'1iled St a4t'rs I11'Hii umli , ALricil r tIl.snAo. W. \ 1. .iun ciNI'

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16PENALTIESThe plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912, (37 Stat. 315), provides thatno person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor shallany common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District ofthe United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or throughany other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or anyother class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, * * * or anyother article * * * specified in the notice of quarantine * * * in man-ner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secre-tary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate anyof the provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface,or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations ofthe Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall upon conviction thereof be punished by a fine not exceeding $500 or byimprisonment not exceeding one year, or both such fine and imprisonment,in the discretion of the court.STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTIONThe States of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Vir-ginia have promulgated or are about to promulgate quarantines restrictingintrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. These Statequarantines are enforced in cooperation, with the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained by address-ing: United States Department of Agriculture, Beetle Control, Box 361,Camden, N. J.Subsidiary offices are maintained in Shelton, Conn.; Glassboro, Trenton, NewBrunswick, and Rutherford, N. J.; New York, N. Y.; and Norristown, Lan-caster, and Philadelphia, Pa.Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipmentsfrom the District of Columbia by calling Main 4650, Branch 174, the inspectionhouse of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Twelfth and BStreets NW., Washington, D. C.GENERAL OFFICE OF STATES COOPERATINGDepartment of entomology, agricultural experiment station, New Haven,Conn.Bureau of statistics and inspection, department of agriculture, Trenton, N. J.Bureau of plant industry, department of agriculture and markets, AlbanyN. Y.Bureau of plant industry, department of agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.Division of plant industry, department of agriculture and immigration,Richmond, Va.(P. Q. C. A.-221.)ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE To ENFORCEMENT OF REGULATION 5,QUARANTINE No. 66, ON ACCOUNT OF THE AsIATIC BEETLE1 AND THE ASIATICGARDEN BEETLE[Effective on and after March 15, 1929]MARCI 2, 1929.The purpose of this circular is to give a more definite and exact interpretationof procedure to be followed in the enforcement of numbered paragraph 3 ofregulation 5, section B. This paragraph reads as follows:"II I 11 case of nursery properties under single o'wiiership and managementbut represented by parcels of lanl widely separated, such parcels may be inde-pendenitly elassiied either as Class I or Class III upon compliance with suchcojidi ions al1d safogUards as shall be required by the inspector. Similarly, unitIiursery properties whicli would otherwise fall in Class III may be open tosubl)divisioli for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in Classes I or III whenin Iie judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by recent and scantyilnfest ation limited to a portion of the nursery concernedd"

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17It is understood that the su1(livision of unit nursery proplrties as pi xfor in the second sentence of the quoted paragraph shall be siubjec t! th.following conditions and limitations:(1) The subdivision of the nursery containing the infestation shall lbe car;ymarked by boundaries of a permanent nature. such boundaries in the case 1Anomala oriontalis to be approximately 100 feet beyond the pint whe 1infestation occurs, and in the case of Aserica castanca approximately 200 feet,or in the case of greenhouses or plants in fraies for either of th'>e inev -'hlesser distance as shall be approved by the inspector.(2) Any such reduction in distance shall be conditioned upon the undi ikby the owner of the nursery concerned of clean-up operations satiarv othe inspector, and upon any other local factors whi:1h might operate to eiinrisk of spread.C. L. MARLAT.Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Adniinidrat( /<.NoTICE TO COMMON CARRIERSUNITED STATEs DEPARTM ENT OF AGiRiCULTU,.( 'FFIRE OF THE SECRETARY,Wh,~bingjton, D. C., M-rch 2, 1 .Sin: Yo u are requested to date and sign the blank receipt blw, indicayour official title, anid return this letl er to the Sewretary of Agrieultu'e nhinclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.Notice is hereby given to he transpori lion eolmpanly you repre-*12, as f--Ii T :That he Secretary of Agriilture, under authority of the o apve(,Autt20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 815), as amended .:act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Sl at. 1184, 1165), has, by Ni:-of Quarantine No. G6, effective on anl after March 135, 1029, quaraninei tStates of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York. Pennsylvania. Vir-ilia. and ihDistrict of Columbia. to prevent the spread of the Asiatic loee ic a'! the A-a igarden beetle, and has ordered that, (1), nursery, ornanwnal. and gre uh estock, and all other plants, and. (2), sand, soil, earlh. peat, (7 npost, l Ii ishall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, revimi frtransportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried Irailpur elmoved, or allowed to be moved from the said quarantined St ate or 1)i rit inmanner or method or under conditions other than tho e preriibedl i!i ;and regulations supplemental to said quarantine or in amne s Ih r t.Copy of the notice is inilosed herewith.Very respectfully,*\. i:\. .J inN .,SrCCt fr! of Au arcl/ur(Inclosures.)[Do not t this rnctipt IRec-iveod this notice and the copy of No!ice of Q(11narain e N\ fh wand reoI 1gullahtions m11eitioned therein thi --y (1, 19Y .( 5ig.nat ur[ Sent I .d i r~iii ci' i rs duizg in im e in or thrcngh the qju r. ntin ar a. 1,tNT1nTI GEN S Al '" I'v T\l: II N s'\A it ,n-N0-i1 I ' oINotice is hereby gixe'' that the Seeeary 0! A,-i'u*1 r i ni y ixerred on him by the plant quai rant i e act f Aus a , 101 .431.-9 29 .8

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18as amended, has by Notice of Quarantine No. 66, effective March 15, 1929, quar-antined the States of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Vir-ginia, and the District of Columbia, to prevent the spread of the Asiatic beetleand the Asiatic garden beetle, and has ordered that (1) nursery, ornamental,and greenhouse stock, and all other plants, and (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, com-post, and manure shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from saidquarantined States or District in manner or method or under conditions otherthan those prescribed in the rules and regulations made thereunder and amend-ments thereto. Copies of said quarantine, and the rules and regulations supple-mental thereto, may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control AdminiNtration, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.W. M. JARDINE,Secretary of Agriculture.[Published in the following newspapers: Hartford Times, Hartford, Conn., March 14,1929; Evening Star, Washington, D. C., March 15, 1929; Trenton Evening Times, Trenton,N. J., March 15, 1929; The World, New York, N. Y., March 15, 1929; PhiladelphiaInquirer, Philadelphia, Pa., March 13, 1929; Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., March 13,1929.]BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINE (No. 63)P. Q. C. A.-219NOTICE TO NURSERYMEN SHIPPING CURRANT OR GOOSEBERRY PLANTS ORFIVELEAF PINESJANUARY 25, 1929.BLISTER-RUST CONTROL AREAS ESTABLISHED IN CONNEOTICUTThe State of Connecticut has recently set aside several areas as blister-rustcontrol areas, within which the growing or possession of currant and goose-berry plants is prohibited (State Quarantine Order No. 17, effective October 1,1928). As a result of this measure, the control-area permit requirements ofFederal Quarantine No. 63 are now applicable to the State of Connecticut, andaccordingly no currant or gooseberry plants or fiveleaf pines may be shippedinto any part of the State unless a control-area permit is attached to the con-tainer (see regulation 4a). Application for such permit should be addressed tothe State entomologist, agricultural experiment station, New Haven, Conn., andshould state the kind of plants to be shipped and the names and addresses ofconsignor and consignee.The control areas consist of 1,500-foot zones surrounding certain white-pine-growing nurseries at Cromwell, Stratford, Woodmont, Deep River, New Canaan,Cheshire, Southport, Yalesville, Waterford, and West Hartford.The list of States which have legally established blister-rust control areas atthe present time, and the address of the officer in each State to whom applicationfor permit should be made, are given below:Connecticut_-----------State Entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Station, NewHaven, Conn.Idaho_------------------Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Boise, Idaho.Maine------------------Forest Commissioner, Augusta, Me.Massachusetts-----------. Director, Division of Plant Pest Control, Statehouse, Boston,Mass.Michigan----------------Inspector in Charge, Orchard and Nursery Inspection, Bureauof Agricultural Industry, Lansing, Mich. New Hampshire----------State Nursery Inspector, Durham, N. H.New York---------------Director, Bureau of Plant Industry. Albany, N. Y.Rhode Island------------State Entomologist, Kingston, R. I.Washington and Oregon may establish such control areas in the future, andit is reconnended that those desiring to ship Ribes or fiveleaf pines into theseStates should Peo(uest definite information on this point from the proper officers'in advance of shipment. Concerning consignments into Oregon address theSecreltIry. State Board (Of llorticulture, Portland. For shipments utto Wash-in"i on. addresss the Supervisor of Horticulture, Olympia.C. L. MAR!ATT,C(iei f, Plait Q uarantine awld Control A dminiratiqn.

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19DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PLANT REGULATIONSPLANT-SHIPMENT REGULATIONS FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA REVISED[Prass niotice]APRIL 1, 19.Revised rules and re-ulations gverning the movenl t of plant and I plntproducts into and out of the Distriat of Columbia became effetaive, t-day(April 1), according to an announcement by the United Stat-. Lepr I tiriet ofAgriculture.The new regulations make little, if any, cianiqie in the present practice of thdepartment in certifying nursery an(l greenhous strek shipped to p1it s JUt idethe Distrirt. The purpose of the revision is to bring up to date ph se partsof the rcuihitions which involve special plant quarantiles, particularly thlserelating to Japanese, Asiatic, and Asiatic garden beetles, as the D istrict isunder special quarant ine oin account of these s ts.All nursery stock and similar plant material intended to be .shipped to poiiliIoutside the District is required to be presented at the inspection house of thePlant Qutarantine and Control Administration, Twelfth al 1 Streets NW., forinspection at the time of shipment. Incomin stock is also delivere ' to the in-spection house, unless it is released at the railway station or elsewhere by aninspector of the department.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS, PLANT PRODUCTS, AND OTHER QUARANTINED ARTICLES INTO AND OUT OFTHE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA[Approved March 2), 1929 ; effective April 1, 1929]INTRODUGrrORY NOTEThis revision of the rules and regulations governing the movelnient of plantsand plant products into and out of the District of Columbia inivolves little, ifany, change in the present practice of the department in makiti in'pm(ti]n andcertification of such materials. The form and phraseology have been ma (ditiedsomewhat to provide 1,r compliance with several special quarantines relating tosuch articles.C. L. M3Lu Arr,Chief, Plant Quarantin (' an l Conrol Adminiistration.I, R. WV. Dunlap, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determii nol thu t, inorder to control and eradicate and tP prevelit lise insemination of dain i' eruusplant diseases and insect infections and infestatins il, il an. 'tid out of theDistrict of Columbia, it is necessary to make and promulgat e the follo\ in;g rulesand( regulations:Now, therefore, urn der tlie authority conferred by the Iln ot quaraninw act ofAugust 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315). as amended. I do order tlint naI p'la't's () I ltproducts or articles whla moV(elit is restrict ad y Feda l lnt quar!nitinshall be moved or tlloved to be mowved, shipped, trawn'p ried, or aIrrird bv anymeans whatever ilnt(a or it of tlie Di4 tict o C'(lmiJil , exa pt ill liwe'with tlie said rules anid regulniliois mid : 1 ueli wt her rtiles., r a tnli , fuldnotices of qulairaliie s nauy I( lrWOMIuL::Itnd iiindcr tl' h1111hirity i f thesaid act.RiiLGULV I T'N 1. DEFIN ITioN'ii'lhe wvoar(s " pl:Wt and plillit pradiiet 5 wliv r u'ad ihese Ii' iN I''sha I inieliide all grac ho T] i-e an'! fIBd :raown flb it'-'I a''k, t ra'e, lihiilb. ries.(1tii , i tranS, aiLs, bl'ila ', 1iit pits, : al ather '4oalls of ;1nit in i fa: ultrees aid shrubl'' amd ii i ,r paints :wan ilit Pra'duel.f 'lR illLAToON '_1. T, 1i I : i \\ l l ii * I ANT 1T a i\Tlhe fiillowini"a olaa', ' K>' [jia'i1 ijil i'i ll :u ii d' n: I i 1 \I At1 os, which i a r ci vi ear to\f t h cia l u i Iiaa 1nd 1rA,! ', 1iiwt Iill force, lmr "uchl 111:1y 11wfe e a et es bjm -f g i: u r sim11,y bf, moltv(d inito w. wit (d, thw liistrict (.I ('a llum ila N", e t o

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20(a) Fruits, vegetables, cereals, and other plant products transported for food,medicinal, or manufacturing purposes.(b) Cut flowers, Christmas trees, and other parts of plants without roots andfree from soil.(c) Domestic-grown seeds of all kinds.(d) Field, vegetable, and flower seeds of foreign origin.ShIpincnt of plants and plant products and other restricted articles into theDistrict of ColumbiaREGULATION 3. GENERAL REQUIREMENTSExcept as provided in regulation 2, plants and plant products and articleswhose movement is restricted by Federal plant quarantines may be admittedinto the District of Columbia only upon compliance with the followingrequirements:(a) Each package must have attached to the outside thereof a certificate ofinspection indicating that the nursery from which the plants were taken wasinspected within one year prior to the date of shipment and signed by the Statenursery or horticultural inspector of the State or Territory or country fromwhich the plants or plant products were shipped.(b) The package, bundle, or other container must be plainly marked with thename and address of the consignor, and the name and address of the consignee.and with the nature of the contents.(c) No package, bundle, or other container conveying restricted plants or plantproducts shall be delivered to the consignee in the District of Columbia by anycommon carrier until its delivery is authorized by an inspector of the PlantQuarantine and Control Administration.(d) Articles covered by special quarantines and other restrictive orders maybe admitted only on compliance with such orders.REGULATION 4. PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO THE DEPARTMENT OFAGRICULTUREAll plants and plant products prohibited, restricted, or unrestricted, addressedto the United States Department of Agriculture, shall be delivered only to theinspection house of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration (Twelfthand B Streets NW.).REGULATION 5. SHIPMENTS WHICH FAIL TO COMPLY WITH REGULATIONSAny plant or plant product or other article transported into the District ofColumbia in violation of these regulations or of any notice of quarantine ' or anyrestrictive order promulgated under the authority of the plant quarantine actof August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, or of any rule or regulationsupplemental to such quarantine or order, shall be subject to destruction, treat-ment, or return to the point of origin at the expense of the owner or shipperunless released by an inspector of the Plant Quarantine and Control Admin-istration.Shipment of plants and plant products out of the Dis:'rict of ColumbiaREGULATION 6. CONTROL OF MOVEMENTExcept as provided in regulation 2, plants and plant products and articleswhose movement is restricted by Federal plaint quarantines shall not be movedor allowed to be moved interstate fromn the District of Columbia to any pointoutside l hereof less a certificate or a permit shall have been issued thereforeby tIhe I ;a11f Quar inI ine and Control Adiniiiistration. Each car, box, bale, or other col!0ni le so moved shall have attached to the outside thereof the in-' Sce list of doinestic 'juarantines in Appendix B.

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21section certificate or permit required hereby. and no common carri r orperson shall accept for shipment or remove su h artcls rim e is:ii : fColumbia unle -s such certifiCate 01' 1;e'mit is so allix d.R1ECULATION 7. CONDITiO WN' CETIFI(ATIONCertificates may be issued forthe int rtate movement of jlants d jLintproducts when such articles have 10 en inspected and found aiwPp .mlyr fplhcu disease and insect inf actions anl infest ations and whln -o sI m n sf1010u1 to comply in full with all other quarantine regulations anid restriJtveor'dors applicable thereto.REGULATION S. PLACE AND TIME uF ISEl'ECT1 NPlants~ and plant prod(ucts other than tho:e li-ted in r gula i 2 ito be shipped out Of the DLstrict of Columbia u)" ic presentU ai t. i mpc-tion house of the Plant Quarantine and Conlrol AinistratIon T\Vlft anB Streets NW.), for inipectiolm at the time of shi1ment. cn K mother' u-t iiorized by an inq-pecor of the Plant Quarailne .11nd Contro! Ad'1i '1-,*rFiin.III cases of large shipmcntc , airangemeits maiy io ma de for is'p ct i n at o rplaces by calling Main 4650, Branch 174, or adolrossing lhe iilanit Qutlrantintland Control Administration.Application for inspection of narcissus bulbs, fiveleaf pines, currants a'dgooseberry plants, and other articles, the movetnent of which ik re'triled lyquarantine regulations or other restrictive orders, ha tll be made at a seUsinof the year and sufficiently in advance of the contemplated date of -himj)ITT toprovide for compliance with such regulations.Thewe revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after AprIt 1,1929, and shall super ede the rules and regulations governing lie mvw ilent ofplants and plant products into and out of the Distriot o Columbia, proiulatedAugust 26, 1920.Done at the city of Washington this 29th (lay of March, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United SUites I Vi rtnment of Agricult ure.[SEAL.] I. W. DUNLA.P,Acting Sccv tary of AgriculturAPPENDIX AAuthority for the above re-ulations is given in the ainiidmeiit to the pintquarantine act of August 20, 1912, contained in the act inaking, alphirohir 1 (Ifor the D)epartment of Airiculture for the 11cal year ending June P), 121,approved May 31, 1920. This amendment was as fPdlowsSEC. 15. That in order further to control and eraidicae and to povent th' 4isti-nation of dangerous plant di-.eas s and insect infections and ml slit m, ni phu orplant product< for or capable o propagation, including aursery stock, her rto as pIn n ts and p ant pr uicts, sh:l1 be moved or all w'd t1 be n .v Ip1 d, It',Ip orted, or carried by ay means Whatever into or out of Ihe )ist ri f' mi.x'In inplian1ce With such rules and regulations as sha: iie prescribed h, v ih> srrof AgricUture its herin fter pJIovided. W\Vlencver Ie S crty v A ri Ar 1investigation shall detci'mine that anny plants and plait priduitS in thi I1v~ri 1f i-bla are infested or infected with inoect Pest ail d-i asts and that an p:a,1. u ieband SI 1bsa ui 1,A or connI)(,C.t d t herew it It are so infel te or ine'4 ix I 1thereof shall Ie givii by him to tie OWn r or person in pis''siin r nr 1 .251(1h ownlelr 1),r) ,rsofln shall fort hiwith contjril or eradicate and prv the miof Mchi In-Pct pe4 or disease and shall re1o11 e, cut, or destroy 0uch1 n l mit i aI,plants, plant products, ;nd 4 articles andi suilances ti-ed or* el'Oiic t mA. \hi0are hereby deilhirvd to be nisance s, wit hun thle iti and in thle umrnr r t Il In .POtiCO or by lb tle-; :id reg ili'ions of the S cretiry if Aartl' or. Wd iOWn1r or (ArIn call 1ot 1e fond or shalt fail, nealet, or rifut n oy w hforeini.~ig jroisioiiof this section, the Sct'iti:ry if A\nri'tilt ure' tIel x .rImand veijmdi to control and emadicate anid lpr'x nt dis-eimiiiatiu'n of suinr'p o(li5( :ise miand to ri mi , (it, or d hurMy intf t d Or uiifeihl lltt Ill 1 .1t 1j11 1,Art ices 11nd siitstant,,s 110(1 or ci'niieit'd th rewxithi mini th~ l'nitedi 8't i h 1 'action fif dobt nguiiist soch wni ter or iteir -mr exuleni, t irtI i o f A iceilt ure in that belilf. Emilyoe5 of t i.\ederil I h tr 1t11, .it:authoriz, (d alld requilired to i ''spoIt piacts, ,latti , iln p at prlit> iiSlitiances tsed or (onneted therewIth wh ienev the Si tr A t A tt. t h,,determine that such insictions tre necvssary for tie j 1 f 1 1 t 0

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22purpose of carrying out the provisions and requirements of this section and of the rulesand regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture made hereunder, and the notices givenpursuant thereto, employees of the Federal Horticultural Board shall have power witha warrant to enter into or upon any place and open any bundle, package, or other con-tainer of plants or plant products whenever they shall have cause to believe that infec-tions or infestations of plant pests and diseases exist therein or thereon, and when suchinfections or infestations are found to exist, after notice by the Secretary of Agricultureto the owner or person in possession or control thereof and an opportunity by said owneror person to be heard, to destroy the infected or infested plants or plant products con-tained therein. The police court or the municipal court of the District of Columbia shallhave power, upon information supported by oath or affirmation showing probable causefor believing that there exists in any place, bundle, package, or other container in theDistrict of Columbia any plant or plant product which is infected or infested with plantpests or disease, to issue warrants for the search for and seizure of all such plants andplant products. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of Agriculture, and he is herebyrequired, from time to time, to make and promulgate such rules and regulations as shallbe necessary to carry out the purposes of this section, and any person who shall moveor allow to be moved, or shall ship, transport, or carry, by any means whatever, anyplant or plant products from or into the District of Columbia, except in compliance withthe rules and regulations prescribed under this section, shall be punished, as is providedin section 10 of this act.APPENDIX BDOMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINES RELATING TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATESThe following list includes domestic plant quarantines issued prior to April1, 1929. Under regulation 5, as given on a preceding page, " any plant or plantproduct or other article transported into the District of Columbia in violationof the quarantines listed below, as well as any quarantines issued subsequentto the date hereof, shall be subject to destruction, treatment, or return to thepoint of origin at the expense of the owner or shipper, unless released by aninspector of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration." Certificatesmay be issued for the interstate movement from the District of Columbia ofarticles whose movement is restricted by such quarantines only " when suchshipment is found to comply in full with all * * * quarantine regulationsand restrictive orders applicable thereto."Date palms.-Quarantine No. 6: Prohibits, except as provided in the rulesand regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement of date palmsand date-palm offshoots from Riverside County, Calif., east of the San Ber-nardino meridian; Imperial County, Calif.; Yuma, Maricopa, and Pinal Counties,Ariz.; and Webb County, Tex., on account of the Parlatoria scale (Parlatoriablanchardi) and the Phoenicococcus scale (Phoenicococcus marlatti).Black-stem rust.-Quarantine No. 38, as amended: Prohibits the movementinterstate to any point outside of the quarantined area of the common barberry(Berberis vulgaris) and its horizontal varieties, as well as certain otherspecies of Berberis and Mahonia, on account of the black-stem rust of wheat,oats, barley, rye, and many wild and cultivated grasses.European corn borer.-Quarantine No. 43, revised: Prohibits, except as pro-vided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement inter-state to any point outside of the quarantined area of (1) corn and broomcorn(including all parts of the stalk), all sorghums, Sudan grass, celery. greenbeans in the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, oat and rye straw as such or whenused as packing, cut flowers or entire plants of chrysanthemum, aster, cosmos,zinnia, hollyhock, and cut flowers or entire plants of gladiolus and dahlia,except the bulbs thereof without stems, from the State of Rhode Island andfrom infested areas in Maine, New Hampshire (eastern section), Massachu-seltts (eastern section), Connecticut (eastern section), and from Fishers Islandin Suffolk County, N. Y., and (2) corn and broomcorn (including all parts ofthe stalk), all sorghums, and Sudan grass from infested areas in Vermont,New Ilampshire (western section), Massachusetts (western section), Connecti-cut (western section), New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan,Indiana, and West Virginia.GipNy nio h (1ad brown-tail moth.-Quarantine No. 45: Prohibits, except asprovided in I fie rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement inter-state to any point outside of the infested area, or from points in the generallyinfested area to points; in the lightly infested area, of stone or quarry products,

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23and of the plants and plant products listed therein. The qut rarnine athe New England States.Japanesc beetle c.-Quarantine No. 4S, revised : Prohibits. excvpt a.iizin the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the noveiment iitert a Iany point outside of the State of New Jersey and the r uiai v ciConnecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and \ iia. vithe District of Columbia of (1) farm. garden, and orhi hard proluc i allkinds ; (2) grain and forage crops of all kinds ; (3) nursery, (rnmeli A. -greenhouse stock, and all other plants; and (4) sand. soil, earthi peat, chipo tand manure.Pink bollicorrn.-Quarantine No. 52, revise(l: Prohibits. except avi prviledin the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the inter.stale vi m ntfrom the regulated areas of Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico of (Iincluding all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters. and vli otherforms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cotton-ted 1ulk,.cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrvippcr;of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicleswhich have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products or which arefouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farmhousehold goods, farm equipment, and if contaminated with cotton, any otherarticles.Satin moth.-Quarantine No. 53, revised: Prohibits the interstate inoveinentto points outside of the regulated areas in Maine, New Hampshire. Vermont,Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Washington of all species orvarieties of poplar and willow trees or parts thereof capable of propa-ation.Thurberia weevil.-Quarantine No. 61, revised: Prohibits the interstate iimvement of Thurberia, including all parts of the plant, from any point in Arizona.and prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplenentalthereto, the interstate movement from the regulated area of Arizona of (1) et-ton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all otherforms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed. cot tonseed hulls,and cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wraploeriuof cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles whiihllhave been used in conveying cotton and cotton products, or which are fouled wN ithsuch products; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farm houwhlicldgoods, farm equipment, and if contaminated with cotton, any other :trtice,Narcissus bulbs.-Quarantine No. 62: Prohibits, except as provided io therules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from everyState in the continental United States and the District of Columbia of inarcis;u-bulbs on account of certain injurious bulb pests, including the greater hub11 i(Merodon equestris Fab.), the lesser bulb fly (Eum uru s .triya us Fallen), :vidthe bulb eelworm (Tylenchus dipsa(Wi Kuehn).White-pine blister rust.-Quarantine No. 63: Prohibits., except as provide inthe rules and regulations suppemental thereto. tile interstate niomxenlt froImiievery State in the continental United States and the Dis strict of C!luIlbiii of5-leaf pines (Pinus) or currant and gooseberry plants (Ribes and l GrIcu1 ia,including cultivated or wild or ornamental sorts).Mexican fruit worm .-Quarait ine No. 64: Prohibit!, except vI provided ii tlerules and regulations supplemental thereto. the in tersitate mIN-ovemenit frwnm tileregulated area of Texas of fruits of all varieties.WIwolate ru.t.-QuarantinTe No. 65: Prolibits the initerstate vim\nt mthe ri-glateid ra in the State of New York of trees. Ibiran ll -, q r ilof Scotch pines ( Pinu1 syjjl(*stri), Canirv Island ipine I P. catwr i1)ine (P. eUribua) I, ,lalOunIse red pine ( P. den.si/Ir ), 4. r icau pine 1'.poir'tiana) , stone pine (P. pineal), western yellow pine (P. /ind/ rutery pinie (P. raditIta , loyoll pine (P. lada), or I.e pin 1 ror Uny v N'ariety thereof, or of any species or VIariety of Lolrd piwn lwr t :n11 d to be susceptil to ihe Wood a e rust.Asiatic bectl and Aiatic qard a ln bc/Ic. -Quarattiine No. ii 1,,as provided in tihe rules and reulotiois supplemint l *her t. hmovement froiI the Siate of New JerNs y and from hIlle retnlowd aira wnecticut, New York, Pennsylv nia, and Virgini, a1d (he I *t Lb 11 (" aof (1) nursery, ornaimeiital, a greehoue stock, *Iil(] all otil r Ilau illsand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.

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24NOTICE TO COMINON CARRIERSAPRIL 10, 1929.SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicatingyour official title and return this letter to the Plant Quarantine and ControlAdministration in the enclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent asfollows:That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended, hasrevised the rules and regulations governing the movement of plants, plant prod-ucts, and other quarantined articles into and out of the District of Columbia,effective April 1, 1929, and has ordered that no plants or plant products orarticles whose movement is restricted by Federal plant quarantines shall be moved or allowed to be moved, shipped, transported, or carried by any meanswhatever into or out of the District of Columbia, except in compliance with said rules and regulations and such other rules, regulations, and notices ofquarantine as may be promulgated under the authority of said act.A copy of the order, with the rules and regulations thereunder, is enclosed.Respectfully,C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.(Inclosure.)(Do not detach this receipt)Received this notice and the copy of the Revised Rules and Regulations Gov-erning the Movement of Plants, Plant Products, and Other Quarantined Articlese-Into and Out of the District of Columbia this ------day of -----------, 1929.(Signature)(Title) .-.f Sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the District of Columbia]EUROPEAN CORN-BORER QUARANTINE (DOMESTIC) (No. 43)EUROPEAN CORN-BORER QUARANTINE REGULATIONS EXTENDED TO NEW AREAS[Press notice]FEBRUARY 27, 1929.Under an amendment to the European corn-borer quarantine regulationsissued to-day by the Secretary of Agriculture, certain new territory, mainlythat found infested with this insect during the past season, is added to theregulated area, effective March 1, 1929. At the same time, the requirement ofcertification is discontinued with respect to packages of shelled corn weighing2 pounds or less.The 2-generation area is enlarged to include 28 new towns in Middlesex, NewLondon, and Windham Counties, Conn.; 1 in Worcester County, Mass.; 4 inCumberland and Sagadahoc Counties, Me.; and 8 in Carroll, Cheshire, andGrafton Counties, N. H. Throughout this area inspection and certification willnow be required with respect to shelled corn (except in packages of 2 poundsor less), the cleaned seed of broomcorn and of sorghums and Sudan grass,celery, green beans in the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, oat and rye straw assueh or when used as packing, cut flowers and entire plants of chrysanthemum,aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock, gladiolus, and dahlia.The additional territory in the 1-generation or western area is more exten-sive. It consists of 7 towns in Cheshire and Sullivan Counties, N. H.; all ofAddison, Chittenden, Franklin, Grand Isle, Rutland, and Windham Counties,and 35 towns in Bennington, Lamoille, Orleans, Washington, and WindsorCounties, Vt.; 66 towns in Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, and HampshireCounties, Mass.; 1 town in Hartford County, Conn.; all of Carbon, Miffin,Monroe, Pike, and Wayne Counties, and 31 towns in Columbia, Greene, Mon-tour, North umberland, and Schuylkill Counties, Pa.; 6 towns In Marshall

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County, IV. Va.; 1:1 towlis in Belmont, Chlrke ' arko, Lair--Irl. iVetGreene, Guernsey, Madison, Miami, Montgomery, Mu-ki1111, IWi r, and I' rk-away Counties, Ohio; 60 towns in Delaware, Fultonl. Grant, lminson. .av,Kosciusko, Laporte, Marshall, Randolph, Starke, St. Joseph. and Welll -'unries,Ind.; and all of the heretofore unregulated portions of the Srte of Micliiun.The requirements for the 1-generation area provide for the inspection andcertification of shelled co-n ( excelit in packaCs of 2 o 1r r : 3cleaned seed of broomneorn and of sorghun and Sudan grass only. as the strainof the borer found in that region does not atitack powers and ut YhThe shipment of ear corn, cornstalks, and other parts and il(ri of corn,broomcorn, sorghum, and Sudan-grass plants from the regulated1 area to or through points outside thereof is prohibited.The actual spread of the borer during the past year, except in R NewEngland States, has been less tatiu during previous seas ns. In In iana, how-ever, it has found its way west to the shore of Lake Michigan, and hnt fact,added to its spread in the Upper Peninsula of the State of Micigan, is thecause of the extension of the quarantine to cover that entire State.MODIFICATION (IF EUROPEAN CORN-BORER QUARANTINEINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe amendment which follows modifies regulations 3 and 5 of the Europeancorn-borer quarantine by (1) adding certain territory to the regulated areas,and (2) discontinuing the requirement of certification with respect to packagesof shelled corn weighing 2 pounds or less.C. L. MARLATT,Chief. Plant Quaran tine and Control Adiniistration.AMENDMENT No. 3 TO RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NMTIcE OFQUARANTINE No. 43 (SIxTH REvISION)[Effective on ind after March 1, 1929]Under authority conferred by flie plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917(39 Stat. 1134, 1105), it is ordered that regulations 3 and 5 of the rules andregulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revi ion , oilaccount of the European corn borer, which were promulgated Deceinber 29, 1927, be, and the same are hereby, anenled to read as follows:REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREASIn accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 4: (sixth revi-sion), the Secretary of Agriculture designiates as regulated areas for the pur-pose of these regulations the States, counties, town'sh ips, towns, and cities lis'teudbelow, includi Jig any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political sudlivisionsincluded within their limits.T ro-ycinralion arcaMaacholu. cls ( a(4cr( ,cctiol).Counlties of virntlh1c Bristol. 1nhsEssex, Middlesex. Nantucket, Norfolk, PlymIoilth, and Suffolk ; a nd Aihburilnh ,Earre, Berlinl, lhcklon .I'oltoln, loyi-.ton, Clinton. D~ouAlas, Fitchbur1 , Gard-ner, Grafton, Iiarvnld. IIhlcin, I loped:fle. Iitbbard tiOn, Lmxancaster, IA, i tr,Lunenolburg, MAlndon. Mlilford. Millbury, AMillville, Northiboro, North1b!)ride rnton, Rlutland, Slirewslurv, Soutlihor(, Sterliniz, S11on, Iiton. xlriVe. We't-loro, West I oylsl(n. We Ihinstir, liil WOr'cer, i-1 Worr I t'-I %r 1 nun lANewi 1'auippshirc (caulrirn s c/ioun.) -4ountios of Btlknop. iIiL'ho. Ml'ri-mllack, Hockinighaimi, and Stafford antid Brookfield, Conway, E> o', 1l iu:uu,Froe*domi, Madison, AMoultonbloro, ()s-:-ip(*v. S.1ndwiv h,TmwrTutnr,Wakefi(el, and Wolfcboro, in Carroll countyy ; lIiintj Imd Str+ r ill (11( irCounty ; Alex:a dria, Ashila dlI, Bridtewvaer, uri'-ol,.I ':i l!t ', jn .ow .Hebhron. H1ol(1rn(-;s, Lyiiue Or'an)-, anld Plymn thI, Ill Grartwn; uny

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26Maine.-County of York; and Baldwin, Brunswick, Cape Elizabeth, Cumber-land, Falmouth, Freeport, Gorham, Harpswell, Portland, Scarboro, Sebago,South Portland, Standish, Westbrook, Windham, and Yarmouth, in CumberlandCounty; Porter, in Oxford County; Bath, Bowdoin, Bowdoinham, Richmond,Topsham, and West Bath. in Sagadahoc County.Rhode Island.-The entire State. Connecticut (eastern section) .-Clinton, East Haddam, Essex, Old Saybrook.Saybrook, and Westbrook. in Middlesex County; Bozrah, East Lyme, Franklin,Griswold, Groton, Ledyard, Lisbon, Lyme, Montvidle, New London, North Ston-ington, Norwich, Old Lyme, Preston, Salem, Sprague, Stonington, Voluntown, andWaterford. in New London County; Canterbury, Killingly, Plainfield, Putnam-Scotland, Sterling, Thompson, and Windham, in Windham County.NewL: York.-Fishers Island in Suffolk County.One-gencration areaNew Hampshire ( western sect ion).-Alstead, Chesterfield, Hinsdale, Walpole,and Westmoreland. in Cheshire County; Charlestown and Langdon, in SuliivanCounty.Vermont.-Counties of Addison, Bennington, Chittenden, Franklin, Grand Isle,Rutland, and Windham; and Belvidere, Cambridge, Johnson, Morristown, andWaterville, in Lemoille County; Jay, in Orleans County; Warren, in WashingtonCounty; Andover, Baltimore, Bridgewater, Cavendish, Chester, Hartland, Lud-low, Plymouth, Reading, Rochester, Springfield, Weathersfield, Weston, WestWindsor, Windsor, and Woodstock, 'in Windsor County.Massachusetts (western section).--County of Berkshire; and Ashfield,Bernardston, Buckland, Charlemont, Colerain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, Gill,Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, Leyden, Monroe, Montague, Northfield, Orange,Rowe, Shelburne, Sunderland, and Whately, in Franklin County; Agawam,Blandford, Chester, Chicopee, East Longmeadow, Granville, Holyoke, Longmeadow, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, Springfield, Tolland, Westfield, andWest Springfield, in Harnpden County; Chesterfield, Cunnington, Easthampton,Goshen, Hatfie-d, Huntington, Middlefield, Northampton, Plainfield, Southhamp-ton, Westhampton, Williamsburg, and Worthington, in Hampshire County.Connecticut (western. section).-Suffield, in Hartford County.New York.-The entire State (except Fishers Island, in Suffolk County).New Jersey.-Woodbridge, in Middlesex County: and Bayonne, Jersey City,Hoboken, Weehawken, North Bergen, Union City, West New York, Guttenberg.and Secaucus, in Hudson County, being all that part of said county east of theHackensack River and Newark Bay.Pennsylvania.-Counties of Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Blair, Bradford,.Butler, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Center, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Co-lumbia, Crawford, Elk, Erie, Forest, Indiana, Jefferson, Lackawanna, Lawrence,Luzerne, Lycoming, McKean, Mercer, Mifflin, Monroe, Montour, Pike, Potter,Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Union, Venango, Warren, Washington, Wayne,Westmoreland, and Wyoming; and Bedford, Bloomfield, Broad Top, Colerain,East Providence, East St. Clair, Harrison, Hopewell. Juniata, Kimmel, King, Liberty, Lincoln, Monroe, Napier, Snake Spring, South Woodbury, Union, WestProvidence, West St. Clair, and Woodbury, in Bedford County : Brownsville,Bullskin, Connellsville, Dunbar, Franklin, Georges, German, Jefferson, LowerTyrone, Luzern e, Menallen. Nicholson, North Union, Perry. Redstone, Salt Lick.Soith Union, Springfield, Stewart, Upper Tyrone, and Washington, in FayetteCounty ; Aleppo, Center, Cuinberlmad, Franklin, Greene. Jackson, Jefferson,Mmiongahela, Morgan, Morris, Richhill, Washington, Wayne, and Whitley, inGretie County: Barree. Brady, Carbon, Cass, Fianlhin, Iienderson, Hopewell,Jackson, Jluniafa, Lincoln, Logan, Miller, Morris, Oneida, Penn, Porter, Shirley,Sin ith field, Spruce Creek, Tod. Union, Walker, Warilorsniark, West. and Wood,in Hiunt inAdon County: Coal, Delaware. East Cameron. East Chillisquaque.Geair'jart. Lewis. Litle Mahaiioi, Lower Augusta, Mouit Ca rmel, Point, Ralphe.Roekefellor, Rush, Shaiiiokiii, Turbot, Ulpl icr Augusta, West Cameron, WestChilli '1ua 11wn, a1d Zerbe, in Northumberland County; Butler, Delano, EastUnion. KIiiie, Mahliamioy, North Union, Rush, Ryan, Union, and West Mahanoy,in Selitylkill County: Allegheny, Black, Brothersvalley, Conemaugh, Fairhope,Jefterson. Jee'r. Larime, Lincolri, Lower Turkeyfoot, M iddlecreek, Milford,

PAGE 27

27Northampton, Ogle, lPaint, Quiemahonin-, Shade, Soner'set, Stoiiycreek, Suniuitand lTpper Turkeyfoot, in Somerset County.West Virgin i.-Counit ies of Brooke, hancock. and Ohio: aind manimroi, Cl;y,Sand Hill, Union, Washington, and Webster, iii Marshall County.Ohio.-Counties of Allen, Ashland, Ashltabula, Aut'laize, Beniont, Carroll,Chanipaign, Clark, Columbiana, Coshetoii, Crawford. Ciyalioga , DefiMai '-, De a-ware, Erie, Fairfield. Fraiiklin, Fulton, Geauga, Guernsey, Jlsnce k, Ilardin,Harrison, henry, Holmes, Huron, Jefferson, Knox, Lake, Liking. Logan1. Lwraiin,Lucas, Aladison, AMaloninlg, Mlarion, MAldin't, _or(eer. Aliailli, AMorrow, A111-skingum, Ottawa, Paulding, Pickaway, P irtage. Putnam, Riehlal, Satidusky,Seneca, Shelby. Stark, Summit, Trumbull, Tuscarawas, Union, Vatn Wert, Wayne, Willianis, Wood, and Wyandot : and Adams, Allen, Brown, Franklin,Greenville, Jackson, Mississinawa, Moi roe. Patterson, Riciland, Wabash, Wa .h-ington, Wayne, and York, in Darke County ; Jasper, Jefferson, Maldison, Marion,Paint, Wayne. and Union, in Fayette County; Bath, Beaver Creek, Cedarvillo,Miami, Ross, and Xenia, in Greene County; Butler, Harrison. Mad River, VanBuren, and Wayne, in Montgomery County ; Bearfield, Clayton, Harrison.Hopewell, Jackson, Madison, Pike, Pleasant, Reading, and Thorn, in PerryCounty.Michiga.-The entire State.Indiana.-Counties of Adams, Allen, De Kalb, Elkhart, Huntington, Jay,Kosciusko, Lagrange, Marshall, Noble, St. Joseph, Steuben, Wells, and Whitley;and Liberty, in Delaware County ; New Castle, in Fulton County ; Van Buren, inGrant County; Cass, Center, Clinton, Cool Spring, Galena, Hanna. Hudson,Johnson, Kankakee, Lincoln, Michigan, New Durham, Noble, Pleasant, Prairie,Scipio, Springfield, Union, Washington, and Wills, in LaPorte County ; Franklin,Green, Greensfork, Jackson, Monroe, Stony Creek, Ward, Wayne, and WhiteRiver, in Randolph County; Center, Davis, Jackson, North Bend, Oregon, andWashington, in Starke County ; Chester, Noble, Lagro, Paw Paw, and Pleasant,in Wabash County.REGULATION 5. CONTROL OF TIE MOVEMENT OF RESTRICTEI)D PLANTS AND PLANTPRODUCTSThe articles enumerated in Notice of Quarantine No. 43, (sixth revision),shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in theregulated areas into or through any point outside thereof, nor froiti the2-generation area to the 1-generation area (as designated in reulatioii 3);nor from the 1-generation area to the 2-generation area, unless a certificate or apermit shall have been issued therefor by the United States, Department ofAgriculture, except as follows:(a) No restrictions are Placed on the interstate movement of celery, greenbeans in the pod, beets with tops. rhulbirb, oat and rye straw as sucii or whenused as packing, cut flowers and entire plants of chrysantht lemum, aster. eo'm os,zinnia, hollyhock. gladjo! is, a iil dahlia, moved from the irt)11ii ted ireas ofNew Hampshire (western section), Massachusetts (western section) .Vermont,Connecticut (we'torn section), New York (except Fisher,, Island .' NewJersey,0 l Pennsylvania .West Virgir ia, Ohio, \ i chigan, and indi ian:. Itstric-tions on the movement of the plants named in this l)aragraph relate only to theregulat ed areas of Massachusotts (eastern sect ioii), New I laniphire 1eu -tc rnsection). Maine, Rhode Island, and Connecticut (eastern section), a1d toFishers Island in Suffolk County, N. Y.( b) No rest rict ions :re lacod on I le inl ersti ate mn'1v(1eu1'm ory -eTc011beans in the pod, beets withi tops, r1lubarl), and out and rye straw as n'hor when lvnd as picking, nIoved bet ween the dates of Janilla C 1 anni I a> .1,inclusive.(c) No rest rictions are placed on the interstate movement of u loa and rootsof dahlias and gladioli without stems.(d) No re;Itriction's nro placed (o lie initorsi to 1nuv n I : s :Fshelled corn weighing 2 pounds or less.6 fart in )arI off I Ie c -or rl,-o1(r rltin t V( n vi NI N:w " I nsylvania are nIs() within tho areas *(rglted On al(cv11flt vi 'PT( JIlof Qiarantitio No. -8. TI1).S. d'sirin g to ship hvrt itur aId ) i 1i)t urhi Pro uTfrom these regions should consult that quarantine for detuAls.

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28(e) No restrictions are Placed on the interstate movement of any of thearticles enumerated when they shall have been manufactured, processed, ortreated in such a manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestationcould be transmitted.(f) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any of thearticles enumerated moved from an area not under regulation through a regu-lated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.(g) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of the articlesenumerated between points within the same regulated area, provided such ar-tidles do not pass through any point outside the regulated area in which theyorigin ated. The restrictions on the movement of corn and broomcorn (including all partsof the stalk), all sorghums, and Sudan grass shall apply throughout the yearand shall relate to interstate movement from each area designated as regulatedinto or through any point outside thereof. No cornstalks, cars, or other parts ord bris of corn or broomcorn plants or sorghums or Sudan grass, originatingwithin a regulated area (except certified clean shelled corn and certified cleanseed of broomcorn and of sorghums and Sudan grass), shall be moved or allowedto be moved interstate from such area, and no certificates will be issued authoriz-ing such movement.The articles enumerated in Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision),shall not be moved or allowed to be moved into the State of Maine from anypoint in the regulated areas outside that State unless a certificate or permitshall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture,except as provided in paragraphs (b) to (f), inclusive, of this regulation.This amendment shall be effective on and after March 1, 1929, and shall canceland supersede amendments No. 1 and No. 2 to the rules and regulations sup-plemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision).Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of February, 1.929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE,Secretary of Agriculture.NoTICE TO COMMON CARRIERSFEBRuARY 25, 1929.SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicatingyour official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in theinclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, asfollows:That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by theact of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, by amend-ment No. 3 to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No.43 (sixth revision), on account of the European corn borer, effective on andafter March 1, 1929, given notice that regulations 3 and 5 have been amended toread as per copy inclosed.Very respectfully,W. M. JARDINE,Secretary of Agriculture.( Inclosures.)[Do not detach this receipt]Received this notice and the copy of amendment No. 3 to the rules and regu-lations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision), mentionedtherein this ---_(lay of -----------. 1929.(Signature)(Title)[Sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quaranltinled area.]

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29NOTICE TO GENERAL PUnLc TJIII iUG H NEWSPAPERSFEBIARmY 23>. 1929.Notice is hereby given that the Setretary of Agricuh ure. under authority i-ferred on him by Ihe plant quzarantine act of Aujust 20, 1(12 -17 Svt. 81 .,amended, has pronmiulgate l an amendment to the rules -0I roulalions suanld-mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision .on tcoount of theEuropean corn borer, effective March 1, 1929. This amendment iodities ret-il-lations 3 and 5 by (1) adding certain territory to thie re-ulatcd areas, and (21discontinuing the requirement of certification wit It re peet to pacl:ages of sheiledcorn weighing 2 pounds or less. Copies of said quaraintiie may be obtained tr'mthe Plalit Quarantine and Control Admnisitration, United States Departinent ofAgriculture, Washington, D. C.W. '. JARDINE,Secretary of AJr >itr .[Published in the following newspapers: Hartford Tin>, Hartford, Conn., March 14.1929; Indianapolis News. Indian.poli, Imd., March 1, 1929; PortlandPl d -Hlcral. I'Wr,-land, M '., March 15, 1929 ; the Boston IIerald, Boston, Mass., March 13. 1929 ; tl-e DetroitNews, Detroit, 'Mich., M.:arch 15. 1929 ; 'Manchester Union Leader. Manchester, N. II, M:rch11, 1929 ; Trenton EvcninTiinis. Trenton, N. J. March S. 1929 the \Vrid. NVw V rk.N. Y., March 9, 1929 the Toledo 3laie, Toledo, Ohio, 'March 15, 1929 ; I'iladel iaInquirer. Philadphia, 'a., M1areh 9. 1929 ; Evening Builetin, P'rovidence, It. I .ur rh AI1929; Burlington FPress. Burling.ton. Vt., 'March 20, 1929; Charl(-!ton Ghv 1tCharleston., W. Va., 1 rch 91 192.1JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE (No. 48)JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE EXTENDED TO MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, AND THEDISTRICT OF COLUMBIA[ Prc -z notice ]JAN uxiRy 29. 1929The Secretary of Agriculture t' i-diiy mioonned a revision of the1 tJabeetle quarantine. eftective Fe rulrV 15. extending the rlguat I r Eva anmodifying the regulations governing the iliterizt4 mfluveml1eint of farimi pr ldtnursery stock, and certain other imateriais, ! inlutidiig sand, oil, t-ar. til, jcompost, aid nature.Saryland, Virginia, and the Ditrict of ' iumbia ire mi brou ht undKthe priovisiolls of t hi; qua:rat itin for the ifinrstim b. Newv errit ry lad ithe regulated area includes Cecil ('ouinty, Md. (eXcept the votin list i a iCecil!1i) ; the entire Dii ct of C lumbia; the city if Alox ndria allA Arli aCounty, Va. all of Delaware norti of Su'. >ex t ucts during the umllllhr fronm June 15 to October 15. ineluim Ix\ipt lhut ihfollo~winig articles are exeiuptel: Pwoatoes anld >weet potaltoes\'le or fr msoil, watermelons, dieid fruits, dried veuetablcz, seeK', irainn-h rom 1 ni Iset-, brormi rn, :1 L, when used 1fur l-ckin artiico hoE Ilim irl. -vegetables, hay 1nd st r w.Interstate mofvent ar fr1iim the I trt D Afr >11mK :from the regulated part of \ irinia, lowever, is to bo unrEv' icd f< r th Vi,1929, owing to the sliiLt deige0 of ilitation in t se arva.Inspection and (Trtlfittioll are a l. required for 1u1 -ry 1 ram 22 dgreeuhou-e stoek, vild al other paIlIV. )pllt riiot, edt fi\\ -Uof PIlzf lonl'0 iiaii l tl--L. TIhese i>-Elvri lo~s iWlj l1'F \ T 21stock :tind other l:t l apily thirouu-iit the yI. exwvjt ti tIluwers aid iort i1ills 4 I In wvi hout ri I n 1 na e pN Iaire ill -Ifcvt l y ur thle N in r JIIWL'J Trio 17i n lo ' VU X Oi I ' S n o'! hr ul b H ,( ( t ul p y c n h l a i uA:1 sand, soil, etrib, punt, cilo-i, a A1Itu e 1 2a afromn ally pI int ii ille rwaU I ld tri aiII wr thLi>certified, exept that iii )-rivijeb arr IK-rd ii Isa ed f res constiU lio l f'll ghi Ir"C"'Ahlted , rvas of rgn.

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30Shippers are required to make application for inspection sufficiently in advanceof the probable date of shipment, and to clean all trucks, wagons, cars, boats,and other vehicles which have been used in transporting regulated articles beforethey are again moved interstate after such use. During the beetle-flight periodin the summer-that is, from June 15 to October 15, inclusive-farm products,nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manuremoving interstate are required to be screened, covered, or otherwise protectedto prevent infestation of these articles. This requirement applies to all auto-mobiles, trucks, wagons, cars, and boats hauling such articles from the regulatedarea to points outside.Changes made in the regulations in the new revision include, in addition tothe extension of territory, a slight modification in the regulations affecting ClassIII nurseries and a new requirement whereby shippers of farm products fromNew York City are brought under the same certification regulations as thosewhich apply to the remainder of the main regulated area.With respect to certain isolated points of Japanese-beetle spread, including Hagerstown, Frederick, Cambridge, and Delmar, Md.; Lewistown and Sayre,Pa.; Hartford and New London, Conn.; Springfield, Mass.; and Delmar, Del.,no Federal order has been issued. The Secretary of Agriculture approves thepolicy of treating these areas as separate control units, conditioned upon coop-eration by the States concerned acceptable to the department providing for(a) nursery control under State quarantines but with Federal supervisionand (b) the enforcement of clean-up operations to reduce or if possible as tocertain points to eradicate the pest.The clean-up operations referred to consist of soil treatment of areas knownor believed to be infested with the larvae and the collection of beetles duringthe next summer by use of traps or by hand. The Secretary points out thatunder these controls the security against spread from such outlying points maybe even more satisfactory than in the general area under the Japanese-beetlequarantine. At the same time the benefit of active cooperation by the States,towns, and individuals concerned will be secured and the clean-up programmay be expected greatly to reduce the numbers of beetles and practically toeliminate the kind of spread which it is impossible to control with any largemeasure of success under quarantine regulations.Copies of the quarantine and regulations may be secured by addressing thePlant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department ofAgriculture, Washington, D. C.QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF JAPANESE BEETLE-REVISED REGULATIONS UNDER QUARANTINE NO. 48INTRODUCTORY NOTEThis revision of Quarantine 48 and the regulations supplemental thereto in-clude substantially the following changes of interest to shippers: The formerregulated area is enlarged to include part of one county in the State of Mary-land, as well as certain new territory in Connecticut, Delaware, and Pennsyl-vania; an additional regulated area consisting of the District of Columbia andpart of the State of Virginia is designated, but the restrictions placed on thelatter area relate only to the interstate movement of nursery and ornamentalstock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure; shipments of farm productsfrom New York City are brought under the same certification requirements asapply to the remainder of the main regulated area ; a slight modification isnade in the regulations affecting Class III nurseries ; and regulations 5, 6, and7 have bwen rearranged in the interest of simplification.C. L. MARLATT,Chief of Administration.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 48 (Sixrir REVISION)[Effective on and after February 15, 1929]I, Willini M. Jardine, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it isnecessa ry to (Ilifr innn ti lie the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, NewJersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia and the District of Columbia to

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prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japolca Newin.), a dan-gerous insect new to and not heretofore widely pre Nafent or distributeld withinand throughout the United States.Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section S of the plant quarantine,ct of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the not of Co.gross lp-proved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly ,ivon the publichearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Comneetieu, liela-ware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virinia. andl theDistrict of Columbia, effective on and after February 15, 1929. IHlreaftor,cinder the authority of said act of August 20, 1912. amended ,S iforea id, 1Ifarm, garden, and orchard products of all kinds: (2 :rain atiid bi'; orl onall kinds; (3) nursery, ornamental, and gr(en iut stock, ci h all ('1rplants; and (4) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and mianout sihml 110t he shipi d,' ffered for shipment to a connon carrier, received for transporatiwn er tras-ported by a coininon carrier, or carried, traisporte(l, moved, or a, owe i bemoved from any of said quarantined States or District into or thirw-h anyother State or Territory or District of the United Stai*s in :t'er or Wthodor under conditions other thin those prescribed in the rules and reuii O1Shereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the rest rirj ionsof this quarantine and of the rules and regulations suppleioitetlal tirim o may belimited to the areas in a quarantinted St-ate now, or which inay hera ier be,designated by the Secretary of Agriculture aregulated areas, when. in thejudgment of the Secretlary of Agriculture, such Iiinitation shall be adequate toprevent the spread of the Japanese beetle to other States and Territories., mdwhen the iovemet of the restricted articles intrastate from such regulatedareas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle nIi-from to other parts of the quarantined States and thence into interstatecommerce.Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of January, 1929.Witness my b( an id the seal of the United States Depart ment of Agrieu.ture..SEAL] W. M. JARDINE,Secretary of Agricultiture.RULES AND RFx;ULATIONS (SEVENT11 REVISION), SUPPLEMENTAL To NoICE OFQUARANTINE No. 48'Effective on and after February 15, 1929, and superseding the regulations lwretoflreissued under the Japanese-beetle quarantine]REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONSFor the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terns,hall be 'Oistrued, respectively, to mean :(a) Japanes beetle: The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popilliajaponica Newin.), in any stage of develoim)Ienlt.(b) The terms infested, infestation, and the like, relate to infetat ion withthe Japanese beetle.(c) Quarantindt (I ar: Any State or District quarant ind by the Secretry ofAgriculture to prevent tihe spread of the ),a pa!I .eet,(d) R(gqulated areI: Aniy area ill a -It ur01)iatined State or I)isltrt wliPh isnow, or which m1ay Iereofler he, designated 1s such by the S ctla'r of Agricnl-lure in accordance with the proviso to Notice of QirlInlt ill(e N 45, a rcvi'n(e) Farm products: Those products included in Notice of Q)ar;ntin1 No lunder items (1) and (2) ; namely, farm, garden, and orchard pr.611t ' allkinds ; grain and forage crops of :ill kinds.(f) Nursery and or(min ial stock: Nursery, o'rnamntaa , :nltd rI ce istock and all other plant roots, cut flowers, ur oth lc port 'i s 4f 1for ornamental use.(g) sand, soil, carth, peat, conipot, and wan nr: Sand soi earl h, :ttcompost, and m1iaiure of any kild, an 01 to either hilk I veItI W, ill c-nection with farm prodiets or Intrsery antd ornamtal ' I k.(h) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and mncr : S:ni I (21 h.pent, Colpost, or manure determllinled by the in-pol r at a nos1I a Icertified.

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32(i) Certified greenhouse: A greenhouse which has complied to the satisfac-tion of the inspector with the conditions imposed in Regulation 6. This termmay apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, or similarplots safeguarded and treated in manner and method satisfactory to the inspector.(j) Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREASConditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with theproviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (sixth revision), the restrictions pro-vided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant prod-ucts and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limitedto such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated bythe Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas: Provided, That the articlesenumerated in said notice of quarantine may move interstate from an area notunder regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a throughbill of lading.REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREASIn accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (sixth revi-sion), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the pur-pose of these regulations the States, counties, townships, towns, cities, hun-dreds, and election districts listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs,or other political subdivisions within their limits:Connecticut.-Towns of Bridgeport, Darien, Easton, Fairfield, Greenwich,New Canaan, Norwalk, Shelton, Stamford, Stratford, Trumbull, Weston, West-port, and Wilton, in Fairfield County; Ansonia, Derby, East Haven, Hamden,Milford, New Haven, North Haven, Orange, Seymour, West Haven, and Wood-bridge, in New Haven County.Delaware.-Counties of New Castle and Kent, and the town of Milford, inSussex County.District of Columbia.-The entire District.Maryland.-County of Cecil, omitting that part of said county south of theBohemia River, namely, election district No. 1 (Cecilton).New Jersey.-The entire State.New York.-Counties of Nassau, Rockland, and Suffolk (except FishersIsland) ; New York City (including the Boroughs of Bronx, Brooklyn, Man-hattan, Richmond, and Queens) ; and the towns of Bedford, East Chester,Greenburg, Harrison, Lewisboro, Mamaroneck, Mount Pleasant, Mount Vernon,New Castle, New Rochelle, North Castle, Ossining, Pelham, Poundridge, Rye,Scarsdale, White Plains, and Yonkers, and those portions of the towns of Cort-land and Yorktown south of the Croton River, in Westchester County.Penn sylvaniia.-Counties of Berks, Bucks, Carbon, Chester, Columbia, Dauphin,Delaware, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery, Mon-tour, Northampton, Northumberland, Philadelphia, and Schuylkill; the towns-ships of Upper Allen, Lower Allen, East Pennsboro, Hampden, Middlesex,Monroe, and Silver Spring, in Cumberland County ; Rye, in Perry County.; andthe following townships and cities, in Lackawanna County, and all territorysoutheast of said townships and cities in said county, namely, Ransom, Scrail-ton, Dickson City, Blakely, Archbald, Carbondale, and Fell.Virgynia.-County of Arlington, and city of Alexandria.REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREASThe regulaled areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of aiivextesision or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writingto the I rn isporta I Jon companies doing business in or through the States in whichsuch areas a [0 located and by publication in newspapers selected by the Secre-tary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.REGULATION 5. RESTRICTONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF FARM PRODUCTS8cction A.-Control of movcnicn tFarm products shliall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate fromany point in the regubated areas, ito or through any point outside thereof

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34Section B.-Conditions of certificationFor the purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries,greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock willbe classified as follows:(1) Class I.-Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in themovement of nursery and ornamental stock in districts included in theregulated areas but in which districts neither grubs in the soil nor beetleshave been found may be classified as Class I. Upon compliance with therequirements of section 6 of this regulation nursery and ornamental stock maybe certified by the inspector for interstate shipment from such premises topoints outside the regulated areas without further inspection and without meet-ing the safeguards prescribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plantsoriginating in nurseries or greenhouses of Classes II and III.(2) Class II.-Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in themovement of nursery and ornamental stock in districts recently or scantilyinfested by the beetle, but in which nurseries or greenhouses no beetles havebeen found and in which it has not been possible to determine any soil invasionwill be classified as Class II. Upon compliance with the requirements of sec-tions (4) and (6) of this regulation nursery and ornamental stock may becertified by the inspector for interstate shipment from such premises to pointsoutside the regulated area upon determination that the stock concerned is freefrom infestation. Such determination may be made, either (a) by completeremoval of the soil from such stock; or (b) by inspection of the outside of thesoil ball and removal and inspection of the upper 4 inches of the soil therefrom;or (c) in the case of plants, (such as azaleas), which would be injured by such removal, by inspection and removal of the soil from 5 per cent of the plants andby intensive examination of the soil in the block concerned ; or (d) by evidencesatisfactory to the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse. (See see. 4 hereof.)(3) Class III.-Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in themovement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the soil orbeetles occur or located in districts known to be generally infested will beclassified as Class III. Upon compliance with sections (4) and (6) of thisregulation, nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector forinterstate shipment from such premises to points outside the regulated areaunder any one of the following conditions:(a) That the roots shall be treated with carbon disulphide emulsion or byother approved means in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector;or (b) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thoroughinspection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stockby washing or shaking ; or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory tothe inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.(See see. 4 hereof.)In the case of nursery properties, consisting of separate units operated inde-pendently, such units nmy be considered for the purpose of rating in Class IIor Class III, as though they were independent nurseries, when in the judgmentof the inspector such action is warranted by the recent or scanty infestation ofthe district concerned, upon compliance with such conditions as the said inspectormay require.(4) Greenhouses of Class II or Class III may be certified as prescribed inparagraphs (2) and (3) hereof, upon complialince with all the following condi-tions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all potting beds, heel-ing-in areas, hotbeds, coldframnes, and similar plots:(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframeson premises in CIss II or Cass III shall ble kept screened during the period offlight of Ole beetle-nanely, between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, in mannersatisfactory to Ilie inspector.(b) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, soil, earth,peat, coimpost, or numiiure taken from areas in which Class II or Class IIIi'nuseries or greenhlioises are located, or wlid iiy liaNe been exposed to in-festation, 11ust be sterilized o1. fiuniga ted under the direction and supervision ofand in mnanier and by met11od saitisfictory to the iIseetor. If such treatedsaIId, soil, earth, pea., compost, or manure is not to be iinlnediately used ill suchgr hoilif;nses it imist be stored in a I iglitly closed bilfldiig or cont ;uiner.

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36REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF SAND, SOIL, EARTH, PEAT,COMPOST, AND MANURESection A.-Controi of movementSand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowed tobe moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas into or through anypoint outside thereof unless a certificate shall have been issued therefor by theinspector, except that no restrictions are placed on the interstate movement ofsand for construction purposes from the District of Columbia or from the regu-lated area of Virginia.Section B.-Conditions of certificationCertificates for the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, andmanure from the regulated areas to points outside thereof may be issued underany one of the following conditions:(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included inthe regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have beenfound.(2) When the material consists of fresh manure and it has been determined byan inspector that no infestation could exist therein.(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an in-spector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the groundand either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or (b)is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an inspectorthat no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the cars andloading operations are protected by screening under the direction of and inmanner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphid under thesupervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.Such fumigation will be required as a condition of certification of all sand, soil,earth, peat, compost, and manure except such as is loaded and shipped in com-pliance with paragraphs (1), (2), or (3) hereof.REGULATION 8. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLESFROM INFESTATION WHILE IN TRANSITFarm products, nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth, peat,compost, and manure moving interstate between June 15 and October 15, inclu-sive, shall be screened, covered, or otherwise protected in manner or methoddetermined by the inspector as necessary to prevent infestation of the articleslisted. This requirement shall apply to each automobile, truck, wagon, car, andboat hauling such articles from the regulated area to points outside thereof.REGULATION 9. MARKETING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATETRANSPORTATIONEvery car, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles listed, theinterstate movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall beplainly marked with the name and address; of the consignor and the name andaddress of the consignee and shall bear a certificate showing the contents to beapparently free from infestation.The inspection certificate in the case of carload and other bulk shipmentsshall accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill oflading pertaining to such shipment, or in the case of truck or other road vehiclethe certificate shall accompany the vehicle.Misuse or transfer of certificates or use of void certificates isprohibited andmay result in the refusal of further certification to the grower or shipperconcerned.REGULATION 10. CONDITIONS GOVERNING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATESPersons intending to move or allow to be moved interstate any of the articlesthe movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7 shall make appli-

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37cation for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of the prob-able date of shipment, specifying in the application the article ainl quantity tobe shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the consignor, and nameand address of the consignee.Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at suchpoints as the inspector shall designate and to so place them that inspection mayreadily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refuse 1. All char-es forstorage, cartage. and labor incident to inspection, other than the services of theinspector, shall be paid by the shipper.Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any )f the articles enumerated can not be determined by the inspector certilicath (ni will he refu.sd.REGULATION 11. IN>PETIoN OF REs'TRICTED ARTICLES IN TRANSITAny car, vehic e. basket. box, or other container moved or offered for move-ment interstate which contains (r may contain articIes the movement of whichis prohibited or restricted I 'v t1ese relations shall be sulj(,ct to inispcti n bvinspectors at any time or place.REGULATION 12. TIIOROUGII CLEANING REQUiIED OF 'YIUCKS, WAGON>. CARS, BOATS,AND OTIR \IL E IIICLES BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATETrucks, wagons, cars, boats. and other vehicles which have been used in trans-portiia any article covered by tliese regulations within the regulated areas shallPot tierea after bc m-ved or allowed to be noNved interstate uitil they have b teenthoroughly swept anid cleanid by the carrier at the pint of uilload ing.r ordestinat hin.REGULATION 12. SIIIPMENTs BY TlHE UNiTEI STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUREArticles subject to restriction in these regulatiis mav Ibe moved intlerst ateby the United States I)epartnment of A riculture for experinientail or sciclltilicpurposes, on such conditions and under sucli safe uards as may be presIrtiodby the Plant (Quarantine and Contr l Adniist ration. The contaiil er f artiviesso inived shall bear, securly attached to the outside there f, an identifyin ta,from the Plant Quarantine and Control Adini stration showing c Giup lianwewith such conditions.Th se revised rul s ailI re-u latio us shIiall be effective (n an1d after Folrua Irv15, 192 ), and shall supersede the rules aiid regulations proinu.iatetl Ma Irc 21,1927. as aimleiided.) ne at the city of WashiIiiton tdiis 25th day (f J.1anuary, 1929.Wit ne-s Illy 1ha(nd anid the seal (0 tle IUnited States Department of riU U.[sE\L~i~. I W. M. TIU)INIThe plant quarantine act of Aiiust 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315). provide s th11:1t 1opersOn slhill ship or offer for shIipillenit to any colnii carrier, li'r si 1111 I!lycolinion carrier receive for tran sport albif or tra lispirt, n h'i i :i1 8 IN icarry or transport from aniy quaranthied State or Territory oir I oist ric of theUnited States, or front ally quarantined Iportion thereof, iiit, r tu anyother State or Territory or Distriet, any clas of nursery snek or :ny otherclass of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, * * t' 8ny otherarticle * * * speeilied ill tle hotic of qunuraniinc * -i I nor ormietlod or 1111der conditions o her than those prescribed by 1( Ser :ir\ oAgriculture. It also provides that any p\so ho sliall \i 1:.te : y theprovisions of this act, ir who sha 1 forge, counterfeit, alter. de:'ace. oP tieroytiny certificate providetd fir i tlli act o)r ill tlie rtuailations 0)t ' fte 'tr yof Agriculture shall be deemed "uilty of a Ii -deiiieae or, :11nd >l:: l , i oiit-tion thereof be polished by a line not eXecidina 5500 'r 14Y inViw>el 1exceeding one year, or both such line and imiipriso:uient , il Il le divrei ioi of hecourt.

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38STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTIONThe States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Penn-sylvania, and Virginia have promulgated or are about to promulgate quarantines restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. TheseState quarantines are enforced in cooperation with the Federal authorities.Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained byaddressing: United States Department of Agriculture, Japanese Beetle Control,Box 361, Camden, N. J.Subsidiary offices are maintained in Shelton, Conn. Wilmington, Del. ; Balti-more, Md. ; Glassboro, Trenton, New Brunswick, and Rutherford, N. J. ; NewYork, N. Y. ; and Norristown. Lancaster, and Philadelphia, Pa.Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments fromthe District of Columbia by calling Main 4650. Branch 174, the inspection houseof the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Twelfth and B StreetsNW., Washington, D. C.GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES CoOPERATINGDepartment of entomology, agricultural experiment station, New Haven, Conn.Department of agriculture, Dover. Del.Department of zoology and entomology, University of Maryland. CollegePark, Md.Bureau of statistics and inspection, department of agriculture, Trenton, N. J.Bureau of plant industry, department of agriculture and markets, Albany.N. Y.Bureau of plant industry, department of agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.Division of plant industry, department of agriculture and immigration. Rich-mond,. Va.P. Q. C. A.-220ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TO ENFORCEMENT OF REGULATION 6.QUARANTINE 48 (SIXTH REVISION), ON ACCOUNT OF THE JAPANESE BEETLEFEBRUARY 21, 1929.The purpose of this circular is to give a more definite and exact interpretationof procedure to be followed in the paragraphs concerned of regulation 6, Quar-antine 48 (sixth revision, effective February 15, 1929).Under section Bi (3) the first sentence of the first paragraph is to be inter-preted for purposes of enforcement as follows:" Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the soil or beetles havebeen found will be classified as Class III. Such classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., in localities known to be generally infested where beetlesor grubs are found in the immediate proximity of such nurseries, etc., onadjacent property or properties."The final paragraph of this section is to be interpreted for administrativepurposes as follows:In the case of nursery proper-ties under single ownership and management,but represented by parcels of land widely separated, such parcels may be inde-penideiitly classified either as Class II or Class III upon compliance with suchconditions and safeguards as shall be required by the inspector. Similarly, unitnursery properties, which would otherwise fafl in Class III, may be open tosubdivision, for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in Classes II or III,when iii the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by recent andscanty infestation linited to a portion of the nursery concerned: Procidcd, Thatthe subdivision containing the infestation shall be clearly marked by boundariesof a perm1anlent mn ture which shall be approximately 500 feet beyond the pointWhere the infestation Occurs.Inasmuch as all nurseries, or suibdivisions thierieof, to be in Class II mustbe uninfested with beetles or grubs, the requirement of screening openings ingreenhouses and cold framiies in such nurseries as prescribed in regulation 6,section B (4), will be made optioiial with the nurseryman in question.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Platt QuarantinC and Con trol Administration.

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#'j j ) /.D14~11 It l U) I I I lI .11 (1 Olt I Ii~ I .I) I 1) \ [(M I loj I ~~)ii 1(11dI I oLUI11 I II )III 1I I,~ 14,441 \ll. ,) 1110 14 4 q 1(11 S111.14I .14 j41du)llaibPW P) -I 1I j .II 'I VII 14111 1710I01q [)111,'1.1 01)1.1 101 0~ piiils pubu811 j! ll t, T1 1A 01I I I II >1)111) Iiii: .1 ')1140 l J1II 110J p l I(d) po1lauf J0f1~~~1o~.lu '-. j 1111 AA dt 101:" ) ) 11 41111" d 1 ", ()1BJI ~~ Id\J1 ) lIllIO.0( I 11 111Idl MI Il i ll '111D~.1l m) 1v I 'VC11d 1.14 u rs \d f)2 pul* t ATm3-I la)tlXII jI' '1t1'IA).I If xiANI T0 ' d im [I1U.IUnd) Jos p) f1\ Iq >If [)I?)pl sd o.1.-~~~~~~~ III p) __ ;L.s~ 'rv J 41: l lp1:adI p. 1 di(pa p q IJi III ud.~11.,),I d X\' 1! [0 1) 11O1 Il 11 ) 011I( IIIANA') ull S. 1)JU%~.)l -.14 '1110i UiruIIAA I 1 lui q .10S t U I smllq _ T ~p o ~ J. U)Uu(Io 11 ~ pli04 4 U S uIT l IIII .1 4\P I 111 J() U (two) sM tj lt. 11 )1:d)4U ' 1 d WANIII" 1' W.1,111 VI. I I 1.> i~ 1[Aulaj > .10i 111iIId~l Uoui:o [JIG~ 04.41 4us~u p s11)1il" 'I' t ofillil aq2.IIUI PILU Ijo411 2 _o *1op put) 1108 sjjtjj) (-),) 1L~1VAJ 1J\Q d.IA\ B ' [Ijlo.),i}d sit 1, 40p jou1 oq] 1 dlililU J) (G (~P21)11. ~ ~ 11 .10 II0 2ii I;)43 11 uM Bu ii~j dl 83 luA'plullN "T6T 014b .11l~ IAI I: .dB ,ijI A 1.111 UB Idtl~f 'd1fl1l1)Td~y 0 A .1 I)T ) .10 )431110(j -.141d~j.1(1l 4A M~ u h 11144 141 a. H1g1, odj 121 qao 1 2Jd vmB 18441 01) 821111 [ill,.1 1; m!)k (MQdIi)A: 1E~t 2 0 SPIIJA%' N pTI4 ,I e r4j1lJ y "-). UA 113,)( I 1 11 4 1')T T I 442k 811 1 11.1 j)T11'111 IBP!IJO dfl

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40MEXICAN FRUIT-WORM QUARANTINE (No. 64)HARVESTING PERIOD FOR GRAPEFRUIT, ORANGES, AND KUMQUATS IS EXTENDED IN TEXAS AREA REGULATED ON ACCOUNT OF THE MEXICAN FRUIT WORM[Press notice]JANUARY 31, 1929.The United States Department of Agriculture announces that, under theauthority given in the regulations supplemental to the quarantine on accountof the Mexican fruit worm, the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration has approved the action of the State of Texas in fixing, for the present season,March 30 as the date on which grapefruit and certain other fruits must beremoved from the trees in the Mexican fruit-worm regulated territory. The host-free period prescribed in the regulations will begin on March 31, and nofruits susceptible to infestation by the Mexican fruit worm, such as grapefruits,oranges, kumquats, peaches, apples, guavas, and others, will be permitted todevelop in orchards or to exist elsewhere within the regulated area after thatdate.The date fixed for this season is one month later than the beginning of thehost-free period in 1928. This change is made at the urgent request of orchardowners and other interests concerned, and was recommended by the StateDepartment of Agriculture of Texas. The grapefruit and oranges this seasonare ripening later than usual, due to rains occurring late in September andearly in October, with the result that not much more than half of the crop hasbeen moved out to date. The wholehearted cooperation of the residents in theregulated area has resulted in the practically complete elimination of secondaryhost-fruit trees, thus greatly reducing the possibility of any Mexican fruit-worminfestation becoming established.NURSERY-STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (No. 37)INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS[T. D. 43163]QUARANTINE AGAINST THE IMPORTATION OF NURSERY STOCK, PLANTS, AND SEEDSNOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 37, WITH REVISED REGULATIONS.-EFFECTIVE ON ANDAFTER NOVEMBER 1, 1928WASHINGTON, D. C., January 22, 1929.To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerncd:The appended copy of a new edition, issued by the Department of Agricul-ture, of Quarantine No. 37, with revised regulations, applicable to nurserystock, plants, and seeds from certain foreign countries, is published for theinformation and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.It is stated by the Secretary of Agriculture, in a letter dated December 28,1928, that " This edition supersedes all previous editions and amendments. Theprincipal changes are indicated in the introductory note and, as pointed outtherein, this is substantially a reprint rather than a revised edition. Java andMexico have been added to the countries listed under Appendix B as havingprovided for inspection and certification in conformity with the requirementsof the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912."E. W. CAMP,Commissioner of Customs.[Then follows the text of the quarantine and regulations.]P. Q. C. A.-222FLOWERS MAY BE CUT FROM FIELD-GROWN BULBOUS IRIS IMPORTED UNDERSPECIAL PERMITMARCH 28, 1929.Persons propagating bulbous iris under special permits are advised that thecutting of flowers (not foliage) from field plantings of such bulbs is here-after permitted. This decision is based on the advice of the horticultural

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41specialists of the deiartniit that the judicious cutting of flowers (not foliage)from fle~l-grown bulbous iris will not inaterially ' lefl( the proj a b 'atioi results,It should be distinctly understood, however. thattlii1 action does ot no lifyin any way, other than as to the cutting of flowers. the Conlditliol of releeof bulbous iris imlY(ried for propa atioii unler special permit as indivat dl in-B-194, revised July 28, 1927, Utilization of Plants Enutered for Prop agation.C. L. MAI!QATT.Chicf, IPlu nt Quarantiitc awl Co)utrol A1dinitrationPINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (No. 52)CHANGE IN LEADERSHIP OF PINK-ROLLWORIM AND THURBERIA-WEEVIL PROJECTSJANUARY 10. 1929.To fill a long-felt need of a special assi lant to the offiker in charge (I 1 theDivision of Foreign Plant Quarantines. ii order that closer conta( -t illay bemaintained with the ficld stations under that project, George G. Be'cker will, inthe near future, be transferre(l to Wa;hlingt on. Mr. Becker has been in cliaur-eof the field direction of the work under the piink-b llworn and Thurberia-wevilprojects since July 1, 1926. His former duties in colinection with tlee l>rojectshave to-day been assunied by R. E. MRcDonald.Mr. McDonald was the State entomologist of Texas for a nuniber ()f years,and more recently was an agent of this administration. To 'Mr. Mel)oiald islargely due the credit for the whole-licatied coo elration which the State ofTexas has given to the departieiit's effortto eradicate or control the pink bollworm since the discovery of this pest in that State. His extended experielncewith cotton insects, his close association wilit this work in Texas during allthese years, and his familiarity with all phases of the project and wit1 thepast policies of the department peculiarly qualify him for the duties to whichhe has now been assigned.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantinc and Control Administrationi.1929 AMENDMENT TO TEXAS PINK-BOLLWORM LAW 8[Approved February 26, 1929]AN ACT To amend Articles 74 and 75 of Chapter 3, Title 4 of the Revised Civil Stat-utes of 1925 ; providing the conditions under which the pink boll worms are to befound ; providing compensation for all losses incurred or expenses sustained by allpersons, firms or corporations required to comply with the provisions of Chapter :1 ofTitle 4 of the Revised Civil Statutes of 1925 ; and enlarging the powers of tho Com-pensation Claim Board ; providing for State ownership or lease of fumigation andsterilization plants ; and declaring an emergency.Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Texas:SECTION 1. That Article 74 of Chapter 3, Title 4 of the Revised Civil Statutes of 1925be amended so as to hereafter read as follows :"ARTICLE 74: Whenever the Commissioner of Agriculture shall deem it necessiry tothe protection of the cotton industry of Texas that the growing of cotton within anyarea of the State, except as provided for in the preceding articles hereof, be placedunder supervision, or that cotton growing he prohibited as a meas of aidilnl in thecontrol and eradication of the pink boll worm, he shill cause to be mnadfe a thboroughexamination of such area by a eonpetent and experie' nced eito11ologist, who sh1, aftergoing upon the premises and after making an examination in person. r1 r 1t the resultthereof to the Commissioner of Agricult iire. Should this report expre ss the c nai ci-lonthat pink boll worms exist in such nuliers as to conslitute a serious ioiN' withinithe territory under investigation, the Commissioner of Agriculture shall cOtrtify thliz reportto the Governor, who shall cause the link Boll Worm Con tit 1 Shiion 1i11 1'11r ' dfor, to hold a hearing at sorne central an1d easily access ib point wiltin the a:i a nrinvestigation; (Ile lnOtlice Of the tilie and place of such clearing shill , 111 bf plibli
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42" 4. That the inspector invited the owner of the land or his agent or representativeto accompany him on the inspection trip, and that the owner or his representativeaccompanied him or declined to do so." 5. Any other information deemed necessary by the Commission for the discharge of itsduties under the provisions of this Chapter." Such statement shall be verified by oath of the person making the same and shallbe filed and preserved in the office of the Commissioner of Agriculture and be open tothe inspection of the public. Said Pink Boll Worm Commission shall make a report tothe Governor immediately after the hearing. Should this report and recommendation befor the prevention of the planting of cotton in any Area and for the establishment of aion-cotton zone, such recommendation shall specify the area to be embraced in theprop-sod non-cotton zone. Upon receipt of this report, the Governor shall declare thegrowing of cotton within such area as may be recommended by the Pink Boll WormCommission a public menace, and thereafter it shall be unlawful to plant, cultivate orgrow cotton, or to ailow cotton to grow within such zone, such proclamation of theGovernor to remain in effect until the Pink Boll Worm Commission, herein provided for,shall have certified that the condition of menace no longer exists. In the event of theestablishment of any non-cotton zone authorized by this Chapter, all persons p-eventedfrom producing cot ton in the non-cotton zones shall be entitled to receive compensation from the State in the measure of the actual and necessary losses sustained thereby. Inall regulated or restricted areas now cstabiished or that may hereafter be established. allpersons, firms or corporations required io comply with said regulations or restrictionsinmpoed upon them by law or any constituted authority shall be entitled to receivecompensation for the actual losses sustained and for all actual expenses incurred byreason of said restrictions or regulations. From and after July 1, 1929, the State shallown or lease and operate all fumigation and sterilization plants and shall operate samewithout cost to the cotton grower or gin, compress or mill ownwr. The CompensationClaim Board. herein provided for, shall have full power and authority to determinethe amount of compensation to such persons, firms or corporations. In determining theactual and necessary losses, the Compensation Claim Board shall take into considerationthe value of the average yield of cotton and other crops second in economic importancethereto in that vicinity: the total amount of land planted to crops during the year forwhich compensation is claimed ; the percentage of such land customarily planted in cottonin that vicinity, and such other factors as they deem essential. The words " cultivatedcrops" as used above shall not be construed to include any small grain crops, hay orpasture crops which are not cultivated during the growing season. No person shall beentitled to compensation who does not in good faith obey the proclamation of the Governorestablishing such non-cotton or regulated zone. Should the report of the Pink BollWorm Commission express the conclusion that it will not be dangerous to the cottonindustry of Texas to permit the growing of cotton within such district under such rulesand regulations as it shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm, the Governor shall proclaim such area as may be set out in the report of thePink Boll Worm Commission a regulated zone, in which it shall be unlawful to plant,cultivate and market cotton except under such rules and regulations as shall be pro-mulgated therefore by the Commissioner of Agriculture, which may include the plantingof seed from non-infested territory, ginning at designated gins, milling or disinfecting ofall seed products within such zone, mnarketing, cleaning of felds, and such other rules asmay be found necessary ; provided that no ginner shall be authorized to gin cotton fromregulated zones unless he shall disinfect all seed under such rules as the Commissioner ofAgriculture shall prescribe. Such proclamation of the Governor, establishing such regu-lated zone shall remain in effect until the Pink Boll Worm Commission shall have certifiedthat the menace no longer exists."SEc. 2. That Article 75 of Chapter 3, Title 4 of the Revised Civil Statutes of 1925be amended so as to thereafter read as follows :"Article 75. The governor shall appoint a Compensation Claim Board for the State,who shall serve until relieved therefrom by the Governor, whose duty it shall be deter-ruined in the manner herein provided the measure of compensation due persons preventedfrom growing cotton and the damages sustained by persons having cotton condemned and destroyed as provided for herein, and losses sustained or expenses incurred by all persons,firms or corporations in such regulated or restricted areas. The said Board shall be coi-posed of three citizens of the State residing outside any area under quarantine underthe provisions of this law, at least two of-'N whorn are actually engaged in the productionof cotton. Before entering upon their duties, the members of the Board shall take theofficial oath, and shall organize by electing one of its members chairman and the Commis-sioner of Agriculture shall act as ex-officio secretary. The concurrence of two membersof the Board shall constitute legal action. The Compensation Claim Board shall conducta public hearing in the county or counties from which the claims for compensation havebeen filed, due notice of which hearing shall be given by publication in some newspaperpublished in or near the county or counties in which the claimant resides, not less thantell days before the date of such hearing, and by mailing from the office of the Commis-siolmer of Agriculture a letter to each claimanot, not less than ten days before the date ofsuch hearing, which notices shall state Ihe time and place of each hearing. Every suchclaim for compensation from the State shall be made under oath, attested by two citizensof the county in which the claimant resides, upon blanks to be furnished by theCoiniss ioner of Ai-riculture."Ever' such c6i mi shall slate:"1. Tl' nm1:1o and the post office of the claimant." 2. I'le Bocation of the farm Upon which the clain is based." :. Tho otal acreage of all cultivated crops produce(] in the year in which such claimis pr4'seli Ied."-4. All otlier iinformi tion d(eenid essential )y the said Compensation Claim Board forte perform1iace of Ile duties developed upon them by this law-EIhl allot tiwint o colipensa tion shall be evidenced by a written order, entered in aperimaiendly bound book keptl by the Board in the olice of the Commissioner of Agri-culture, :Ind a certified copy of each allot ment shall be given the claimant. If anyclaiin;t is diss;itisfid with (he nation of tie (:aim Board oil his claim, he shall havethe right witll six months afit er the decision of the CLa im Board to make applicationto the Di "t rict ( ourt of the coun y of which he is a resident or in which his cotton was

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44into small larvae. The latter pass the winter concealed in the crevices of thebark. in webs so hidden and inconspicuous as often to escape even the mostcareful inspection. On account of the practical impossibility of satisfactorilydetermining whether poplars and willows are free from infestation, the move-ment of these plants and cuttings from any of the infested areas into or throughany other State or territory of the United States is prohibited by the Federalquarantine." Postmasters and the agents of transportation companies are instructed to refuse to accept such articles for transportation, and if accepted they are sub-ject to interception by inspectors of the Department of Agriculture, en route orat destination, and the shipper is subject to prosecution."WOODGATE-RUST QUARANTINE (No. 65)WOODGATE-RUST REGULATIONS AMENDED[Press notice]MARCH 15, 1929.The quarantine regulations on account of the Woodgate rust, a dangerousdisease attacking Scotch pine and several other hard pines, have been amendedto include Madison County, N. Y., according to an announcement by the UnitedStates Department of Agriculture. The amendment becomes effective on April1, 1929. The entire area now under quarantine on account of this diseasecomprises the following counties in the State of New York: Clinton, Essex,Franklin, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, and St.Lawrence.This quarantine prohibits the movement of Scotch pine and certain other hardpines from the above counties to points outside the State.AMENDMENT OF WOODGATE-RUST QUARANTINEINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe amendment which follows adds Madison County, N. Y., to the area desig-nated as regulated on account of the Woodgate rust.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.AMENDMENT No. 1 To RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To NoTIcE OFQUARANTINE No. 65(Effective on and after April 1, 1929)Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917(39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the rules and regula-tions supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 65, on account of the Woodgaterust, which were promulgated October 18, 1928, be, and the same is hereby,amended to read as follows:REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREASIn accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 65, the Secretaryof Agriculture designates as regulated area the counties of Clinton, Essex,Franklin, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, and St.Lawrence, in the State of New York, including all cities, towns, townships, andother political subdivisins within their limits.This amendment slial be effective on and after April 1, 1929.Done at the city of Washington this 9th day of March, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[sEAL.] R. W. DUNLAP,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

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45NOTICE TO COMMON ClARI~M-iSAic I 9. 1 929.SiR: You are refquested to date and signl the blank receipt low. inmliatingyour official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agricultro in theinclosed penalty envelope, which irequires no postage.Notice is hereby g-iven 0) the transpo station company you reprnsent asfollows:That the Secretary of A-:iculture. under antihority -I the awt approvedAugust 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), :is amendedby the act of Congress approved Mareh 4. 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has. byamendment No. 1 to the rules and regulani"ns supplemlen tal to Notice Uf Quar-antine No. 65, on account of the Wotmlgate rust, effectivee on and after I April 1,1929, given notice that regulation 3 has been amended to real as pr copyinclos'ed.Very respectfully.it. W. DUNvA.Acting Secc(lary of Agriculture.(Inclosure.)[Do not detach this receipt]Received this notice and the copy of amendment 1 to the rules and regula-tions supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 65 mentioned thereini thisday of ------------. 1929.(Signature)(Title)[Sent to all common carriers in the State of New York.]NOTICE TO GENERAL, PUniC THROUGH NEwSPAPERSMlw1i 9. 192n.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture. under aunthorityconferred on him by the plant quarantine act of Augtust 20, 1912 37 Stat.315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment to the rules and re-ula-tions supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 65, on account of tle Wood-gate rust, effective April 1, 1929. This amendment extends the r gulatcd areato include Madison County, N. Y. Copies of said anieidndment m:N be obtin48from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administ rat ion. United States l)tart-ment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.It. W. DUNLAP,Acting Secretary of Aqricuitootwltu[Published in Oneida Dispatch, Oneida, N. Y., March 22, 1929.1TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTSPLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO PLACES IN WYOMINGTrirIM ASSISTANr PosTIMASTFU G1LN U.WIaISinlton. bry oi, 11. 1:9The State of Wyoming has established kwaces for tetrmiiniial ili ion 1n, rthe provisions of the act of March 4, 1915, emilbdied in sc wR 00l 1 '.tLaws and Regulations, of the following ida its an d p4:lit Idn, (i1n :"All field-grown woody plants, or cuttings or scions thrI*(ov .it '!1'ih1 cuitflowers; and all strawberry plants: J'roridud. That >ad hi id t W i, lidplant products shall not al)ply to any nursery stock which I W\ ("w11m*tag certifying that the nursery stock is being shipped froi a 0lri'iinto do business in Wyoming for the current season, nor to t Ice ii old "l"bulbs, and hiotlious'.e or liel(-grown herha IonI phi lt

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46All postmasters are therefore informed that packages containing any plantsor plant products addressed to places in the State of Wyoming may be acceptedfor mailing only when plainly marked so that the contents may be readily ascer-tained by an inspection of the outside thereof. The law makes the failure soto mark such parcels an offense punishable by a fine of not more than $100.Postmasters within the State of Wyoming shall be governed strictly by theprovisions of paragraphs 3, 4, 5, and 6, section 468, Postal Laws and Regula-tions, in the treatment of all packages addressed for delivery at their officescontaining any of the plants or plant products above described as subject toterminal inspection.Inspection service is maintained at the places in Wyoming named below, andall postmasters in that State shall, after receiving the required postage therefor,under the provisions of section 468, Postal Laws and Regulations, send to thenearest inspection point each package containing plants or plant productssubject to terminal inspection: Sheridan.Casper.Laramie.Owing to the perishable character of plaits and plant products the packagescontaining such matter must be given prompt attention.Any failure of compliance with the foregoing instructions or with the provisions of section 468, Postal Laws and Regulations, coming to the attentionof any postmaster should be reported to the Third Assistant Postmaster General,division of classification.R. S. REGAR,Third Assistant Postmaster General.PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO PLACES IN MISSISSIPPITHIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,Washinrgton, March 9, 1929.Postmasters in the State of Mississippi are infomiied that provision has beenmade for the terminal inspection of plants and plant products at Wiggins, sothat the complete list of such terminal inspection points in Mississippi is asfollows:A. & M. College. Holly Springs. Pascagoula.Biloxi. Houston. Poplarville.Brookhaven. Jackson. Senatobia.Cleveland. Laurel. Starkville.Corinth. Meridian. Tupelo.Durant. Moss Point. West Jackson.Grenada. Natchez. Wiggins.Gulfport. Ocean Springs. Yazoo City.Upon receiving the required postage as prescribed by paragraph 3, section 468,Postal Laws and Regulations, parcels containing plants and plant productssubject to terminal inspection should be sent to the inspection point nearest theoffice of address.R. S. REGAR,Third Assista it Postmaster General.CONVICTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACTThe following convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act werereported to the administration during the period January 1 to March 31, 1929:JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. Maud A. Corbett, Wandel Dahlia Gardens,Matawan, N. J., in tlhe interstate sllipment on February 23, 1928, of 22 dahliatubers an(d 3 dahlia 11chimps to San Gabriel, Calif., a point outside the regulatedarea, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and wasfined $5. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 356.)

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47In the case of the United States v. Wilbur S. Fargo (trading as The Growers' Sales Co.), Clinton, N. J., in the interstate shipment on October 27, 1928, of 1rose bush to St. Louis, Mo., a point outside the regulated area, without inspec-tion and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $50. (PlantQuarantine Case No. 362.)In the case of the United States v. Edward Cirillo, New Haven, Conn., in theinterstate transportation on July 17, 1928. of 42 bushels of green corn and 5baskets of beans in the pod from an infested area in New York to New Haven,Conn., a point outside of the regulated area, without inspection and certifica-tion, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $7.5. (Plant Quarantine CaseNo. 361.)BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. the Barteldes Seed Co., Lawrence, Kans.,in the interstate shipment in March, 1928, of 3 black currant plants in violationof the regulations, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25. (PlantQuarantine Case No. 354.)QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTSIn the case of the Vnited States v. Antmio Saizur. El Pasi. Tex. in attempt-ing to smuggle in 3' stalks of sugar eanv frIim Mexico. the tefei d8n1111 waifined 45.In the li se of the n i ted States r. Ltui< C'hajaI. El 1Is. Tex. in :tl mIt-ing to simggle inl 1 pioce of sugtar cane from Mexieo. the defemtld:it was fillel S5.In the case of the Tnited States v. John E. Museley, El Paso. Tex., in attempt-ing to smuiiile in 1 a Voea(o from A1 Mexic(. ih defeidalint w fil fied 55.In Ihe ca52 of the Inited States v. Tilmureia Rhjs. El Pas. Tex., in att mjli -ing to smu gle in 7 pieces of sugar cane and 1 orange from Mexico. the defend-anit was failed $.In the case of the United States r. R. 1. de la Garza. Laredo. Tex. in at-tempting to smuggle in S stalks of sugar t' cane from Mexico. the defendant wasfield $5.If! the casP lf the Iinitd State. r. J. Al. Bonillas. N.ale. ArIz .in attp-in g to siugle in 28 pomi-rti mtes, 99 sweet Iinws. : griplfruit. 2' erani s 12pief.(s of (utar cane, and 1 ho 'x of ilant s frm Mexiro. the deeunla w8'fin-ed ' 10.!i1 the (ase of the I'ltrd State v. Matias Flir-, Biuwn'vilhr. Tex., in nt-teil I to smu wge in 4 avocados Irom Mexio. thiefendait wati' e iiii .Il the ease of Ihe Ulite:l Slates r. Albeto Alvarez. D)ntl*-, Ariz._ in attempting to smuggle in '7 oranges fijom Mexico. the dlfeeltim wat lled S.Il tOhe care of 1he FIa ted States r. Vulentutiuit Rivera vda (1e A ili. E 1 l'Tex., ill atlemiiii u t sI ui" ii 21 ji'wes of sAl ea te frum i\e\ic. lhedefeiidaint w:is fined 5.Ill the ca-e ot the ullited Stares r. EIllrKjth Marti z L l'a.T in 8tempting N) smntitztzle ill 1 I1I: iev l im Mexi\ r. tlle deot iidIim w\Ii d u IIll the ase lt e UI i ted Stat es r. Alejainira l ' revz. L 1 Pa'(i T1' ill i 8ellptinjg to smuntnpzgIe in 2 stals of sutzar ainc front Mexirc. lo, the dit mm wV'1-fired $5.Il tlhe (ase of the Iiitid Statis r. Maria Sel'lvetla. E! I':1-". T' n :ttmptinm i sugzle ini ; 1 le a1) 1 swev l jime fr m lii< .tml del :Allitwvaus Iined S5.Ill ihi( emIs o f o th e Ii!ited StaIte e r. J1.ei. m i I V. L I'>T ii It impit illit) imlol n a otdo f1m1(xi1.th 111d1t lill, (i8Ill the ( e of lthe I'iited States r. A r an i\Ta ni E' l'a .T /. iV 1tilptinlg 1I smlulit l' in 15 pieces ()1 SUIar cNe n 11A rn\i. tIidefenld'.nt1 wv' filled s5Ill tIe c(Ie( of t Uiit Sta t's r. A11111114'l M'l rtinlez, NSU \\ i K. Ariz. ill litIll t vc4s ) the l5.itcd 1r. T4mp inI I to smu11sle ill I0 pieces tkt su Ar l ca * fom ax m. he'0''filled $5.In ilh( c'Iso of, lhw Inited 1'te .Allionio E:m,!an wife, E1 :1 T1'il :itlemptinig_ tos me l inl 26 plmits md jlwa sa f mm 1''ej IIhAidefenidalt. wvasI 11ed '$.5.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA3 1262 09230 9318In the case of the United States v. J. M. Azios, Laredo, Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in 3 plants from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Vicente Ayala, Laredo, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in 93 oranges from Mexico, the defendant was fined $15.In the case of the United States v. Anelie Montes, Laredo, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in 26 oranges from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Calletano Carillas, Nogales, Ariz., in at-tempting to smuggle in 48 guavas, 26 limes (sweet), and 2 oranges from Mex-ico, the defendant was fined $5.ORGANIZATION OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROLADMINISTRATIONC. L. MARLATT, Chief of Adlninistratioa.S. A. ROHwER, Assistant Chief.B. CONNOR, Business Manager.R. C. ALTHOUSE, Informational Officer.C. A. LoCKE, Executive As.stant.H. T. CRONIN, Administrative Assistant.E. R. SAssCEU, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines.S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines.A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gipsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine,(Headquarters, A elrose Highlands, Mass.).L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge European Corn Borer Quarantine (Head-quarters, Eastern Section, Boston, Mass.; Western Section, Toledo, Ohio).C. H. HADLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine (Headquarters,Camden, N. J.).R. E. MCDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-antines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).B. L. BoYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,Calif.).P. A. HOIDALE!, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Worm Quarantine (Headquarters,Harlingen, Tex.).ADVISORY FEDERAL PLANT QUARANTINE BOARDC. L. MARLATT, Chairman.J. E. GRAF, Bureau of Entomology, Member.R. A. OAKLEY, Bureau of Plant Industry, Member.M. B. WAiTE, Bureau of Plant Industry, Member.Forest Service, Member.U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE:1929


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