Citation
Service and regulatory announcements

Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Abbreviated Title:
Serv. regul. announc. - U. S., Plant Quar. Control Adm.
Creator:
United States -- Plant Quarantine and Control Administration
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Quarterly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
16 v. : ; 23 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--P.Q.C.A. no. 96 (July/Sept. 1928)-S.R.A.--P.Q.C.A. no. 111 (Apr./June 1932).
General Note:
Title from caption.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
030288967 ( ALEPH )
12903606 ( OCLC )
sn 86014227 ( LCCN )
0888-7608 ( ISSN )
Classification:
351 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

Full Text




97

TABLE 1.-Palm inspections, date-scale eradication project, July 1 to December 31, 1928

Arizona California
Item
Phoenix Yuma Coachella Imperial
district district district Valley

Number Number Number Number
Palm inspections..............................-------------------------------- 7, 586 9,282 53, 852 (1)
Infested properties found ........................ ----------------------------------- 5 0 19 25
Infested palms found, and treated or destroyed ..............----------------- 13 0 212 11, 003
Palms located on reconnaissance survey ......--------------------....... 24, 202 .......----------.---------.......... 2, 583
*
I Palms located on the reconnaissance survey were not intensively inspected and all infestations discovered in the Imperial Valley were from casual examinations only.



EUROPEAN-CORN-BOR'ER QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT

SPREAD DURING 1928

The more important developments of the European-corn-borer situation during the last six months of 1928 have been the determination of, on the one hand, the notable retardation of spread to the south in Indiana and Ohio, and, on the other, an acceleration in the rate of spread eastward in New England and westward in Indiana.
In the east, the 1-generation strain was discovered in New Hampshire and Connecticut for the first time, and it also was found to have invaded hitherto uninfested parts of 11 counties in Vermont, the remainder of Ierkshlire, and parts of 3 additional counties in Massachusetts, and all or parts of 10 counties of central and northeastern Pennsylvania. The extension westward in northern Indiana was scarcely greater than normal, but is especially important because the infestation reached the shores of Lake Michigan for the first time.
The 2-generation strain of the corn borer meanwhile was found to have spread westward into Windham, Middlesex, and New London Counties, Conn., but the extension of its range in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine consisted of only occasional townships.
Taking, as a whole, the area throughout the United States now invaded by the borer, there was practically no commercial danmae experienced last year other than in a small area in Rhode Island extending slightly into Massachusetts. In the nearest approach to the Corn 1:elt, namely, in western New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan, the corn-borer population averages for these five States less than 7 borers to 100 stalks, whereas coimmercial damage requires from 400 to 500 borers to 100 stalks. This average of 7 borers to 100 stalks represents an actual decrease front last year's avera of 10 borers to 100 stalks. This decrease is clearly due to cleanm-up operations in the more heavily infested bordering strip along LIke Erie and in eastern Michigan which overhbalanced the modest increase in Ithe more sparsely ilnfesed area in these States, over much of which there is still less tha;in I borer to 1( stalks of corn. The questions which can not now h)e answered is how rapidly and how much the corn) borer will build up throughout this western area in future years.

INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES

All corn shipped out of the quarantined area must be slielld,. cleah:lned. inspected, and certified. (Table 2.) In addition, cut flowers and certain fri products, other than corn must also be inspe(ted if they originate ill the 2 leration regulated area. (Table .) D)uring the progress of th'-e inspections 20 egg masses, 4,078 Iarvae, and 5 putpae of the European corn hroer were discovered and the infested ilnatcrihls refused certiic'ation.








98


TABLE 2.-Shelled corn certifleL, July 1 to December 31, 1928


Month Eastern Western Month Eastern Western
area 1 area area 1 area

Bushels Bushels Bushels Bushels
July ----------- 160, 147 167,974 November-------------- 182,303 196, 214
August ------------------ 113,022 79,387 December ------- L---~ 964,071.5 444,209
September---------------- 139, 158 51, 899
October ------------------ 201,394 41,021 Total------------- 1, 760,095. 5 980,704

1 East of the western border of Pennsylvania.

TABLE 3.-Certification of cut flowers and plant& in 2-generation area (eastern

New England), July 1 to December 31, 1928

Beans, celery, Beans, celery,
Cut flow- beets, and Cut flow- beets, and
ers and rhubarb ers and rhubarb
Month entire _______Month entire ______plants plants
certified Certi- Per- certified Certi- Perfled 1 mitted I fled I mitted I

Number Bushels Bushels Number Bushels Bushels
July------------------ 34, 746 8, 815 9, 028 November------------ 248, 708 2, 301 10, 614
August--------------- 814, 971 7, 341 9, 061 December ------------- 119,019 1,471 12,087
September ------------ 255, 969 5, 146 4, 613
October-------------- 111,077 3,291 6,062 Total- ----- ,584,490 28,365 51,465

I Permits are issued for the reshipment of articles originating outside the regulated areas, while certificates are used in the case of articles originating, inside such areas.

CONTROL OF VEHICULAR TRAFFIC

In order to prevent the movement of contraband articles outside the regulated areas by trucks, passenger cars, and other road vehicles, road stations were maintained throughout the season in Pennsylvania, Ohio., Indiana, and Michigan, as well as a considerable number- of stations in the vicinity of New York City on highways, located in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. The average number of men .employed on this work was. 85 in Pennsylvania, 228 in Ohio, 85 in Indiana, 160 in Michigan, and 54 in the vicinity of New York City.
Nearly 7,000,000,cars, were stopped at the road stations and over 27,000 dozen ears of corn and 44 bushels of shelled corn were found moving in violation of the quarantine regulations. The periods during which these interceptions were made are shown in Table 4.

TAB3LE 4.-Results of road-station operation, July 1 to December 31, 1928


Carsstoped Crn tken Shelled corn interCarsstoped Crn tkencepted
Month
Eastern Western Eastern Western Eastern Western section section section section section section

Number Number Ears Ears Bushels Bushels
July -------------------------------- 90, 564 579, 702 5, 580 7,034 0 3
August ----------------------------- 1, 147, 434 1, 855, 404 131, 671 73, 464 0 10
September-------------------------- 1, 141, 943 1, 802, 463 40, 489 67, 371 15 16
October ----------------------------- 256,451 0 1,679 0 0 0
November ------------------------------ 0 0 0 0 0 0
December ------------------------------ 0 0 0 01 0 0
Total-------------------------- 2, 636, 392 4, 237, 569 179, 419 147, 869 15 29


It was possible to inspect only a very small proportion of the number of ears intercepted, as more corn was seized at the various road stations than could possibly be examined with the number of men available. One important seizure







99

consisted of 35 ears of sweet corn which was later proven to have originated in the 2-generation area near Boston, and it contained 34 European corn-borer larvae. This corn was being shipped to a point in southern New Jersey.
QUARANTINE AMENDED

On August 7, at the request of the commissioner of agriculture of Maine, the Federal corn-borer quarantine was amended by adding a requirement that restricted articles were not allowed to be moved into the State of MXaine from any point in the regulated areas outside that State unless a certificate or permit therefor should have been issued by the United States Department of Agriculture. The reason for this change was that the degree of infestation in the southwestern part of Maine was very light, largely due, it is believed, to active clean-up operations instituted by the growers with the assistance and cooperation of the State authorities. Wholesale shipments of infested corn from southern Massachusetts and Rhode Island to Portland. Me., caused considerable alarm among Maine farmers, as it was feared that the number of borers introduced with the corn would undo the results of the energetic eradication efforts. The protection the farmers requested was accordingly granted through the promulgation of the amendment described.
On the same date the regulations were further changed to include in the 1-generation area all that part of the congested districts in New Jersey located east of the Hackensack River and Newark Bay. This action opened populous markets to shippers from Jersey City and New York City, and greatly simplified the quarantine administration by reducing the number of road stations which it was necessary to operate in that vicinity to three, located on the important bridges across the Hackensack River. A total of 23 additional quarantine stations were also operated in other points in New Jersey.
CORN-BORER APPROPRIATION

The agricultural appropriation act passed in April, 1928. made the amount of $887,660 available to the administration for corn-borer regulatory work during the current fiscal year, but in view of unexpected contingencies this sum is proving somewhat insufficient. Accordingly, the pending agricultural appropriation bill 2 for the fiscal year 1930 carries, on the recommendation of the department, the following item:
For the control and prevention of spread of the European! corn borer. $S9,000: Provided. That in addition thereto there shall be immediately available for this purpose $50,000 of the $10,000,000 appropriated by the joint resolution making an appropriation for the eradication or control of the European corn borer, approved February _3. 1927. (U. S. C., supp. 1, p. 22, sec. 146.)
It is anticipated that the item of $50,000 referred to will, if appropriatedd, be expended in part during the current season and in part in the fical year ending June 30, 1930.
In May, 1928,. an act authorizing an appropriation of $7.000.)0 for fieldcontrol operations similar to those carried out under the $10(000,().(100 ppropriation of 1927 passed Congress and was signed by the P'resident. An item to carry out this authorization was included in the second d(Iiciency bill presentedI to Congress iniinediately thereafter, ilut it failed to pass at that time and has not been brought up again in t he present session .
The funds being expeind(led fir Eurolen corn-hrer regulatory work by the cooperating States during the present year total aliproximately $103.450.



PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF THE GYPSY MOTH
INTENSITY OF INFESTATION INCREASING IN NEW ENGLAND

Since 1924, when the acreage d(efoliated by the gypsy moth in the infested territory of New England was the smallest that it had beewn for 20 years, there has been a rapid increase in the abundance of this insct and inll the extent of the areas defoliated. This situation in the western iipart of the infested territory has been especially dangerous, as every increase in the number of moths

See footnote 1, p. 90.







100

present in that region makes the maintenance of the barrier zone increasingly diffcult.
The increasing intensity of infestation made it necessary to revise the gypsymoth-quarantine regulations effective October 1, for the purpose of enlarging the area desi gnated. as "generally infested" by including therein 50 towns of Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut previously considered as lightly infested." The territory so transferred has a total area of 1,581.34 square miles.

NEW JERSEY INFESTATION APPROACHING EXTINCTION

In the New Jersey area, fortunately, the situation is very much more satisfactory, as no gypsy-moth egg masses have been discovered during the past six months. Scouting has been carried on in six townships surrounding Somerville, and, while it is not believed that the gypsy moth has. been totally eradicated, the insect is rapidly approaching extinction. The results secured from the eradication campaign carried out in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Agriculture have been excellent and no defoliation has resulted since the first year of operation.
QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT

The gypsy-moth quarantine requires inspection and certification of forestplant products, including logs and lumber, stone and quarry products, nursery and ornamental stock, and forest-grown evergreens of the type commonly known as Christmas trees and greens.
In the course of the examination of 3,003 prospective shipments of forest products, 40 have been found infested with 1,023 larvae, pupae, or egg masses of the gypsy moth. In a similar manner 47,883 prospective shipments of stone and quarry products have been examined, 40 of which were found infested with 413 larvae, pupae, vr, egg masses. Certificates were refused with respect to such infested shipments. No infestations were found during the inspection of 3,258 shipments of Christmas trees and greens and other forest-grown coniferous trees, or in the inspection of 7,839 shipments of nursery stock. In the case of the last-named classes of articles it will be recalled that special protective measures are in effect, namely, that Christmasi trees are not permitted to be shipped from the generally infested area, that nurseries are carefully examined by State inspectors in advance, and that nursery stock is not offered for Federal inspection unless a State nursery inspection certificate is already in the possession of the nursery concerned.
Table 5 shows the number of inspections and interceptions during the past six months but does not include inspection of nursery stock and forest products originating in the territory in New Jersey regulated under a gypsy-moth quarantine issued by that State. Inspectors of the State and Federal departments in cooperation examined and certified 63 such shipments in September, 114 in October, 169 in November, and 123 in December, a total of 469. No infestation was discovered in these shipments.

TABLE, 5.-Inspections under Federal gypsy-moth quarantine, July 1 to December 31, 1928


Forest products Stone and quarry Nreystock Christmas trees and products other evergreens

Mnh Ship- Ship- La-Ship- Ship_ Lar- Si- Ship- Lar- Ship- Ship Larmens mntsvae ent mets aements ments vae, ments mentsve in- in- pupae, in- in- pupae, in- in- pupae, in- in- pupae,
aspect fesmassresg spected tested or egg spected tested or egg spected tested or egg spetedmetedoreg masses masses masses

July -------------5731 2 9' 7,828 3 11 146 0 0 17 0 0
August --------- 559 10 390; 7,9 32 8 17 536 0 0 58 0 0
September ----- 446 9 416 8;,538 11 33 1, 796 0 0 58 0 Ncoeber------- 466 12 160 8,229 3 115 3,818 0 0 53 0 0
Nvme--- 432 5 35 8,662~ 11 118 1,022 0 0 586 0 0
December -------527 2 13 6,694 4 119 521 0 0 2,486 0 0
Tota--- 3,003 40 1,023 147,883 40 413 7,839 0 0 3,258 0 0







101

APPROPRIATIONS

The pending agricultural appropriation bill 3 for the fiscal year 1930 carries $567,500 for moth-control work, approximately the same amount as has been
-available for the past several seasons.


JAPANESE-BEETLE CONTROL

SPREAD INTO ISOLATED LOCALITIES

During the summer of 1928, adult Japanese beetles were found at the following new localities all more or less isolated from previously known infestations: Hagerstown, Frederick, and Delmar, Md.; Lewistown and Sayre, Pa.; Hartford and New London, Conn.; Springfield, Mass.; several points in Delaware; and in and near Alexandria, Va. In addition, the isolated infestations formerly known and made the subject of eradication experiments in northern Delaware and at Baltimore, Cambridge, Perryville, and Chesapeake City, Md., and Washington, D. C., were found to be persisting. No Japanese beetles, however, were discovered at York or Gettysburg, Pa., or Ridgely, Md., where eradication work had also been carried on.
In consideration of this situation a public hearing was held on September 24,
-1928, "to consider the advisability of extending the Japanese beetle quarantine to the States of Massachusetts and Virginia." The department later announced in an official press release on December 20 (which is given in full on a later ,page) that a revised edition of the Japanese-beetle quarantine would shortly be promulgated, extending the regulated area to include the town of Rye in Perry County, Pa., the city of New Haven and certain adjacent townships in Con-necticut, all of Delaware north of Sussex County. and most of Cecil County, Md. .A second and separate regulated area is also planned to cover the District of Columbia, Arlington County and the city of Alexandria, Va. The following isolated points are to be brought under State control and are not to be covered by the Federal quarantine: Baltimore, Hagerstown, Frederick, Cambridge, and IDelmar, Md.; Lewistown and Sayre, Pa. ; Hartford and New London, Conn.; Springfield, Mass., and Delmar, Del. This State control will include nursery inspection and certification (in most cases under State quarantine), and, where necessary, the enforcement of clean-up operations to reduce, or, if possible as to certain points, to eradicate the pest.
Soil treatment as a part of such clean-up operations of isolated points was started in Maryland at Cambridge on October 22 and was continued in that locality until November 7. The work was supervised by department inspectors but practically all expenses for labor and material were borne by the State. The crew treated 12.6 acres with 5.15 tons of carbon-disulphide emulsion at Canbridge, after which 6.03 tons of emulsion were used in treating 15.5 acres at Delmar. The work was discontinued on December 5 oving to the fact ,that the soil temperature had gone below 40' F.

CERTIFICATION OF FARM PRODUCTS, CUT FLOWERS, SOIL, AND SIMILAR MATERIALS
The regulations supplemental to the Japanesc-beetle quarantine in effect ,during the summer of 1928 required the inspection and certification of all farm products and cut flowers fromn June 15 to October 15, inclusive (with the exception of certain products, such as potatoes and grains, unlikely to carry Japanese btles), but the restrictions on farm products were removed by the Secretary of Agriculture oni October 1 owing to the absence of beetles the last week of September.
On July 17 betles were observed in large numbers on the water front and in the market and freight-yard districts of Philadelphia, and it was evident that a heavy flight was in pro,ress. Accordingly, under authority count aitied in the regulations, inspection wvs withheld on all farm products offered for shipment from Philadelphia between the hours of 10 a. in. and 8 p. in., and this withdrawal of certification (during that period of the (lay was coniilued from July 18 until August 23, at which time scouting of it he water front, freight

8See footnote 1, p. 96.







102

yards, and market districts showed the beetles to have decreased to such an extent that the restoration of a 24-hour inspection service was justified. During these five weeks inspection service w;as, maintained during the night and early morning hours when the beetles were not flying.
The quantities of articles other than nursery stock certified during the 6-month period are shown in Table 6, and the amounts of material treated with chemicals to eliminate infestation are shown in Table 7.

TAB3LE 6.-Quantities of farm products, cut flowers, soil, and similar' articles certified, July 1 to December 31, 1928

Sand, CompostFrisadHynd
Month Cut soil, Pet ad FutsadHyI
foes et. manure vegetables straw

Boxes Carloads Carloads Carloads Packages Bales July--------------------------------- 4,7174 822 22 58 2,468,568 6,233
August ------------------- 3,601: 898 41 62.5 2,292,009 12,590
Se tmbr------------------ 3,485 1,017 40 49.5 1,547,738 14,790.54
October ----------------------------- 2,244j 1,566 60 106 0 0
November ----------------------------- 0 1, 113. 5 26.25 78 0 0
December --------------------------I 0 527 16 75 0 0
Total ------------------------- 14,104 5,943.5 205.25 4291 6,308,315 33, 613.5


TABLE 7.-Citem ica 1 trea tvnen ts of a rticles (other than~ nursery stock) restricted'
under the Japanese- beetle quarantine from July 1 to Decemnber 31, 1928

Arse
nate
of-lead.
Carbon-disulphide treatment of- Calcium-cyanide treatment of- treatment
Month ofPottingi Sand Leaf ClySurface Ha Straw Ms Bana- Surfacfr
soil1 mold Ca soil a, anas soil

Cu. yds. Cu. yds. Cut. yds. Cu. yds. Sq. yds. Bales Bales Bales Bunchesi Sq. ft.
August -------------- 99 1,447 0 97 0 100 3,320 1,181 47,926 546,643
September ---- -------199 1,915 107 0 130 645 4,696 807 0 46,.89&
October ------------ 1,7241 0 0 0 503 0 0~ 0 0 a
November -------- 36~ 0 0 204 0O 0 0. 0 0k
December --------4 16' 0 0 0~ 0 01 01 0 0 0,
Total --------- 2,291 3,652 161 97 951 954 8,478 2,403 115, 666 600, 59Z

In addition to the figures given above, 6 cubic yards of potting soil were treated with steam in November.

Thirty-five road inspection posts were maintained during the summer and. fully manned until October 1, when the farm-products quarantine was lifted. At th-At time the men were largely withdrawn except in Connecticut and New York. On all the roads on which the volume of traffic wvarran1ted, 24hour service was maintained. Oil less important roads men were stationed during the hours of greatest travel, or the hours were varied from day to day so that inspectors might be at their posts, at various times aind the traffic could not anticipate a time when they would not be on duty.

NURSERY CLASSIFICATION
The requirements governing the movement of nursery stock to points outside the regulated area depend on the classification of the nursery in which, the stock is produced. The inspection with respect to Class I nurseries and greenhouses-namely, those located in districts included in the regulated area but in which neither grubs in the soil nor beetles have been found-is confined







103

largely to the summer and fall period and no treatment requirements are in ,effect. Nurseries and greenhouses of this class numbered 678 on December 31.
Class II nurseries and greenhouses, located in districts recently or ,-cantily infested by the beetle but in which nurseries or greenhouses no beetle-s have been found and in which it has not been possible to determine any soil invasion, are subject to inspection during the digging and shipping season n and certain protective measures are prescribed, but as long as there is no invasion ,of the premises, treatments of the plants themselves are not required. Suich nurseries and greenhouses numbered 81 on December 31.
Class III nurseries and greenhouses, those in which either grubs in the soil
-or beetles occur or located in districts known to be generally infested, are subject to the maximum restriction involving either removal of the soil from the roots, or the treatment of the soil ball. Such nurseries and greenhouses numbered 198 on December 31. Establishments which receive uncertified stock from other dealers within the regulated area lose their classified status but
-are permitted certification by fulfilling Class III requirements.
Changes of classification of nurseries and greenhouses from July 1 to December 31. 1928, are reported as follows: In New Jersey 22 nurs eries were changed from Class I or Class II to Class III because of finding beetles on the premises, and 5 were thus transferred to Class III because of finding 'beetles in the immediate vicinity. In Pennsylvania 5 nurseries were changed
-to Class III because beetles were found on the premises and 2 on account of ,collecting them in the immediate vicinity. Ten New Jersey nurseries had their
-classification changed from Class 1 to Class III on account of failure to confine their purchases inside the regulated area to certified stock and 1 nursery was for the same reason changed from Class, I to Class II. Two Pennsylvania 'nurseries were changed from Class I to, Class III and 1 from Class I to Class II for the same reason.
Every year a considerable amount of nursery digging is performed in classifled nurseries during the fall months for the purpose of supplementing the fre*quent and periodic summer scouting for the adult beetle and of determining any soil invasion which may be present. in nurseries of Class III this digging1Jr isconfined largely to plots treated with lead arsenate. The results of this work in the fall of 1928 are shown in Table 8.

TABLE 8.-Results of diggings for Japanese anid Asiatic beetle larvae onl nursery
and other premises, October and November, 1928

Inese Infested
NuIrnser- with t
Stat Nurer- ith larvae of
StteDiggings iesor0- Jaaee related
'~tions larvae
beetles

Number Number Yumber Number
Connecticut ----------------------------------------------- 11 1 1 0
Delaware ------------------------------------------------- 1 1 0 0
Maryland------------------------------------------------ 023 16 0
New Jersey ----------------------------------------------85S", 121 0
New York----------------------------------------------- 10, 274 115 0 5
Pennsylvaniia---------------------------------------------- 4 4 2 11
Virginia--------------------------------------------------- :3 310
District of Columbia --------------------------------------- 15 21 0 1
Total---------------------------------------------- 9,196 270 20 1 6

ISame property as one of those listed in previous column.

Thie extent, of certification andi t reatnient requiiredl to insure the freted],n o)f shipmients of nursery an(1 ornamental stock frvii inlestittion is iutijaw d iin Table 9.
45830-29-2







104

TABLE 9.-61ertification and treatment of nursery stock, July 1 to December 81,
1928

Plants certified after chemical
Plants or thermal treatment
certified _____ _____ ____Month without Plants
chemical Treated Treated certified
or thermal Treated 'with with hot
treatment 1 with OSI wormseed wate
oil wae

July----------------------------------------- 5,392,211 0 0 0 5,392,211
August -------------------------------------- 5,113,120 0 0 5,090 5,118,210
September------------------------------------ 3,503,730 197 0 3,205 3,507,132
October-------------------------------------- 6,464,975 2,386 22 13,252 6,480,635
November------------------------------------ 5,769,232 767 4 7,627 5,777,630December------------------------------------ 4,068,647 0 0 3,804 4,072,451
Total----------------------------------- 30,311,915 3,350 26 32,978 30,348,269r

1Included among the totals in this column are large quantities of plants which were certified after the, roots had been washed entirely free from soil and thoroughly examined by an inspector.

FEDERAL AND STATE VIOLATIONS

In addition to interception of regulated articles at road stations,, which are not classed as violations of either State or Federal quarantines owing to the fact that the shipments are stopped before the violations occur, there were, reported by inspectors employed, on the Japanese-beetle-control project and others, 28 violations of this quarantine in July, 49 in August, 32 in September, 33 in October, 31 in November, and 28 in December, a total of 201. These numbers include 18 violations of this quarantine intercepted in transit by inspectors of the administration not -directly connected with this project and those reported by the various States. The shipments, concerned were in some cases returned to the shipper; in others were inspected and allowed to proceed to destination, and in a few cases destroyed. They were all investigated personally, the consignor and the. postmaster or agent of the transportation company involved, interviewed, and the full details reported to. the Washington office of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration for determination as to prosecution.
The Japanese-beetle-control inspectors also. detected 16 violations of the white-pine blister-rust quarantine, and a single violation of the foreign quarantine governing the importation of nursery, seed, and ornamental stock, which were reported to the Washington office of the administration for investigation and appropriate action. Eleven of the, blister-rust-quarantine cases also, constituted violations of the, quarantine on account of the gypsy and brown-tail moths.
AVAILABLE, FUNDS

The Federal appropriation for the control and prevention of spread of the Japanese and Asiatic beetles for the current fiscal year amounted to $2 65,800, and cooperating States are expending approximately $173,325 additional for the same period. The pending agricultural appropriation bill' for the fiscal year 1930 includes an item of $2,67,000 for this purpose but the amount of' anticipated funds available for State work for the ensuing year is not yet known.


PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF PINK BOLLWORM

The outstanding feature of the pink-bollworm situation for the present crop has been the apparent (and possibly temporary) elimination or disappearance of the insect in the northern part of the regulated and previously infested area. In the 1928 crop no specimens of the pink bollworm were found in any part of Arizona or New Mexico or in that part of the west-central Texas area north,

See footnote 1, p. 96.







105

of the thirty-second parallel of latitude, part of which constitutes the southern boundary of New Mexico. Whether this situation should be largely ascribed to severe winter conditions in parts of the formerly infested localities, or whether the active clean-up operations carried out throughout these regions are responsible, has not been determined.
SUPPRESSION OF WEST-CENTRAL TEXAS OUTBREAK

The only instance of survival of the pinIk bollworm in the 192 rop of cotton in the recently infested west-central Texas area which has yet been discovered was noted on November 21 and 22, when inspectors of "he administration found 11 larvae in a field 5 miles east of Odessa in Ector County on the extreme western edge of the Cotton Belt. One of these larvae was -'ound on November 21 and on the following day 10 more were taken from a single boll in the same field, 3 of them living when collected and the other 7 dead.
Scouting is still in progress in the region 6 but the indications thus far are that there exists a much smaller number of pink bollwormns in this area than was present in the 1927 crop. Prior to the discovery of the sin-le infested field reported to date, inspectors of the department had expended time and effort in their search for infestations in the region this season equivalent to the total number of man-days employed the previous year when 24 infested fields were discovered in the seven counties named. Simultaneously gin-sterilization supervisors were making daily observations of gin trash, a fertile source of information as to cotton-insect conditions in the locality, but the results of this work have been negative.
In this newly infested area there are practically no facilities for milling cottonseed, and arrangements were accordingly made by the State of Texas under regulations promulgated August 20, 1928 (see S. R. A. No. 9. pp). ), to permit the movement of cottonseed to certain mills located just outside llthe regulated territory. Such movement is conditioned on the maintenance of careful safeguards as to seed sterilization, the use of tight cars. the (cleaning" of such cars after unloading, the segregation of stored seed received from the regulated area from other seed in the plant, the fumigation of linters, and similar restrictions. In order to bring the Federal quarantine into harmony with the Texas regulations, amendment No. 2 to Federal quarantine No. 52 was issued November 2. 1928, and it will be found printed in full on a later page. Full-time inspectors representing the State and Federal departments jointly are stationed at each of these designated mills to see that the various safeguards are strictly enforced.
Two fumigation tubes and compressors have been erected within the newly infested area in order to free the cotton lint and linters from possible infestation. and to comply with Federal requirements governing interstate shipmielits of these products. These plants are located at Lamesa and Big Spring. respectively, and have been constructed b)y private capital l
Representations have been made to the department favoring the elimination, of compression as a requirement for the movement of linters to 11uninfel-ted localities from the oil mills of the regulated area and from the outsidee ie icnated mills mentioned. Trihle conditions on which lhese requests oere h(l sel have ben carefully investigated and it has been determinled that ihe e'iartmenit could not safely make this change in the regulations. The fuiiilitin and compression requirements in effect in previous years with rlestect i4 the shipment of lint an(d linters are therefore being continued on tl t(. salie busis as heretofore.
CONDITIONS IN NEW MEXICO AND ARIZONA IMPROVED

Inspections thus far this season have not revealed any pink-bol~vrm infestation in New Mexico or Arizona,. In the 192(; and 1927 rops of inti slight infestations were found in the Deming area and the I)uncan Valley of Newv Mexico, and in Co(hise County and the Safford, I)unm, and tlSta 'ruz 'alleys of Arizona. These points represent the extreme western outp)osts of pink bollworms thus far discovered in the United States. As a result of clen-up operations in the districts concerned in 1927 and 1928, the infestation had been reduced to such a point that inspections of cotton fields and of gin trash in these areas have yielded only negative results this season.

SNo pink bollworms have been found In this area up to Mar. 25, 192.9, by the sc outs ince the Odessa discovery reported above.







106

QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT

The most important measures to prevent the spread of the pink bollwormn from the regulated territory are those prohibiting the movement of cottonseed
-to uninfested localities and requiring that all cottonseed produced within the
-area be sterilized. The efficiency of the cottonseed-heating machines in the .gins has continually increased, the average for the last three months of 1928 being approximately 94 per cent. This is an increase of 3 per cent over the 'new record established last year. It means that considerably more than 94 iPer cent of the seed is properly heated, as all periods during which the recording device may continue to register during breakdown and other unavoidable troubles are charged against the efficiency record.
Road stations maintained to. intercept vehicles carrying restricted articles on the highways have numbered 14, located at or near Ajo-, Ariz.; Lordsburg, Silver City, and Roswell, N. Mex.; and Alpine, Coahoma, Fort Davis, Fort Stockton, Gail, Girvin, Sterling City, and Valentine, Tex.

APPROPRIATIONS
The appropriation for the fiscal year 1929 in the regular appropriation bill amounted to. $487,800. In addition there was available an unexpended balance of about $100,000 remaining on July 1, 1928, from an appropriation of $200,000 made by House Joinft Resolution 223 early ini March, 19,28.
In addition to these sums the second deficiency act for the fiscal year 1928 included an appropriation of $5,000,000 for the establishment of noncotton zones, but this was based on certain conditions prescribed in two provisos which made the amount, in fact, largely unavailable for that purpose. (See S. R. A. No. 95, p. 24.)
Anticipating that a large part of the unexpenlded balance from House Joint Resolution 223 would remain unexpended during the fiscal year 1929, the pending agricultural appropriation bill 6 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1930, makes an appropriation for the control and prevention of spread of the pink bollwormn, as follows:
The unexpended balance of the funds available for this purpose for the fiscal year 1929 is continued available for the fiscal year 1930, together with $397,120 of the unexpended balance of the appropriation of $5.000,000 for establishing and enforcing noncotton zones, carried in the second deficiency act, fiscal year 1928.
It is therefore anticipated that there will be available for pink-boliworm work in the next fiscal year sums amounting approximately to, $497,120.



SATIN-MOTH-QUARANTINE REGULATIONS REVISED

As a result of the continued spread of the satin moth in the New England States, it has become necessary to, modify the boundaries, of the regulated area, and this was done in a revision of the satin-moth quarantine, effective January 1, 1929. The revision adds 172 towns, containing approximately 5,116 square miles, to the area under regulation. The quarantine and regulations as revised are given in full on a later page.


THURBERIA WEEVIL

During the last six months of 1928 there were no- important changes in the kncwn. status, of the Thurberia weevil. Safeguards equivalent to, those prescrib~ed with respect to, the pink-boliworm-infested territory were in effect in A. rizona and1( cottonseed sterilization and the fumigation anmd compression of lint or' linters. were carried out under the direction of inspectors of the. administrationi alI1 of the State of Arizona.
The pending agricultural appropriation bill 6 for the fiscal year 1930 includes an itein for the control and prevention of spread of the Thurberia weevil," an 1tin". to $:34,300, approximately the same sum as has been available for this project for the present year.

0See footnote 1, p. 96.







107

BULB-PEST CONTROL

Reports from the nursery-inspection officers of the various States show a large increase in the number of narcissus bulbs over those on hand in Iprevious years, in some States amounting to double the number available in 1927. The details have not yet been tabulated but are expected to be ready for the next issue of the Service and Regulatory Announcements.
The hot-water treatment first employed for both bulb flies and eelworms has met with some objections on the part of the growers. Accordingly, on the recommendation of the Bureau of Entomology, based largely on experiments conducted at Puyallup, Wash.. the administration on July 12 authorized n'iumcyanide fumigation as an approved bulb-fly treatment under the domestic larcissus quarantine. (See S. It. A. No. 96. pp. 79, 80.) This method was adopted by the bulb growers at once as preferable to the hot-water or carbon-disulphide treatments previously authorized, and was employed as a bulb treatment during the fall shipping season, almost to the exclusion of other methods. With few exceptions, only those bulb growers on whose premises eelworms were found employed hot water for salable bulbs.
The bulb-nematode situation has greatly improved on the Pacific coast, and losses from it this season were reduced to a niimum. At the same time Ihis species was found to occur sparsely in more other bulb-producing sections than had previously been determined as infested. In the Northeastern and Northwestern States the field symptoms appear to be masked or less apparent, and it is also possible that the eelworms multiply much more slowly and cause less injury than in warmer regions. The hot-water treatment of the bulbs, associated with certain other sanitation practices, appears everywhere to be highly successful in eliminating infestation. In general. eelworms have been found almost solely in those plantings started prior to 1926 when the hot-water treatment of all imported narcissus was first required. The large new plantings are almost or entirely free from the pests and excellent progress is being made in wiping out infestations in the plantings started from bulbs imported from 1920 to 1925, which importations were commonly infested with celworms.
A change in the marking requirements for packages of domestic-grown nircissus moving interstate was included in the last revision of the quarantine reulations and was effective for the first time this fall. In 1926 and 1927, dealers' reshipments of bulbs in broken lots were exempted from any form of certification, but this provision did not work out satisfactorily. Accordingly, the revision effective May 15, 1928, provides that certified narcissus bulbs taken from crates or other original containers for reshipmint interstate in smaller lots shall have securely attached to each container a tag or label signed by the shipper thereof reading as follows: "The undersigned certifies that the narcissus bulbs contained herein were taken from a shipment of narcissus bulbs certified by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration under Notice of Quarantine No. 62."
A total of 241 packages of narciSsus were intercepted without either a grower's certificate or a dealer's tag during the fall-shipping season: 237 of which were discovered in transit by department inspectors and 4 by State eniployees examining nursery stock at destination. The packages intercepted by Federal inspectors were returned to the consignor, and, if they contained inspected bIulbs, were then in most cases 1)rop)erly labeled and reshippled. Twentyfive of the shipments were nonconmmnercial inll nature and had not been inspected, but the bulbs in all blut 1 or 2 of the 210 packages sent improperly labeled lby commercial dealers proved( to have been inspected and certified on the premises of thle original grower. Seventeien of t 1 Colmecial conc(,rnts resolvile for violations and all bulint onle of the private individuals reported misunderstand(ing or ignorance of the regulations, anld most of tihe remnainig violations were ascribed to the carelessness of enployees in failing to ttall labels pro. vided flor that purpose. In view of the fact that this regulation was in eect this year for the first time, .,prosecutions were not instituted, 111( depll illlient feeling that the return of the packages conlstitutied a sullfficienlt penalty y.


WHITE-PINE BLISTER-RUST QUARANTIN-E ENFORCEMENT

Inl a revision of lthe llister-lrust-quarantill rog.ll iol elTeutile Al.u t-1 1 1928 (see S. It. A. No. 9G. pp. 5 a l) 9 A-i), a number of editions ere e whlicllh will, it is believed, (orrelaonle ore closely with linlllrsOry pritI I i li~ ui anlly iIcrease ill I he (danger of iselliatill I* t Ie Ilistel rI1lt ilH I, ,\ 1 I, I, iT I -t







108

The most important of these changes consists of provision for the interstate movement under permit of five-leaf pines from the generally infected area, New York, Washington, and the New England States, into the more lightly infected fStates, when they have been grown from seed in a nursery free from currant and gooseberry plants and with a Ribes-free zone around the premises. -Eight nurserymen have applied for permits under the above provision; two from New York and six from New England. None of the five-leaf pine trees involved in these applicatiouis were found to have been grown in full compliance with the conditions specified and no. permits have as yet been issued. It is our understanding, however, that three or possibly four of the applicants are now adapting their nursery practice to the growing of pines from seed to, be sown in the spring of 1929 and -will thereafter be able to meet the requirements and receive certification and permit.
'CONNECTICUT ESTABLISHES BLISTER-RUST CONTROL AREAS
The State of Connecticut has recently set aside blister-rust-control area *s within which the harboring of currant and gooseberry plants is prohibited under State laws. The effect of the establishment of these areas is the application of the requirement under the Federal blister-rust quarantine, that control-area permits must be attached to containers of five-leaf pines and currant and gooseberry plants shipped, into Connecticut from any part of the United States. A mimeograph circular on this subject will be issued later. Other States, which have previously established control areas, are Idaho, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, and Rhode Island.
SPREAD OF THE DISEASE DURING 1928
The Bureau of Plant Industry reports that during the spring and summer of 1928 the blister rust was found! to. have spread eastward from Washington and northwest Idaho, throughout the northern third of the latter State, that it was found at one point in northwestern Montana, and that spread south into several new counties of Oregon was also noted. In the East, many of the new localities
-found infected in Pennsylvania and New Jersey in 1927 again showed blister rust on currant and gooseberry bushes this season. The disease was discovered in 1928 in 13 new counties of the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of Michigan and in 2 new counties in Wisconsin.
TRANSIT INSPECTION
The work of the blister-rust inspectors under the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration is devoted primarily to the examination of nursery-stock shipments in transit at such important transfer points as Chicago, Kansas City, St. Paul, Minneapolis, Omaha, Council Bluffs, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Portland, Seattle, Spokane, and elsewhere. As in previous seasons, shipments of parcel post, express, and freight were inspected to, determine whether they carried blister-rust host plants, namely, five-leaf pines, and currant and gooseberry bushes. Such, violations as were discovered were systematically turned back to the consignors, and the shippers were later requested by the administration to submit an explanation of the violation.
In this manner, 18 violations of the blister-rfist-quarantine regulations were intercepted at transit-inspection points during the fall of 1928. Four -of these consisted of shipments by commercial concerns and either contained currant and gooseberry plants moved out of infected States, without being properly dipped in the required lime-sulphur solution, or came from an infected State and were not labeled as to contents, or consisted of five-leaf pine branches shipped from an eastern State westward to a point across the Mississippi Valley quarantine line. The remaining 14 shipments found *to be in violation of the quarantine were made by private individuals ignorant of the regulations.
The work of the white-pine blister-rust, inspectors is, also, of material service in the enforcement of other domestic plant quarantines, as shown by the following synopsis of the violations detected by them and reported to the administration for reference to the proper field offices concerned during the 6-month period.
Black stem rust (Quarantine No. 38)_ 2 Japanese beetle (Quarantine No. 48)_ 15 European corn borer (Quarantine No. Narcissus bulbs (Quarantine No. 62)_ 225
43) -------------------------------2 White-pine blister rust (Quarantine
G.ipsy moth and brown-tail moth No. 63) -------------------------- E7 21
(Qua rantine No. 45) -----------------1 Total ----------------- I-------266

718 at railway terminals and 3 auto interceptions in Michigan.





109

APPROPRIATIONS
The pending agricultural appropriation bill" includes an item for the control and prevention of spread of the white-pine blister rust, amounting to $_7,X approximately the same sum as has been available for this project for the present year.


MEXICAN-FRUIT-WORM ERADICATION

The success of the Mexican-fruit-worm eradication operations in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas continues to be evident as no specimens of this insect have been found in the United States since June, 1927, in spite of the repeated determination of their presence in oranges and other fruits in the markets of Matamoros, across the river in Mexico.
The maintenance of the host-free or starvation period throughout the regulated area is undoubtedly primarily responsible for the present encouraging situation. During 1927 and to some extent in the spring of 1928 this host-free period was maintained by the picking of such fruits from the trees before they were permitted to ripen. The strongest efforts in 1928, however, have been directed toward the elimination of the summer-host fruit trees themselves in order that the citizens of the region may not be subject to the inconvenience of picking the green fruit each season. Surveys undertaken during the year showed the presence of 36,721 such secondary host trees, mainly peaches and plums, most of them scattered in small numbers in farmyards and in private gardens located in cities and villages.
After the commercial grapefruit and orange crops had been picked in February, department inspectors devoted much time and attention to the presentation of the importance of the destruction of such trees to the owners. The first to respond were those who also possess citrus groves, and are therefore vitally concerned with the success of this project. Community interest and public sentiment supported the campaign and those who were not commercially affected rapidly followed the lead of the others. No legal pressure was employed as official regulations require only the picking of the green fruit, but most owners realized how objectionable such an annual picking would become.
By the end of December the undertaking had been completed in several of the 10 districts into which the territory is divided and over 91 per cent of the summer-host trees within the entire area had been destroyed, about 3,286 remaining at the close of the year. As only a small proportion of the owners of such trees had anything to gain personally, the entire undertaking is an excellent example of wholehearted community cooperation.
ORCHARDS CLEANED UP SATISFACTORILY
An important feature of the eradication program consists in the prompt destruction, by burying or other means, of fallen fruit in the orange and grapefruit groves. This is so important that the fruit from orchards in whicli this condition is not maintained is refused certification.
The groves have been found to be in a cleaner and more satisfactory condition in this respect during the last two months of 1928 than at any previous time. Of the 3,089 premises inspected during December, certificates were temporarily withheld from only 57 (or less than 2 per cent), on account of fallen fruit or the presence of such a weedy condition that the amount of fallen fruit could not readily be determined.
FRUIT MOVEMENT

Certification for movement of fruit from the regulated area to outside loiitw is based (1) on the orchard inspection described above, (2) (i the maiitehiaice 41f such sanitary conditions in the p)avking plants that cull piles are not 1) it ted to exist, and (3) on the absence of ahy unzIsound fruit in the 'utaiiers Ii 'e shipped. General perlnits have been issued 247 c'nimiierciil parker this ,e:Il, and their plants are subject to repeated inspection earh mon h.
By the end of 1)ec(,eijer 760 carloads of grapef1ruit, orange, and kuuiuat had been moved frm tie valley by rail. In adit lwi to that i rountl. -1T0.7iG

See footiot'e 1, p. 96.







110

boxes and baskets of such fruit moving in trucks were checked on the highway leading out of the regulated territory during October, November, and December', and 3,118 additional boxes and baskets were carried out in passenger cars. There express company's figures showing the number of individual boxes by express are not yet available, but the extent of such shipments is indicated by the fact that 19,825 individual permits for the shipment of single boxes by individuals and noncommercial concerns were issued by the inspectors.
Culls which capi not be certified are being sent to, three canning plants. located at McAllen, Olmito, and Corpus Christi, respectively.

ROAD ST. _TION ESTABLISHED
On October 8 a road station was established on the automobile road leading: from the regulated area northward toward Falfurrias, and numerous intercefrtions have been made at this station. The owners of noncertified fruit were given the choice of taking the fruit back to the regulated territory or destroying. it. The number of vehicles inspected at this, point from the date of establishment of the station to December 31 amounted to 13,850, of which 4,709 contained fruit. The fruit carried in 14 trucks and 1,717 passenger cars was found not to have been properly certified, and was intercepted. In, most cases, the owners preferred to, destroy the, uncertified fruit rather, than return with it to the. regulated area for inspection and certification.

FINANCIAL STATUS
The agricultural appropriation bill' for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1930,. carries $115,000 for the control and prevention of spread of the Mexican fruit worm, of which amount $30,0010 consists of a reappropriation of the unexpended balance of the appropriation for this. purpose contained in the first deficiency actfor the fiscal year ended June 30, 19,28. The amount named constitutes an increase of $15,000 over the sum available, for the current season, the difference being necessitated by anticipated increases in fruit production.


CONSIDERATION GIVEN TO NEW QUARANTINES

infestations considered as possible subjects for, new quarantines, during the past half year have included the Woodgate rust in New York, the phony peach disease in Georgia, the larch canker in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and certain Asiatic beetles found during recent years to, have become established in, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and the District of' Columbia.
Quarantines with respect to only one of these-the Woodgate rust-had been. issued by the close of the year. This quarantine and the regulations supple-mental to it will be found in full on a later page.
The European larch canker, which was discovered in southeastern Massa-chusetts in recent months, is a disease of great importance which threatens. to be a cause of serious damage to Douglas fir, in case it spreads to the Western States. Massachusetts and Rhode Island are making an active effort to eradicate it, and pending determination of the, results of this effort Federal action has been postponed.
As a result of a hearing held on December 17 on the phony peach disease,, the drafting of a quarantine, with respect to, this disease is now in progress.
The Asiatic-beetle problem was discussed at a hearing held on September 24 called by the Secretary of Agricultureto consider the advislbility of extending the quarantine on account of the.Japanese beetle, to the States of Massachusetts and Virginia and of making its provisions applicable to infestations of certain other Asiatic beetles.
The evidence presented at that hearing included a statement of the localities. at which the Asiatic beetles were known to be pre-sent, and outlined the damage which hatd already been observed. The proper procedure to follow in consideration of the evidence presented at the hearing was later discussed with represenitatives of the States and nursery interests concerned, at a series of conferences held onl October 2, October 25, October, 31, and December 4. The decision

"See footnote 1, p. 90.









of the department to establish a Federal quarantine on account of these et was announced on December 20, but the detailed preparation of the regulations was still in progress at the end of the month.



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

GIPSY-MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL-MOTH QUARANTINE (No. 45)
GIPSY-MOTII AND BROWN-TAIL-MOTH REGULATIONS MODIFIED
(Pe, not ice)
SEPTEMBER 10, 1928.X
Under a revision of the gipsy-mioth and brownl-tail-mioth qiua railt ine announc 1) ed to-day by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administrattion, United S1tattesDepartmient of Agriculture, that part of thec quarantine dealin,(-' wit ii tile gipsy mnoth is modified so that the are dei1ae as gnral fse
wvitht this insect is being enlarged to include 50 towns of Vernmnt, Msa chus-etts-, and Connecticut heretofore designated as lightly infested."
Thle revised quarantine becomes effective October 1, 1928, and copies are now available for distribution.
The Vermont area affected by this change, totaling 245.66 square miles, includes- the towns of Springfield, Rockingliii, West-minster. Putniey, 1)uiniunrston, Brattleboro, and Guilford. The area in Massachusetts. am0unting(- to 359.24 square miles, comprises the towns of Buckind, Ashlield, Goshen. Ches-terfield, Will iamsburg_, Conway,. We,- ha lapton, Southampton, Montgo mery, usel Blandford, and Granville. In Connecticut there are thus transferred to the generallyv infested area 976.44 square mliles. includinlit the yOwui's 4f Sli"el East Granby, Granby, Hartland, Barkhamstead. Canton, Sims."bury, Bloomfield, Windlsor Locks, Windsor, 11artford, Wetherffield, Glaistonhury, Colchester, Hlebron. An-dover, Columia,, Lckbann Fr,1;;7;in, B1(!zrah. 'Ne-w London, Groton. Ledyard, Preston, Norwich, ISpragune, Lisi 1on~, G riswoid. Vo lunt own, Northl StoningtJon, and Stonington.
The revision also includes a modification of the regulations governing' the interstate movement of Christmas trees and greens. The shipment of these articles, will, in the future, be authorized under inspection and certification when they have originated in the lightly infested area and are transported into thle generally infested area for shipment to points outside the territory under regulation.


UNITED STATES l)EIwRVNIENT OF AoRICUTURlE, OlFvmCE OF TI'lE 1E()UETA Ry,
PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL, ADMUI1T1{A TION.

QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF GIPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH

NOTICE OF 41UjARANTINE NO. 15

(Effective on and after July 1, 1920. Suoptr-scdes Notice, of Quaraiiie No. :1:, Ncvi (dl
The fact has beeii determ-lined b)y thie S-cretar y of Agriculture. ind not ice is hereby -ivce I. thalt two 1inJuriou0s inetsthe isy111o111 ( %.01 or hUriI 4 ispflr) anld th11bron1-tail moth41 (Eu p11ror.0o ct (h17/ iloca)- --not heret ofore wNidel v. ditribuited within anid thlrougho,11ut the 1 'nitt(I states. exist inlatso the folilowiin~g State, to wvit: Mainle, New I laiiipsliire, Xeriiaoiit, A sahstilhiI Island, and Conlivicci cl .
No\\, therefore, 1, ( '. V. Mlarvin,. Ac*ti_ jug Scretn a' v of Agriel it un-, und1(ot a he authority conferlred by s(ct jol .1 th il t qa niit :1, iiteat* \lg 201. 1912 (37 Stat. 315) is jinei!(lod 1),y I he act of t ''inres provei arui4 1 17(39 St(at. 11:34. 116,50~, doi hereby) tilmiara 1llte thle fi c t' \hainle. New Ih i shire, Vermont, Massa1usv k ,BueIlnd, a11d t '4111WiCtic~ :11 id I1 1111 h
Notice( of Quarainie No,) 15 do (Irdeir that1 1 1) cot erust ue, uh as sPViWO. fir. hemlock, pine, juiperwi (cedar), ait1d abriteiwhit cedar), kuo 111ai described as ('li-it mlas 1ret's,' Ii(I d m t s t here it', ;11ti deora 1"live, ph a iii s, 1>uch
4-7'S30---29- --3







112

as holly and laurel, known and described as Christmas greens or greenery";
(2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties. cordwood, and lumber: (3) field-grown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, and other plants and plant products, excepting fruit pits, seeds of fruit and ornamental trees and shrubs, field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding plants, and other herbaceous plants and roots; and (4) stone or quarry products, shall not be moved or allowed to move interstate from any of Said States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto.
Done in the District of Columbia, this 28th day of May, 1920.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL. ] C. F. MARVIN,
Act ig Secretary of Agriculture.
REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS 10 SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE
NO. 45
[Effective October 1, 1928]
Regulation 1.-Definitions.
For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Gipsy moth: The insect known as the gipsy moth (Porthetria dispar).
(b) Brown-tail moth: The insect known as the brown-tail moth (Euprocti chrysor'rhoea).
(c) Quarantined area: Any State, or any portion thereof, quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture upon determination by him that either the gipsy moth or the brown-tail moth, or both, exist therein.
(d) Infested area: Those portions of any quarantined area which are designated by the Secretary of Agriculture to be infested with either the gipsy moth or the brown-tail moth, or both.
(e) Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Regulation 2.-Plants and Plant Products and Stone or Quarry Products Subject to Restriction.
The restriction on the movement of plants and plant products and stone or quarry products covered in this Notice of Quarantine No. 45 and in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto shall apply to all products enumerated in the notice of quarantine originating in or moving from the areas in the quarantined States now, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as infested areas.
No restrictions are placed by this quarantine and the regulations supplemental thereto on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated therein from all points in the quarantined States outside of the areas now, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as infested areas. Regulation 3.-Infested Areas.
The following towns and all the territory between said towns and the Atlantic Ocean are designated as gipsy-moth infested area:
Harrington, Columbia, 18, 24, Beddington, 22, 28, 34, 40, 39, Grand Falls Plantation, Summit, Greenbush, Argyle, Alton, Bradford, Charleston, Atkinson, Dover, Foxcroft, Guilford, Abbot, Kingsbury Plantation, Mayfield, Moscow, Pleasant Ridge Plantation, Highland, Jerusalem, 4, Redington, Dallas Plantation, Green Vale, Rangeley Plantation, Richardsontown, and Magalloway Plantation, Maine; Errol, Millsfield, Ervings Location, and Columbia, New Hampshire; Lemington, Canaan, Norton, Holland, Derby, Newport, Troy, Jay, Westfield, Lowell, Eden, Johnson, Morristown, Stowe, Waterbury, Duxbury, Fayston, Warren, Granville, Hancock, Rochester, Chittenden, Pittsford, Ira, Tinmouth, Wallingford, Mount Tabor, Peru, Winhall, Stratton, Somerset, Searsburg, and Readsboro, Vermont; Rowe, Charlemont, Hawley, Plainfield, Cummington, Worthington, Middlefield, Chester, Blanford, and Tolland, Massachusetts; Cole0 This revision consists in the enlargement of the area designated as "generally infested." to cover certain towns in Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut heretofore included in the "lightly Infested" area; and in a modification of regulation 4 to authorize. under inspection and certification, the shipment from the generally infested area of Christmas trees and greens originating in the lightly Infested area.




113

brook, Winchester, Torrington, Hlarwvinton, Tlioma'-ton. P'lymouitlh. \aterl iry. Wolcott, Southington, 'Meriden, Middletield. D urham. Guilford, -Nor'th Braiiford, North Haven, and Branford, Connectict New Slioreim. Rh (-dc Isla ad.
For the purpose of inspection and transportation, the above-desi,'itated to\\nIs and territory quarantined for the gyps., y moth are divided into two) areas to be know\\n ais the lighttly infested area ani the gun.wrau itifu.4cd aireai.
The, folllowing towns comprise the lightly infested area:
Milibridge, Harrington, Columbia, 18. 24, Beddington, 22, Plantation No. 21, 28, 34, 40, 39. Grand Falls Plantation, Summit. Argyle, Alton. Sangerville. Guilford, Parkman, Cambridge, Ripley, Harmony, 'Wellington, Kingslury lllant atii ifl Abbo(t. May-field, Moscow, Concord, Pleasant Ridge Plantation, Hlighlandl. Lexington. Kingfield, ,Jerusalem, 4, 'M(;unt Abriaiant. Redjingtoii. Sandy River Plantation, Dallas Plantation. Ranigeley Planitation,. D, E. Berlin, Rtoxliury. Byron. Andover North Surplus, Andover 'West Siirpluis,. CRicllarlSliltowi i. Magalloway Plantation, Upton, Grafton. Riley, Steuben. (Gouldslaroull.Il. Wintter Harbor, Sullivan, Sorrento. Hancock. Lamoine. Edlen. Mount D esert, Soiitlhwest Harbor. Tremont, Swans Island, rlenton, Isle au Haut, Stonington. Dee,(r Isle, Brooklyn, Sefdgwick, Bluehill. Surry. ci ty of Ellswvorth. 'Mariaville. 'Waltham. 8, East B1ro)ok, Franklin, 9, 10, 7, Cherryfield, Deblois, 16, Amherst, Aurora. Plantation No. 33, Plantation No. 32, C'reenfield. Greenbusli. Milford. Blradley, Eddington, Clifton, Otis, Dedham, Holden, city of Brewer. O rono). Vecazie., city of Olditown, city of Bangor, Orrington. Bucksport, Orland, Penobscot. Castine, Brookville, North Haven, Vinal Haven, Isleshoro, Searsport, Stockton 'Springs. Prospect, Frankfort, 'Winterport, -Newur'gh, Hampden, Herman, Carmiel, Levant, Kenduskeag, Glenburn, Hudson, Corinth. Charleston, Bradford. Atkinson. IDo ver, Foxcroft, Garland, Dexter, Corinna, Exeter, Stetson, Newport, Plymouth, Etna, Dixmnont, Jackson,, Monroe. Brooks, Swamiville, 'Waldo. city of Belfast, Noirthport, Lincolnville, Camden. Hope, Appleton, Searsmiont, Liberty, Belnu mt, .Morrill, Montville, Palermio, Freedom., Knomx, Thornd ike. Unity, Albion, Burnham, Troy, Detroit, Palmyra, Pittsfield. Hartland, St. Ailbans, Athens. Brighton, Bingham, Solon, Cornville, 'Madison, N irridgewock, Skowhegan, Canaan, C'liniton, Fair-field, Smithfield, Oakland. 'Waterville. Benton, 'Winslow, Vsabr uh China, Somlerville, 'Washington, 'Wi ndsor. S idneiy. "Maniestyr. Monmo uth. Winthrop), Readfield, 'Wayne. Fayette. M mun t Vornon. Belgrade, Roe -iemmna. Chesterville, New Sharon. 'Mercer, Stark. 111(1ustry. Anson. New Vineyarid, Emb(Len, New Portland, Freemn.n Strong. Salem. Madrid, Ph illips, Avon,~ Temple. Farmington, Wilton, Jay. Livermore, East Livermore, Leeds. Greenie, Turner, Hebron, Oxford, Paris, Buckfield. Hartford, Sumner, Canton, Peru. Fra nkl in, Dixfiel, 'Mexico, Carthage, Perkins, IV, 'Weld, Andover, Rumford, Newvry, Bethel, Milton, 'Woodlstock. Greenwv (1(, Albany, Norway, Otistield. hla riismi. Waterfordl, Sweden, Lovell. Stow, Stoneham, 'Mason, Fryeburg Academy Grant, Batchelders Grant, and Gilead, Maine: Success. Cambridge, Errol. 'Milislield. Odell, Ervings Location, Columbia, Chatham. Bean's Purchase. Shelbu rie. G-i-r ham, Berlin, 'Milan, IDummer, St.ratf mid. Northmumnberlanmd, St ark, Kilke ni n, Randolph, Low and Burbank's Purchaise,.0Sargen t's Purchase. .Jackso)n. Bai I',let I Co., Hart's Loceation, Cutt's Grai-tt, Livermiore. Lincolnm Fra ncmiia,1 Betlcheni. Carroll, Jefferson, Lancaster, 'Whitefield, Dalton, Littleton, ThMninw,.I.yn Lisbon, Bath. Landaiff, and Easton. _V( i ffanpxh ire: IA'Iningtwn.Cnan Averill, Norton, Avery's Gore, 'Warre~n Goe Warner's Grn t. Lewis.,vnshk Maidstone, Ferdinanid. Br-ighton, East llaven, Victory. Kirmby, Burke., N -wvrk, Charleston, Morgan. Holland. Derby, Brim-iingtoni. Westinore.utn SliellId, Barton. Glo~ver, Ira si murg, (ovon try. ('ov t ry Gore, Newport, Albainy. Gi-evisboro, Stannard. Waldeit, Cabot, 'Woodhuiry. llardwick, Elninore. W h 0 tI.4';l tsbury, Lowell. Troy, AVes'tfield. .Iay. Eden. 11yde Park, Miorrisiowi..Jlisi, Avery's Gore, Watermry. IDuxlinry, 'Waits4fi(eld, Faystomi. (I;(11vi lie. Bra i1t*t e Hancock, Rtoes-ter, Bethel, Pitfel (hittelideti. P'ittsford, Pr(ctor, I0thlidi. Mendlon, Sherburne. 'West Rut landl. Ir,[. ('lren(,. Moun11t Ta.Wiil~ll1.
'Itton, Smnerevt, Blooniifieldl. 67id Hall, Grnibhy. LucImeiu r, C(lnm td.WiIr

'alais, 'Woree,4ter,, stowe, M;Niddlese;X, 'Mon1tlw''r, East iMlmtj 14e.l'1iittb. Groton. Ryegate. Newbury' Toplshan, Orangev liarre. Berlin. Mmviet\vii. N.N'tlhfeld,. Warre-n. Roxhuiry, Brookfieldl. Willimninstown.1 Wahimto.4'unil h. BIlr[ford, Fairlee, W~est Fairlee, Vershire, ('helsenl 0 (11, 'IlllI I TuuinbnI-e. taorl Thetford.NrvcSt oi oa o.S cblg.B aid u'i f. 11:1 -lrI "inI
Bridgewater, Wodistock. lartland. 'Wnsr ~is Wiid.o' H''ji) lrimw i Shrewsbury, Tffnniouth, 'Wallillgford, Mount 11olly. L,1dlo1w. (';Ivenil i. WVcatlm ersfield, Baltimor, Chester, Andlover, Wes(tonr. Lti, mitdg _rove., L' iuidui1,m-e'v.







114

Windham, Grafton, Athens, Townshend, Brookline, Jamaica, Wardsboro, Dover, Newfane, Marlboro, Wilmington, Searsburg, Readsboro, Whitingham, and Halifax, Vermont; Rowe, Heath, Charlemont, Hawley, Worthington, Cummington, Plainfield, Huntington, Chester, Middlefield, and Tolland, Massachiusetts; North Haven, Branford, North Branford, Guilford, Madison, Durham, Haddam, Killingworth, Clinton, Westbrook, Essex, Saybrook, Chester, East Haddam,, Lyme, Colebrook, Winchester, Torrington, New Hartford, West Hartford, Avon, Burlington, Harwinton, Thomaston, Plymouth, Bristol, Plainville, Farmington, New Britain, Newington, Rocky Hill, Cromwell, Berlin, Southington, Wolcott, Waterbury, Meriden, Middlefield, Middleton, Portland, Chatham, Old Saybrook, Old Lyme, East Lyme, Salem, Marlboro, Montville, and Waterford, Conneotict; New Shoreham, Rhode Island.
All other towns shall be classed as the generally infested, area.
The following towns and all the territory between said towns and the Atlantic Ocean are designated as brown-tail moth infested area:
Tremont, Southwest Harbor, Mount Desert, Eden, Swans Island, Brooklin, Bluehill, Trenton, Surry, Orland, Bucksport, Winterport, Hampden, city of Bangor, Hermon, Carmel, Etna, Plymouth, Troy, Burnham, Pittsfield, Canaan, Skowhegan, Norridgewock, Stark, Industry, Farmington, Wilton, Dixfield, Peru, Rumford, Bethel, Mason, Stoneham, Stow, Fryeburg, Brownfield, and Porter, Maine; Freedom, Tamworth, Sandwich, Holderness, Plymouth, Rumney, Groton, Alexandria, Danbury, Wilmot, New London, Newberry, Bradford, Henniker, Deering, Antrim, Hancock, Peterboro, Jaffrey, and Rindge, New Hampshire; Winchendon, Gardner, Westminster, Princeton, Holden, Paxton, Worcester, Millbury, Sutton, Douglas, Uxbridge, Millville, Blackstone, Bellingham, Wrentham, Plainville, North Attleboro, Attleboro, Seekonk, Swansea, Somerset, Fall River, and Westport, Massachusetts.
Regulation 4.-Regulation of Movement of Plants and Plant Products and
Stone or Quarry Products Under Quarantine Originating in Infested Areas.
(1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitoe (white cedar), known and described as Christmas trees," and parts thereof, and decorative plants, such as holly and laurel, known and described as Christmas greens or greenery" ; (2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, and lumber; (3) fieldgrown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, and other plants and plant products excepting fruit pits, seeds of fruit and ornamental trees and shrubs, field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding plants, and other herbaceous plants and roots; and (4) stone or quarry products, shall not be moved or allowed to move interstate to any point outside the infested area quarantined for the gipsy moth or the brown-tail moth or interstate from points in the generally infested area to points in the lightly infested area unless and until such plants and plant products and stone or quarry products have, been inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and certified to, be free from the gipsy moth and the brown-tail moth: Provided, That Christmas trees" and parts thereof, and decorative plants, such as holly and laurel, known and described as "Christmas greens or greenery,' shall not be moved or allowed to, move interstate from the generally infested area to any point outside thereof, except that such articles which have originated in the, lightly infested area may be shipped from the generally infested area under the inspection and certification required herein: Provided further, That such plants and plant products and stone or quarry products may be moved interstate without restrictions, other than the requirements made by regulation 8 hereof, between all points within the lightly infested area, between points in said lightly infested area and points in the gfenerally infested area, and between all points within the generally infested area subject to such restrictions as may be approved by State officials. Regulation 5.-Inspection, Certification, and Marking.
Every car, box, bale, or other container of plants and plant products and stone or quarry products of which inspection is required by these regulations shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee, and shall bear a certificate showing that the cont ts have been inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found to, be free from gipsy moth and brown-tail moth infestation.
The inspection certificates in the case of carload and other bulk shipments shall accompany the waybills, conductors' manifests, memoranda, or bills of lading pertaining to such shipments.





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Certificates of inspection will issue only for plants and plant products and stone or quarry products which have been actually inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture, and the use of such certificates in conne-tion with plants and plant products and stone or quarry products which have not been so inspected is unlawful.
Regulation 6.-Conditions Under Which Articles Restricted by This Quarantine May Be Shipped Interstate Without Inspection But Under Permit.
Plants and plant products and stone or quarry products, of which the interstate movement is restricted by these regulations, may be shipped interstate from points within the infested areas to points outside the infested areas under permit from the Secretary of Agriculture (1) when such products have been manufactured, processed, and stored in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation could be transmitted, and (2) when such products originate outside of the infested areas and, while within the infested areas, have been stored and safeguarded in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation could be transmitted. Permits will issue only for plants and plant products and stone or quarry products which are not infested with the gipsy moth or brown-tail moth, and transportation companies shall not accept or move interstate from within the infested areas such plants and plant products and stone or quarry products unless each shipment is accomipaniedl by a permit issued by the United States Department of Agriculture, 408 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Mass.
Regulation 7.-Conditions Governing Inspection and Issuance of Permits.
Persons intending to move or allow to be moved interstate plants and plant products and stone or quarry products for which certificates of inspection or permits are required by these regulations shall make application therefor as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications must show the nature and quantity of the plants or plant products and stone or quarry products it is proposed to move, together with their exact location. and, if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. Applicants for inspection. will be required to assemble the articles to be inspected at the shipping point and so to place them that they can be readily examined. If not so placed, inspection will be refused. Articles to be inspected must be free from ice and snow and in condition to make inspection easily practicable: Proarided, That, in lieu of inspection, disinfection by heat or other means under the supervision and to the satisfaction of the inspector of the United States Department of A~riculture may be authorized by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration as a condition of certification for movement.
With respect to nursery and field-grown florists' stock, Federal inspection and the issuance of Federal certificates authorizing the interstate movement of nursery products will be conditioned on the presentation of a valid State certificate stating that the nursery in question has been inspected by a State nursery inspector and certifying that it is apparently free from infestation with gipsy and brown-tail moths. Such State certification shall be renewv(ed each year, shall be based on an inspection made as promptly as practicable after the egg-laying period of the gipsy moth, and shall be valid for the purpose of Federal certification until the following egg-hatching Iperiod, except that, pending reinspection, shipinents may be inspected and certified for interstate movement on the basis of the State certification of the preceding year: Proridcd. That whenever any nursery or in(lependent unit thereof in the infested area, or shipment therefrom, is reported by a State ilspctor to be appreciably infested with either the gipsy moth or t Ie brown-tail ni th, o rh IeIe vIt -h infestation is determined )by a Federal ilnsector on his examinat ion of material offered for shipment, further certification for interstate nmivemnit fr(omi such nursery, or independent unit thereof, will be refused until such nurery has ieni freed from infestation and has been again inspected and (ert iTieid by ie Sit :e to be apparently clean: "Providcd further. That during the larval l'riod of the gipfsy moth all nursery stock shall be assembled for the examination of the Federal inspector. and if passed by himni as free fr#,n amy infestation, eliher by egg masses or wind-blown larve, it shall then be lined uh at, thru ghly sprayed under the dir(ctioin of und in mamnner and method smisfattry i', the said inspector, who will certify each shipment as having been ihus iinswield and treated.

~See UB-179.







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With respect to living trees and plants not grown in nurseries, inspection and certification for interstate movement will be conditioned upon the presentation of a statement by the applicant indicating the exact source of such trees and plants, and in addition to such statement, if dug on land other than the property of the applicant, a permit~ from the owner of the said land authorizing such digging, provided such permit is required under the law of the State wherein the land is situated. if the inspection of the trees or plants intended for shipment discloses. infestation with either the gipsy moth or brown-tail moth, certification will be refused as to the intended shipment and as to other similar shipments of trees or plants originating on the same property or in the same locality.
With respect to quarries, and with respect to yards or other places where forest products are assembled for shipment, as a condition of inspection and certification, the premises or surroundings of such places, shall be cleaned up and kept free from gipsy-moth infestation.
All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to, inspection or disinfection other than the services of the inspectors shall be paid by the shipper.
Regulation 8.-Thorough Cleaning Required of Cars, Boats., and Other Vehicles Before Moving Interstate.
Cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been. used in transporting within the infested areas under the provisions of regulation 4, which provide for such movement without inspection and certification, plants and Plant products, and stone or quarry products covered by these regulations, or any other article which may hereafter be made subject thereto, shall not be moved or allowed to move interstate unless the same shall have been thoroughly swept out and cleaned by the carrier at the point of unloading Or destination, of all litter and rubbish from such regulated articles. No litter', rubbish, or refuse from any such plants and plant products: and stone or quarry products. or Other article shall be moved or allowed to, move interstate.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective ony and after October 1, 1928, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated May 17, 1927.
Done at the city of Washington this; sixth day of September, 1928.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

PENALTIES

The plant quarantine act of August 20,- 1912 (37 Stat. 315), provides that no person shall ship! or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any person carry transport foany quarantined State orTerritory orDitctoth United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class, of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bu'bs, seeds, ***or any other article
* * specified in the notice of quarantine ***in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed1 guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500 or by imprisonment not exceeding one year. or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.

NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERS

U UNITED STATES I)EPARTX ENT OF AG IIcuf.TuRi,, OFFICE OF THE' 'SECRETARY,
Washington, D. 0., Sep tenbber 6, 1928.
Sri. You are requested to (late andl sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, anld returii this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosedl pi)a Ity envelope, wVhich requires no postage.
Notice is h~ereb~y gi ~'Cn to the transplortation1 company you represent, as 14l)oS:
"I'liait the Sec-retariy of Agriculture, under authority of th act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act "(:37 Stat. 315), as amnde~ld by the ac:t of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165),




117

has, by quarantine notice No. 45, which became effective July 1, 1920, quarantined the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, as infested with either the gipsy moth or the browntail moth, or both, and has ordered that the interstate movement of (1) coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and aborvitae (white cedar), known and described as "Christmas trees," and parts thereof, and decorative plants such as holly and laurel, known and described as "Christmas greens or greenery"; (2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, and lumber; (3) field-grown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, and other plants and plant products, excepting fruit pits, seeds of fruit and ornamental trees and shrubs, field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding plants, and other herbaceous plants and roots; and (4) stone or quarry products, from any point within the areas designated as infested by the gipsy moth and brown-tail moth to any point not located in said infested areas, and from the generally infested area to the lightly infested area of the territory quarantined for the gipsy moth, shall be made only in accordance with the revised rules and regulations supplemental to said notice of quarantine No. 45, which become effective October 1, 1928, and amendments which may hereafter be made thereto.
Copy of the notice is inclosed herewith.
Very respectfully,
R. W. DUNLAP,
(Inclosures.) Acting S'cretary of Agriculture.

(Do not detach this receipt)
Received this notice and the copy of quarantine No. 45 with revised rules and regulations mentioned therein this (lay of 1928.
(Signature) .
(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRIcULrURE, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
Washington, D. C., Septcnber 6, 1928.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine No. 45, on account of the gypsy moth and l)rovlwntail moth, effective October 1, 1928. These revised rules and regulations restrict the interstate movement from the infested areas of Maine, New llIan pshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut of (1) conifeous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), known and described as "Christmas trees," and parts thereof, and d(ceortive plants, such as holly and laurel, known and described as Christnias eens or greenery "; (2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanhark, posts, poles, (air stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, and lumber; (3) field-grown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, and other plants and plant products, exceptlig firuit pits, seeds of fruit and ornamental trees and shrubs, field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding plants, and other herbaceous plants and roots ; and (4 1) stone or quarry products. This revision consists in the enlargement of the area dh ignated as "generally infested," to cover certainn towns in V\ermoht, Massahusetts, and Connecticut heretofore included in the lightly infested area, and in a nmodlification of regulation 4 to authorize, under iiiS ectioll alld certilicat ion, the shipment f;oin the generaly infested area of Chrilmas tires anld greens originating in the lightly infested area.
Copies of said revised( rules and regulations may be obtained front the Plant Quarantine and Control Admiiiistration, department 4 Agriculture, W\as-hington, D. C.
It. \W. 1)UNLir,
Acting ec'tary of I !rievl It ire.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Iirtford Times, li rtforl, (Conln,, Seplteimber 15, 1928; Portland Press HIerald, Portland, M., Sept'niem-r 17. l95,; Thi lUoton Herald, Boston, Mass., September 17, 1928; The Manchet-sr Union L*'adbr. Mianchst'er, N. H., September 17, 1928; The Evening Bulletin, I'rovidence. l. I., S1eptembe 15, 1925; The Burlington Free Press, Burlington, Vt. September 17. 1.924.1








INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFTac] DEPARTMENT,.
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, November 5, 1928.
POSTMASTER:
My DEAR S ix: There is inclosed for your information and guidance a copy of Quarantine Order No. 45, with revised, rules and regulations, of the United States DepartmOent of Agriculture on. account of the, gyps' moth and the browntail, moth, effective, October 1, 1928, the purpose of which is to enlarge the generally infested areas in the States of Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. This edition of the quarantine Order supersedes all previous editions and amendments.
Under the provisions of paragraph 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regulations, the- acceptance for mailing of the plants and plant products referred to from the regulated areas designated in the quarantine order is subject to the restrictions of that order and all concerned will please be governed accordingly.
Sincerely yours,
R. S. REGAR,
Third, A sstant Pos'tmaster General.


JTAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE (No. 48)
PUBLIC HEARING ON REVISION OF JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE
(Press notice)
September 10, 1928.
A public hearing to consider the advisability of extending the Japanese-beetle quarantine to, the. States of Massachusetts and Virginia, and of making its provisions applicable to, infestations- of certain other Asiatic beetles', was announced by the United States Department of Agriculture to-day. It is to be held before the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration and the Federal Plant Quarantine Board in the offices of the administration, 1729 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C., at 10 a. in., September 24, 19,28.
Surveys during the present summer have resulted in finding considerable numbers of Japanese beetles at two points, in Springfield, Mass., and at several rather widely scattered locations in the city of Alexandria, Va., and its suburbs. It appears necessary, therefore, to extend the quarantine to include these points and such adjoining territory as may be necessary in the States concerned. At the same time consideration will be given to the extension of the regulated area in Connecticut, where specimens of the insect have been found at New Haven, Hartford, and New London; in Delaware, where Sussex and Kent Counties are now involved in infestations; and in Pennsylvania, where similar finds have been made at Lewistown, Marysville, and Sayre.
It will be recalled that the department, in October, 1927, following the public hearing held October 6, 1927, announced *that action had been deferred with respect to certain outlying points of possible establishment of the. beetle in the States of Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania, and in the District- of Columbia, in order to give those States and the District an opportunity to. demonstrate the possibility of the eradication of such, for the most part, incipient infestations. The reappearance of the beetle during the summer of 1928 at certain of the points discussed at that~ time necessitates, renewed consideration of the extension of the, regulated area to cover those locations as well as other apparently new infestations in Frederick, Hagerstown, and Delmar, Md.
The department also, proposes to consider the bringing under, regulations similar to, or identical with, those relating to. the Japanese beetle, three other dangerous pests of Asiatic origin discovered in parts of the same territory in recent years. The beetles concerned are known to. entomologists, as Anomala orientali& Waterhouse, Aserica castanea~ Arrow (which has also been known as Autoserica, east anea, and erroneously called Awtoserica japonica), and erica &imitis Lewis. The first named was found in Connecticut in 19,20, and that State in cooperation with the department has carried out active control measures which have reduced the damage from it. Nevertheless, serious, injury to lawns from its work at New Haven is reported, and additional specimens have been found In New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. From 1912 to. 1917 this




119

insect was extremely destructive to sugar cane in Hawaii, but has since been brought under control there by an introduced parasite. The pest known as Aserica castanea was discovered in 1926, and in 1927 was found to be distributed in portions of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. During the last two months it has also been found in the District of Columbia. The larvae are most frequently found injuring well-kept lawns, and the adults have been discovered attacking some 50 different kinds of flowers and vegetables. The third species. Serica similis, is a Japanese pest of sugar beets and other plants, several adults of which were captured on Long Island near New York City in 1927.
All three species are destructive agricultural pests in eastern Asia and Japan. In the nature of the plants infested and the methods of attack, they resemble the well-known Japanese beetle, but they are less likely to attract public attention as they fly at -night rather than in the daytime.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF EXTENDING
THE QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE JAPANESE BEETLE TO THE STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS AND VIRGINIA AND OF MAKING ITS PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO INFESTATIONS OF CERTAIN OTHER ASIATIC BEETLES

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newm.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, and which has been known for some time to exist in portions of the States of New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and the District of Columbia, has recently been discovered in the States of Massachusetts and Virginia. The Secretary of Agriculture also has information that in parts of the same territory infested with the said Japanese beetle there have been discovered certain other Asiatic beetles, namely: Anomala orien tali Waterhouse, Aserica castanea Arrow (also known as Autoserica castanca), and Serica similis Lewis, dangerous insects new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of revising the quarantine on account of the Japanese beetle to include the States of Massachusetts and Virginia within the quarantined area; of making the provisions applicable to infestations of the said other Asiatic beetles; and of restricting or prohibiting the movement from the States of New Jersey, New York. Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, or from any districts therein designated as infested, of (1) farm, garden, and orchard products of all kinds; (2) grain and forage crops of all kinds; (3) nursery, orchard, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants; and (4) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.
Notice is therefore hereby given that, in accordance with the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), a public hearing will be held at the United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration and Federal Plant Quarantine Board, 1729 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C., at 10 a. m., September 24, 1928, in order that any person interested in the proposed revision of the quarantine may appear and be heard either in person or by attorney.
R. W. DUNLAP.
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE TO BE EXTENDED (Pre~ss no0ticeA)
DEwcEmwu 2o. 1928.
A revised edition of the Japanese-beetle quarantine with changes bsed upon facts brought out in the public hearii of September 24. 19128, will shortly e promulgated, the Secretary of Agriculture annonces. to take care of the extension of the Japanese beetle during the past year. The pread of the a pa nese beetle for 1928, contiguous to the present. area under q(luarantine, will he included in such area in the revision of the quarantine now in preparation. The exact details of the territory to be so included will be announced later in 'nne tion with the isssuance of the revised regulations. In general the hldditions will include, for Pennsylvania, the township of Rye (Perry Coun y. in which the town of Marysville is lhwated; for Connmecticut, the city of New Haven and certain adjacent townships; for Delaware, all of the State nrth r' Sussex
45830-29 -4






120

County; and for Maryland, the northeast corner of the State, including most of Cecil County.
In addition to such spread which is directly connected with the previous Japanese-beetle area, a considerable number of isolated points of spread remote from such general area have been determined during the past two years. With respect to such points, the Secretary approves the policy' of treating them as separate control units rather than to include them by a broad extension of the quarantine lines in the general quarantined area. This action is necessarily conditioned upon cooperation by the States concerned acceptable to the department, and is in accord with policies which hitherto have been followed in connection with other plant quarantines, namely, such quarantines as those on account of the gipsy moth, the corn borer, and the pink bollworm.
In the case of the Japanese beetle, such State cooperation will involve:
(1) Nursery control under State quarantine, but with Federal supervision,, making such control the exact equivalent to what would be enforced under a Federal quarantine; (2) enforcement of clean-up operations to. reduce or, if possible as to certain points, to eradicate the pest-these, to include soil treatment of areas known or believed to be infested with larvae, and the collection of beetles during the next summer by use of traps or by hand.
The outlying points of infestation concerned in this announcement are as follows: Hagerstown, Frederick, Cambridge, and Delmar, Md.-the latter town, extending into Delaware; Lewistown and Sayre, Pa.,; Hartford and New London,, Conn.; Springfield, Mass., and Washington, D. C., including Arlington County, Va., namely, the portion of Virginia which was originally incorporated in the District of Columbia.
At several of these points only one or two beetles. have been found, very possi-' bly mere chance escapes from passing motors. Such points are. Hagerstown, I beetle; Frederick, 2; and Lewistown, 1. In the case of Cambridge, 15 beetles were found; Sayre, 14; New London, 11; and Hartford, 12. At none of these towns has there been any determination of, soil infestation, but the numbers of beetles would indicate such possibility.
The points where definite soil infestation has resulted include, notably, Washington, Baltimore, and Springfield, and, to a. less extent, Cambridge and Delmar, but at all these points, the beetles are limited to the town or immediate suburbs. At none of these points are any nurseries directly concerned or areas of production or distribution of farm produce. Under the nursery control, any establishments in any proximity to, the towns enumerated will be brought under the same restrictions that are now applied in the general Japanese-beetle area, namely, as to classification and requirements as to inspection, certification, and treatment.
The Secretary points out that under the. controls proposed the security against spread from such outlying points may be in even a better status than in the general area under the Japauese-beetle quarantine, more particularly on account of the proposed collection and destruction of all beetles as they emerge throughout the season. The continuance of this arrangement beyond 1929 will necessarily be conditioned upon the success of the local control efforts and the spread, if any, into intervening territory.
Such outlying infestations must necessarily be a recurring factor in connection with all plant quarantines, and, inthe case of the Japanese beetle, the plan for 1929 will give opportunity for a thorough demonstration of the possibility of control by such local clean-up. On the other hand, to include these points and the intermediate territory under the general quarantine would immediately open. extensive areas in the States concerned to the uncontrolled movement of nursery stock and farm products, with the probable result of establishing the beetle more or less throughout such areas. It would, at the same time, discourage any clean-up operations as to the present invaded points as being necessarily useless,. with the result of building up the beetle population at these points and thus greatly increasing the risk from them as centers of spread by road and rail traffic.
Under the policy which is adopted the benefit is secured of active cooperation by the States, towns, and individuals concerned, and the enforcement of a cleanup program which will greatly reduce the numbers of the beetles and practically eliminate the very kind of spread-by road and rail traffic-which it is impossible to control with any large measure of success under quarantine.









NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (No. 37)

RESTRICTIONS RE ORCHID PERMITS

P. Q. C. A.-218. Revised October 8. 1928.'2
Permits for the importation of orchids, under the propagation lmurpose of regulation 14, Quarantine 37, have carried, hitherto, a limitation of 25 plants. for species, and 100 plants, for hybrid seedlings. The larger number authorized for seedlings was to give the importer a better opportunity to secure, from a purchase of 100 plants from a particular cross, superior plants for use either for hybridizing or for multiplication by asexual methods. As to unproved hybrids. it was recognized that the chance of getting superior plants by this method varied a good deal with different crosses and that in many instances the seedlings secured might be largely of mediocre quality. Unfortunately, advantage has been taken of this limitation to make it a means of building up stocks of cheap orchids for cut-flower trade and with little or no relation to the strictly propagation purpose of the permit.
To correct this situation, importations by any perinittee of orchids for propagation will be limited to not to exceed 400 plants ( species or hybrids in any one year, and within such total not more than 20 plants of any one kind. Species and named hybrids, not available in the United States. are open to importation within the 400 total at the option of the permittee in numbers of 1 to 20 of each kind. The importation of unnamed or unflowered hybrids will be limited (i. e., within the 400 total) to not to exceed 20 different crosses in any one year, and will be further limited to crosses which can meet the requirements of probably special or exceptional merit. The designation "named hybrids is understood to cover hybrids which have been given an award under a varietal name by some institution in the country of origin of the type of the Royal Horticultural Society of England.
In any discussion of limitation on importation of orchids and other ornamentals, the fundamental purpose of the provision for entry for propgalion under regulation 14 should not be lost sight of. namely, to provide for the entry of new and unavailable plants strictly for multiplication and increase. with
the topba xn and .r1 -Z+ wt
the object eventually of making such plants available from domestic sources and thus stopping the pest risk involved with unrestricted importation It should be perfectly clear, therefore, that to authorize what amounts to practically unlimited importation of European seedling orchids is inconsistent with this purpose. On the other hand, provision for the entry of necessary Iparent stock is in full accord with tihe regulation.
For orchids which may produce hundreds of thousands of seed in a single capsule. a very few superior examples ot' any species, or of atly proved hybrid. are sufficient for seedling production. With respect to asexual mnultiplictiii,. it sees to be clear that this method can not be made a means (of lroviding this country quickly with large quantities of orchids. aid. inll the case o(f nt slpec(ies and named hybrids, foreign stocks are not available for purchase in large ulntities. With respect. however, to both methods of propagation, American and European propagat ors are on much the same basis. Europe may now ha:ve some advantage in llarger o t' ks of spee1ces and l ri. 4 Ill the tller liait. parent plants of high quality are becoming more available in this countryy all the time, and, under the restrictions now to be enforced, can he :ded by purchase to nt any reasonable need(. It is recognized lthat mni of iit European hybrid(ls, which have bieen given awards and have recei ict arioetal names, are closely held and aIre not available to American purchasers., it this condition is not affected one way or the1 other by t1 lerolxwell ret rit i os. Many foreign hybrids are, however, opell to purllhase its parent si o'.s anid 111 American specialist can also competeet, but perlmIs at some liNltivanttne,. w\ilh the English purchaser of the new things, but again tlhat (lsad:vanta e is nit increased or diminished by these restrictions. On the oilher lm l. t lithld is wide open for thie (evel(pnient l f iew andl\ 1 superior lybrils ill this cwlll 'y illi, with tile lrge stocks of sj ies aid iyl it is whihi i l i. ille_ t'lil lI:,e, I lwre, by conmilnlercial growers 1and by amateur SlUfpecialists, the oplIrt lunity for .uch hybridization and productionI of new and valuable types is ralilld.1 Ihet ,mitig as good here as it has been abroad.

"With the exception of mpar. 2, this revision is identical with thw origanl






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Hitherto, the interest in commercial orchid production in the United States seems to have been largely in making provision for the cut-flower trade rather than in developing stocks -of species and superior hybrids for sale, as plants, to collectors and others. The purpose, therefore, in the present restrictions is to make it possible for anyone to purchase parent stock for reasonable propagation needs of any species or any proved and named hybrid which may not be available in this country. Recognizing also the possibility or gamble of securing at first hand new and valuable varieties which may result from hybridization Of specialists in Europe, provision is made for the purchase- of limited stocks of unproved seedlings resulting from crosses concerning which evidence can be submitted indicating a reasonable basis in parentage of unusual or exceptional merit.
NO TE.-As indicated, the foregoing discussion relates to importations of orchids for the propagation purpose of regulation 14. Entry of orchids for educational, experimental, or scientific purposes under this regulation will be limited to such number as shall be determined to be necessary for such purposes.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief. Plant Quaranitine and Control Administration.



PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (No. 52)

PINK-BOLLWORM REGULATIONS AMENDED

(Press Notice)
NOVEMBER 6, 1928.
An amendment to the pink-bollworm-quarantine regulations, affecting the movement of cottonseed and lint from certain areas of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, has just been announced by the Secretary of Agriculture. Under this amendment, effective November 15, 1928, provision is made for the issuance of permits for the interstate movement of sterilized cottonseed to authorized oil mills located outside of, but in the vicinity of, regulated areas upon determination by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration that reasonable necessity exists for such action. The authorization of such oil mills will depend upon compliance with such conditions as shall in the judgment of the administration eliminate the risk of spread of the pink bollworm therefrom.

MODIFICATION OF PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE

INTRODUCTrORY NOTE

The amendment which follows modifies the pink-bollworm quarantine regulations with respect to. the movement of cottonseed and lint. Provision is made for the issuance of permits for the interstate movement of sterilized cottonseed to authorized oil mills located outside of, but in the vicinity of, regulated areas, upon determination by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration that reasonable necessity exists for such action. The authorization of such oil mills will depend upon compliance with such conditions as shall, in the judgment of the administration, eliminate any risk of spread of the pink bollworm therefrom.
C. L. MARLAT1',
Chief, Plant Quiiara nt ine and Control Administration.
AMENDMENT N-'O. 2 TO RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTION OF QUARANTINE NO. 52 (]REVISED)
[Effective on and after November 15, 19281

I iindes authority conferred by I-he plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress, approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 5 of the rules and regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine No. 52 (revised) on account of the pink bollworm, which were promulgated July 9, 1927, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:







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Regulation 5.-Control of Movement of Cotton and Other Articles.
(a) Stalks, bolls, and other parts of the cotton plant and gin waste shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from regulated areas.
(b) Seed cotton shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inters'ate from regulated areas, except that for the purpose of ginning such seed cotton may be moved interstate without permit between two contiguous regulated areas. Cottonseed and cotton lint ginned front seed cotton so moved may be returned without permit to point of origin.
(c) Cottonseed shall not be moved or allow ed to be moved interstate from regulated areas into or through any point outside such areas: Prorided. That upon determination by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration that reasonable necessity exists for such action, oil mills located outside of but in the vicinity of the regulated areas may be authorized to crush cottonseed originating in said areas, upon compliance with such conditions as shall in the judgment of said administration eliminate any risk of spread of the pink bollworm. Such authorized mills shall be operated in manner and by method satisfactory to and under the supervision of the administration. In ease of such authorization, permits may be issued for the interstate movemeltit from the regulated areas or portions thereof to such authorized mills for crushing. of cottonseed which has been sterilized in a cottonseed-heating machine approved by and operated in a manner satisfactory to the inspector. Permits may also be issued for the interstate movement of such sterilized cottonseed between regulated areas when such movement is not through any point outside any regulated area.
(4) Cottonseed hulls shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from regulated areas into or through any point outside such areas. Cottonseed hulls may be moved interstate under permit 1 between regulated areas when such movement is not through any point outside any regulated area on the furnishing of evidence, satisfactory to the inspector, that the cottonseed from which the hulls were obtained was sterilized as required in paragraph (c) of this regulation.
(e) Cottonseed cake and cottonseed meal shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area except under permit. Permits will be granted on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector, (1) that the cottonseed (from a regulated area) used in the production of the cake and meal offered for movement was sterilized as required in paragraph (c) of this regulation; (2) that in the process of and subsequent to the manufacture of such cake and meal safeguards have been taken against their possible contamination with raw cottonseed; and (3) that the containers or wrappers of such cake and meal have met the requirements hereinafter set forth in paragraph (g) of this regulation.
(f) Cotton lint shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area except under permit. Permits for such movement will be granted on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector, (1) that such cotton lint (except samples) has been compressed to a density of not less than 22 pounds to the cubic foot, and (2) that such cotton lint has b(een disinfected under the direction of, and in a manner satisfactory to, the insl'ctor. Cotton linters, delint, or grabbots. produced by any oil mill located outside the regulated areas but authorized under paragraph (c) hereof to crush cottonseed originating therein shall be returned to the regulated areas for comilpression and disinfection and shall not be moved therefrom except in compliance with this paragraph.
Uncompressed and undisinfected cotton lint may be moved interstate under permit 1 between regulated areas under such safeguards :s shall be required by the inspector when such movement is not through any point outside anY regulated area.
Baled cotton lint grown outside of but concentrated within a regulated aree may be moved interstate under permit out of such regulated area on lhe fur"All of the Arizona areas defined in regulation 3, except Safford and 1)unca Val 'leys. are infested not only with the pink hollwormn but also with the Thurlwria weevil a! are included within the area designated as regulated area in the Thurberia-we vil quaranti (See Notice of Quarantine No. 61--Revised.) Under that quiarantie seed cotton, cotton seed, and cottonseed hulls are prohibited(l interstate movement from the 'lThurt)ri -weevil regulated area and no permits will be issued for such nmovelmentl I' rmits ftIr the inter state movement of unconimpressed and undisinfected cotton lint from that area will not he issued.
See footnote 13.







124

fishing of evidence, satisfactory to the inspector, that such lint has been handled in a manner to safeguard it from possible contamination with the pink bollworm.
(g) Bagging and other wrappers and containers which have been, used in connection with or which are contaminated with cotton, seed cotton, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake and meal, or cotton lint shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area except under permit. Permits will not be granted until such bag-Ing or other wrappers or containers have been cleaned or disinfected to the satisfy action of the inspector.
(h) Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products or which are fouled with such products, farm. household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, other articles shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area until the same have been thoroughly cleaned or disinfected at the point of origin or shipment to the satisfaction of the inspector.
(i) Hay and other farm products the interstate movement of which has not been specifically provided for elsewhere in this regulation may be moved interstate without restriction until further notice.
This amendment shall be effective on and after November 15, 1928.
Done at the city of Washington this 2d day of November, 1928.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
f SEAL.] C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERS

UNITED STATE& DEPARTMENT or AGRICULTURE, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINIS TRACTION, IVashington, D. C., November 2, 1928.
SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315) as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, by amendment No. 2 to the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (Revised), on account of the pink bollworm, effective on, and after November 15, 1928, given notice that regulation 5 has been amended to read as per copy inclosed.
Very respectfully,
C. F. MARVIN,
Acting k secretary of Agriculture.
(Inclosures.)

(Do not detach this receipt)
Received this notice and the copy of amendment 2 to, the Rules and Re gations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 mentioned therein this day of 1928.
(Signature) -----------------------(Title) -----------------------[Sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT or AGRICULTURE, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION, Wa8hington, D. C., November 2, 1928. Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, revised, on account of the pink bollworm, effective November 15, 1928. This amendment modifies regulation 5 with




12 3

respect to the interstate movement of cottonseed and lint from the regulated areas of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. Copies of said quarantine ny be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. Washington, D. C.
C. F. MAI N,.
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Arizona Republican, Phoenix. Ariz., November 20, 1928; New Mexico State Tribune, Albuquerque, N. Mex., November 20, 1928; Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Fort Worth, Tex., November 20, 1928.]


SATIN-MOTH QUARANTINE (No. 53)

PUBLIC HEARING NOVEMBER 12 TO CONSIDER EXTENDING SATIN-MOTH QUARANTINE
IPress notice I
OCTOBER 26, 1928.
A public hearing to consider the advisability of extending the quarantine on account of the satin moth to the State of Vermont was announced by the lUnited States Dep)artment of Agriculture to-dlay. The hearing will be held before the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration and the Federal Plant Quarantine Board in the office of the administration, 1729 New York Avenue, Washington. D. C., at 10 a. m., November 12.
A very considerable spread oni the part of this insect has been discovered through surveys conducted during the past year. For the first time it has appeared in Vermont, where specimens were found at scattered locations in the eastern third of Windham County, and in the southeastern corner of Windsor County. These and other newly discovered infestations appeIar to make necessary the addition of 172 towns, covering approximately 5.116 square miles, to the regulated area. The most extensive of these areas are in Connecticut and New Hampshire, where they total 1.966 and 1.654 square miles, respectively. Less spread has been found in Maine and Massachusetts, amounting to 330 and 902 square miles, respectively.
The satin moth is a serious pest of poplar and willow trees, with importations of which it was accidentally introduced from Europe some years ago. Be ause it is practically impossible to satisfactorily determine by inspection wiiether such trees are free from satin-moth infestation, the interstate mniovenment of these trees from infested territory is prohibited. The caterpillars hibernate on the bark of the trees in webs so inconspicuous that they are difficult to locate.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF EXTENDING
THE QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE SATIN MOTH TO THE STATE OF
VERMONT
Oci o 215, 1928.
The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the satin moth (Ntilpnotia sanisy L.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, which has bee(m known for some time to exist in portions of the States of Maine, New Hamlpshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Washington, has recently been discovered in the State of Vermont.
It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of extending the quarantine on account of the satin moth to include the State of Vermont within the quarantined area, and of prohibiting the interstate movement of poplar amid willow trees, and parts thereof, front the said State or from any infested districts determined therein.
Notice is, therefore, hereby given that in accordance with the plant lquarnantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the at of (incrtess approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 11(5), a public hearing will be held at the United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quaranti e ad ('omntrold Administration, and Federal PIlant Quaraltine Ioarl. 17.2) New Yrk Avenue. Washington, D1). C., at 10 a. in., Novemlber 12. 192S. in order that any lihrson1 interest in the proposed eXtellSi 4oll of thle quarantine may npplar and lbe hIeai either in person or by attorney.

Alctina m f'crtoru of .1tri'ult ur







12 6

SATIN MOTH CONTINUES TO SPREAD IN NEW ENGLAND
(Press notice)
NOVEMBER 26, 1928.
The area under quarantine on account of the satin moth, an insect inj urious to poplars and willows, has been enlarged to include for the first time territory in Vermont as well as additional territory in Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Connecticut, it was announced to-day by, the United States Department of Agriculture. No addition to the area already under quarantine in the State of Washington was necessary. The revised quarantine, approved by the Secretary of Agriculture, becomes effective January 1. 1929.
On account of the practical impossibility of satisfactorily determining by inspection whether poplars and willows are free from satin-moth infestation, due to the habit of the caterpillars of hibernating in inconspicuous webs on the bark of the trees, the regulations under this quarantine prohibit the "interstate movement from any point in the regulated area into or through any point outside thereof of poplar and willow trees, and parts thereof capable of propagation."
The territory added by this revision consists of 21 towns in Maine, 51 towns in New Hampshire, 8 towns in Vermont, 33 towns in Massachusetts, and 5.9 towns in Connecticut., a total of 172 towns, containing approximately 5,116 square miles.
The infested'areas are designated as follows:
The following towns and all the territory between said towns. and the Atlantic Ocean: Bar Harbor, Trenton, city of Ellsworth, Otis, Clifton, Bradley, Milford, city of Oldtown, Glenburn, Kenduskeag, Levant, Hermon, Hamp~den, Newburg, Dixmont, Troy, Burnham, Pittsfield, Canaan, Skowhegan, Fairfield, Oakland, Belgrade, Mount Vernon, Fayette, East Livermore, Livermore, Turner, Hebron, Oxford, Norw~ay, Waterford, Sweden, and Fryeburg, Maine; Conway, Madison, Tamworth, Sandwich, Campton, Rumney, Plymouth, Hebron, Alexandria, Danbury, Wilmot, Springfield, Sunapee, Goshen, Unity, and Charlestown, New Hampshire; Springfield, Rockingham, Westminster, Putney, Duinmerston, Brattleboro, and Guilford, Vermont; Colrain, Heath, Charlemont, Shelbourne, Deerfield, Whately, Hatfield, Northampton, East Hampton, South Hampton, Westfield, and Southwick, Mass'achusetts; Suffield, Enfield, East Windsor, South Windsor, East Hartford, Hartford, Glastonbury, Portland, East Hampton, East Haddam, Lyme, and Old Lyme, Connecticut.
The following counties and all the territory between said counties and the Pacific Ocean: Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Lewis, and Skamania, Washington.

QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE SATIN MOTH, WITH REVISED REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The revision of the quarantine on account of the satin moth adds to the area designated as regulated 21 towns in Maine, 51 towns in New-Hampshire, 8 towns in Vermont, 33 towns in Massachusetts, and 59 towns in Connecticut, making a total of 172 towns, altogether containing approximately 5,116 square miles. The effect of the revision is to prohibit the movement of poplar and willow trees and parts thereof from this additional territory to outside points, on account of the practical impossibility of satisfactorily determining by inspection whether poplars and willows are free from, satin-moth infestation, due to the habit of the caterpillars of hibernating in inconspicuous webs on the bark of the trees.
C. L. MARLATr,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

NOTICE OF QUJARANTINE NO. 53, REVISED
[Effective on and after January 1, 1929]

1, William M. Jardine, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Washington, to prevent the spread of the satin moth (Stiipnoti-a saliois L.), a dangerous, insect new to! and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.







127

Now, therefore. under the authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Maine. New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts. Rhode Island. Connecticut. and Washington. effective on and after January 1. 1929. Hereafter, as provided in the said act of August 20. 1912, amended as aforesaid, no species or variety of poplar (Populus) or willow (Salix) trees or parts thereof capable of propIagation shall be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported. moved, or allowed to be moved interstate from any of the said quarantined States into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Pro-vided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined Statc now, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture such limitation shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the said satin moth to other States and Territories, and when the movement of the restricted articles interstate from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of said satin moth therefrom to other parts of the quarantined States and thence into interstate commerce.
Done at the city of Washington this 21st day of November, 1928.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE.
Secretary of Agriculture.

REVISED RULES AN'C REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 53

Regulation 1.-Definitions.
For the purpose of these regulations the following words. names, and terms as used herein shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Satin moth: The insect known as the satin moth (Stilpnotia salici.s L.).
(b) Quarantined area: Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the satin moth.
(c) Regulated area: Any area in a quarantined State which is now or which may hereafter be designated as such by the Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the provisions of Quarantine No. 53, as revised. Regulation 2.-Limitation of Restrictions to Regulated Area.
Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the States concerned with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 53, as revised. the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such movement from the arvas in such States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.
Regulation 3.-Regulated Areas.
In accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 53. as revised. the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated area for the purpose of these regulations the States, counties, townships, towns, and cities listed below, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits; and all the territory between said towns and cities and the Atlantic Ocean:
Baf Harbor, Trenton, City of Ellsworth. Otis. Clifton, Bradley. Milford, Ciiy of Oldtown, Glenburn, Kenduskeag, Levant, Hermon. Ham )deni, Newlhurglh, Dixmont, Troy, Burnham. Pittsfield, Canaan. Skowhegan. Fairlield, Oa)kland. Belgrade, Mount Vernon, Fayette, East Livermore, Livermore. Turner, Hebron. Oxford, Norway, Waterford, Sweden. and Fryeburg. Maine; Conway., MNadisoni. Tamworth, Sandwich, Campton, Rumney, PIlymouth. Hebronm. Alexandria. I)abury, Wilmot, Springfield, Sunalx e, Goshen, Unity, and Charlestown. XNO Hanipshir; Springfield, Rockingham, Westminster, Putney, D)umminerstnii. Bra ttleboro, and Guilford, Vermout; Colrain. Heath. Chimrlemnont, Shelburn, I)eerfield, Whately, IiHatftield, Northanpton, Easthuniamptoni. Southuanpton, Westfleld.







128

and Southwick, Massachusetts; Suffield, Enfield, East Windsor, South Windsor, East Hartford, Hartford, Glastonbury, Portland, East Hampton, East Haddam, Lyme, and Old Lyme, Connecticut; the following counties and all the territory between said counties and the Pacific Ocean: Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Lewis, and Skamania, Washington.





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ek,
















A IV












FIGURE 1.-Map of the New England States. The shaded portion shows the area in
these States designated as regulated on account of the satin moth

Regulation 4.-Extension or Reduction of Regulated Areas.
The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any







129

extensi,)n or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies doing business in or through the States in which such areas are located, and by publication in newspapers selected b1)y the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.
Regulation 5.-Control of the Movement of Restricted Plants and Plant
Products.
Poplar or willow trees or parts thereof capable of propagation shall nt be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any po ut in fhe regulated area into or through any point outside thereof.
No restrictions are placed by these regIlations "on the iters;ate 1w\vet!1nt of the plants enumerated therein from points in dithe quarantinedl St:ttes outside of the areas now, or which may hereafter be. designated by the Sec(retary )of Agriculture as regulated areas.


BRITISH COLUMBIA













ORAON
*- SVSOKANOGAN FRRY PIND



CHELAN
DOUG LAS 5D An
LINCOLN SPOKANE


,KlTTITAS GRANT
AOAMS
1 WHITMAN

O4 FRANKLIN GAFitL
k YAKIMA
BENTON WALLA WALLA

KLICKITAT ,,* .

OREGON

FIGURE 2.-Map of the State of Washington. The shaded portion shows the area in
this State designated as regulated on account of the satin nmoth

No restrictions are placed on the interstate inovement if the :rtij es enumerated from an area not under regulation through a reen'at lt area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.
No restrictions are placed on the inter-tate movement of the articles onumlerated between points within the regulated area, provided such articles do) not pass through any point outside thereof. Regulation 6.-Shipments by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may ie moved interstate by the United States department of Agriculture for experimental m- scientific purposes on such conditions and under such safeguards as mny be prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The container of articles so moved shall hear. securely attached to the outside tlereofl. n identifying tag from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration showing 4-m~ ianet with such conditions.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after .,lanuary 1, 1929, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgatel ()ntober 30, 1926, as amended.







130

Done at the city of Washington this 21st day of November, 1928.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] WV. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRIMILTURE.
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATIO-N, WVashington, D. C., November 21, 1928.
SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 19,17 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, by Notice of Quarantine No. 53, revised, effective on and after January 1, 1929, quarantined the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Washington as infested with the satin moth, and has ordered that poplar and willow trees and parts thereof capable of propagation shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the said quarantined States in manner or by method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the revised rules and regulations supplemental to said quarantine or in amendments thereto.
Copy of the notice is inclosed herewith.
Very respectfully,
W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriouture.
(Inclosures.)

(Do not detach this receipt)
Received this notice and the copy of quarantine No. 53, revised, with revised rules and regulations mentioned therein this ------ day of ----------, 1929.
(Signature) - - - - -
(Title) - - - - -
[Sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT oF AGRICULTURE, OFFICE OF THE SECRETrARY,
Was~ington, D. C., November 21, 1928.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under, authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 19,12 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 53, on account of the satin moth, and of the rules, and regulations supplemental thereto. This revision adds 21 towns in Maine, 51 towns in Newv Hampshire, 8 towns in Vermont, 33 towns in Massachusetts, and 5.9 towns in Connecticut to the areas designated as regulated, and prohibits the movement of poplar and willow trees and parts thereof capable of propagation from such regulate *d areas in the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Washington.
Copies of the said revised quarantine and of the revised rules, and regulations may be obtained froin the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agrimultwre.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Manchester Union Leader, Manchester, N. H., December 6, 1928; The Burlington Free Press, Burlington, Vt., December 6, 1928; The Boston Herald, Boston, Mass., December 6, 1928; The Hartford Times,: Hartford, Conn., December 5, 1928; Portland Press-Herald, Portland, Me., December 6, 1928; The Seattle Times, Seattle Wash., December 10, 1928; The Evening Bulletin, Providence, R. 1L, December 6, 192A.1




131

WOODGATE-RUST QUARANTINE (No. 65)
NEW QUARANTINE RESTRICTS SHIPMENT OF NEW YORK PINES
(Press notice)
OCTOBER 23, 1928.
A quarantine prohibiting the interstate movement of Scotch pine and certain other hard pines, from nine counties of northern New York State. onl account of the Woodgate rust, was announced to-day by the Secretary of Agriculture. The regulations become effective November 1.
The regulated area from which the shipment of susceptible pines is prohibited includes Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis. Oneida, and St. Lawrence Counties of New York State. Two heavily infected sections are known, one just southwest of the Adirondack Mountains, and the other in the extreme northeastern corner of the State. The disease is less generally distributed in other parts of the regulated area.
All hard pines appear to show a certain amount of susceptibility to Woodgaterust infection, but several important species (including red and pitch pines) have not yet been proved able to support the fungus long enough to harbor and disseminate the disease, and are therefore omitted from the list of restricted species at this time.
None of the pines now prohibited movement, namely, Scotch, Canary Island, slash, Japanese red, Corsican, stone, western yellow, Monterey, loblolly, and Jersey pines, is native of this region, but several of them have been widely introduced.
Scotch pine, the species attacked with particular virulence, is a tree of great value to the Northeastern States, where it has proved successful when planted in blowing sand. The danger from Woodgate rust, however, lies less in the menace to that species than in the danger of its spreading to other regions and proving highly injurious to the extensive hard pine stands of the Southern and Western States.
The disease causes galls or swellings on the trunks and limbs of the trees attacked. The parts of the tree above the galls then die, or "brooms" are produced which destroy the value of the pine for lumber. This rust is especially difficult to control as it spreads direct from tree to tree without the intervention of an alternate host.
UNITD STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, OF'IcE OF THE SECRETARY,
PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION.
QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE WOODGATE RUST
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 65, WITH REGULATIONS
[Effective on and after November 1, 19281

I, C. F. Marvin, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the State of New York to prevent the spread of the Woodgate rust, a dangerous plant diseasee not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under the authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (3) Stat. 1134, 1105). and having duly given the public hearing as required thereby, I do quarantine the said State of New York, effective on and after November 1. 1928. Hereafter. under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, no trees. branches, limbs, or twigs of Scotch pine (Plinus sy/estris). or of any variety thereof, or of any other sxcies or variety of hard pine shall le slhipp d. offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a cannon io carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed( to be moved from the said quarantined State into or through any other State or Territory or I)istrict of ithe United States in manner or method, or under coliditions other than those rescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and in amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine iand of the rules a- id regulations supplemental thereto imay be limited to the areas in the quiarantined State now, or which may be hereafter. designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated aieas, when inll the judgment of the Secretary of Agricultulre







132

such limitation shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the Woodgate rust to other States and Territories, and when the movement of the restricted articles intrastate from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the Woodgate rust therefrom to other parts of the State and thence into interstate commerce.
Done at the city of Washington this 18th day of October, 1928.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] C. F. MARvIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculure.

RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 65

Regulation 1.-Definitions.
For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Woodgate rust: The disease known as Woodgate rust and caused by a fungus known as Peridermium sp.
(b) Quarantined area: Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture upon determination by him that the Woodgate rust exists therein.
(c) Regulated areas: Areas in a quarantined State which are now or which may hereafter be designated as such by the Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 65.
(d) Scotch pines: Trees, branches, limbs, and twigs of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) and of all varieties thereof.
(e) Hard pines: Trees, branches, limbs, and twigs of the species of Pinfws commonly known as "hard pines." (For list of species brought under restriction at this time, see regulation 5.)
Regulation 2.-Limitation of Restrictions to Regulated Areas.
Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 65, the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.
Regulation 3.-Regulated Areas.
In accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 65, the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated area the counties of Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Oneida, and St. Lawrence, in the State of New York, including all cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits.
Regulation 4.-Extension or Reduction of Regulated Areas.
The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies doing business in or through the State, of New York and by publication in one or more newspapers; selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the said State.
Regulation 5.-Prohibition of Movement of Scotch Pine and Other Hard Pines
from the Regulated Areas.
No trees, branches, limbs, or twigs of Scotch pine (Pinus sqflvestris), Canary Island pine (P. canariensis), slash pine (P. caribaea), Japanese red pine (P. densiflora), Corsican pine (P. nigra poiretiaa.), stone pine (P. pinva), western yellow pine (P. ponderosa), Monterey pine (P. radiata), loblolly pine (P. taeda), or Jersey pine (P. virginiana), or of any variety thereof, or of any species or variety of hard pine hereafter found to be susceptible to the Woodgate rust, shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated area into or through any point outside thereof.
No restrictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of species or varieties of hard pine other than those named in the preceding paragraph unless and until such species or varieties shall be found susceptible to the Woodgate rust.
No restrictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.




133

Regulation 6.-Shipments by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be mnov d interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientiific purposes on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an idiutifying tag from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration showing conpliance with such conditions.
These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after November 1. 192.
Done at the city of Washington this 18th day of October, 1928.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[sEAL.] (Signed) C. F. MAmn1iN.
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
APPENDIX

Penalties

The plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, * or any other article * specified in the notice of quarantine * in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500 or by imprisonment not exceeding one year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.

NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION, lVWasihington, D. C., October 25. 19.
Si: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicatillng your official title, and mail this sheet to the Secretary of Agricuiture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as fllows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has. by Notice of Quarantine No. 65, on account of the Woodgate rust. (fTectiive on and after November 1, 1928, ordered that no trees, branches, limbs. or twigs of Scotch pine or of any variety thereof, or of any other spl cies or variety of hard pine, shall be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the State of New\ York, in maier or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental to said notice of quarantine.
Very respectfully,
C. F. MARVIN,
Acting 8('reta ryl of Ag.ricultuire.
(Inclosures.)

(Do not detach thi receipt)
Received this notice and the cop)y of Notice of Quarantine No. G5 mentioned therein this ------ day of ------, 1928.
(Signature)- - - - -
(Title) .--------..
[Sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantiwned area






134

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION, Washington, D. C., October 25, 1928.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated Notice of Quarantine No. 65, with rules and regulations supplemental thereto, on account of the Woodgate rust, effective November 1, 1928. The effect of this quarantine is to prohibit the interstate movement of trees, branches, limbs, and twigs of Scotch pine and certain other hard pines susceptible to said rust from the counties of Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Oneida, and St. Lawrence, in the State of New York.
Copies of said quarantine with rules and regulations may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in The Times, Watertown, N. Y., November 5, 1928.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, December 7 1928.
POSTMASTER.
My DEAR SIR: There is inclosed for your information and guidance a copy of Quarantine Order No. 65 of the United States Department of Agriculture on account of the Woodgate rust, effective November 1, 1928, which prohibits the movement of Scotch pine and other hard pines from the counties in New York State enumerated in the order.
It will be noted that regulation 5 of the order absolutely prohibits the movement of Scotch and other hard pines or parts thereof from the regulated area into or through any point outside such area.
Under the provisions of paragraph 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regulations, you will please be careful to, see that no trees, branches, limbs, or twigg of any variety of the pine trees mentioned in the order are accepted for mailing at your office.
Sincerely yours, R. S. RtGAR,

Third Assistant Postmaster General.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS '
PUBLIC HEARING DECEMBER 17 TO CONSIDER QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE PHONY 11 PEACH DISEASE
(Press notice)
NOVEMBER 22, 1928'.
A public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of Georgia and Alabama on account of the phony peach disease was announced by the United States Department of Agriculture to-day. The. hearing will be held before the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration (.Ind the Federal Plant Quarantine Board, in the office of the administration, 1729 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C., at 10 a. m., December 17.
The phony peach disease was first observed at Marshallville, Ga., perhaps as early as 50 years ago,. It is now present in about 90 per cent of the commercial peach orchards of Georgia and also in a limited adjacent section of eastern Alabama. However, surveys, made in 1926 and 1927 in North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, and Florida failed to disclose this disease in those States.
Special investigations begun in 1921 by the Bureau of Plant Industry of the United States Department of Agriculture to determine the cause of the disease




135

and methods of control have resulted during the last two years. particularly through more complete experiments in 1928, in finding that the disease is ommunicable and is spreading in the manner of a contagious disease, but the exact cause or nature of the contagion is unknown. From these discoveries it aplears advisable to control the nursery stock from the infected areas in an effort to prevent its spread to other peach districts. Fruit from phony trees apparently can not transmit the disease and. accordingly, no restrictions on fruit shipments are contemplated.
With the onset of the disease, a "phony" tree develops shortened internodes, a large number of lateral twigs, and large, flattened. dark-green leaves giving the appearance of compact, dense growth with very healthy foliage. With each additional year after the disease appears there is a notable decrease in the average size of fruit and in the number of fruits to the tree, and the fruit is apt to be distinctly poorer in flavor than normal fruit though slightly better in color.
Not only does it seem possible that this disease may invade peach-growing districts beyond the borders of Georgia and Alabama, but the positive results of experiments where almond, apricot, and nectarine were top-worked on "phony trees suggest that the disease might also attack fruits closely related to the peach if introduced into the districts where they- are grown.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF QUARANTINING
THE STATES OF GEORGIA AND ALABAMA ON ACCOUNT OF THE PHONY"
PEACH DISEASE

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION, Washington, D. C., November 21, 1925.
The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the "phony" peach disease, a dangerous plant disease not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States. exists in the States of Georgia and Alabama.
It appears necessary, therefore. to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of Georgia and Alabama and of restricting or prohibiting the movement of roots of peach, nectarine, and almond from these States or from any districts therein designated as infected.
Notice is therefore hereby given that, in accordance with the plant quarantine act of August 20. 1912 (37 Stat. 315). as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134. 1165), a public hearing will be held at the United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, 1729 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C.. at 10 a. m., Ilteember 17, 1928, in order that any person interested in the proposed quarantine may appear and be heard, either in person or by attorney.
H. W. DuNLAP.
Acting Scretary of Agricultiure.

QUARANTINE ACTION WILL BE TAKEN AGAINST CERTAIN ASIATIC BEETLES
(Press notice
DKcitNmB 20, 1112S.
The necessity of taking quarantine n ction with report to, certain Asiatic beetles (Aserica castanca, Anon la orientali and $crica sim ili ) .. ,new to and potentially dangerous as crop and lawn I eSts, is announced by the Secretary of Agriculture. This decision is based on careful consideration o(f Ihe eidence submitted at the public hearing of September 24. and on evidence secure by a reexamination by specialists of the Department of Agriculture of the actual damage now being occasioned by these insects in the limited areNs where est:blished. This evidence and reexaminati(on indicate clearly that these beetles are capable of occasioning very serious damage. particularly to lawns and other grasslands. In addition, at least one of these lw etles (Axterica castan'a) has already been determined to cause material damage by leaf feeding to some 50 different varieties of plants belonging to widely separated groups, including some half dozen fruits and vegetables.
Under the purIpose and provisions of the plant quarantine act. therefore, it becomes the duty of the department to undertake all such m,:urV s ny be practicable to restrict and prevent as far as p ible the spread of thIte pests through the agency. of any carrying articles.







136

As a result of this deterniffiation the Secretary announces that in the near future he will promulgate a quarantine on. account of the insects named. This order will become effective early in the coming; calendar year andwill govern the movement of nursery stock, plants with soil, sod, and other articles likely to carry these insects from the areas which are now known to be infested.
Such known infested areas divide themselves naturally into two groups; one a fairly connected district covering portions of New York and New Jersey, and the other certain isolated infestations which can now best be considered for quarantine purposes as separate units. The general- area includes the northeastern po rtion of New Jersey, namely, portions or all of Bergen, Passaic, Essex, Union, and Hudson Counties; the southeastern portion of New York, including the southern part of Westchester County, also New York City, and Long Island eastward to Suffolk County. The isolated infestations occur at N T*ew Haven, Conn., Riverton, N. J., Philadelphia, Pa., and Washington, D. C. The exact details of the territory to be so included will be announced later in connection with the issuance of the quarantine and regulations thereunder.
During the fall-shipping season nurserymen in the areas infested by these, Asiatic beetles have cooperated with the Department of Agriculture in accepting measures to prevent spread in connection with their fall and winter shipments. All such shipments have been supervised by inspectors of the department, and no shipments have been made from these nurseries except from blocks in which no infestation whatever was disclosed in the process of digging and removal of the plants.


CONVICTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

The following convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act were reported to the administration during the period October 1 to December 31, 1928:
JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE
In the case of the United States v. Thomas V. Roche, agent of the American Railway Express Co., at Spuyten Duyvil, N. Y., in receiving 1 lilac bush for interstate shipment from New York to a point outside the quarantined area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $1. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 35T.)
In the case of the United States v. William F. Lang, department of parks, Borough of Bronx, New York City, in the interstate transportation of 15 white pine, 15 Australian pine, 15 Scotch pine, and .35 barberry plants with soil to a point outside the quarantined area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $100. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 358.)
WHITE-PINE BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINE
In the case of the United States v. Amil F. and Arthur Dass (Dass Nursery Co.), Bridgman, Mich., in the interstate shipment of 12 red-currant and 12, gooseberry plants from a State designated as infected to an uninfected State, which plants were neither dipped, dormant, nor defoliated, the defendants pleaded guilty and were each fined $50, 'or a total of $100. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 355.)
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the case of the United States v. Petra Ruiz de Rico, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 7 avocados fruiv Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Ramon Hernandez, El Paso, Tem, in attempting to, smuggle in I mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States. v. Christobal E. Alvarez, El Paso,, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 3 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Cornelia Hernandez, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 3 guavas from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Carmen Pena de Castellano El Paso, Tem, in attempting to smuggle in 20 rose apples from Mexici.,, -he defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Apolinar Franco, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 6 guavas frony Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.




1317

In the case of the United States v. Paulina Zuniga, El Paso, Tex.. in attemiipting to smuggle in 6 guavas from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Esther Pena, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 3 avocados and 1 guava from Mexico, the defendant was finel $5.
In the case of the United States v. S. Cavascos, Laredo, Tex., in attemnptinlg to smuggle in 2 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. A. P. Glesias, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 300 avocado seeds from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. David Lopez, Laredo, Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in 55 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Adolfo Garcia, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 3 guavas front Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the. United States v. Petra Alvarede de Acendo, El Paso, Tex, in attempting to smuggle in 5 guavas from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Gregorio Avinia, Alamo, Tex., in attewpting to smuggle in 4 cherimoyas from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Mrs. S. F. De Freno, Laredo, Tex., ill attempting to smuggle in 4 oranges from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States 'v. Forest Grafton, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 12 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. T. G. Mejia, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 44 sweet limes and 5 figs from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Romulo Garcia, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 2 mameys from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Angel Ramos, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 5 oranges and 2 tangerines from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Francisco Castaneda, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 10 oranges and 6 stalks of sugar cane from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Cesario Dominguez, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 19 pieces of sugar cane from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Lilia Randall, Nogales, Ariz., in attempting to smuggle in 6 oranges from Mexico, the defendant was filled $5.
In the case of the United States v. Alejandra Morales, El Paso, Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in 3 pears from Mexico, the defendant was filled $5.
In the case of the United States v. A. E. Taylor, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 10 pounds of shelled corn from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Genaro Alvarado, El Paso. Tex., ii attempting to smuggle in 5 guavas from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Rafael Albillar, El Paso, Tex.. in attempting to smuggle in 8 guavas from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Josefina Apodaca, El Paso, Tex., il attempting to smuggle in 2 oranges from Mexico, the defendant was lined $5.






UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION

LIST OF CURRENT QUARANTINES AND OTHER RESTRICTIVE
ORDERS AND MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS
[The domestic and foreign quarantine and other restrictive orders summarized herein are issued under the authority of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912, as amended. The Mexican bQrder regulations and the export certification regulations are issued under specific acts of Congress]
QUARANTINE ORDERS
The numbers assigned to these quarantines indicate merely the chronological order of issuance of both domestic and foreign quarantines in one numerical series. The quarantine numbers missing in this list are quarantines which have either been superseded or revoked. For convenience of reference these quarantines are here classified as domestic and foreign.

DOMESTIC QUARANTINES

Date palms.-Quarantine No. 6: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement of date palms and date-palm offshoots from Riverside County, Calif., east of the San Bernardino meridian; Imperial County, Calif.; Yuma,, Maricopa, and Pinal Counties, Ariz.; and Webb County, Tex., on account of the Parlatoria scale (Parlatoria blanchardi) and the Phoenicococcus scale (Phoenicococcus marlatti).
Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.-Quarantine No. 13, revised: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement from the Territory of Hawaii into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of all fruits and vegetables in the natural or raw state, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata) and the melon fly (Dacus cucurbitae).
Sugar cane.-Quarantine No. 16: Prohibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Porto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of living canes of sugar cane, or cuttings or parts thereof, on account of certain injurious insects and fungous diseases.
Sweet potato, and yam.-Quarantine No. 30: Prohibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Porto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of all varieties of sweet potatoes and yams (Ipomoea batatas and Dioscorea spp.), regardless of the use for which the same are intended, on account of the sweet-potato weevil (Cylas formicarius) and the sweet-potato scarabee (Euscepes batatae).
Banana plants.-Quarantine No. 32: Prohibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Porto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any species or variety of banana plants (Musa spp.), regardless of the use for which the same are intended, on account of two injurious weevils (Rhabdocnemis obscures and Metamasius hemipterus).
Black-stem rust.-Quarantine No. 38, as amended: Prohibits the movement interstate to any point outside of the quarantined area of the common barberry (Berberis vulgaris) and its horticultural varieties as well as certain other species of Berberis and Mahonia, on account of the black-stem rust of wheat, oats, barley, rye, and many wild and cultivated grasses.
European corn borer.-Quarantine No. 43, revised: Prohibits, except as piovided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement interstate to any point outside of the quarantined area of (1) corn and broomcorn (including all parts of the stalk), all sorghums, Sudan grass, celery, green beans in the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, oat and rye straw as such or when used as packing, cut flowers or entire plants of chrysanthemums, aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock, and cut flowers or entire plants of gladiolus and dahlia, except the bulbs thereof without stems, from the State of Rhode Island and from infested areas in Maine, New Hampshire (eastern section), Massachusetts (eastern section), Connecticut (eastern section), and from Fishers Island in Suffolk County, N. Y. ; and (2) corn and broomcorn (including all parts of the stalk), all sorghums, and Sudan grass from infested areas in Vermont, New Hampshire (western section), Massachusetts (western section), Connecticut (western section), New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, and West Virginia.
(138)




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Gipsy moth and brown-tail moth.-Quarantine No. 45: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement interstate to any point outside of the infested area, or from points in the g-enerally infested area to points in the lightly infested area, of stone or quarry products, and of the plants and the plant products listed therein. The quarantine covers all the New England States.
Hawaiian and Porto Rican cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products.Quarantine No. 47: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement of cotton, cottonseed, and cotto)nseed products from the Territories of Hawaii and Porto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States on account of the pink l ollworm (Pectinophora gosssypiella) and the cotton blister mite (Eriopiyca gossypii), respectively.
Japanese beetle.-Quarantine No. 48, revised: Prohibits, except as provi(led1 in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement interstate to any point outside of the State of New Jersey and the regulated areas of Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York, and Connecticut of (1) certain fruits, veget ables, and other farm products between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, and (2) nursery stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure throughout the year.
United States quarantined to protect Hatriii.-Quarantine No. 51: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement from the United States to the Territory of Hawaii, as ships' stores or as baggage or effects of passengers or crews, of sugar cane, corn, cotton, alfalfa, and the fruits of the avocado and papaya in the natural or raw state, oi account of injurious insects, especially the sugar-cane borer (Diatraca .accharalis Fab.), the alfalfa weevil (Hypera jostica (yll.), the cotton-boil weevil (An tlmonomus grandis Boh.), the papaya frlt fly (Toxotrypana curvicauda Guerst.), and certain insect enemies of the fru of the avocado.
Pink bollworm.-Quarantine o. 52, revised: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations pplemental thereto, the interstate movement from the regulated areas of Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico of (1) cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products or which are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and if contaminated with cotton, any other articles.
Satin moth.-Quarantine No. 53, revised: Prohibits the interstate movement to points outside of the regulated areas in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Washington of all species or varieties of poplar and willow trees or parts thereof capable of propagation.
Porto Rican fruits and vegetables.-Quarantine No. 58: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement from the Territory of Porto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of all fruits and vegetables in the raw or unprocessed state, on account of injurious insects, including the West Indian fruit fly (Anastrephlia fraterculus Wied.) and the bean-pod borer ( .1(irlirue testulalis Geyer).
Sand, soil, or earth, with plants from Hawaii and Porto Rico.-Quarantine No. 60: Prohibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and 'Po)rto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of sand (other than clean ocean sand), soil, or earthi, a roundl tihe i(,nt of plants, to prevent the spread of white grubs, the Japanese rose beetle,. and termites or white ants.
Thurberia wcevil.-Quarantine No. 61, revised: Prohibits thie interstate iovement of Thurberia, including all 1)parts of the plant, from alny point in Arizoina, and prohibits, except as provided in the rules utl( regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from the regulated area of Arizna of (1)i cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, liners, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, and cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and e otton lprWoducts, or which are fouled with such products; (4) ihay and other farm products: and
(5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if centauninaled with cot todil. any other articles.






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Narcissus bulbs.-Quarantine No. 62: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from every State in the continental United States and the District of Columbia of narcissus bulbs, on account of certain injurious bulb pests, including the greater bulb fly (Merodoan equestris Fab.), the lesser bulb fly (Eumerus strigatus Fallen), and the bulb eelworm (Tylenchus dipsaci Kuehn).
White-pine blister rust.-Quarantine No. 63: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from every State in the continental United States and the 'District of Columbia of fiveleaf pines (Pinus) or currant and gooseberry plants (Ribes and Grossularia, including cultivated or wild or ornamental sorts).
Mexican fruit worm.-Quarantine No. 64: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from the regulated area of Texas of fruits of all varieties.
Woodgate rust.-Quarantine No. 65: Prohibits the interstate movement from the regulated area in the State of New York of trees, branches, limbs, or twigs of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris), Canary Island pine (P. canariensis), slash pine (P. caribaea), Japanese red pine (P. densiflora), Corsican pine (P. nigra poiretia'na), stone pine (P. pinea), western yellow pine (P. ponderosa.), Monterey pine (P. radiata), loblolly pine (P. taeda), or Jersey pine (P. virgniana), or of any variety thereof, or of any species, or variety of hard pine hereafter found to be susceptible to the Woodgate rust.

FOREIGN QUAIANTINES

Potatoes.-Quarantine No. 3: Forbids the importation of potatoes from Newfoundland; the islands of St. Pierre and Miquelon; Great Britain, including England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland; Germany; and Austria-Hungary, on account of the disease known as potato wart (Synehytrium endobioticum.).
Mexican fruits.-Quarantine No. 5, as amended: Forbids the importation of oranges, sweet limes, grapefruit, mangoes, achras sapotes, peaches, guavas, and plums from the Republic of Mexico, on account of the Mexican fruit fly (Trypeta ludens).
White-pine blister rust.-Quarantine No. 7, as amended: Forbids the importation from each and every country of Europe and Asia, and from the Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland, of all fiveleaf pines. and all species and varieties of the genera Ribes and Grossularia.
Pink bollworm.-Quarantine No. 8, as amended: Forbids the importation from any foreign locality and country, excepting only the locality of the Imperial Valley, in the State of Lower California, Mexico, of cottonseed (including seed cotton) of all species and varieties, and cottonseed hulls. Seed cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed hulls from the Imperial Valley may be entered under permit and regulation.
Seeds of avocado or alligator pear.-Quarantine No. 12: Forbids the importation from Mexico, and the countries of Central America of the seed of the avocado or alligator pear on account of the avocado weevil (Heilipus lauri).
Sugar Cane.-Quarantine No. 15: Forbids the importation from all foreign countries of living canes of sugar cane, or cuttings or parts thereof, on account of certain injurious insects and fungous diseases. There are no, Federal-restrictions on the entry of such materials into Hawaii and Porto Rico.
Citrus nursery stoo.-Quarantine No. 19': Forbids the importation from all foreign localities and countries of all citrus nursery stock, including buds, scions, and seeds, on account of the citrus canker and other dangerous citrus diseases. The term "citrus," as. used in this qu-arantine, includes all plants belonging to the subfamily or tribe Citratae.
European pines.-Quarantine No. 20: Forbids, on account of the European pine-shoot moth (Evetria buoliana), the importation from all European countries and localities of all pines not already excluded by Quarantine No. 7. Indian corn or maize and related plants.-Quarantine No. 24, as amended: Forbids the importation from southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, IndoChina, and China), Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine Islands, Formosa, Japan, and adjacent islands, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of seed and all other portions of Indian corn or maize (Zea mays L.) and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte (Euchlaena), Job's-tears (Coix), Polytoca, Chionachne, and Sclerachne, on account of the downy mildews and Physoderma diseases of Indian corn, except






141

that Indian corn or maize may be imported under permit and upon compliance with the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.
Citrus fruits.-Quarantine No. 28: Forbids the importation from eastern and southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and China). the Malayan Archipelago, the Philippine Islands, Oceania (except Australia. Tasmania, and New Zealand), Japan (including Formosa and other islands adjacent to Japan), and the Union of South Africa, of all species and varieties of citrus fruits, on account of the citrus canker, except that oranges of the mandarin class (including satsuma and tangerine varieties) may he imported under permit and upon compliance with the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.
Sweet potato and yam.-Quarantine No. 29: Forbids the importation for any purpose of any variety of sweet potatoes and yams (Ipomoea batata and Dioscorea spp.) from all foreign countries and localities, on account of the sweet-potato weevils (Cytas spp.) and the sweet-potato scarabee (Earsepcs batatae).
Banana plants.-Quarantine No. 31: Forbids the imxportation for any purpose of any species or variety of banana plants (Musa spp.). or portions thereof, from all foreign countries and localities, on account of the bananaroot borer (Cosmopolites. sordidus). This quarantine places no restrictions on the importation of the fruit of the banana. (For restrictions on the entry of the fruit of the banana, see Quarantine 56.)
Bamboo.-Quarantine No. 34: Forbids the importation for any purpose of any variety of bamboo seed, plants, or cuttings thereof capable of propagation, including all genera and species of the tribe Bambuseae, from all foreign countries and localities, oni account of dangerous plant diseases, including the bamboo smut (Ustilago shiraiana). This quarantine order does not apply. to bamboo timber consisting of the mature dried culms or canes which are imported for fishing rods, furniture making, or other purposes, or to any kind of article manufactured from bamboo, or to bamboo shoots cooked or otherwise preserved.
Nursery stock, plants, and seeds.-Quarantine No. 37: Forbids, except Is provided in the regulations supplemental thereto, the importation of nursery stock and other plants and seeds from all foreign countries and localities on account of certain injurious insects and fungous diseases. Under this quarantine the following plant products and seeds may be imported without restriction when free from sand, soil, or earth, unless covered by specIial quarantine or other restrictive orders: Plant products capable of propagation, imported for medicinal, food, or manufacturing purposes, and field, vegetable, and flower seeds. Cut flowers from the Dominion of Canada are also allowed entry without permit. The entry of the following nursery stock and other plants and seeds is permitted under permit:
(1) Bulbs of the following genera: Lilium (lily), Convallaria (lily of the valley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip). and Crocus: and. until further notice, Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow). Galanthus (snowdrop), Scilla squilll), Fritillaria imperialism (crown imperial), FritillariHa meleagri ( ninea-hen flower), Muscari (grape hyacinth), Ixia, and Eranthis (winter aconite).
(2) Stocks, cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits for propagation; except that stocks of apple, pear, quince, and Mazzard cherry may not he imported under permit or otherwise after June 30, 1930.
(3) Rose stocks for propagation, including Manetti. Multitflora. Irier Rose. and Rosa Rugosa.
(4) Nuts, including palmn seeds for propagation.
(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees; seeds of deciduous and evergreen ornamental shrubs; and seeds of hardy perennial plants -except that mango seeds may not be imported under permit or otherwise.
Provision is also mauide for the issuance of special permits under s feguards to be prescribed in such permits for the entry in limited quantities (of niurery stock and other plants and( seeds not covered in the preceding lists for the purpose of keeping the country supplied with new varieties and necessary propa glting stock.
European corn. bore-r.-Quarwantine No. 41. revised : Forbids. except us prlvided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the imporltation from all foreign countries and localities oft the stalk and all other parts. wht her use(l for packing or other purposes, in the raw or unmmufatu er(d state. (,f In ian corn or maize, broomcorn, sweet sorghums, grain sorghuns. Sudan grass, John-







142

.son grass, sugar cane, pearl m illet, napier grass, teosinte, and Job's-tears, on
-account of the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilaiis) and other dangerous insects and plant diseases.
Stocks, cuttings, scions, and buds* of fruits.-Quarantine No. 44: Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the im.portation of stocks, cuttings, scions,, and buds of fruits from Asia, Japan, Philippine Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand), on account of dangerous plant diseases, including Japanese apple cankers, blister blight, and rusts, and injurious insect pests, including the oriental fruit moth, the pear fruit borer, the apple moth, etc.
Seed or paddy rice.-Quarantine No. 55: Forbids, except from the Republic of Mexico upon compliance with the conditions prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the importation of seed or paddy rice from all foreign countries and localities, on account of injurious fungous diseases of rice, including downy mildew (Sclerospora~ racroearpa), leaf smut, (Entyonc oryzac), blight (Gospora oryztorum), and glume blotch (Meianonw,m giurnarum), as well as dangerous insect pests.
Fruits and vegetabies.-Quarantine No. 56, as amended: Forbids, except. as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto., the importation ,of fruits and vegetables not already the subject of special quarantines or other restrictive orders,, and of plants or portions of plants -used as packing material in connection with shipments of such, fruits and vegetables, from all foreign countries and localities other than the Dominion of Canada, on. account of injurious insects, including fruit and melon flies (Trypetidae). Includes and supersedes Quarantine No. 49 on account of the citrus black fly.
Flag smut.-Quarantine No. 59: Forbids. the importation of all species and varieties of wheat (Triticum spp.) and wheat products, unless so milled or so processed as to have destroyed all flag smut spores, from India, Japan, China, Australia, Union of South Africa, Italy, and Spain.

OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS
The regulation of the entry of nursery stock from foreign countries into the United States was specifically provided for in the plant quarantine act. The act further provides for the similar regulation of any other class of plants or plant products when the need therefor shall be determined. The entry of the plants and plant products listed below has been brought under, such regulation:
Nurseryl stock.-The conditions governing the entry of nursery stock and other plants and seeds from all foreign. countries and localities are indicated above under Foreign quarantines." (See Quarantine No. 37, revised.)
Potato'es.-The importation of potatoes is forbidden altogether from the countries enumerated in the potato quarantine. Potatoes may be admitted from other foreign countries under permit and in accordance with the provisions, of the regulations issued under order of December, 22, 1913, bringing the entry -of potatoes under restriction on account of injurious potato diseases and insect pests. Importation of potatoes is now authorized from the following countries: The Dominion of Canada, Bermuda, and Cuba; also from the State's of Chihuahua and Sonora and the Imperial Valley of Lower California, Mexico. The regulations, issued under this order have been amended so as to, permit, free of any restrictions whatsoever under the plant quarantine, act, the importation of potatoes from any foreign country into the, Territories of Porto Rica and Hawaii for local use. only and from the Dominion of Canada into the United 'States or any of its Territories or Districts.
Avocado, ~~~~or alligator' pear.-The order of February 2,11 n h eua
tions issued thereunder restrict the importation from Mexico and the countries of Central America of the fruits of the avocado, or alligator pear, on account of tlie avocado weevil. Entry is permitted through the port of New York only, and is limited to the large, thick-skinned variety of the avocado. The importation of the small, purple, thin-skinned variety of the fruit of the avocado and of avocado nursery stock under 18 months of age is forbidden.,
Cot toi.-The, or(ler of April 27, 1915, and the regulations, issued thereunder restrict the importation of cotton fr. om all foreign countries and localities, on a ccont of inj urious insects, including the pink bo01lworm. These regulations apply in part to cotton grown in and imported from the Imperial Valley, in the State of Lower California, Mexico,.
Cot tor.seed products.-T.he order, of June, 23, 1917, and the regulations iss 'ued thereunder restrict the importation of cottonseed cake, meal, and all other






143

cottonseed products, except oil, from all foreign countries, and a second order of June 23, 1917, and the regulations issued thereunder restrict the importation of cottonseed oil from Mexico on account of injurious insects, including the pink bollworm.
Rules and regulations governing (1) entry for immediate export. (2) entry for immediate transportation and exportation in bond, and (3) safeguarding the arrival at a port where entry or landing is not intended of prohibited plants and plant products.-These rules and regulations, as revised August 1, 1920, govern the unloading and transfer of cargoes and transportation in bond when it is determined that such entry can be made without involving risk to the plant cultures of the United States, and also provide for the safeguarding at a port or within the territorial waters of the United States where entry or landing is not intended of any prohibited or restricted plants and plant products.
Rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and out of the District of Columibia.-These rules and regulations were promulgated August 20, 1920, under the amendment to the plant quarantine act of May 31 of that year. They provide for the regulation of the movement of plants and plant products, including nursery stock, from or into the District of Columbia and for the control of injurious plant diseases and insect pests within the said District.
MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS
Rules and regulations prohibiting the mocentent of cotton and cottonseed from Mexico into the United States, and governing the entry into the Unit d States of railway cars and other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, or other materials from Mexico at border points.-These rules and regulations, proinulgated June 23, 1917, pursuant to authority given in the appropriation act 4or the United States Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year 118, and since repeated annually, are designed to prevent the entry of the pink bollwvorm of cotton which is known to exist widely in Mexico. They provide for the examination of passengers' baggage, for the disinfection of railway ears, freight, express, and other shipments, and for the cleaning of domestic cars handling Mexican freight. All fees collected for cleaning and disinfecting railway cars are deposited in the United States Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.
The inspectors concerned in the enforcement of these regulations at border points are charged also with enforcement of restrictions on the entry of plants and plant products under various foreign plant quarantines.
Rules and regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture governing the inspection and certification of plants and plant products offered for export to meet the sanitary requirements of foreign countries.-These rules and regulations were promulgated August 9, 1926, pursuant to authority given in the appropriati,)on act for the United States Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year 1927. They provide for the inspection and certification of fruits, vegetables. nursery stock, and other plants and plant products intended for exl)port to countries requiring such certification. All fees collected for this service are (deposlite(d1 in the United States Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.


ORGANIZATION OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION

C. L. MARLA'r, Chief of Admiistration. S. A. RoHw As&sistant Chief.
B. CONNo~, Business Manager.
It. C. ALTHOUSE, Informational Officer.
C. A. LoCKE, Executive Assistant.
H. T. CRONIN, Administratirc Assistant. E. R. SAsscma, in Chuarge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, 18 ChlarC 1)mCetic Plant Quarantines. B. L. BOYDEN, in Field (Charge Date Hcale Quarntiac (l/eudqurl rs,, India,
Calif.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge European (rn i orer Qua'tanton l itdtarters, Eastern Scctioni, Boston, .llass. ; 'stllern ctio, Toleo, i)
A. F. BURGESS, int Field harge (lipy M.1oth/ and ]rotrnTal /1/th (,tutratine
(Headquarters, Mclroce Higihlands, Mss.).






144

C. H. HADLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine (Headquarter8,
Cam den, N. J.).
GEORGE G. BEciKER, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weeva
Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Worm Quarantine (Headquarters.
Harlingen, Tex.).

ADVISORY FEDERAL PLANT QUARANTINE BOARD

C. L. MARLATT, Chairman. J. E. GRAF, Bureau of Entomology, Member. R. A. OAKLLY, Bureau of Plant Industry, Member. M. B. WAITE, Bureau of Plant Industry, Member.
Forest Service, Member.


ROSTER OF TECHNICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL

FEDERAL PLANT QUARANTINE BOARD

C. L. Marlatt, Chairman; Chief of Administration, and also Chief Bureau of
Entomology.
J. E. Graf, member; Assistant Chief Bureau of Entomology. R. A. Qakley, member; senior agronomist, in charge of forage crops, Bureau of
Plant Industry.
M. B. Waite, member; senior pathologist, in charge fruit diseases, Bureau of
Plant Industry.
member; Forest Service.

PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION

C. L. Marlatt, Chief of Administration. S. A. Rohwer, Assistant Chief of Administration. B. Connor, business, manager. R. C. Althouse, informational officer. C. A. Locke, executive assistant. H. T. Cronin, administrative assistant.

FOREIGN PLANT QUARANTINES

E. R. Sasscer, principal entomologist, in charge.
In Washington

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA INSPECTION SERVICE

Object: To inspect, certify, and, if necessary, disinfect plants and plant products entering and leaving the District of Columbia; to inspect plants at field stations maintained by the Department of Agriculture.
Peter Bisset, senior horticulturist, in charge. Assistants: W. B. Wood, associate entomologist; Norman Perrine, associate chemist; R. G. Cogswell, assistant plant quarantine inspector; H. Y. Gouldman, assistant plant quarantine inspector; D. P. Limber, assistant plant quarantine inspector; W. T. Owrey, assistant plant quarantine inspector; W. I. Whiton, assistant plant quarantine inspector.
IMPORT DIVISION

Object: To control the entry of plants and plant products.
N. Rex Hunt, senior pathologist, in charge. Assistants: D. Lumsden, associate horticulturist ; A. J. Bruman, assistant plant quarantine inspector'; C. E. Cooley, plant quarantine inspector, in charge, special permits; Mrs. A. E. Harrell, assistant horticulturist; H. B. Shaw, associate plant quarantine inspector, in charge, regular Iwrmits; L. M. Scott, associate plant quarantine inspe.'ctor, in charge, field inspection and release special permit plants; J. M. R.




145

Adams, assistant plant quarantine inspector ; C. I. Brown, junior administrative assistant, in charge, cotton records.

MARITIME AND -MEXICAN BORDER INSPECTION SERVICE

Object: Maritime inspection-to inspect, certify, and, if necessary, disinfect foreign plants and plant products. the entry of which is regulated. including inspection of parcel post, passengers' baggage, ships' stores. and crews' quarters.
Object: Mexican border inspection-to inspect and, when nece' sary, fumigate railway cars and other vehicles from Mexico; to examine passengers' baggage, express, freight, and parcel-post packages for contraband pIants and plant products.
F. A. Johnston, plant quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistants: 11. L. Sanford, associate entomologist; Mrs. May L. Gouldman. assistant plant quarantine inspector; L. L. Spessard, junior plant quarantine inspector; Lusettie Blevins, senior scientific aid.
In the Field
MARITIME INSPECTION SERVICE
Alabama:
Mobile, care collector of customs. J. R. Wood, collaborator, in charge.
California: Headquarters at 1015 L Street, Sacramento. L. A. Strong, assistant
director of agriculture, agent; W. C. Jacobsen, chief, bureau of plant quarantine and pest control, collaborator; A. C. Fleury, supervising
quarantine officer, collaborator.
Crockett. R. R. W. J. Dabel, collaborator, in charge.
Eureka, box 486. Earle Mills, collaborator, in charge.
Los Angeles, 784 South Central Avenue. C. H. Vary, collaborator, in
charge.
San Francisco, 10 Ferry Building. F. C. Brosius, collaborator, in charge.
Assistants: B. T. Bryant, collaborator; J. F. Curry, collaborator; E. C.
Decker, collaborator; A. M. C. Dennett, collaborator; E. C. Dutton, collaborator; S. G. Langford, collaborator; J. G. Latham, collaborator; E. W. Longan, collaborator; W. N. Ross, collaborator; F. M. Rice, collaborator; H. H. Rowland, collaborator; C. S. Smith, collaborator;
E. M. Swift, collaborator; G. R. Wilson, collaborator.
San Diego, box 617. P. M. Howard, collaborator, in charge. Assistant:
A. C. Chatterley, collaborator.
San Luis Obispo. Thomas Chalmers, collaborator, in charge.
San Pedro, Box 391. A. P. Messenger, collaborator, in charge. Assistants:
J. F. Altstaetter, collaborator; H. H. Clendenen, collaborator : A. L.
Flinn, collaborator; H. K. Mosle, collaborator; J. W. Prall, collaborator.
Santa Barbara, Box 552. E. S. Kellogg, collaborator, in charge.
Santa Paula. A. H. Call, collaborator, in charge.
Florida: Headquarters at State Plant Board, Box 135, Gainesville. J. H. Montgomery, assistant plant commissioner, collaborator.
Jacksonville, Box 1713. P. Thomas, collaborator, in charge. Assistants"
W. H. Merrill, collaborator; H. M. Williams, collaborator.
Key West, Box 484. L. R. Warner, collaborator, in charge. Assistants
W. V. Millington, collaborator; R. C. Milner, collaborator.
Miami, Box 842. J. V. Gist, collaborator, in charge. Assistants: J. B.
Bowers, collaborator; Reginald Hart, collaborator; W. N. Iull, collaborator.
Pensacola, Box 606. P. F. Robertson, collalorator, ill charge.
Tampa, Box 283. U. C. Zeluff, collaborator, in charge. AR.sistant R. I).
Potter, collaborator.
Georgia:
Atlanta, State Board of Entomology. R. Al. Seeley, collarlator, in uliarge.
Savannah, Customhouse. V.iC. Durha, collar; 'rat w, in cl.lharg. Hawaii:
Honolulu, Box 2520. D. T. Fullaway, collaborator, in charge. Assistants
I. K. Joshua, collaborator ; W. J. Murtaugh, 'llhorat',r I. A. \Vhitimv.
collaborator.
Illinois:
Chicago, 450 Fetleral building. II. W. Iheker. as.itt l liiI1t qUantie
inspector, in charge. Assistant : II. F. St'if er, ci dIllaI'tw or.







146

Louisiana:
New Orleans, 323 Customhouse, 423 Canal Street. W. T. Dillard, associate
plant quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistants: G. Gay,' assistant plant quarantine inspector; M.' J. Kerr, assistant plant quarantine inspeetor; W. H. Baskin, ju nior plant quarantine inspector; J. H. Moreland, junior plant quarantine ]inspector; R. L. Trigg, junior plant quarantine
inspector.
Maine:
Portland, Customhouse. G. J. Duncan, collaborator, n charge (United
States Customs Service).
Maryland:
Baltimore, 102 Customhouse. C. E. Prince, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistant: W. A. Ranck, junior plant quarantine
inspector.
Massachusetts:
Boston, 408 Atlantic Avenue. W. G. Bemis, associate plant quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistants: 0. A. Hardy, junior plant quarantine inspector; R. W. Woodbury, junior plant quarantine inspector. Michigan:
Detroit, 1 Customhouse. W. W. Wood, assistant plant quarantine inspector,
in charge. Assistant: D. E. Gower, junior plant quarantine inspector.
Port Huron. C. 0. Nelson, collaborator, in charge (United States Customs
Service).
Mississippi:
Gulfport, Box 331. F. P. Amsler, collaborator, in charge.
Pascagoula. R. P. Colder, collaborator, in charge. New York:
New York, room 304, 45 Broadway. W. H. Freeman, plant quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistants: R. Faxon, associate plant quarantine inspector; H. G. Frank, associate plant quarantine inspector; L. C.
Griffith, associate plant quarantine inspector; R. D. Kennedy, associate plant quarantine inspector; J. W. O'Brien, -associate plant quarantine inspector; C. E. Drumheller, assistant plant quarantine inspector; F. G.
Inman, assistant plant quarantine inspector; S. A. Mann, assistant plant quarantine inspector; K. F. Petsch, assistant plant quarantine inspector; G. A. Samouce, assistant plant quarantine inspector; H. Sargent, assistant plant quarantine inspector; R. Shemin, assistant plant quarantine inspector; G. F. Smith, assistant plant quarantine inspector; C. G.
Anderson, junior plant quarantine inspector; N. A. Eaton, jr., junior plant quarantine inspector; R. C. Elliott, junior plant quarantine inspector; 0. G. Fitzgerald, junior plant quarantine inspector; K. W.
Holloway, junior plant quarantine inspector; P. X. Peltier, junior plant quarantine inspector; A. 0. Plummer, junior plant quarantine inspector.
New York, 45 Broadway. W. S. Fields, in charge, field inspection special
permit material for New York district. Ohio:
Owensville. R. S. McKay, collaborator, in charge, inspection of Cuban
citrus fruit at Cincinnati.
Oregon:
Portland, 205 New Post Office Building. T. J. Baker, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistant: L. E. Bozarth, collaborator. Pennsylvania:
Philadelphia, 134 South Second Street. Max Kisliuk, jr., associate plant
quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistants: C. G. Albrecht, assistant plant quarantine inspector; W. W. Chapman, assistant plant quarantine inspector; A. G. Harley, junior plant quarantine inspector; W. J. Ehinger,
junior plant quarantine inspector.
South Carolina:
Charleston, 7 Customhouse. J. T. Rogers, associate plant quarantine inspector, in charge.
Texas:
Galveston, Box 177. L. R. Dorland, associate plant quarantine inspector,
in charge.
Houston, Box 685. H. C. Millender, associate plant quarantine inspector,
in charge.




147

Virginia:
Norfolk, 119 West Main Street. C. E. Prince, jr.. assistant plant quarantine
inspector, in charge. Assistant: E. W. Palmer, collaborator (United
States Customs Service).
Washington:
Seattle, 4119 Arcade Building. A. G. Webb, associate plant quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistants: M. J. Forsell. assistant plant quarantine inspector; C. V. Scott, assistant plant quarantine inspector: E. I. Smith, assistant plant quarantine inspector: W. R. Shinn. junior plant quarantine
inspector; J. P. Young, junior plant quarantine inspector.

MEXICAN BORDER INSPECTION SERVICE
Arizona :
Douglas, Box 943. R. O. Collier, junior plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistant: W. J. Douglass, junior plant quarantine inspector.
Nogales, Station Building. C. E. Bellis, associate plant quarantine inI)spector,
in charge. Assistants: R. A. Rodgers. assistant plant quarantine inspector; H. A. Horton, junior plant quarantine inspector : J. C. Prithett, junior plant quarantine inspector: R. C. Watson, junior plant quarantine
inspector; L. A. Curtis, fumigation mechanic. California:
Calexico, Box. 761. O. A. Pratt, associate plant quarantine inspector, in
charge.
San Ysidro. A. C. Hill, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in charge. Texas:
Brownsville, Box 499. O. D. Deputy, associate plant quarantine inspector,
in charge. Assistants: H. S. Dean, assistant plant quarantine inspector; R. B. Lattimore, assistant plant quarantine inspector: A. A. Stalmach, assistant plant quarantine inspector : U. G. Haddon. junior plant quarantine inspector; F. E. Swan, junior plant quarantine inspector.
Del Rio, Box 1069. H. M. Cely, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistant : R. B. Haller, junior plant quarantine inspector.
Eagle Pass, Box 438. J. B. R. Leary, associate plant quarantine inspector,
in charge. Assistants: M. M. Richardson, assistant plant quarantine inspector; G. H. Russell, assistant plant quarantine inspector; J. T. Watt,
junior plant quarantine inspector.
El Paso, 8 Federal Building. T. A. Arnold. associate plant quarantine
inspector, in charge. Assistants: A. H. Greer. assistant plant quarantine inspector; E. G. Hagadorn, assistant plant quarantine inspector; B. R.
Anderson, junior plant quarantine inspector: C. P. Daley. junior plant quarantine inspector; W. R. Sudduth. junior plant quarantine inspector.
Fabens. J. G. Combest, collaborator, in charge (United States Customs
Service).
Hidalgo, care deputy collector of customs. J. 31. Singleton. assistant plant
quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistants: I. W. Herryhill. junior plant
quarantine inspector; L. A. Frost, junior plant (luarniantinc insictor.
Laredo, Box 277. V. J. Shiner, associate pilnt q uaranttic inwct or. in
charge. Assistants: B. C. 11t use. assistant plant quarantine insl-'ctor R. C. Bondy, junior plant quaranlitinle insltor: 0. M. Jo nes. Junior
plant quarantine inslM(,ctor ; II. R. Cary. senior funiigation mechanic.
Presidio. F. B. Moore, collal)orator, in charge.,, (United States Customs
Service).
In addition to the collaborators listed under the p'art-inspect inn and Mexicanbord(ler projects the adminiiiistration has some 177 collaborat ors in lthe various States, working without comIlwnsation, who inspect iliported iurslery '4tock. a nd who also make the required insixwctions under the dom'esti'c nrcis-hulb and white-pine blister-rust Federal quarantines.

MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY ANE M ET.ON-FLIY PROJECT

Headquarters, 1428 South King Street, honolulu, T. II. 11. F. Willard, senior entomologist, in charge

Object: To prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fl, anl mll n fly from the Territory of Ivawaii to other parts of tili United Stati '. involving the inspection and certification of fruits and vegealbl for 1 shiipnait supe prvi~ionli







148

of fruit and vegetable plantations and of packing material, and the inspection and sealing of baggage for pasengers leaving Hawaii for the mainland. Territory of Hawaii:
Rilo, Box 624. Robert Pahau, inspector, in charge, island of Hawaii.
Honolulu, Box 340. H. F. Willard, senior entomologist, in charge. Assistants: Ah Fook, inspector; E. I. Banks, inspector.
Lihue, Kauai. W. A. Anderson, inspector, in charge, Lihue section, island
of Kauai.
Paia, Maui. A. B. Braue, inspector, in charge, island of Maui.
Waimea, Kauai. Frank Cox, inspector, in charge,-W aimea section, island
of Kauai.
PORTO RICAN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Object: To inspect and certify fruits and vegetables for shipment to the mainland, and to inspect commercial shipments, of plants and plant products introduced into Porto Rico under permit, including examination of parcel post, passengers' baggage, ships' stores, crews' quarters, etc. Porto Rico:
C. P. Trotter, associate plant quarantine inspector, in charge.
Fajardo, Box, 15. M. A. Martin, collaborator, in charge.
Mayaguez, Box 643. S. D. Whitlock, assistant plant quarantine inspector,
in charge.
Ponice. J. T. Beauchamp, collaborator, in charge.
San Juan, Box 991. C. P. Trotter, associate plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistants: R. W. Nicaise, assistant plant quarantine inspector; H. Fox, junior plant quarantine inspector; L. A. Catoni, collaborator;
J. Luciano, collaborator; J. A. Ramos, collaborator.

CERTIFICATION OF EXPORTS
Object: To inspect and certify at all ports of entry fruits and vegetables for export to meet the sanitary requirements of foreign countries, aided by the men assigned to the maritime and Mexican border inspection service. New York:
New York, Room 304, 45 Broadway. W. H. Freeman, senior plant quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistants: Emile Kostal, associate plant quarantine inspector; R. A. Fox, assistant plant quarantine inspector; A. G. Lennox, assistant plant quarantine inspector; R. G. Smith, assistant plant quarantine inspector.
Massachusetts:
Boston, 408 Atlantic Avenue. W. G. Bemis, associate plant quarantine inspector, in charge. Assistant: C. A. Davis, assistant plant quarantine
inspector.
DOMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINES FOR WHICH NO SEPARATE UNITS HAVE BEEN ORGANIZED
S. B. Fracker, principal plant quarantine administrator, in charge.
Object: To prevent spread of the white-pine blister rust, the black stem iust, the Woodgate rust, and narcissus-bulb pests through the enforcement of quarantine regulations; inspection of regulated plants and plant products in transit.
In Washington
S. B. Fracker, in addition to being in charge of the departmental and field work done by this unit, is responsible for drafting of quarantines and legal forms.
M. A. Thompson, junior plant quarantine inspector, in charge of certain features of white-pine blister-rust quarantine enforcement and, transit inspection.

In the Field
Illinois:
Chicago, Atlantic Hotel. J. M. Corliss, agent. Rhode Island:
Providence, 39 Glendale Avenue. R. A. Sheals, agent. Washington:
Spokane, 406 Federal Building. C. R. Stillinger, associate plant pathologist.







149

The names given constitute the permanent force. This force is assisted during the spring and fall shipping seasons by from 10 to 20 temporary employees detailed to duty at New York, Pittsburgh, Chicago, St. Paul. Omaha, Kansas City, Spokane, Seattle, Portland, Ogden, Pocatello, and other points.
DATE-SCALE PROJECT
Headquarters, Room 6, First National Bank Building, Indio, Calif. B. L.
Boyden, senior entomologist, in charge
Object: Eradication of date scale and prevention of spread, involving the burning and torching of infested palms and the enforcement of quarantine regulations.
]Indio. Assistants: A. J. Shamblin, associate horticulturist; A. E. Cavanagh,
senior scientific aid; I. C. Caswell, senior scientific aid; H. B. Ames, junior scientific aid; G. F. Fulkerson, junior scientific aid; H. E. Bronson, inspector;
C. J. Frost, inspector; M. E. Moore, inspector; C. T. Owsley, inspector.
Phoenix, Ariz., Box 1117. C. H. Rothe, junior plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. H. B. Skinner, agent.
Brawley, Calif., Box 445. C. T. Cordill, junior scientific aid, in charge.
EUROPEAN CORN-BORER PROJECT

Headquarters, Rooms 401-402 Brown Building, 185 Summer Street, Boston,
Mass. L. H. Worthley, administrator in corn-borer control, in charge

Object: To suppress the spread of the European corn borer, and, where possible, to effect its eradication, involving scouting operations to determine range of infestation, operation of quarantine lines to prevent long distance spread, clean-up operations, and the enforcement of quarantine regulations against possible carriers of this insect.
Connecticut:
Bridgeport, Rooms 418-421 Newfield Building, 1188 Main Street. H. N.
Bartley, entomologist, in charge; J. S. Stockbridge, field supervisor in insect control; Arthur Viall, field supervisor; T. M. Cannon. senior scientifie aid; H. V. Hotchkin, agent; R. L. Dillingham, agent: Glenn Heath, agent; H. H. Lawrence, agent; F. D. Mathewson, agent; C. L. Studer,
agent.
Stratford, 205 Beardsley Avenue. George P. Babson, principal field aid, in
charge.
New York:
New York, 45 Broadway. Leland Wolfe, agent, in charge. Massachusetts:
Boston, Rooms 401-402 Brown Building, 185 Summer Street.
Boston, Room 50, 12 South Market Street. R. S. Clifton. administrative
assistant, in charge; C. W. Lewis, principal scientific aid: M. H. McIntire, South Berwick, Me., collaborator; W. A. Osgood, Durham. N. H., collaborator; W. J. Powers, field supervisor in insect control; J. B.
Marshall, agent.
Ohio:
Toledo, 615 Front Street. Earle G. Brewer, administrative officer, in
charge; F. S. Puckett, administrative officer:; C. M. Fox. junior administrative officer; O. P. Norris, junior administrative officer; II. C. Ameigh, administrative assistant ; Johln II. Ilarman, associate entomologist ; C. O.
Larrabee, chief field aid; C. (. Cheevers, agent; .T. WV. Enwright, principal field aid; F. L. Fall, principal field aid; It. M. Fudge, agent : P. A.
Howell, agent; George A. Dean, Manhattan, Kans., collaborator; W. P.
Flint, Urbana, Ill., collaborator; C('. 0. Reed, T('olumbus, ()hio, collaborator; N. H. Dunlap, agent G. E. Krydeir, agent: IR. Rogers, agent H. A. Burkmeyer, agent; C. P. Hartley, agent; W. 11. Crafts, agent; T. B. Heald, field sulervisor in insect control:; M1. .1. Kelly. field supervisor in insect control; W. J. Neville, agent: II. B. I )illingha, agent; J. D. Kimport, agent; MA I . Lichty, agent ; 11. A1ars. ngent ; William Macko, agent; II. G. Rowden, agent; T. J.. Wehrschmin(lt, agent ; W. II.
Weible, agent; L. H. Colby, agent; Frank Galpin, agent.
The permanent European corn borer control force, listed above, is aouinented during the summnner and fall months by the employment of several hundred temporary men who act in the capacity of scouts and (luarantine linen.







150

GIPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH PROJECT

Headquarters, 964 Main Street, Melrose Highlands, Mass., A. -F. Burgess, principal entomologist, in charge
Object: To prevent the spread of the gipsy and brown-tail moths and to eradicate all gipsy-moth infestations found beyond the quarantined area, involving scouting operations to determine the range of infestation, clean-up, and eradication operations and the enforcement of quarantine regulations against these pests.
Massachusetts:
Melrose Highlands. Assistants: S. S. Crossman, senior entomologist, first
assistant; H. B. Dalton, senior administrative assistant; H. L. Blaisdell, senior administrative officer, in charge of scouting and extermination work; L. E. Gibson, administrative assistant; H. 1. Winchester, principal scientific aide; J. J. Whitney, principal mechanic; W. H. Hanley, field supervisor; R. M. Kittredge, field supervisor; F. C. McDonough, field
supervisor; J. A. Priest, field supervisor.
Boston, 408 Atlantic Avenue, Appraisers' Stores Building, Room 303. J. N.
Summers, administrative officer, in charge of moth quarantine office; F. WV. Graves, jr., administrative assistant; M. H. Feeney, senior
scientific aide.
Pittsfield, Barker Avenue, West Pitts-field. D. G. Murphy, principal scientific aide, in charge of storage and care of motor vehicles and equipment;
C. A. Mclsaac, principal scientific aide.
Athol, Box 216. C. A. Manchester', senior scientific aide.
East Dedham, 52 Fairview Avenue. P. H. Meagher, senior scientific aide.
Framingham, Box 186. P. S. Coffin, senior scientific aide.
Great Barrington, Box 4. H. H. Harkins., field supervisor.
Middleboro, Box 180. J. J. Roach, senior scientific, aide.
North Adams, 454 West Main Street. G. N. Harris, field supervisor.
Quincy, 71 Verchild Street. R. W. Kennedy, senior scientific aide.
Shelburne Falls, 9 South Maple Street. J. W. Regan, field supervisor.
Wakefield, Box 41. 1. B. Newbegin, senior scientific aide.
Woburn, Box 135. G. A. Miller, senior scientific, aide.
Westfield, Box 260. W. H. Shinkwin, agent.
Worcester, Box 718. 1. L. Bailey, senior scientific aide. Maine:
Bangor, Box 89-2. A. C. Ward, senior, scientific aide.
Bath, Box 2,92. G. J. Galvin, senior scientific aide..
Portland, Box 361. L. H. Noble, senior scientific aide. New Hampshire:
Concord, Box 86. D. Harrington, senior, scientific aide.
Durham, University of New Hampshire. W. A. Osgood, collaborator.
Keene, Box 209. J. Keefe., senior scientific aide.
Milford, Box 65. W. Sarsfield, senior, scientific aide.
Plymouth, Box 111. J. F. Murray, senior scientific aide. Vermont:
Barre, Box 250. R. L. Emrick, agent.
Essex Junction, Box 211. W. W. Bancroft, principal scientific aide.
Fair Haven, Box 113. H. N. Bean, principal scientific aide.
Rutland, Box 2:11. H. E. Singer, agent.
St. Johnsbury, Box 2,65. F. L. Keene, senior scientific aide.
White River Junction, Box 432. R. H. Flaker, agent. Rhode Is-land:
Westerly, Box 63. WV. J. Ahearn, senior scientific aide.
Newport, 6 Bedlow Avenue. J. F. McDevitt, senior scientific aide. Connecticut:
Ansoniia, Box 508. F. C. Rich, field supervisor.
(.1anan, Box 141. S. E. May. principal scientific, aide.
East Hartford, Box 109. C. M. Emerson, senior scientific aide.
New Milford, Box 903. W. A. Collins, senior scientific aide.
Willimanttic, 54 Moulton Court. J. F. Keough, senior scientific aide.
Winsted, Box 16. 0. C. Otis, field supervisor.







151

New Jersey:
Bound Brook, Box 506. H. A. Ames, administrative assistant, in charge;
C. T. Davis, principal scientific aide; M. J. Anderson, field supervisor; F. N. Bancroft, field supervisor; F. C. Flint, field supervisor; F. W.
Graham, field supervisor; E. R. Manning, field supervisor; W. J. Nestle,
field supervisor.
New York:
Albany, Conservation Commission. H. L. McIntyre, collaborator; S. Phillips, agent.
The force listed above is augmented by 54 agents. They direct the work of a force of laborers which varies throughout the year from 125 to 400 men.
JAPANESE AND ASIATIC BEETLES PROJECT

Headquarters, 1590 Pierce Avenue, Camden, N. J., Box 361. C. H. Hadley,
principal administrator in insect control, in charge

Object: To prevent spread of Japanese and Asiatic beetles, and, where possible to effect their control or eradication, involving scouting operations to determine range of infestation, clean-up operations, and the enforcement of quarantine regulations against possible carriers of these insects, cooperating with the Bureau of Entomology and the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.
Connecticut:
Shelton, Hurley Building, 449 Howe Avenue. J. P. Johnson, agent, in
charge.
Delaware:
Wilmington, 218 West Tenth Street. W. E. Cranston, agent, in charge.
Assistant, E. A. McKnight, agent.
Maryland:
Baltimore, 301 East North Avenue. W. C. Armstrong, field supervisor in
insect control, in charge.
New Jersey:
Camden, 1590 Pierce Avenue. Assistants: C. W. Stockwell. senior admininistrator in insect control; H. B. Ward, agent; R. W. Sherman, assistant plant quarantine inspector: T. C. F. Cronin, junior plant quarantine inspector; J. W. Balock, junior entomologist; V. A. Johnson, junior entomologist; F. L. O'Rourke, junior entomologist; F. G. Winn. field -ulpervisor in insect control; W. J. Thomason, jr., agent; G. C. Palphreyman,
agent; Charles Schreiber, agent; Leon Gray, agent.
Glassboro, 121 Main Street. C. O. Kelly, Federal and State employee, in
cha rge.
New Brunswick, Throop and Suydam Streets. D. W. Millay. ,'ent,t in
charge.
Rutherford, 39 Park Avenue. E. II. Conrow, agent. in charge.
White Horse (Trenton) located 3 miles outside of Trenton on the TrentonYardville Pike. G. K. Handle, agent, in charge; assistants: It. II. EIlen,
agent; J. H. Erwin, agent.
New York:
West Farms, New York City. 2000 Bronx Street. C. II. Ziniiuner. agent, in
charge; assistants: G. C. Masearo, agent : J. E. HIallore,.ii agent : W. A.
Shinkwin, scientific aide; G. E. Braashb, agent. Pennsylvania:
Norristown, Box 74. J. K. Gould, agent, in charge: assista' ts W. F.
Walsh, agent; T. II. Yeakle, agent; T. D. Connor, agent.
IAncaster, 126 North Prince Street. W.N. Dobbs, field superv-isir in in'et
control, in charge: assistant: M. R. Clark. agent.
Philadelphia, 141 South Fifty-second Street. G. B. Stichter, agelt, in
charge; assistants: C. T. Trout, agent ; H. J. ugherty et : .
Rathfon, agent.
The permanent force, listed above, is augmented durillng the 1sun11er 1 0 i)lls by the employment of approximately 500 additional temporary iehl a'ikans and laborers, and the project now has, in addition to those lited above. 69 employees, some of whom are paid partly out of Federal alpr''lrial int anl partly out of the appropriations of Ihe cooperating States.







152

PINK-BOLLWORM PROJECT

Headquarters, 421 Aztec Building, San Antonio, Tex. .George G. Becker, entomologist, in charge

Object: To suppress the spread of the pink bollworm of cotton and, where possible, to effect its eradication, involving scouting operations to determine range of infestation, clean-up operations, and the enforcement of quarantine regulations against possible carriers of this insect. Arizona :
Safford, Box 537. W. F. Rice, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistants: W. K. Bayless., agent; W. F. Senette, agent. 1New Mexico:
Carlsbad, Box 784. W. B. Rogers, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistant: L. A. Mayer, agent.
Las Cruces, Box 849. R. R. Rosa, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistants: S. R. Morris, junior plant quarantine inspector;
R. F. Lawrence, agent; J. D. Smith, agent; 0. C. Weigle, agent.
Lordsburg, Box 188. J. D. Waugh, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistants: K. G. Beaubien, agent; D. A. Blankinship, agent; C. L. Friday, agent; V. C. Holley, agent; H. L. Spencer-, agent; J. B.
Zuch, agent.
Roswell, Box 845. H. B. Prickett, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistants: E. L. Wilde, assistant plant quarantine inspector; R. L. Eberhard, junior plant quarantine inspector; W. C. Maxwell, junior plant quarantine inspector; F. M.* Wilson, junior plant quarantine inspector; W. E. Dorsett, agent; W. A. Gray, agent; H. C. Greer, agent; E. J. Hedgcoxe, agent; E. F. Loving, agent; W. T. Lumpkins, -agent;
W. W. Rester, agent; C. V. Sweatt, agent.
Silver City, Box 24. G. F. McLain, agent., in charge. Assistant: D. Dale,
agent.
State College. H. L. Kent, president College of Agriculture and Mechanical
Arts, collaborator.
Texas:
Alpine. D. J. Byers, agent, in charge. Assistants: E. W. Barnett, agent;
J. K. Graham, agent; R. H. McKinney, agent.
Austin. R. E. McDonald, State entomologist, agent.
Big Spring, Box 533. G. C. Bond, associate plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistants: G. W. Chowns, assistant plant quarantine inspector; W. C. Baker, junior plant quarantine inspector; H. J. Fernald, agent; M. S. Jones, agent; W. W. Klugh, agent; C. G. Latham, agent; C. M.
Locke, agent; C. D. McGehee, agent; L. L. Riner, agent; G. D. Rule,
agent.
Coahoma. C. W. Shockley, agent, in charge. Assistants: C. H. Mader,
agent; W. L. Thomson, agent.
El Paso, 612 Mills' Building. J. S. Brock, associate plant quarantine
inspector, in charge. Assistants: J. C. Woodward, assistant plant quarantine inspector; K. A. Gallant, junior plant quarantine inspector; J. N.
Crisler, agent.
Fabens, Box 147. B. C. Graham, assistant plant quaranti*ne inspector,
in charge. Assistants: J. I. Cowger, agent; T. Johnston, agent; R. T.
Kyzar, agent.
Fort Davis. H. E. Welker, agent, in charge. Assistants: A. D. Bloys,
agent; J. D. Patrick, agent.
Fort Stockton. W. C. Jackson, agent, in charge. Assistants: P. C. Avery,
agent; J. McD. Cobb, agent; G. G. Odom, agent.
Gail. W. E. Kennedy, agent., in charge. Assistant: H. Miller, agent.
Girvin. K. P. Morris, agent, in charge. Assistants: W. A. Blankinship,
agent; G. N. Page, agent.
La mesa, Box 813. D. M. McEachern, assistant plant, quarantine inspector,
in charge. Assistants: R. A. Vickery, assistant entomologist; J. D.
Bittner, agent; A. J. Dutton, agent; J. C. Gay, agent; W. F. Maner,
agent; E. V. Truesdale, agent.
Marfa. L. F. Curl, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in charge,. Assistants: L. B. Coffin, junior plant quarantine inspector; A. K. Inman., junior
plant quarantine inspector; H. L. Alford, agent; J. R. Daniel, agent.







153

Texas-Continued.
Pecos, Box 8. L. D. Harris, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in charge.
Assistants: H. J. Henderson, junior plant quarantine inspector; B. H.
Hicks, agent.
San Antonio, 421 Aztec Building. Assistants: S. D. Smith, plant quarantine inspector; R. W. White, associate plant quarantine inspector; G. G. Harris, assistant plant quarantine inspector; F. I. Jeffrey, assistant plant quarantine inspector; A. C. Johnson, assistant plant quarantine inspector; J. B. Moore, assistant plant quarantine inspector; I. Shiller, assistant plant quarantine inspector; W. E. von Rosenberg, assistant plant quarantine inspector; E. M. Dieffenbach, assistant mechanical engineer; J. H. Adams, junior plant quarantine inspector; T. R.
Adkins, junior plant quarantine inspector; H. S. Cavitt, junior plant quarantine inspector; W. C. Edgeworth, junior plant quarantine inspector; K. R. Elliott, junior plant quarantine inspector; G. L. Furr, junior plant quarantine inspector; S. P. Harrell, junior plant quarantine inspector; E. Hobbs, junior plant quarantine inspector; F. V. Irvin, junior plant quarantine inspector; M. S. Mirimianian, junior plant quarantine inspector; P. L. Netterville, junior plant quarantine inspector; R. G. Oakley, junior plant quarantine inspector; J. N. Todd, junior plant quarantine inspector; J. S. Wilson, junior plant quarantine inspector; J. L. Wood, junior plant quarantine inspector; Joe Milam, principal scientific aid ; W. E. Gassett, senior scientific aid; S. A. Bushland, junior administrative assistant; C. H. Bergeron, agent; T. H. Burris, agent; G. C. Brotherton, agent; W. W. Bowen, agent; T. A. Barnett, agent; E. C. Bottcher, agent; W. A. Culberson, agent; E. Cason, agent; V. Curtis, agent; S. L. Calhoun, agent; 0. L. Cook, agent; W. 1. Duplessis, agent; W. S. Dailey, agent; S. C. Dews, agent; S. R. Greer, agent; E. Gould, agent; C. D. Gibson, agent; W. T. Gurley, agent; C. W. Getzendaner, agent; J. S. Graham, agent; O. F. Haslbauer, agent; R. E.
Herndon, agent; W. A. Harvison, agent; A. M. James, agent; B. B.
Jones, agent; B. E. Liston, agent; C. D. Lebert, agent; L. L. Lewis, agent; J. M. McGough, agent; R. Mathes, agent; 0. D. Morris, agent; J. H. Miller, agent; C. E. Martin, agent; C. L. P'arnell, agent; J. B.
Patteson, agent; S. E. Poe, agent; E. S. Permenter, agent; R. T. Rawlings, agent; J. E. Steele, agent; R. C. Soxman, agent; W. F. Vogel, agent; L. A. West, agent; L. L. Williams, agent; G. T. Woodworth, agent,
K. H. Word, agent.
Stanton, box 2b O. L. Walton, junior plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistant: W. C. Gainey, agent.
Sterling City. W. E. Stockton, agent, in charge. Assistants: W. G. Hill,
agent; J. N. Smith, agent; J. B. Stallcup, agent.
Valentine. H. D. Hunter, agent, in charge. Assistant: E. R. Barnett,
agent.
THURBERIA WEEVIL PROJECT

Headquarters, 421 Aztec Building, San Antonio, Tex. George G. Becker, entomologist, in charge

Object: To prevent spread of the Thurberia weevil, involving scouting operations to determine range of infestation, clean-up operations, and the enforcement of quarantine regulations against possible carriers of this pest. Arizona:
Tucson, box 307. W. E. Conn, assistant plant quarantine inspector, in
charge. Assistants: G. B. Ray, assistant plant quarantine inspector; W. E. Ayers, junior plant quarantine inspector; W. H. Anderson, agent;
R. D. Burr, agent; J. A. Downs, agent; J. C. Rloby, agent.
MEXICAN FRUIT WORM PROJECT

Headquarters, 503 Baxter Building, Harlingen. Tex. P. A. Iloidale, plant quarantine inspector, in charge
Object: To eradicate the Mexican fruit worm within the United States, and to enforce regulatory measures to prevent its reestablishmient, including the destruction of alternate hosts, and the maintaining of host-free lcriods.

3 Transferred temporarily from the Bure:iu oft Entola.







154

Texas:
Brownsville, Chamber of Commerce. Entomological determinations: F. H.
Benjamin, associate plant quarantine inspector. i
Box 752. District inspector: A. V. Smith, assistant plant quarantine
inspector. Assistant: L. F. Greer, senior plant quarantine aide.
Donna, box 778. District inspector: J. W. Monk, agent. Assistants: C. H.
Peery, agent; Miss A. M. Schweitzer, collaborator.
Harlingen, 503 Baxter Building. In charge of administrative office: K. H.
Townsend, associate plant quarantine inspector. Coordinator of field operations: M. H. Ford, associate plant quarantine inspector. District inspector: W. R. Heard, assistant plant quarantine inspector. Assistant district inspector: L. R. Du Bois, agent; G. J. Potter, senior plant quarantine aide.
La Feria, box 177. District inspector: J. M. Worsham, agent. Assistant:
0. C. Trotman, agent.
Mercedes, box 32. District inspector: W. W. Decell, assistant plant quarantine inspector. Assistant: F. G. Bernard, agent.
Mission, -box 261. District inspectors: L. G. Plyler, assistant plant quarantine inspector; F. 0. Swan, assistant plant quarantine inspector. Assistant: J. B. Corns, senior plant quarantine aide.
Pharr, box 500. District inspector: J. W. Patterson, assistant plant quarantine inspector. Assistants: C. R. Roitsch, junior plant quarantine inspector; Mrs. A. C. Allen, collaborator; Mrs. J. W. Hollan, collaborator;
Miss V. Johnson, collaborator.
Raymondville. District inspector: J. K. Smith, agent.
San Benito, box 884. District inspector: A. Thomae, assistant plant quarantine inspector. Assistant: T. M. Dobson, senior plant quarantine
aide.
Weslaco, box 453. District inspector: E. F. Pepper, assistant plant quarantine inspector. Assistant:, G. V. Warren, senior plant quarantine aide.
The permanent force which is listed above is increased during the winter and spring months by the employment of temporary assistants.


LIST OF STATE PLANT-QUARANTINE OFFICIALS

There are listed below the appropriate 'officials of the various States and Territories from whom additional information relative to restrictions on the movement of plants and plant products may be secured: Alabama: B. P. Livingston, chief, division of plant industry, Montgomery. Arizona: 0. C. Bartlett, State entomologist, Phoenix. Arkansas: Paul H. Millar, chief inspector, State plant board, Little Rock. California: W. C. Jacobsen, chief, bureau of plant quarantine and pest control,
department of agriculture, Sacramento.
Colorado: C. P. Gillette, State entomologist, Fort Collins. Connecticut: W. E. Britton, State entomologist, New Haven. Delaware: J. A. Adams, plant pathologist, State board of agriculture, Dover. Florida: J. H. Montgomery, quarantine inspector, State plant board, Gainesville. Georgia: M. S. Yeomans, State entomologist, Atlanta. Hawaii: D. F. Fullaway, chief plant inspector,, board of commissioners of agriculture and forestry, Honolulu.
Idaho: M. L. Dean, director, bureau of plant industry, Boise, Illinois: P. A. Glenn, chief plant inspector, State Entomologist Building, Urbana. Indiana: Frank N. Wallace, State entomologist, Indianapolis. Iowa: Carl J. Drake, State entomologist, Aines. Kansas, north: George A. Dean, entomologist, Kansas Agricultural College, Manhattan.
Kansas, south: H. B. I-Imigerford, entomologist, Lawrence. Kentucky: H. Garman, State entomologist, Lexington. Louisiana: W. E. Anderson, State entomologist, Baton Rouge. Maine: Robert F. Chandler, jr., State horticulturist, Augusta. Maryland: E. N. Cory, State entomologist, College Park. Massachusetts: 11. H. Allen, director, division of plant-pest control, State House,
Boston.









Michigan: E. C. Mandeinberg.,, in charge of orchard and nursery in spection, care
of State department of agriculture, Lansing.
Minnesota: A. G. Ruggles, State entomologist, University Farm. St. P1aul. Mississippi: R. W. flamed, entomologist, State plant board, A. and M. College. Missouri: Leonard Ilaseman, State entomolo'gist. Columbia. Montana: Edward Dickey, chief, division of horticulture. Missoula. ,Nebraska: L. M. Gates, nursery inspector, department of agriculture, L~iic)lni. Nevada: George G. Schweis, field entomologist. State Quarantinle Office, Reno. New Hampshire: W. C. O'Kane, deputy commissioner, depa-,rt1men1t of ag-ricuilture.
Durham.
New Jersey: Harry B. Weiss, chief, bureau of statistics and inspection. Trenton. New Mexico: H. L. Kent, president, College of Agriculture and 'Mechanic Arts,
State College.
New York: B. D. Van Buren, director, bureau of plant industry, department of
agriculture and markets, Albany.
North Carolina: R. W. Jeiby, State entomologist, department of agriculture,
Raleigh.
North Dakota: J. A. Munro, State entomologist, Fargo. Ohio : E. C. Cotton, division of plant industry, department of agriculture,
Columbus.
Oklahoma: R. E. Montgomery, State nursery inspector. Oklahoma City. Oregon: Charles A. Cole, secretary, State board of horticulture, 719 Oregon
Building, Portland.
Pennsylvania: R. H. Bell, director, bureau of plant industry, Harrisburg. Porto Rico: Carlos Chardon, commissioner of agriculture and labor, San Juan. Rhode Island: A. E. Stene, chief, bureau of entomology, State House, Providence. South Carolina: Franklin Sherman, chief, division of entomology and zoology,
Clemson College.
South Dakota: R. W. Vance, nursery inspector, Pierre. Tennessee: G. M. Bentley, State entomologist and plant pathologist, 406 Morrill
Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Texas: J. M. Del Curto. State entomologist. department of agriculture. Austin. Utah: F. E. Stephens, State agricultural inspector, State board of agriculture,
Salt Lake City.
Vermont: M. B. Cummings, State nursery inspector, Burlington. Virginia: G. T. French, State entomologist, 1112 State Office Building, Richmond. Washington: J. I. Griner, supervisor of horticulture, department of agriculture,
Olympia.
West Virginia: W. E. Rumsey, State entomologist, Morgantown. Wisconsin: E. L. Chambers, State entomologist, Capitol Annex, Madison. Wyoming: L. T. Oldroyd, commissioner of agriculture, Cheyenne.























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