Citation
The Seminole

Material Information

Title:
The Seminole
Creator:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publisher:
Senior Class of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Annual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
63 v. : ill. ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
College yearbooks ( lcsh )
College yearbooks ( fast )
Students ( fast )
University of Florida
Genre:
yearbook ( aat )
serial ( sobekcm )
Yearbooks ( fast )

Notes

Abstract:
The first University of Florida yearbook was published in 1910. Originally the editors of the yearbook and those of the Florida Alligator were elected during the student body elections each year. The yearbook was titled The Seminole, a name given prior to the football rivalry between the University of Florida and Florida State University. Except for 1944 when the yearbook was not published due to World War II, the Seminole was published annually until 1973. That year, possibly due to financial difficulties and a change in the student culture, the yearbook ceased publication. In 1983, the students again saw the need for a yearbook and published the Tower, renamed after Century Tower. In the 1980s, the Tower became an agency of Student Government and by 1993 the Tower was receiving annual funding. The Tower continued to be published until 2008 when the yearbook again ceased publication.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. no.1 (1910) - v. 63 (1973).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida Archives
Rights Management:
Copyright Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier:
01389460 ( OCLC )
sc 84005031 ( LCCN )
ocm01389460

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Tower (Gainesville, Fla.)

Full Text













4 49A-, I



































3m


















UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES



















I



























Published Annually
by
The Junior Class University of Florida





FKI
f/ -'



















FOREWORD

In this, the ninth volume of The Seminole, which we have striven so faithfully to perfect, we have asked and obtained the cooperation of every person connected with the University.
This volume, like past volumes of The Seminole, is intended as a pleasant memorial of a full year here; a melody, composed of good deeds, humorous incidents, and the harvest of honest industry.
It is issued rather for your amusement, than for our fame. Should you, gentle reader, after many years, in musing over its pages find comfort, recall a dear friend, or be led to reflect on your achievements in college days, it will have crowned our efforts with success, and our tedious task will have been but a milestone along life's pathway of pleasure.
THE EDITOR.
























CONTENTS

I. The University II. The Classes III. Athletics IV. Fraternities V. Military VI. Organizations VII. The College Year




















This Book is Affectionately Dedicated to
The Sacred Memory of Lieutenant Wiley Haralson Burford S A Son of Florida
Who Gave His Life Willingly to the Cause


And to
His Many Comrades in Arms All Sons of Florida Who Answered the Call













































W : dh2




























Eight
















-7




SLOPIDAI FIRST lo FALL




What greater could be the sacrifice? On battle's altar he gave his life; With a smile on his face felt death's cold hand, 'Mid the war's flaring rim in a foreign land. Gone ?-No, not to us who knew him well, His noble life and valorous deeds still live. For the cause of his friends he gave his all, What more could a man so dearly give?

We wait the day, we know not when, to mee:, To clasp his hand, his cheerful smile to greet,
To live with him again, in his abode,
To live with him forever near our God.
With twilight settling down upon our lives, The flaming memory of one so dear burns bright, The monument of love he left behind, Casts on our darken path a beam of light.


These wavering lines are but a solemn thought of him, Who answered to the Nation's call. Who's resting now in peace with Seraphim, The first true son of "Florida" to fall.
S. F. W.







WHIn a

__ --- .ur or ,rbr, arY 14&, 19- .



Nine

























\

t5TATT -~






.EI.~. 6.'






a -1 *1 hA! S







/2' ~~PY~IN F ~'~Arm



4~4 I


.6 N1 'a (I



A-~

*. 4~1 'I,

V CA~KA ~ ~9~4~;~;2* */
















Ten



























Seminole Staff 1919

DEWEY A. DYE................................Editor in Chief
W. HAROLD FORD.. ................ ...... Assistant Editor in Chief
LLOYD Z. MORGAN ..-------......-------...--..--..........----------....Managing Editor
JAMES W. BRYCE........... .....-------------------Assistant Managing Editor
WALTER W. GUNN .-----------...............----------..------............. .Business Manager
FRANK P. COOPER.----....--------....--......-.........Assistant Business Manager
SIBBALD FLINT WILSON.......------------..........................---------------- Art Editor
HENRY C. WARNER.----......-- ...................-----------------------.............Athletic Editor
OSCAR H. NORTON ---......--.......................---------------------------Local Editor
EUGENE CARPENTER_ -------....--------.........-------------.... .Literary Editor
WILLIAM BIVENS ---------....... .. ...........---------------Assistant Local Editor
W. L. MCALEXANDER........... ....----------------------------Snapshot Man























Eleven












































































Twelve




































































































bi 4


























SThe woriai lm itnoes onoThe
-v* ieels o ri6f A lqultititde oi: thrf andind rise lietoweil pass 9 e ca )s he e asseg



the cables we vfIdonri nlus t

TO prepare jcwc
o"R vf4; s


S~e~k t~AR























i~~J~BiBt ~~i

z
i, I" ~C": ec:"



iA~ :al i i -i


















j
i






L









I

i

Ei~l i:r I :





i, ; i V, rl




b
~






'















Fourteen

















College of Arts and Sciences

FACULTY

J. N. ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D.
Professor of Ancient Languages Dean of College of Arts and Sciences
O. C. AULT, A.B.
Professor of History and Economics
J. R. BENTON, B.A., PH.D.
Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering
L. W. BUCHHOLZ, A.M.
Professor of Education and School Management
H. W. Cox, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of Philosophy and Education
C. L. CROW, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of Modern Languages and Secretary of General Faculty
H. S. DAVIS, PH.D.
Professor of Zoology and Bacteriology
J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of English Language and Literature
W. L. FLOYD, B.S., M.S.
Ass't Dean of College of Agriculture and Professor of Botany and Horticulture
J. J. GRIMM, B.S.,
JAS. N. ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D. Ass't Professor of Botany and Bacteriology Dean I. M. LEE, A.B.
Ass't Professor of Chemistry J. L. MCGHEE, A.B., PH.D., Professor of Chemistry
W. S. PERRY, A.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering
A. D. ST. AMANT, B.S., M.A., Acting Professor of History and Economics
T. M. SIMPSON, M.A., PH.D., Professor of Mathematics
N. L. SIMS, A.M., PH.D., Professor of Sociology and Political Science
COL. E. S. WALKER, U. S. A. (Retired), Commandant of Cadets and Professor of
Military Science and Tactics
C. A. ROBERTSON, A.B., Instructor in English

N OW that the men are beginning to return from the camps to take

up their life of preparation, we may view the field of the Arts and Sciences with a clearer eye. The past year has been a trying one
owing to the general disruption of the American colleges. Yet, during this period the college has "carried on" Avith renewed efforts to train men to be of service to their country. The quick discriminating thinker, he who knows men, and the man with broad sound judgment, these are the type which the College of Arts and Sciences has been aiming to produce as
material for the American army training schools.
But as peace hovers near, the college has turned to the training of
men to be leaders in civil life. Thru a course in this college a young









Fifteen















man learns those, broad facts of life which are acquired by the less fortunate thru hard knocks and years of trial. The keen, liberal and masterful type of thinking, moulded during these courses gives to its men a sure grasp on their future work. Truly, Arts and Sciences. is somewhat an introduction or opening to future work, not a vocation in itself, but from its degrees









J. M. FARR, M.A., PH.D.










C. L. CROW, M.A., PH.D.

branch all the roads of life whether that of the professional, as the lawyer or doctor; or that of the artisan or tradesman. Thruout his life he will carry a broader viewpoint, along with that impetus and poise necessary to the one who successfully masters the trials and knocks of life.
Aiding us in our striving for these ideals is a very strong and efficient facH. S. DAVIS, PH.D. ulty.






Sixteen










































J. L. McGHEE, A.B., PH.D. N. L. SIMS, M.A., PH.D.






























J. J. GRIMM, B.S. I. M. LEE, A.B. Seventeen






































0~ 4~'"P- V Lm iki




























Eihte

















College of Agriculture

FACULTY
P. H. ROLFS, M. S.
Dean of the College of Agriculture
E. C. ARNOLD, A.B., LL.B.
Professor of Law
L. W. BUCHHOLZ, A.M.
Professor of Eduaction and School Management
H. W. Cox, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of Philosophy and Education
H. S. DAvIs, PH.D.
Professor of Zoology and Bacteriology
J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of English Language and Literature
W. L. FLOYD, B.S., M.S.
Ass't Dean of College of Agriculture and Professor of Botany and Horticulture
WM. GOMME,
District Agent of Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work in Florida
J. J. GRIMM, B. S.
Ass't Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
G. L. HERRINGTON, B. S.
State Agent for Boys' Clubs
S. W. HIATT
P. H. ROLFS, M.S., Dean District Agent for Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work in West Florida E. W. JENKINS, B.PED., District Agent for Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work
in Central Florida
C. MILTIMORE, B.S., Librarian
J. L. MCGHEE, A.B., PH.D., Professor of Chemistry
C. K. McQUARRIE, State Agent in Charge of Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work
and Farmers' Institutes
F. ROGERS, B.S.A., Professor of Soils and Fertilizers
A. P. SPENCER, M.S., Assistant Director of Extension Division
J. SPENCER, D.V.S., Professor of Veterinary Science
T. M. SiMPSoN, M.A., PH.D., Professor of Mathematics
J. E. TURLINGTON, B.AGR., M.S., PH.D., Professor of Agronomy
S. L. VINSON, Editor of Agricultural News Service and Instructor in charge of
Correspondence Courses and Agricultural Journalism
COL. E. S. WALKER, U. S. A. (Retired), Commandant of Cadets and Professor of
Military Science and Tactics
C. H. WILLOUGHBY, B. AGR., Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying

PREEMINENT among the colleges of the University stands the

College of Agriculture. Not only has it the largest enrollment and offers more courses to the students enrolled, but it comes in contact
with and is of service to a greater number of men and women of the State than any other college on the campus, Never before has the demand for








Nineteen














scientifically trained men in the field of agriculture been so great as it is at the present time. The College is meeting these rapidly increasing demands by the establishment of new courses and in giving to the students enrolled the very best practical and scientific edu.cation and training possible. In order to do this new departments are being established. Last year a department of








W. L. FLOYD, B.S., M.S.










C. H. WILLOUGHBY, B.AGR.

Veterinary Science was created and the college proposes to establish a department of Poultry Husbandry this year.
Under the direction of Dean P. H. Rolfs, Asst. Dean W. L. Floyd, Dr. J. E. Turlington, Dr. John Spencer and Prof. C. H. Willoughby as heads of their respective departments, the College of Agriculture is especially favored. These men, together with their assistants and J. SPENCER, D.V.S. the cooperation of the professors of the






Twenty















College of Arts and Sciences are accomplishing results unsurpassed by her sister colleges. She is very fortunate to have in the faculty men who are experts in their field and who are well prepared to teach the subjects belonging to their departments. They are entirely in sympathy with the work of the college and the welfare of the students and residents of the
State.
The College of Agriculture stands with beckoning hands to every man
of scientific or of practical talent. The courses offered are many. First it offers a four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. This course involves courses for students specializing in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Horticulture, Agriculture, Agricultural
Education, Chemistry and General Horticulture.
A middle course is given for students who have not time to complete
the four-year course. This course emphasizes the practical, technical and scientific problems that confront the farmers of the State and leads to the title of Graduate in Farming. Very Practical one-year and four-months courses are offered to those who have only a working knowledge of the
common school branches.
To those who do not find it convenient to attend these courses the
college offers a ten-day short course which is becoming very popular and attended by large numbers. Correspondence courses are also conducted
which reach many people who are unable to attend the institution.










STwentone















Twenty-one





































Ion=




















































Twenty-twoao
















College of Engineering

FACULTY
J. R. BENTON, B.A., PH.D.
Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering and Dean of the College of Engineering
R. E. CmANDLER, M.E., M.M.E.
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Drawing
C. L. CRow, M.A., PH.D.
Professor of Modern Languages and Secretary of the General Faculty
H. S. DAVIS, PH.D.
Professor of Zoology and Bacteriology
J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of English Language and Literature
I. M. LEE, A.B.
Ass't Professor in Chemistry
J. L. McGHEE, A.B., PH.D.
Professor of Chemistry
W. S. PERRY, A.B., M.S.
Ass't Professor in Physics and Electrical Engineering
A. D. ST. AMANT, B.S., M.A.
Acting Professor of History and Economics
T. M. SIMPSON, M.A., PH.D. J. R. BENTON, B.A., PH.D., Dean Professor of Mathematics T. D. SMITH, B.S.
Ass't Professor of Civil Engineering M. L. THORNBURG, B.S., M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering
.R. W. THOROUGHGOOD, C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering
E. S. WALKER, Col. U. S. A. (Retired), Commandant of Cadets and Professor of
Military Science and Tactics
H. S. WEBB, M.S., Acting Professor of Electrical Engineering




as will be useful to its graduates in the profession of engineering.
The courses of instruction offered are similar to those of other
American engineering schools of college grade and are Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Civil Engineering, and Chemical Engineering.
The headquarters and principal building of the College of Engineering
is known as Engineering Hall. This is a three-story brick building of the same general style of architecture as the other buildings of the University.
Attached to this building are two one-story wings in one of which are located the boilers, steam engine laboratory and machine shop. The other, or south wing, has just been completed this year. It is a one-story building, forty by one hundred and eighty feet, and divided into three sections.








Twenty-three














The north section is to be used for a woodshop, the middle section for a forge shop, and the south section for a foundry.
The appropriation for this building was made with the expectation of its. covering the cost of construction and Equipment, but on account of the sudden rise in the price of construction work during the year, the funds turned









W. S. PERRY, A.B., M.S.











T. M. SIMPSON, M.A., PH.D.

out to be sufficient for the construction work only. It is expected that the legislature will appropriate the necessary money for equipment this year. At present the woodworking shop and forge shop are located in a one-story brick building a short distance from Engineering Hall.
Another improvement made during R. W. THOROUGHGOOD, C.E. the past year was the completion of the







Twenty-four



































E. S. WALKER

third story of Engineering Hall,. and moving the Physics Laboratory to that place. This makes an ideal laboratory on account of 'its large size and convenient arrangement of apparatus.












R. E. CHANDLER, M.E., M.M.E.











Twventy-five





























Tmalr




































































Twenty-six














College of Law




-N




FACULTY
HARRY R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B.
Professor of Law, Dean of / ~'' O College of Law E. C. ARNOLD, A.B., LL.B.
Professor of Law
C. W. CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B.
Professor of Law












HARRY R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B., Dean

T may be well said that the title of that well known Shakespearean
drama, "The Comedy of Errors", is a congenial caption to the ordinary person flight across the stage of time. Life-a terse statement
of many mistakes, much pathos, and little unalloyed joy. But there is a scene in that unfolding comedy which outshines all others in its intensity and impact-that laid in the shadows of Justice. There, a mistake means incarceration or death; there, a mistake means the loss of property, the monument to man's sweat and blood and honest endeavor; there, mistake means the turning loose upon society of the criminal, who paints his history in the blood of others. Thus, mistakes in that scene must be reduced to a minimum; and that can be attained only thru a thoro and
intensive training in law.






Twenty-seven















Conceived in the minds of those who had this aim in view; backed by the money of this fast advancing commonwealth, and fed by the undauntable youth of this State, the College of Law, installed in 1908, has risen to that high pinnacle of success which is so well known and realized by the foremost jurists of the South. It extends to those who would grasp the golden opportunity, an unexcelled course in substantive and adjective law. It gives to the State of Florida a class of men far advanced in the ability to cope with the legal problems that go hand in hand with this unfolding era of prosperity.
Just inside the campus gates, stands the College of Law building. Elaborately equipped it is at the disposition C. W. CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B.

of those enterprising men who would be the real men of the future. It has one of the best law libraries in the State and the best librarian; practice court room; administrative offices; consultation rooms; spacious recitation rooms; and supplied with the last thing in modern conveniences. The faculty are men in the prime of life who have consecrated their entire time to the advancement of the legal profession.
Clothed in the atmosphere of the Old South, yet subservient to no creeds nor antagonisms, the College of Law stands for the highest ideals. It stands for right and justice. Today it is the law of tomorrow in the embryo. E. C. ARNOLD, A.B., LL.B.








Twenty-eight






























LUI U


r<



z C,( 'LLA


;,LL,




j .l


>HQ >1, "111 % o N
v CD




OQ -wz A oll o





z st~-~o 7z, Zt y c








Twenty-nine Z

















































Thirt
1=77





P-i As Hg

















Teachers' College and Normal School

FACULTY

H. W. Cox, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of Philosophy and Education and Dean of the Teachers College
J. N. ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D.
Professor of Ancient Languages
-O. C. AULT, A.B., Professor of History and Economics
J. R. BENTON, B.A.
Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering
L. W. BUCHHOLZ, A.M.
Professor of Education and School Management
W. S. CAWTHON, A.M.
Professor of Secondary Education, and State High School Inspector
C. L. CROW, M.A., PH.D.
Professor of Modern Languages and Secretary of the General Faculty
J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of English Language and Literature
P. W. FATTIG, B.S. IN ED., M.S.
Professor of Agricultural Education H. W. COX, A.M., PH.D., Dean W. B. HATHAWAY, A.B., B.D., M.A.
Instructor in Mechanical Engineering J. R. FULK, A.M., PH.D., Professor of Education and Supervisor of Practice High
School
J. L. McGHEE, A.B., PH.D., Professor of Chemistry J. W. NORMAN, A.B., A.M., Professor of Education
T. H. QUIGLEY, Professor of Trade and Industrial Education
T. M. SIMPSON, M.A., PH.D., Professor of Mathematics
A. J. STRONG, Instructor in Mechanic Arts and Foreman of the Shop
J. E. TURLINGTON, B.AGR., M.S., PH.D., Professor of Agronomy
T. C. FRYE, B.PED., Fellow and Assistant in Education
L. L. HOUSEHOLDER, A.B., Fellow and Assistant in Education

TEACHING as a vocation gives men one thing that they all desire,
that is, personal influence over people. The Teachers College of the University of Florida aims to produce broad, well-trained and
efficient teachers and leaders who will use wisely this privilege. Wide opportunity is offered the student thru elective work so as to enable him to reach out and touch many fields. In the required educational work in the regular four-year course he is given the fundamentals under professors who know their fields from practical experience. An attempt is made thru the study of the history of education and public school administration to impress upon the student the responsibility and nobleness of the REAL









Thirty-one













teacher's work, and to prepare him to be a leader in the profession when he goes out. The modern teacher is not merely a school master-he is more-he is a leader in the community group in which he lives; his influence must be felt, and he should be the best informed and best educated man in his group.
The highest work of the Teachers College of the University of Florida is to take young men with ability and purpose and familiarize them with progresL. W. BUCHHOLZ, A.M.












W. S. CAWTHON, A.M. sive educational methods, and how to take and apply them to the classroom. Like efficient methods in business, efficient methods of teaching have developed, and it remains for the teachers' colleges to inculcate such correct systems in the minds of their output in order that they may go out and disseminate such knowledge to the schools and the teachers of the country. The teaching profession of Florida looks to W. W. HATHAWAY, the graduates of the Teachers College A.B., B.D., M.A. here for leadership and inspiration.





Thirty-two









































LAW LIBRARY





























GENERAL LIBRARY





Thirty-three

















































































Thirty-four















Agricultutal Experiment Station

FACULTY
P. H. ROLFS, M.S.
Director of Experiment Station and Division of University Extension
S. E. COLLISON, M.S.
Chemist of Experiment Station
B. F. FLOYD, A.M.
Plant Physiologist to Experiment Station
J. M. SCOTT, B. S.
Vice-Director and Animal Industrialist to Experiment Station
C. D. SHERBAKOFF, PH.D.
Associate Plant Pathologist to Experiment Station
H. E. STEVENS, M.S.
Plant Pathologist to Experiment Station
J. B. THOMPSON, B.S.
Specialist in Forage Crop Investigation for Experiment Station
J. E. TURLINGTON, B.AGR., M.S., PH.D.
Professor of Agronomy
G. UMLAUF,
Gardener
T. VAN HYNING
Librarian
S. L. VINSON
Editor of Agricultural News Service and P. H. ROLFS, M.S., Director Instructor in charge of Correspondence Courses and Agricultural Journalism J. R. WATSON, A.M., Entomologist to Experiment Station
C. K. McQUARRIE, Division of University Extension, Farm Demonstration
A. P. SPENCER, M.S., Assistant Director of Extension Division

HE Experiment Station of the University of Florida is one of the

most important of its kind in the United States. Its director, P. H. Rolfs, is recognized as one of the ablest men employed in
this line of work and his reputation as an expert is nation-wide. Under his direction a staff of scientists labor for the betterment of the animal and
vegetable life of Florida.
The main object of the Experiment Station is to acquire and diffuse
useful agricultural knowledge. It carries on investigations and experiments which the farmer is unable to do and could not afford to. The results of such are a direct benefit to the farmer and they are given to him without cost. This information is published in the form of bulletins and distributed free to the farmers of the State. Thus it saves him the worry and expense of such an investigation and adds to his profits in the
future.
Problems connected with the agricultural development of the State are









Thirty-five














being solved in the different research departments. Problems connected with Horticulture, including plant breeding, plant introduction, and propagation; Animal Industry, including the study of feed crops, the effect of feeding certain crops to cattle and hogs, the growing of feed and forage crops, the increased production of cattle and hogs, better breeds for the State; Agronomy,









C. K. McQUARRIE










J. M. SCOTT, B.S.
including the breeding of cotton, corn, and other farm crops; Plant Pathology, including the study of plant diseases, determining the causes and conditions favoring the methods of control for preventing losses from diseases; Plant Physiology, including the study of plants as affected by fertilizers and soil, especially as to the effect on plants; Entomology, including the study of insect pests, their habits and methods of comA. P. SPENCER bating.






Thirty-si








































AN:












. .. . .. .


~ra19~s l~~ TrThirty-seven































1-- --~--~I~~











\I



















I












H


: :s

























I

























































II TILirty-ei~ILt
























C \
-c~ d n~ ~
t -~wwlb~
r rW51 a
~~ oe~~y r~ L
s ~4
,~S9~ sqW :~y~C~ Z ~i~w- n; :~( F~~CLCsr~ ~

a
hl\"J ':
F
~ih
r;~s~E'" j ioi
BFucSr; r
gT, iW
a,~R~L,~ S~u~o tP
-r
sZ W14
D~,~~p*O
a~rrlOC~IT~

o I ~P"
~h ~IS~
~LJ3 n
,0,~
~~dP~nu g~$ Ot~yd ISnz I ill e ,iY
~RPJ ,~~3 h0
a3 ~o
$a"
9 hB~YP~ h3*
lii;z~

i U Ff~u 1~ ,I u m
~ C%;i e" r3~" r ;9 aJ~ ?Z ~ u;.itr 'i Ut QZi) O F;" o
SBSL cz~-~3~
Z 4~lwi I-0n~ ~llr~ s llld rs WZ o r':Z~~o
L
~~,wLc
~;e_~oZ~ r
c ~~Zq~""f~ P~ e
*'Hr' J i- Olq ~c ciii ?&
~DJ~. ~ lu o
< i-~ i; "'~
u~ W
33 B w U)
~~:o' A W za~
r po;S ~ Iv J
Co Q
j:4E~ ~;36 iY P
~~Le ;i. a o 27 LL ~ IU o" n ~ox
(P, t r Q>t
n :Z
rd~u b
O:34 B T~gl t:J i: o
W O~ t ~m
>L~~m W ~
eYw ii
~~,: Lop4jld~(; )WII "~~c~' ~ '~H O bt; hJ p 2 ~~~~i l~hV ~~3(1











































Miss MARY MCROBBIE MRS. MARGARET PEELER MRS. S. J. SWANSON
Resident Nurse Matron Director of Commons



























BUCKMAN HALL






Forty















Alex Francisco vs. Auditor Graham
24 BUCKMAN COURT, 275, APRIL 1ST, 1919 HE facts in this case are as follows: Alec Francisco, the plaintiff,
runs a small soda fountain and dance hall near the campus of the University of Florida. Auditor Graham, the defendant, operates
a fashionable eating house known as the "House of Commons", sometimes
spoken of as the beanery or mess hall.
Alec claims that the Auditor by the aid of Mrs. Swanson and her
family of waiters furnished food of such a good variety and in such abundance that one of the said Alec's best customers, to-wit, Bohooley, quit patronizing the soda fountain and aance hall of the said Alec, for which reason he brings this suit to recover for the damages suffered by reason
of the alienation of Bohooley's affections.
During the course of the trial Alex produced a number of witnesses
who testified in his behalf. The first testimony was given by Mess Hall Johnson, a man who has made himself famous by reason of his ferocious
and notorious appetite.
"Your Honor, on many occasions at meal time after bringing my
appetite under sufficient control to be able to allow my attention to






















THOMAS HALL






Forty-one














wander pro tern from my fork, I have searched in vain to the right and to the left to see whether or not I alone remained in the mess hall and just as I was about to lose hope my vision would light upon one who was seated at the corner of the middle table, one who even yet had not slackened his interest or energy and one who was no less than Bohooley. When I made the supreme sacrifice, yea, even when I paid the last full measure of devotion by leaving the mess hall, I did so with a feeling of reluctance and fear lest the food left behind me be devoured by a food destroyer mightier than myself, whose appetite I can in no wise approach."
The second witness introduced by Alec was one of the fairest members of the younger social set of Gainesville. Her name is here omitted from the record at Bohooley's request. Her testimony is as follows:
"Your Honor, whether or not the amount of food eaten by Bohooley prevented him from buying anything from Alec I am unable to say, for during the entire eight years in which I have known him he has never yet bought me a box of candy. But regardless of this I believe that Alec should be allowed to recover from the Auditor, because without a doubt the eats in the House of Commons have had an awful effect upon the said Bohooley. More than once has he been tardy in filling his dates with me, all because of the ridiculous amount of time used in eating. More than once have I been thus denied the pleasure and comfort of his society




















UNIVERSITY COMMONS














because he lingered to partake of a last sweet delicacy in the House of Commons. And more than once have my hopes and dreams of matrimony been thus shattered and broken to pieces on that impregnable rock, the
House of Commons!"
At this point in the trial when the jury were just about to be swept off
their feet; at a time when they were about to yield up their power of reason to be replaced by their sense of beauty, Auditor Graham introduced
his star witness, William S. Airth, who testified as follows:
"Your Honor, it seems that one thing which so far has been overlooked is the necessity that the jury have a full knowledge of all the facts
and incidents surrounding this case.
"The training we get in the mess hall is approximately the most
valuable of any received at the University of Florida, as we there learn to fight life's battles while we're young. Another advantage is that it cultivates a policy of watchful waiting. Three times a day we stand outside and watch for Bob's right hand to go up. Then comes the training you get as
a sprinter, for as soon as the doors are opened a big drive begins.
"Good as this training may appear to be, yet more valuable than all
else is the training received by a waiter. Why, Your Honor, I'd rather be a waiter in the mess hall than to be clothed in purple or to wear the diadem of the Caesars. With a load of eats on their hands and the aisles crowded they learn to side step and dodge, an art which is of great value both in football and dancing. Like in football they sometimes fumble and are penalized, five, ten or fifteen words back. But if they ever do any slugging then they are ruled out of the game entirely by referee Swanson.
"More striking than anything else is their steady habits. The other
day a waiter went out to the kitchen and got a dish of grits, then he went
back and got another dish of grits, then he went back-."
William S. Airth continued telling about the waiter going back after
another dish of grits until at last the judge went to sleep. When he awoke he heard the same old story, "then he went back and got another dish of grits; then he went back and got another dish of grits". The judge asked, "Aren't they ever going to finish bringing the grits? How about a little zip ?" But Airth continued, "then he went back and got another dish of grits, then he went back and got another dish of grits, then he went back and got another dish of grits", until at last the judge said: "Well, you can let your waiter rest awhile now because the statute of limitations has run against the offense and although Alec might have been able to have recovered when this suit was begun it is too late now, as you have
used such a long time testifying that his right of action has lapsed".
Plaintiff non-suited.
Whitfield, McCallum and Hargrave, J. J. concur in the opinion.






Forty-three


















n~;~

;n4k





~I I d;

~ i~~; ~,kfi LpPdB~ 8~~














"a, ~i~ Ciiir"


p" ~F~L~
,~ --- ..
iBn"is ;S~ i'"';: 19





B





~l~is 8~ ~ ~ ~~~8;~
~~~i~









Fortl-fozl,












LU ) P
< A Z r >-)bz I 0




0 J
FI~dZLLj




4 w mor4r~ "c %~on W <.1L rw




3 tu _~ WW


W INc~ W~'~P



Uj M. I :C l

od W -1 z V- V w Z La - 0 )H U P6Z VTZO WW 0 C A fj< : I- : d 4 o
H H zc -WIL F- D~i~~hLL


co U)




W z 4z Az : Wbw~ ~Wa <






































PefI 01






















a Mtil. /. ell





THE HONOR COMMITTEE











Forty-six











Graduate School







































CHARLES A. ROBERTSON, A.B.












THOMAS C. FRYE, B. PED. LEROY D. HOUSEHOLDER, A.B.








Forty-eight









SENIOR S





































HUGH HAYNESWORTH McCALLUM "Mc"
JOHN NASH WHITFIELD Jacksonville, Fla.
"Whit"-"Clown" COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Tallahassee, Fla.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Pi Kappa Alpha; Serpent Ribbon Society; President Benton Engineering Society, 1917-'18; Baseball "F" 1916-'17'18-'19; Mandolin Club; President Duval Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi; Base- County Club; Vice President Senior ball "F", 1917-'19; Capt. Baseball 1919; Class; Cheer Leader 1918-'19; Athletic President Combined Senior Classes .'19; Editor Alligator 1918-'19; "F" Club. "F" Club.


























Fifty







































THOMAS MYERS PALMER "Tomn"
PAUL DOUGLAS CAMP Tallahassee, Fla.
"Pee Dee" ARTS AND SCIENCE COLLEGE White Springs, Fla.
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 7

(Y Kappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi; Assistant Editor of Seminole 1917-'18; Representative to Executive Committee of Theta Chi; Phi Alpha Kappa (local Student Body from Junior and Senior
Ag.); Serpent Ribbon Society; President Class.
Inter-Fraternity Council 1918-'19; Agricultural Club, Vice President 1917-'18, Secretary-Treasurer 1916-'17, Critic 1918-'19; Inter-Society Debating Team 1917-'18; Secretary- Treasurer Senior Class; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 1916-'17; Stock Judging Team 1917-'18; Scroll and Saber; Battalion Staff 1919; Student Assistant Animal Husbandry and Dairying
1918-'19.
C

















Fifty-one






































EDWIN PHILLIPS GRANBERRY "Eddie"
Sargo, Fla. EDWIN BURKETT HAMPTON
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING "Skeet"
Gainesville, Fla.
ARTS AND SCIENCE COLLEGE
Kappa Alpha; Benton Engineering Society; Tennis Club; Senior Baseball; I Marine Corps; Columbia College; Glee Club. Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Serpent Ribbon Society; Cooley Club; John Marshall Debating Society; Washington and Lee 1913-'14-'15-'16.




























Fifty-two







































LAURENCE HERVEY SKINNER
"Larry" CHARLES FREDERICK SMITH, JR. Alachua, Fla. "Karl" ARTS AND SCIENCE COLLEGE Gainesville, Fla.
ARTS AND SCIENCE COLLEGE


Kappa Alpha Fraternity; Theta Ribbon Society; Columbia College 1915-'16,
1916-'17; Baseball Manager 1916-'17; Phi Kappa Phi; E. K. Chemical SoVarsity Basketball 1916-'17; President ciety.
Dramatic Club 1916-'17; University Band 1917-'18; Senior Baseball; 2nd Lt. Inf.
U. S. Army.


























Fifty-three







































ROBERT TURNER iARGRAVE "Bob"
ALDEN BAILEY CROSBY St. Petersburg, Fla.
"Willie" COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
San Mateo, Fla.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Delta Rho (local); Member Board of Athletic Directors 1919; President BenBenton Engineering Society, Vice ton Engineering Society 1918-'19; Y. M. President 1916-'17; Tennis Club 1917; C. A. Cabinet 1919. Seminole Art Staff 1918.



























Fifty-four







































PAUL D. BARNS ,"Judge'
"Judge"Plant City, Fla. DEOCLECIO DE OLIVERIA PINTO Plant City, Fla. COLLEGE OF LAW S. Carlos, S. Paulo, Brazil COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Brazilian Student Association; CosmoWashington and Lee University; Kap- politan Club, Vice President 1918-'19.
pa Alpha Fraternity; Cooley Club (local
legal fraternity).































Fifty-five




































WALLACE FREDERICK PERRY "Sparks"
Fruitland Park, Fla. JUAN A. VELOSO COLLEGE OF LAW
Carcar, Cebu, Philippines
COLLEGE OF LAW


Track Team and "F" Club, 1914-'15'16-'17-'19; Discharged from U. S. N. R. F. January 16, 1919.

President Cosmopolitan Club 1919; John Marshall Debating Society.




























Fifty-six






































EMORY G. DIAMOND F. D. MILES "Diamond Dick" "F. D."
Jay, Fla. Darlington, Fla. TEACHERS COLLEGE TEACHERS COLLEGE





Columbia College, Lake City, 1916-'17- Theta Chi; Serpent Ribbon Society;
'18; Philosophian Literary Society, Sec. Peabody Club, Vice President 1917, Pres1916; Vice Pres. Sophomore Class 1917; ident 1919; Masonic Club; FreshmanTennis Club; Y. M. C. A., Pres. 1918, and Sophomore Contest 1916; Dramatic Club Delegate to Blue Ridge Conference 1918; 1916-'17; Scrub Football 1917; Track Ministerial Association, Pres. 1918; Pea- Team 1917; Class Football 1916-'17; body Club; Inter-Society Debating 1919; Color Sergeant Wm. A. Owens Camp Phi Kappa Phi 1919. Sons of Confederate Veterans 1916; Laboratory Assistant in Psychology 1919.























Fifty-seven









































RALPH CROSBY
"Ralph"
ELMOSE DIXIE BEGGS San Meto, Fla.
"Dicks" COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
Pavo, Ga.
COLLEGE OF LAW
Pi Kappa Phi; Cooley Club (local honorary legal fraternity); John Marshall Debating Society; Serpent Ribbon Society.
Pi Kappa Alpha; Sergeant Company C 1916-'17; Lieutenant Company C 1917'18; Second Lieutenant Infantry U. S. A. 1919; Hell Bent Society 1916-'17; Serpent Ribbon Society; Agricultural Club 1916-'17-'18-'19.























Fifty-eight









































LOWELL MASON HODGES
"Hodges" CHARLES McCOY JOHNSON Hodges" "Chink" Greenwood, Fla. "Chink"
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE Jacksonville, Fla.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Kappa Alpha; Alabama Poly. Inst. 1916-'17; Cadet Captain Company B 1919 (resigned); Second Lieutenant U. Phi Kappa Phi (honorary); Phi Alpha S. A. and R. C.; Agricultural Club;
Kappa (honorary agricultural); Agri- Senior Class Baseball; Masonic Club;
cultural Club, President 1918-'19; Brad- Duval County Club 1916-'17-'18-'19.
ford County Club 1916-'17; Prize Winner Barrett Company Essay Contest
1917-'18.

























Fifty-nine






































C. W. WANG
RALPH STOUTAMIRE "King"
"Stout" Honan, China
Tallahassee, Fla. COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE



Agricultural Club 1915-'19, President 1919; Leon County Club 1917-'19, President 1919; Business Manager Florida Alligator 1919; Captain Company A 1919; Y. M. C. A. 1915-'19; Class Football 1915 and 1916; one of Florida's first Flint Chemical Society; Agricultural to the colors; Phi Alpha Kappa (honorary agricultural local); Delta Rho Club; Cosmopolitan Club. (local fraternity).












Sit











Sixty








































BENJAMIN FRANKLIN WHITNER
"Ben" HERMAN V. STAPLETON
Sanford, Fla. "Herman" COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE Arcadia, Fla.
ARTS AND SCIENCE COLLEGE



Kappa Alpha; Second Lieutenant InKappa Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi fantry U. S. A.; Farr Literary Society;
Alpha Kappa (local honorary agricul- Tennis Club.
tural fraternity); E. K. President Y.
M. C. A. 1918; Farr Literary Society; Battalion Staff 1919; Seminole County Club; Alligator Staff 1917; Scroll and
Saber.
























Sixty-one
















Senior History
WENTY-SIX strong, depleted by the ravages of war, the class of
nineteen-nineteen is ready to step over the threshold into the world of life and action. Four years ago the class of nineteen-nineteen first entered the gates of Florida's piney campus to take up the tedious task of educating themselves for the study of the greatest of all artsthe art of life itself. Since then they have experienced wondrous things. In that short space they have seen the span supporting nations and empires crumble, totter and fall to ruins.
During this period while the world has been going through enormous changes, the present day Senior class has not concealed its light under a bushel; it has displayed its plastic properties to the utmost. It has aimed high and achieved greatly.
Not the least of these achievements was that, due to the unrelenting and tireless efforts of certain members of the class, the student body finally adopted the principle of Student Self Government. The authority and honor of drafting a constitution and by-laws for this government was delegated to the Senior class. Though tentative constitutions have been drafted and some articles have been styled in their finished form, at the time THE SEMINOLE goes to press the plan in all its completeness has not been put before the student body for ratification.
At that remote period when the now dignified Seniors were termed rats, they were stronger-by several times than they are now. This decrease may be attributed to many causes, the chief and most important one being the noble readiness with which the major part of the class responded to the Nation's call for men.
The homes of these men are scattered now-some have made the supreme sacrifice and sleep in Flanders Field 'mid the poppies where wooden crosses stand "row on row".
At the end of the S. A. T. C. regime the class members elected as officers the following men who have served them faithfully:
J. N. Whitfield, president; H. H. McCallum, vice president; P. D. Camp, secretary and treasurer; T. M. Palmer, honor-committee representative.
CLASS HISTORIAN.










Sixty-two









UNIOR S















Junior Class

























T. D. WILLIAMS W. W. GUNN
"Duke" "Pistol"
ARTS AND SCIENCE ENGINEERING Jacksonville, Fla. Marianna, Fla.

























H. H. BUSHNELL LLOYD Z. MORGAN
"Bush" "Rat"
ENGINEERING LAW
Pensacola, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla.







Sixty-four








































H. F. BACHE R. L. SENSABAUGH "H. F." "Sensie"
ARTS AND SCIENCE AGRICULTURE
Chattahoochee, Fla. Winter Haven, Fla.
























J. P. DRIVER E. K. KNIGHT "Jack" "Kid"
ARTS AND SCIENCE LAW
Citrus, Fla. Bradentown, Fla.







Sixty-five








































DEWEY A. DYE F. M. DEVANE "Dad"-"Dummy" "Half-wit"
LAW LAW
Bradentown, Fla. Plant City, Fla.
























F. D. INGRAM H. S. BAILEY "Judge" "Atom"
LAW LAW
Dade City, Fla. Lynn Haven, Fla.






Sixty-six









































C. S. THOMAS A. K. BISHOP "Lazy" "Bish"
ENGINEERING AGRICULTURE Gainesville, Fla. Eustis, Fla.

























S. G. KENT R. E. NOLEN "Kent" "Nolen"
ENGINEERING AGRICULTURE
Cocoanut Grove, Fla. Chicago, Ill.







Sixty-seven










































R. L. WESTMORELAND, JR. W. V. DE FLORIN
"Westie" '"V De"
AGRICULTURE ENGINEERING
Live Oak, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla.


























LEO H. WILSON S. W. GETZEN
"Briggs" "Gets"
AGRICULTURE LAW
Bartow, Fla. Brewster, Fla.






Sixty-eight








































A.E. CARPENTER H. C. WARNER "Gene" "Henry"
ARTS AND SCIENCE ENGINEERING Orlando, Fla. Tampa, Fla.


























J. D. SUNDY S. C. HANSEN "J. D." "Pretty"
ENGINEERING AGRICULTURE
Delray, Fla. Charleston, S. C.







Sixty-nine









































C. D. LYMAN W. E. DANIELS
C. u. L A"Bill"
"Nuts" ARTS AND' SCIENCE ENGINEERING Pensacola, Fla. Gainesville, Fla.


























M. N. YANCEY E. H. HURLEBAUS
"Yanc" "Curley"
ENGINEERING AGRICULTURE
Plant City, Fla. Harrisburg, Pa.






Seventy







































N. B. DAVIS J. B. BOOTH, JR.
"Davey" "Junior"
ARTS AND SCIENCE ARTS AND SCIENCE Palatka, Fla. Tavares, Fla.


























H. R. DESILVA E. B. PAXTON "Pete" "Pax"
TEACHERS ENGINEERING
Pensacola, Fla. Sanford, Fla.






Seventy-one







































H. H. ZEDER A. THETFORD
"Zeder" "Thet"
ENGINEERING LAW Delray, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla.

























L. B. PRATT S. W. HOLLINRAKE
"Pratt" "Rake"
ENGINEERING ARTS AND SCIENCE Ortega, Fla. Ocala, Fla.






Seventy-two








































J. N. TICHNOR H. R. STRINGFELLOW "Tick" Hart
AGRICULTURE ENGINEERING Zephyrhills, Fla. Gainesville, Fla.


























H. C. GORDON B. N. RAA "H. C." "Miss Raa"
LAW ARTS AND SCIENCE Tampa, Fla. Tallahassee, Fla.







Seventy-three







































J. J. CARUSO JULIAN DIAZ
"Songster" "Dias"
LAW LAW
Wilmington, Del. Tampa, Fla.



































Seventy-four


















Junior History
INCE the initial ingress of the class of nineteen-twenty on the campus
three years ago, they have always been prominent in student affairs.
Debating, literary, athletic, and scholarly laurels have been the lot
of the various members of the class to win at different times.
This year in particular they have taken an active part in all things.
To relieve the heavy laden Seniors, who were laboring under the necessity of doing a Senior's work in one semester, the Juniors undertook to publish THE SEMINOLE without the aid of that class in any way except as to
bearing a pro rata share of the expense.
The editor-in-chief of the Alligator, several minor members of the
staff, the president and a major part of the members of the board of directors of the Florida Athletic Association are Juniors. In addition to this, many of the officers in clubs and other organizations on the campus are Juniors. In fact to members of other classes it seems that every place
and thing is infested by Juniors.
This Commencement, for the first time in several years, the Juniors
are to give a Promenade in the New Gymnasium. Plans which have been made for this event were materializing in a favorable manner at the time THE SEMINOLE went to press, and it is assured that this act of reviving
an ancient custom will not be a failure.
During the first part of the year it was impossible to elect officers, and
maintain a class organization, due to the predominance of the military on the campus. However, since the end of the S. A. T. C. and the return to the pre-war and normal basis, the Junior class ship of state has safely
weathered all storms under the command of the following officers:
T. D. Williams, president; W. W. Gunn, vice president; H. H. Bushnell,
secretary-treasurer; and L. Z. Morgan, reporter.
L. Z. MORGAN, HISTORIAN.













Seventy-five





































































'GATOR LAKE Seventy-six







I,: I \





SOPHOPIQ1ES

























~I


aii~~


iE~9~s- ~iii ;-ri~ ~~"S~i;:a~ici IIL
-i;l ~ii~i~i~ si~P~
Is:;


-;- : hi C~iSI (i~i~
~~a; ii i ~ ;ri ,an ~~~ ic~c""8 W;I
;* e, i. i~li i "'
~aj-i~~
1- 6~
as
-C c~:
rr : ~
,: i81
,, :;" "'"*XT.."i
iL vr ~~s;r ~:~ ~ r ::; u i r;i
r '~~t ""~"i: ~B,-i":"
"~
;'~ ~ELa~i~F
-iiw*


e
"-"'-' ~ i, ;~ i~j rc :- ; lr~ P~ ~::~~~: ~ ~~ ~
i
i:: :. :a lari~s~
~a~p-~
a 19i~
ir~p~ ~dP~e9is~



I ~
Lirl ~I ~iIi
~~i~~l ~": ~ i ;~; i~ a i- - -; i~B~~a~~











Seventy-eight




























;*i~ar ~"~Tj ar~

u al ~"8;i
":*4 ai~~i~;F~i"";i~;~~ 7~"~'~ iiIO ~~~a ~ ,,l.:iP cwsi;-;11' s~i~"L I~c~
~ ":r .~I

~I~~B


1
:~

.1:2% B
i-i
ir r ~I ib: a~~
"':~~t ~~ i i I~~-" r:
"i
lil ~i~ii -~~I. fl ~i, '" L~ LM~i ~i~ nrunl: Air;lZL r, a":- -il ;
'~ "Ii~" ij~i~ ~ Z ~"
9__ ra .e rs

~Vfl~

83


:: ; ~

it
I;. I ~.
.il?" _: 4 -1 .i I i : '" i'"~l" W~ ir:X^x~_ it "
lir "
iirl
i;ic

p,






~ I ""-i
: ,:". i .~ a e~i~~ -~cw,

r ~a I: j i: %.
.,i
a
8- i

fQ / B. i"

"".; c~$l:;*~~ :~,,~,,,, ,~ ILr~B~ li:i~~ ;aij#'
1 hir














Seventy-nine

















Sophomore Class History

IN September-'17 it was-there came from all directions, far and near, an aggregation of lately graduated high school Seniors who entered their State University and were for sometime thence called "Rats". Not unlke every class of rats that preceded this one, each member entertained preconceived ideas of conduct and order which he expected in some measure to follow. But inevitably he was urged to adopt very diverse courses, long since tried and established to suit his particular constitution. For a while this wrought bewilderment and confusion, but they showed a good spirit of adaptability and soon adjusted themselves to their circumstances.
The first progressive act was that of welding an organization from the ninetyeight classmen. From that time on unity and cooperation has been the working principle of the class. During the Freshman year the class proved themselves to be loyal and aggressive Gators. Seven out of the fourteen men on the Varsity football team were rats. Every man on the basketball squad was a Freshman with the exception of one. They came out triumphant in the flag rush, Newton Axelson tearing down the skull and bones emblem of the Sophomores within twenty seconds of the record. They lost to the Sophs in the tug-o'-war which followed, thru lack of experience and weight. When it came to inter-class athletics the Class of '21 proved to be the champions of the campus in everything.
At the opening of the Sophomore year the administration of the class was placed in the charge of Jemmie Bryce as president; Bill Harrison, vice president, and Bill Catlow as secretary and treasurer. Louis Tatom represented the class on the Honor System Committee. As is always the case, the second year began with fewer members of the first year back and scarcely no new members to fill the vacancies. The old pep still survived, however, and all the laurels have not been bestowed on other classes. True the flag rush was lost this year, but that was very natural since the rats came in overwhelming numbers. The tug-o'-war was lost also because of being much over-balanced in weight.
As a unit the class has not made itself conspicuous this year. The demoralized conditions at the beginning of the year caused by the S. A. T. C. and other uncertainties accounts largely for this. However, individual work on the part of many members of the class deserves comment. Ben Archer, as managing editor of the Alligator, is largely responsible for the most creditable paper that has ever been published by the students at the University. Associated with Archer on the staff were, Tatom, Friedlander and Huff, all Sophs. George Hartman, besides being manager of the Varsity baseball team, proved his worth as a pitcher. Curtis Coxe was another twirler of renown, and Dell Hart held second base. Clemons and Roberts won the S. A. T. C. for having played football while in the army. Friedlander made himself famous as an orator and debator.
Thus the Class of '21 comes to the end of its second year and is startled at the thought that half of its college career is spent. As it looks back over its past history it is able to feel reasonably proud of its achievements in every line of endeavor. In the two years that are yet to come with their blue skies unclouded by the smoke of war, the members of the class joy in the thought that they can work toward a definite goal, and not be interrupted by a challenge to fight the enemies of civilization and humanity. They can concentrate their energies to the accomplishment of their high and worthy purposes. HISTORIAN.









Eighty









FESHJE


























II ~:g*~ ~lg: ,,
"ii'" ~I ~~
8
~il~

i .~- I~a~a~th
81R ~i;,; ~p g :~. ~i~~ :si
r x~ i i;,~
~~~i~n^*

:p, ": a.~:~::~:~i~ Is
i,
d
i~i.r
r
lill
I~it~ h-".i ~ .~ -~I~ : srap~ ~::: l~:~i B'~iii~L ~ ~

.I I; "~ 6
-x~ ~ u I :~ ~, otru ( ~*b n :;-:;


i ~d~ s ;*, ~vl
%r-~~ E 1::'~- "
r r; r ;si

:a iQ
.%i_

,, a,.~r ~ i :~ ~. .:.;~ ~:_ : il




ii C~~,; i (




i; i i. _i
a,.-: : -.. II -;-(-:i :; ~ -; i:

L- l




-i -;C


f$*
E "
/ i;~i V1 cii

-~ ;

a: -RY Z.~li







-B
r a Y'- i""" L ~U~. *I~
~1*6 ":L~
~i"~'iC~Rg$~;l ,_~:: ;~.~ ~1~ .'I -n. "i~ ; g
snr r ra~ i:a-- i;
-i~~,r -~ ~"1 : 1
'yi2x ~~ c:i"" ~~ ~~l~~u**

















Eighty-two









































Y7





























Eig~hty-three

















































































Eighty-four


























4 4' 7D~'c














WK




















Right-flv







































































Eiahtu-six
















The Freshman Class

HE Freshman Class of 1918-1919 began its career as a purely war class,
It had an enrollment of one hundred and seventy-seven students in all-the largest class in-the history of the University. Practically every member
being a candidate for the Officers' Training Corps, there was the greatest rivalry from the very beginning to excel in all those things pertaining to military science, tactics, and drill. With the excitement and exhilaration consequent to military life, as well as the uncertainty of remaining here for any length of time, it was only a natural result that there should have been a tendency among many to treat scholastic work lightly, and among some to exclude it altogether for the more immediately practical and useful military work. Few indeed were the men who could hope, or who even desired to spend a year here, much less to complete a course, when there was the wonderful opportunity constantly before them of gaining honor and glory on the battlefields of France. The collapse of the Central Powers put an all too sudden end
to these noble ambitions.
Demobilization, about a month after the signing of the armistice, marked the
opening of the Christmas vacation, which, du' to the generosity of the Faculty, was
a longer one than usual.
January sixth found the class back at school, somewhat depleted in numbers,
but, nevertheless, strong in the determination to do in the five months remaining before the close of school all the workrusually done by a class in a whole year. It was, indeed, a class composed of men who, sobered by war experience, realized the
seriousness of their duty in school to themselves and to the country as a whole.
Soon after the re-opening of school the class was completely reorganized, "Bill"
Madison being elected president, "Snowball" Norton vice president, "Bill" Bivens secretary and treasurer, and Fred Mellor representative for the Honor Committee.
It was only a short time before the old Florida spirit was showing itself in the actions of the class. The first big demonstration came when the class answered the challenge of the Sophomores to the annual flag rush. Having successfully braved the barrage of bayonet belts wielded by strong armed "old men" outside the old gymnasium, the whole class assembled in the building and perfected a method of attack to be used on the Sophomores, who, at the same time, were forming their defensive line around the well-greased tree upon which the flag was nailed. At the signal a solid mass of Freshmen moved slowly to the attack. The Sophomores resisted valiantly with fists and feet generously interspersed with sand and red pepper, but all to no avail. The advance of the Freshmen was so overwhelming that after a short, fierce struggle Johnny Sherman was able to tear the flag from the tree by climbing upon the shoulders of his comrades, thereby saving them from the disgrace of wearing green caps for the remainder of the year. Final honors of the day were won by the Freshmen
in the tug-o'-war between two selected teams.
How well the class has succeeded in its scholastic endeavors since settling down
to work in January must be left to the professors to judge at the end of May, but it is certain that every man in the class deserves much credit for the many discouraging obstacles that have been overcome during the year. There can be no doubt that the Freshman Class of 1918-1919, composed as it is of such patriotic, conscientious, working, persevering men, will be a graduating class in 1922 of which the University
of Florida may well be proud to be the Alma Mater. HISTORIAN.









Eighty-seven



















~~: ~liiQ ;, "j~ C~
_~,i* ~$8;
illii ~~T 2;1~
.rsr:*i
""iC "iIr b;~i:

~p
'~.?.iilEf
~I -~1
L ..-r
"i~~j~i
~~~ T ~* ~ rz ~
'LL\ ~FiiBiRljq_ ll ~1 ;ix.
I~ ~ Iw1~ fi~ :a~ ig~: XYjl
ae~i:a







J6"-~Lj




";" ~~i I~~~
Irrb. i





B II~
~ru *"a~ a~~iie ~g-~ ic- i

I-~ ~: "~- ll~e5Bls wrap
~i~Y~~h~r~ ~B~C '~


r llt6r~B~~


*r~,28i


i I










"--I; ~" I :r i :p(i~i
















Eiglr tl/-ei~c/l~t



















YELL TH YELL EatAll5ED LINE CH E E*LEASE *GenttLe reader'
O point form the XRO! This bIrd xpresson tha as not a thisascaywas 1 a( J thenmoael for O tamC drvr 2n Roai'S o the battle of a4lh icent Chateau- Tkhiery inAerpiece, jr e's, only beerl The lsynl ., &ayl-T,.9 &crienal> ,e h.s JU Fo' of otbill. cQ1TIQ r-o m


















nd e easiest
spetitator ye
foir n 62a-ys3ot .































&tay sIyhere
11 starve to
]Vnowwhicl








40-~r









































OB : ASSOC O BOARD OF DIRECTORS



























Ninety























The Florida Athletic Association

"WHAT IS IT?"
HE Florida Athletic Association is a non-profit corporation duly
authorized and organized under the laws of the State. It consists of a board of directors composed of two faculty members and the
balance of four elected from the student body. It is presided over by a president who is assisted in his executive tasks by a vice president and secretary who are students. The money which the board spends is
handled by the University auditor.
The board of directors elects the team managers and directs the
policy of the athletic department of the'University of Florida. The board
for the year of 1918-'19 was:
LEO H. WILSON. -----------..... ---............------------------------...... President
R. T. HARGRAVE..........-----------------.....--..............------------------. Secretary
W. M.: MADISON ----------------------.....-----.....----.....--.............-- Vice President

STUDENT BOARD
Dewey A. Dye Henry C. Warner W. W. Gunn Lloyd Z. Morgan FACULTY BOARD
A. L. Buser J. J. Grimm


















Ninety-one























































t10
N






II ,

K

















Ninety-two















Coaches

BASEBALL
C OACH Emmitt K. Perryman, commonly known in the baseball
circuit as "Preacher Perryman", is originally from Georgia. He began his professional baseball career with the Roanoke Club in
the Virginia League, and with whom he played for several years. From the Virginia League he went to the Southern where he starred as a pitcher, then to the St. Louis Browns in the American League. He was playing with the Southern League at Birmingham when he joined the colors and was commissioned first lieutenant in the infantry. Coach Perryman as a man is one of the most congenial fellows that ever coached a baseball team. He wins his players with the "old pat on the back" and the smile
with which he greets- every one.



FOOTBALL

Coach Buser came to us in the fall of 1917 from Wisconsin, where he had a record of being both a student and an athlete. He played a line position for three years on the Wisconsin Varsity football team, was captain in 1913. He won his "W" at weights, and was president of the athletic association. In the two years he has been with us he has done a great deal towards putting Florida before the athletic world. Buser is interested in every branch of athletics; which makes him especially fitted for his position. He is a man with lots of backbone and when he starts out for something he brings home the bacon. To him is due most of the credit for A. L. BUSER the raising of the money to pay off the
Athletic Director Athletic Association debt.










Ninety-three
















Florida in Athletics for the Year of 1919-1920
WITH the war at an end, and the University again under normal
conditions, Florida will be represented the coming year in all branches of intercollegiate athletics. Never before in the history of the world has athletics been given such an impetus as it has during the recent war. It has been proved beyond a doubt that physical training is the essential thing in war, therefore the universities of the United States are going to develop this phase of college work to the utmost. In the past, only a select few have received this training, but from now on the whole student body will be trained in some form or another. It means the training of the weak as well as the strong.
Florida this past year did little in intercollegiate athletics. Football was placed in the background at the time, for the S. A. T. C. was just being organized. No doubt, if the war had lasted for some years more, football would have been played with as much zest and enthusiasm as ever before. All other intercollegiate sports were not entered into. With the ending of the. war, and the University again assuming its regular work, baseball season was upon us. By a great deal of work, a schedule was arranged for a trip thru South Carolina. The trip was made, a total of eight games being played; Florida losing five and winning three. However, the baseball team of this year was the best that Florida ever had.
During the spring, the wrestling team was busy, and ended the season with more backing than the sport has ever had. Volleyball also came into the center of activity. As time goes on, many new forms of athletics will be undertaken at this university.
The prospects for next year are unusually bright. Many new men are with us, and the men of Florida before the war are returning daily, so that it appears as tho Florida will again be herself in athletics.
One of the most enjoyable features of the University of today is the new Gymnasium. Without a doubt, it is one of the most modern and up to date gyms in the South. With such a building at our disposal, men will take a greater interest in their work and make use of this splendid building. As far as equipment is concerned, the gym will be equipped completely. Plans have been received for the equipment of same, and when completed, Florida will have the best equipped gym in the South.









Ninety-four












































Next Year's Football Schedule

October 25-Florida vs. Georgia at Tampa.
November 9-Florida vs. Tulane at New Orleans.
November 22-Florida vs. South Carolina at Columbia, S. C.
November 27-Florida vs. Oglethorpe at Gainesville.
Effort has been made to arrange a game with Vanderbilt, to be
played in Jacksonville. As yet nothing definite can be said about this.
There will also be several preliminary games played during the season, the
schools and dates not yet arranged for.










Ninety-five






























JM







NORTON

0D E
H HUNTER











C LEMONS MORGON






Ninety-six
















The Football Season 1918
HE 1918 football season at the University of Florida could hardly
be dignified with the name. Immediately after the opening of school, in the earlier part of September the University was in the
grip of the influenza epidemic which had spread over the entire country.
This tended to delay practice; in fact made it impossible even to consider
football at that time.
Later the school was taken over by the Government and transformed
over night into a Student Army Training Corps post, complete with four
infantry companies and a naval unit.
Between these several departments football games were indulged in
quite often., One spirited game was between the Navy and the Army.
Although the teams were not of the calibre that represents those two divisions of the military in the United States annually, yet they were strong enough to make pep run high. The Army team was victorious with the
close score of 6 to 0 as the final result.
Several games were also had with the local High School in which the
Florida Unit S. A. T. C. was always victor by a large score.
Turkey Day in Jacksonville a team from the post played a close game
with a picked team from Camp Johnston. After a game one hour long the score sheet showed the tallies to be 12 to 0 in favor of the Camp. It was a splendid game with the outweighed and outraged Army Gators fighting like demons every minute of play. The one incident which marred the day was that Hunter had his shoulder broken in the first rush. He was the third man to answer sick call due to football, Dalton and
O'Niel being the other two.
War time "F's", with the "F" in prominence and S. A. T. C. worked
into the design were given to the following men: Dye, Sewell, Norton, Wuthrich, Adams, Clemons (Captain), Burke, Madison, Morgan, Blitz,
Dodd, Hunter.
No doubt with the raw material which the Students' Army Training
Corps attracted to the University would in a normal year have resulted in
a winning team.











Ninety-seven




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E25C8P2AE_97UF37 INGEST_TIME 2014-11-12T22:19:41Z PACKAGE AA00022765_00010
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES