Citation
The Seminole

Material Information

Title:
The Seminole
Creator:
University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publisher:
Senior Class of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Annual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
63 v. : ill. ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
College yearbooks ( lcsh )
College yearbooks ( fast )
Students ( fast )
University of Florida
Genre:
yearbook ( aat )
serial ( sobekcm )
Yearbooks ( fast )

Notes

Abstract:
The first University of Florida yearbook was published in 1910. Originally the editors of the yearbook and those of the Florida Alligator were elected during the student body elections each year. The yearbook was titled The Seminole, a name given prior to the football rivalry between the University of Florida and Florida State University. Except for 1944 when the yearbook was not published due to World War II, the Seminole was published annually until 1973. That year, possibly due to financial difficulties and a change in the student culture, the yearbook ceased publication. In 1983, the students again saw the need for a yearbook and published the Tower, renamed after Century Tower. In the 1980s, the Tower became an agency of Student Government and by 1993 the Tower was receiving annual funding. The Tower continued to be published until 2008 when the yearbook again ceased publication.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. no.1 (1910) - v. 63 (1973).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida Archives
Rights Management:
Copyright Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier:
01389460 ( OCLC )
sc 84005031 ( LCCN )
ocm01389460

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Tower (Gainesville, Fla.)

Full Text






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CONTENTS
I. The University
II. The Classes
III. Athletics
IV. Fraternities
V. Organizations
VI. The College
Year
VII. Et Cetera



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FOREWORD

N the following pages we
Have tried to show life -at Florida as it really is.
Pursuing this ideal, we have been forced to depart at times from tradition, and in many respects the Seminole of 1917 bears little resemblance to his older brothers.
We have tried to make this
T
book a little bit of the campus that you could carry away with you. If in after years a journey through its pages will bring back the happy days of '17, it will have accomplished to the
fullest its purpose.
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FLORIDA

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

FACULTY
JAS. N. ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D.
Dean and Professor of Ancient Languages
O. C. ADULT, A.B.
Associate Professor of History and Economics
J. R. BENTON, PH.D.
Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering
L. W. BUCHHOLz, A.M.
Professor of Education and School Management
H. W. Cox, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of Philosophy and Education
C. L. CRow, M.A., PH.D.
Professor of Modern Languages
H. S. DAVIS, PH.D.
Professor of Zoology
J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of English Language and Literature
E. R, FLNT, PH.D., M.D.
Professor of Chemistry and Resident Physician
W. L. FLOYD, M.S.
Professor of Botany and Horticulture
C. A. HUNTER, M.S.,
Instructor in Botany and Bacteriology
H. G. KEPPEL, PH.D.
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy
W. S. PERRY, A.B. JAS. N. ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D. Instructor in Physics and Electrical Engineering N. L. SiMs, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of Sociology and Political Science
C. A. ROBERTSON, A.B.
Fellow and Assistant in English

































Ten








SeSemmole





THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
A MONG the many questions asked by young men of today are some of thi Nature: "Where can I best fit myself for life ? "Where can I obtain clear thought, sound judgment, systematic working ideas ? These qualities are absolutely essential to any man who hopes to attain prominence in professional life. He should first have a liberal education, if possible, before entering upon a specified field of life, because this liberal education is the very foundation of all life; it enables him to market his products to the world, to keep himself in close contact and sympathy with the affairs of his fellow men. The College of Arts and Sciences gives this general culture. In this col- O. C. ALT, A.B.

lege the individual is trained in the various lines of study which will give him clear thought, sound judgment, and systematic training. Under such men as Dean Anderson, Dr. Farr, Dr. Keppel, Professor Ault, Dr. Flint, Dr. Crow, and Dr. Sims, students undoubtedly receive such a discipline of their intellects, such an enlargement of their visions, and such an increase in their powers of appreciation of the beautiful and the true, as will enable them to be truly useful citizens and influential members of society.
The head of this college, Dean Anderson, is above all a student. Having mastered the classical languages and the modern, and traced the origin of every letter in the alphabet, as far as is possible, he is useful not only as a walking dictionary, but also as an inc. L. CROW, M.A., PH.D. ventor of words. Keen, exact, and reserved,









Eleven








UeSemiriole





he stamps a personality upon all of his students which will not soon be forgotten. If a student in Greek is not accurate when he has finished a course under Dr. Anderson, there is no hope, and who can say that accuracy is not a quality to be desired for any line of work ?
Dr. James M. Farr, commonly known among the boys as Jimmy ", is a lover of fun, and he gets all the fun he wants. Each year the registrar sends him scores of freshmen, and the doctor makes as much fun as he wants of this material. However, "Jimmy is fond of mixing with the boys, even using their campus language at times, and becoming one of them himself again. It has been said that he makes a course for students just as hard, and yet as fair, as one possibly could. In other words he teaches a young man how H. S. DAVIS, PH.D. to work. But the return for labor done for

Dr. Farr is a passport which, if rightly used, will enable a person to enter the courts of kings, to partake of the best fruits this world can offer.
Dr. Flint is the cool, calm, rapid worker who teaches the young man how to expedite business. He is never in a hurry; wise men never are. One speech a year by him is enough to keep the boys in good health the whole nine months. Any problem related to chemistry and science can be easily solved by this man, who has devoted his life to these lines of work. From the courses under Dr. Flint the student receives training which prepares him for professional work.
Of the efficient, business-like professors, none stands out more prominently than Dr. Crow, the master of modern languages. Not a mistake escapes his eagle eye in the class- J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D.










Twelve













room. His pupils receive ,extraordinary discipline in the faculties of the memory, as he is quite exact, but the greatest benefit to be derived from his courses is the knowledge of
the language being studied.
The College of Arts and Sciences teaches
the student above all to think for himself.
It is for the most part under such men as Dr.
Keppel, who has never been given a fair mathematical problem which he could not solve; Professor Ault, the progressive thinker, and Dr. Sims, the profound student of men and modern political conditions, that the young man acquires this self-reliance. These men teach a student that men, no matter how highly the world may honor them, are all mere human beings, very susceptible to mistakes. One should learn to form independent
judgments and to stand by them. E. R. FLINT, PH.D.

If a young man has a degree from the College of Arts and Sciences is he not, then, efficiently prepared to fight life's battles ? People may talk of following exclusively special lines of work, but after all it is the general culture and the liberal education, which count most in present-day affairs. Are not accuracy, broad vision, and an ability to think independently the greatest benefits of a college career ?










N. L. SIMS, A.M., PH.D.











Thirteen










teceminotle



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

FACULTY
P. H. ROLFS, M.S.
Dean
O. C. AUmT, A.B.
Associate Professor of History and Economics
L. W. BUCHHOLZ, A.M.
Professor of Education and School Management
H. W. Cox, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of Philosophy and Education
H. S. DAVIS, PH.D.
Professor of Zoology and Bacteriology
J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of English Language and Literature
E. R. FLINT, PH.D., M.D.
Professor of Chemistry
W. L. FLOYD, B.S., M.S., Assistant Dean and Professor of Botany and Horticulture
C. A. HUNTER, B.S., M.S.
Instructor in Botany and Bacteriology
H. G. KEPPEL, A.B., PH.D.
Professor of Mathematics
F. M. RAST, JR., B.S., M.S.A.
Assistant Professor of Soils and Fertilizers
N. L. SIMS, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of Sociology and Political Science
J. E. TURL1NGTON, M.S., PH.D. P. H. ROLFS, M.S. Professor of Agronomy O. W. WEAVER, B.S.
Professor of Agricultural Journalism and Correspondence Courses
C. L. WILLOUGHBY, B.AGR.
Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying































Fou7

Fourteen








e Seninole





r :THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
HE current year has been a big one for the Agricultural College. Starting off with the largest enrollment in its history, and easily the largest of the colleges of the University, it set itself resolutely to the task of making some new history every week.
Even a lawyer will admit that it succeeded.
Courses are offered in the Agricultural College for all sorts of students. First, there is the four-year course, for the regularly enrolled college students. Separate curricula are offered for students specializing in Agronomy, Horticulture, Animal Husbandry, and Chemistry, and for those who wish general work in agriculture. A special group has
lately been arranged for agricultural teachers. W. L. FLOYD, B.S., MS.

Short courses of various kinds are offered for students who, through lack of time or preparation, do not wish to take the full course of four years. The Middle Course of two years emphasizes the practical, technical training, though giving also some scientific work. Its graduates are given the title Graduate in Farming. The one-year and fourmonth courses require for entrance only a working knowledge of the common school branches. The work is all practical. A tenday course is offered in the winter for farmers, and is always well attended. A correspondence course is also conducted by the College.
The faculty for the College of Agriculture includes, beside the members of other faculties of the University who give instruction in their departments to agricultural students, six F. M. RAST, JR., B.S., M.S.A. men devoting all of their time to Agricultural









Fifteen









CeSeminoo








College work. Dean P. H. Rolfs, a graduate of the Iowa Agricultural College, is the author of Sub-Tropical Gardening ", and a recognized authority in southern horticulture. Major W. L. Floyd, Assistant Dean and Professor of Horticulture; C. L. Willoughby, Professor of Animal Industry and Dairying; Dr. J. E. Turlington, Professor of Agronomy; F. M. Rast, Assistant Professor of Soils and Fertilizers; and O. W. Weaver, Professor of Agricultural Journalism, are all men of recognized scholastic attainments.
The agricultural students, through the Agricultural Club, led the way this year in many student activities. They started the University J. E. U M.S, Carnival, which, with the enthusiastic co-opJ. E. TURLINGTON, M.S., PH.D.
eration of the other colleges, was carried

through as one of the most successful student activities of the year. They have lent their support and their abundant pep" to every worthy undertaking of the year, and the Agricultural Club is recognized as the livest organization on the campus (at least, according to agricultural students).










0. W. WEAVER, B.S.












Sixteen









1ieSeminote
























C. L. WILLOUGHBY, B.AGR.


































I3917

Seventeen









GeSeminole



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

FACULTY

J. R. BENTON, B.A., PH.D.
Dean and Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering
R. E. CHANDLER, M.E., M.M.E.
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Drawing
C. L. CRow, M.A., PH.D.
Professor of Modern Languages
H. S. DAViS, Pa.D.
Professor of Zoology and Bacteriology
JAt.11ES IM. FARR, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of English Language and Literature E: R. FLINT, PH.D., M.D.
Professor of Chemistry and Resident Physician
H. G. KEPPEL, A.B., PH.D.
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy
W. S. PERRY, A.B.
Instructor in Physics and Electrical Engineering
E. R. STlVERS, C.E.
Instructor in Civil Engineering
A.'J. STRONG
Instructor in Mechanic Arts and Foreman of Shops
R.'W. THOROUGHGOOD, C.E.
Professor of Civil Engineering
J. R. BENTON, B.A., PH.D. E. S. WALKER, U. S. A. (Retired)
Commandant of Cadets and Professor of Civil Engineering



































E eighteen








'Oh e Se minote





COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
HE College of Engineering, the oldest
of the five colleges of the University of Florida, presents to those having
an inclination toward technical pursuits, a superb opportunity to prepare themselves for
the practice of engineering.
Engineering Hall, constructed along the
same architectural lines as the other buildings on the campus, heated, lighted, and equipped in the most modern and approved manner, is the immediate home of the college. Here are found all the facilities essential to provide
adequately for the needs of students in engineering. Three large, well lighted drafting rooms, supplied with desks and drawing tables, amply provide for large classes in drafting and plotting work. A dynamo laboratory, H. G. KEPPEL, A.B., PH.D.

one of the most complete and up-to-date to be found in any school, is provided for students in electrical engineering; while a machine shop, a steam laboratory, and a materials laboratory meet the demands of students in other engineering courses. A separate brick building is used for the wood shops. Here are found sufficient lathes, tools, benches and other equipment to supply the large classes in wood shop and pattern-making work. Annexed to this structure are the forge and foundry shops. The instrumental equipment of the civil engineering department deserves especial mention, and the number of instruments of the same kind is such as to allow small individual units in surveying and mapping classes, thus permitting better instruction in the actual handling of instruW. s. PERRY, A.B. ments. This department has also a cement







teen








C e Seminole



testing and materials laboratoatory, provided with testing machines for determining breaking stresses of various substances. The machine shops, recently completed, are fitted with everything necessary for thorough instruction in work of a mechanical nature. An examination of all these departments will readily convince one that in capacity and equipment, the Engineering College can provide for classes several times as large as those now enrolled.
The faculty of the College of Engineering is composed of men who hold degrees from the best colleges of this country, and from European institutions. They have all had many years of practical experience in the practice of engineering, and are especially able in the teaching of their various subjects. Also since many of the courses contained in A. .STRONG the curriculum are taught in other colleges

of the University, the engineering student comes under the direction of of other able instructors, and has the opportunity of mingling with those pursuing other courses, thereby adding a broadening influence to his college life.
Due to lack of advertising facilities, an aid so much employed by most colleges, many young men of our state are ignorant of the remarkable opportunities offered by their own home institution, and enroll elsewhere for a technical training. We sincerely trust that we may convey to these students an idea of our equipment and courses, which we are confident will amply meet their needs.




R. W. THOROUGHGOOD, C.E.









Twenty








TheSeminote





















E. S. WALKER






























T19*i-n
Twenty-one









OheSeminole



COLLEGE OF LAW







FACULTY

H. R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B.
Dean and Professor of Law
C. W. CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B.
Professor of Law
W. L. SUMMERS, A.B., LL.B., Jur. Dr.
Professor of Law









H. R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B.




































Twenty-two









7 'leSeminole


THE COLLEGE OF LAW

HE College of Law at the University of Florida is not conducted for the purpose of enabling a few favored young men to prepare themselves for an T honorable, interesting, and sometimes somewhat profitable profession, however desirable that may be. It is not even conducted for the purpose of providing weekly salary checks for its professors. It is conducted in the interest of the people of the State of Florida. Not a step is taken, however beneficial it might be to the individual student, unless it is beneficial also to the people of the State. No doubt the opportunity to secure a cheap and easy degree, and consequently admission to the bar would, in a sense, prove beneficial to many individuals, but it would be highly prejudicial to the state, which is already oversupplied with cheap and easy lawyers.
Accordingly, the students who enter the
law school in Septem- ber, 1917, will be not juniors, but freshmen, for the course in law is now a three year course. They will labor a year longer than their predecessors to obtain the same degree, but when they have obtained it they will take their place among the graduates of the best law schools of the country. They will be prepared to become a
credit to the bar of the State.
The College of Law had, this year,
sixty-nine students. Al- though no collegiate work was required for entrance, more than twenty of the men were college graduates, such universities as Prince ton, Washington and Lee, and South Caro- lina, being represented by the majority. Many others had one, two or
three years of college CRADALL, BS., L.B. work.
The college occu- pies a, modern, wellequipped building at the entrance to the campus. Its library is provided with complete sets of all the important reports, digests, and texts. Its practice court room is the equal of many of the best court rooms of the state, and has seen, it may be said, as many hard-fought cases. Its faculty is made up of men of known standing and ability. Dean Harry R. Trusler, who conducts the work in Equity Pleading and Procedure, has had wide experience in the practice and teaching of the profession.
Professor C. W. Crandall, a graduate of Michigan, is in charge of the work in Common Law Pleading and Procedure; and Dr. W. L. L. Summers, a graduate of Yale, of the courses in Criminal Law and Pleading. Two more professors are to be elected for the next session. In addition law students are allowed to elect work in other departments of the University. Special lecturers, including such men as Chief Justice Jefferson B. Brown, of the Supreme Court of Florida; Justices R. F. Taylor, R. S.
Cockrell, W. H. Ellis, Thos. M. Shackleford, and James B. Whitfield, of that court;





Twenty-three














Hon. John L. Neely, U. S. District Attorney, and many other distinguished barristers, also aid in the instruction of the students.
But a discussion of the College of Law would not be complete without some mention of the record of its students in campus life. Previous to the present year it was the boast of the law student that he had never failed to win an intercollegiate contest within the University. Although this record has been broken in 1917, law students have still in many ways led the way. The College of Law was given the prize for the best float in the parade of the University Carnival. Of the four intercollegiate debaters selected, three were law students. The military company formed this spring of men not required to drill had its origin in the Law College. And, last but not least, all the class officers of the combined Junior Classes were, by some strange coincidence, students in the College of Law.
























W. L. SUMMERS, A.B., LL.B.
















Twenty-four















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PRACTICE; COUT OO





I










Ohe Semirnole



TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL

FACULTY
H. W. Cox, A.M., PH.D.
Dean and Professor of Philosophy and Education
J. N. ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D.
Professor of Ancient Languages
O. C. AULT, A.B.
Associate Professor of History and Economics
J. R. BENTON, B.A., PH.D.
Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering
L. W. BUCHHOLZ, A.M.
Professor of Education and School Management
W. S. CAWTHON, A.M. State High School Inspector
C. L. CROW, M.A., PH.D.
Professor of Modern Languages
J. M. FARR, A.M., PH.D.
Professor of English Language and Literature
E. R. FLINT, PH.D., M.D.
Professor of Chemistry and Resident Physician
J. J. GRMM, B.S.
Instructor in Chemistry
W. B. HATRAWAY, A.B., B.D.
Instructor in English, Latin and Spanish
H. G. KEPPEL, A.B., PH.D.
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy
J. W. NORMAN, A.B., A.M.
Assistant Professor of Education
A. J. STRONG
Instructor in Mechanic Arts and Foreman of the Shop
H. W. COX, A.M, J. E. TURL1NGTON, M.S., PH.D.
Professor of Agronomy
C. H. LICHLITER, A.B.
Fellow and Assistant in History
J. C. NIXON, B.S.
Fellow and Assistant in Mathematics
T. J. OVERSTREET, A.B.
Fellow and Assistant in Mathematics































Twenty-six














TEACHERS COLLEGE

ILD Indians once roamed among the pleasant hills of sunny Florida, enjoying the results of their chase; but all is changed now. Graduate of the Teachers College and Normal School now explore every town and village of the state, sending to the University the high school graduates to be greencapped Freshmen-the kind whose fame has sent remorse into the hearts of the other
classes this year.
Such is the inevitable result of attending the Teachers College where bald-headed,
long-bearded, indescribably wise men sit and pass out knowledge of hyper-psychological import. Wherever the teacher goes, after being here for a season, the cranums of the boys and girls of our state are filled with the noble ambition of becoming patriotic, liberty-loving sons and daughters of our dear
old Uncle Sam.
In the well-equip ped psychological laboratory under the able direction of Dr. Harvey W. Cox the future teacher investigates the laws of mind. He even weighs thoughts and learns which of his class-mates are criminals and why.
Peabody Hall-a $40,000 buildingcages manynoisy speci- mens of human anatomy. Some are small in stature, with a brainpan full of gray stuff, others have misplaced manes and bull, and a third class (only oneno other like him) has an onion like crest, screened with a strip of white, downy fur.
But in this onion crouch ideas which assist in annihilating Tennessee and SouthCarolina; and when the face wrinkles L. W. BUCHHOLZ, AM. the "moo comes out."
In the library of 25,000 volumes one
may see every day some student forced to report to his instructor on a super-technical article, or trying to store up a line and force some rat" into the belief that some college students achieve greatness. The student body loves the library bcause it is
a big submarine to us in torpedoing from the profs" a passing grade.
No graduate of the Teachers College lives on a paltry stipend in after life. Soon
after leaving the U he lands a $1,000 position, marries, and gets a raise. The most famous school men of our state-superintendents, principals and teachersare sons of the Teachers College and in every nook and dell between the Perdido river, St. Marys river, and the Florida Straits live men and women, boys and girls, who are direct descendants, intellectually, of our Faculty, and finished products of
our laboratories.





9A

Twenty-seven










)heSeminole





























W. S. CAWTHON, A.M.



























W. B. HATHAWAY, A.B., B.D.












Twenty-eight








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AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

STAFF

P. H. ROLFS, M.S.
Director
S. E. COLLISON, M.S.
Chemist
H. L. DOZIER, B.S.
Laboratory Assistant in Plant Pathology
B. F. FLOYD, A.M.
Plant Physiologist
F. F. HALMA, B.S.
Assistant Horticulturist
J. MATZO, B.S.
Laboratory Assistant in Plant Pathology
J. M. SCOTT, M.S.
Vice-Director and Animal Industrialist
C. D. SHERBAKOFF, M.S., PH.D.
Assistant Plant Pathologist
L. J. STADLER Laboratory Assistant in Dairying
H. E. STEVENS, M.S.
Plant Pathologist
T. VAN HYNiNG Curator of Museum and Librarian
J. R. WATSON, A.M.
Entomologist
P. H. ROLFS, M.S. C. K. McQUARRIE, State Agent of Farmers' Demonstration Work and Assistant Superintendent Farmers' In. stitutes


































Thirty








eSeminole


THE EXPERIMENT STATION

T HE Florida Agricultural Experiment Station was founded in 1888. Its funds are received from the Federal government, and it must comply with the rules of the Department of Agriculture, but it cooperates, to a great degree, with the College of Agriculture of the University. The Director of the Experiment Station is the Dean of the Agricultural College. The station staff assists in college instruction,
and the college faculty assists in research work.
On the University campus and in the community of which it is a part, the Experiment Station is usually considered a relatively unimportant part of the University.
Fifty miles away the University is frequently considered an incidental adjunct to the Experiment Station. Through its publications and through its extension workers the station reaches the man on the outside; there are few in the state who do not see the value of its work, and through it the work of
the University.
The lines of inves- tigation carried on by
the Experiment Station fall naturally into several departments: Hor- ticulture, including the introduction, breeding, and propagation of plants; Animal Indus- try, including the study of feed crops, the effect of feeding certain crops to cattle and hogs and the growing of feed and forage crops; Agrono- my, including the breeding of cotton, corn, and other farm crops; Plant Pathol- ogy, including the study of plant diseases pro- duced by fungi and bacteria; Plant Physiol- ogy, including the study of plants as affected by fertilizer and soil conditions; Chemistry, in- C. K. MC QUARME cluding the study of fertilizers and soils, es- pecially as to their effects on plants; and Entomology, including the study of insecticides and insects and
their parasites.
The results of these investigations are published in the form of bulletins, press
bulletins, and annual reports. One hundred and thirty-four bulletins, two hundred and sixty-four press bulletins, and twenty-six annual reports have already appeared.
These publications are all distributed free on request.
Through the Division of University Extension the University reaches thousands
of citizens who otherwise would never receive its help. Though cooperative demonstration work has been carried on for many years, it was not until 1914, with the passage of the Smith-Lever bill that it assumed its present proportions. Through the Smith-Lever bill the state received in 1914 $10,000 annually and the additional sum of $11,898, if this amount is also appropriated by the state. The latter amount was
to be increased yearly by $5,408 until the sum of $44,345 has been reached.






Thirty-one








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The staff of the Extension division includes the director, the state agent, the assistant state agent in charge of women's rural work, two district agents, the corn club agent, thirty-five county demonstration agents, and thirty-two county canning club agents. Numerous lecturers from the station and college staffs are also included.























J. M. SCOTT, M. S.



























Thirty-two




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hememinole






THE HALLS MRs. S. J. SWANSON Matron

MRS. MARGARET PEELER Assistant Matron

MISS MARY MCROBBIE Resident Nurse C. E. HAYWOOD Steward

MRS. S. J. SWANSON

























BUCKMAN HALL







j1

Thirty- our









7 CleSeinole



THE HALLS

T HOMAS Hall and its twin, Buckman, were
completed in 1906, and were first used for the school year of 1906-1907. They are red brick buildings, three stories high, built in five and six sections respectively. Fireproof walls separate the sections, thus doing away with the dangers, in case of fire, of long corridors and inaccessible stairways. Bathrooms, equipped with needle point showers, are located on every floor of each section.
The suites consist of one, two, or three rooms. Plenty of closet room is afforded. Often as many as eight large windows light the rooms; and electric light is furnished until midnight, after which hour the eager student must take his chances on Hawkshaw," the night watchman, and the twenty-five cents fine imposed for using the juice after MISS MARY MCROBBIE hours. (A hint-buy window shades.)
Thomas Hall originally housed the University to a great extent. The offices of the administration, mess hall, infirmary, everything but the gymnasium and the athletic field-were contained in Thomas Hall. Buckman Hall accommodated the majority of the students.





















THOMAS HALL





T9-








ieSemiriole


Now, however, Thomas is entirely given over to sleeping-rooms, or to rooms intended for that purpose, with the exception of the third floor of A section, where Miss Mary McRobbie holds sway and ministers to the dead and wounded after football games and Mess Hall meals. Miss McRobbie's apartment is on this floor, as is also the Infirmary, a large, sunshiny, airy place equipped with iron beds and kept up in true hospital style by the efficient nurse.
Buckman has one section less than Thomas. In E section, on the third floor, Mrs. Swanson and Mrs. Peeler have their rooms. From here they begin early-only too early!-in the mornings, their daily clean-up, roust-out crusade on the sleeping dormitories: leading with pitiless regularity their corps of sweepers: listening with hearts which are (necessarily) as stone to MRS. MtARGARET PEELER drowsy complaints, yet withal saving the boys a lot of mental anguish concerning the whereabouts of collar-buttons, neckties, poker decks, and so on.
In D section the unofficial post office of the University is located. Paul Weimer and Otto Manecke bring the students' mail out to the campus twice a day, call out





















UNIVERSITY COMMONS





Thirty-six








Oe Seminole


the letters in front of the section and then place the unclaimed few in lettered boxes on the -second floor. For a study in human expressions, or in the science of human behavior, go to mail-call and watch the fellows. Shattered love affair" is written all over one man's face; Check didn't come," says another chap, altho he utters not a word. The shrug of another's shoulders fairly shouts I wonder who's kissing
her now ? "
Ivy is beginning to creep over the walls of the buildings, and is giving them a
look of age and dignity-one might call it a pedigreed" look. In time Thomas will be to our campus what Witherspoon is to Princeton's-a sort of benevolent
grand-daddy to future Gator generations.



MESS HALL

Mess Hall! Where the hash is handed around. Where the "Zip flows like
wine. The home of the mistaken steak, the un-panned pancakes, and the ungritful grit.
Mess Hall! What's in a name? Gentle reader, EVERYTHING.
Mess Hall, the institution, was established with the University. Mess Hall, the
building, was erected in 1911. We will deal with the building. It is a more
pleasant subject.
Mess Hall is situated at a safe distance south of the dormitories and equidistant
from them. The building is, like all the others, of red brick. It is one story high
and consists of a spacious, well-lighted dining hall and large kitchens in the rear.
Meals are served at 6:30 A. M., 12:45 and 6:00 P. M. The food is-well, we're
still alive, anyhow. Many students pay part of their college expenses by serving in Mess Hall. "Rowdy Bill Wilkinson and Gumshoe Hamm, the chief dignitaries and mainstays of the place, preside from their high desk near the east door, announcing in sonorous and impressive tones anything you'll give them to announce, and sticking the frisky ones demerits for playfully throwing biscuits around.
We hope to see Mess Hall some day attain the dignity of the name "Commons."
If a name means anything, one ought to be as suitable as the other.




















Thirty-seven








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STUDENT EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Thirty-eight









TheSeminole









THE HONOR SYSTEM

IT is an astonishing fact to outsiders that the University of Florida has established
a permanent honor system so early in its youth. With the beginning of the 1916-'17 term the students and faculty gave their sanction to a very simple code
of laws previously drawn up by students in good standing, anxious to better conditions.
The system itself is unique and distinctly of "Florida ". Each man is on his
honor not only to keep his own name immune, but also to report each breach of truth or honor to an executive committee composed of five members, the president of the student body, as chairman, and one member from each class. This committee shall try all cases just as a court does, and of course has authority to expel a student who has been convicted. No student can be convicted, however, except upon the witness of two other students as regards his breach. An appeal may be made to the faculty from the decision of the student committee. Any amendment to the honor code requires a two-thirds vote of the student body, and a notice of the proposed amendment must be
served upon the faculty previous to its adoption.
The manner in which the students have not only respected their system but also
shown great pride in carrying it into actual effect is especially gratifying to everyone.
Members of the faculty feel at liberty to leave their rooms at any time, whether an examination or just a quiz is on. The professors do not even have to require a pledge.
On the other hand the students feel themselves in possession of the quality of true manhood, which fairness and openmindedness alone can give. The campus and classrooms are free from watchful restriction. Let it be known that no man devoid of honor could stay on the University of Florida campus, first, because he would be ill at ease himself, and second, because his fellows would soon find him out. It is a fact witnessed by many studentsat at their honor system has, from the time it was so favorably received and adopted, been a successful institution, praised and prized alike
by its upholders and originators. Truth and true education go hand in hand.
The members of the Student Executive Committee are: P. F. Collins, Chairman;
Norris McElya, Senior representave; M. Sparkma, Juior representative; W. E.
Stone, Sophomore representative; T. D. Williams, Freshman representative.















Thirty-nine







e Seminoblei





















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Forty-on










Cehezninole









HERBERT LAWRENCE DOZIER Columbia, S. C.

B.S., University of South Carolina '15 Glee Club '16, '17; Manager '17 University Minstrels '16, '17 Class Football '16. '17 Scrub Football '17 Laboratory Assistant, Experiment Station



















LUCIEN YOUNG DYRENFORTH
"Dearie"
Oak Park, Ill.

B.S., University of Florida, 1916
Pi Kappa Alpha
Theta Ribbon Society
German Club, President '16
Chief Musician Band
Orchestra
Flint Chemical Society, Secretary *16
Class Football '16
Inter-Fraternity Conference

















Forty-two









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J. REX FARRIOR Chipley, Fla.

A.B., University of Florida Kappa Alpha
Theta Ribbon Society German Club Tampa Club Varsity Football Football Captain '16 Varsity Baseball First Sergeant Company "C" Vice-President Sophomore Class "F" Club
Vice-President Senior Academic Class '16 Athletic Editor Seminole '16



















Forty-three









e Seminole









OTIS PASCAL HUFF "Lord Huff"
Laurens, S. C. A.B., Wofford College Delta Sigma Phi Theta Ribbon Society Farr Literary Society Flint Chemical Society Agricultural Club





















CLARENCE B. MALONEY
Pat "
Kalamazoo, Mich.

B.S., Michigan Agricultural College Sigma Alpha Epsilon Phi Alpha Kappa Serpents Ribbon Society Agricultural Club















Forty-four










UheSeminole











JESSE CARLISLE NIXON "King Nick"
Denver, N. C. B.S., and A.M., Davidson College Graduate School Glee Club Fellow in Mathematics, Teachers College






















THOS. J. OVERSTREET Wilmore, Ky. A.B., Asbury College Orchestra Chess Club





















Forty-five








eSemiuote














THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
HE Graduate School is, when considered from the viewpoint of numbers, an
almost insignificant part of the University body. But this is a false viewpoint; each branch of the system should be judged by the results obtained, not by the number who obtain those results. Viewed according to this true standard, the Graduate School is doing a noteworthy service in the University, as one will admit who considers the ability and high standards of its faculty and who sees the character and attainments of its students. Not only in intellectual affairs nor in pursuits followed after leaving college do they make their marks: the most relevant point to be stated in this book in favor of the graduate students is that, while numerically few, they take an active part in school activities, social, moral, and athletic, and thus make a strong impress in our campus life.
The University has not been, nor is it likely soon to be, in a position to lay great stress on graduate work. With the men who apply for work in this school it is a case of the early bird ", because only a small number can be accommodated. Nothing but Master's degrees can be offered. It is to be added that these degrees are the rewards of much diligence, original research and independent thinking, and we may well take off our hats to the ones of our number who have their dissertations accepted by the Committee on Graduate Work.





















Forty-six













































































S~S..

~' '''T?.~:~ i~0










Se D emuin ol




























P. F. COLLus President Combined Senior Classes



























Z. J. STANLEY President Combined Senior President Senior Law Class Academic Classes









Forty-eight










G e Seinoe






EVERETT W. BARKWELL

Minneapolis, Minnesota AGRICULTURE

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Agricultural Club; Polk County Club; "40" Club; Class Football, '16, '17; Vice-President Agricultural Club 1917; Agricultural Debating Team 1917; Associate Editor 1917 Seminole.









CLARENCE JAMES BRAYMER Major"
Bradentown, Fla.
ENGINEERING

Benton Engineering Society, President 1917; Captain Company "A" 1916; Captain Rifle Club '16, '17; Assistant Editor Alligator 1916.










WYNFRED ROSCOE BRIGGS Squire"
Zephyrhills, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Phi Alpha Kappa (Honorary Agricultural Local); Agricultural Club, Vice-President '15, Critic '16; Band '14-'17; Member Y. M. C. A. Cabinet '14-'17; Delegate State Student Y. M. C. A. Conference '14'17; Delegate Y. M. C. A. Conference Blueridge '15; President State Student Council of Y. M. C. A. '16;
Inter-Society Debating Team '14, '15.










Forty-nine









SeSeminole




C. E. CHILLINGWORTH "Chick "
West Palm Beach, Fla.
LAW

Alpha Tau Omega; Cooley Club; John Marshall Debating Team 1916; Serpent Ribbon Society, President 1916; German Club; Farr Lit., Secretary and Treasurer '15; Second Junior Law Honors; John Marshall Debating Society '16; Inter-Fraternity Conference '15, '16, '17; President Inter-Society Debating Council '17; Vice-President Senior Class; Vice-President Athletic Association 1917; Alligator Staff '15, '16, '17.







R. H. COBB

Orlando, Fla.
LAW

Phi Delta Theta; John Marshall Society; Cooley Club (Local Honorary Legal); Glee Club '16; Minstrel '16; Cheer Leader '17.







PAUL F. COLLINS
Eddie"
Racine, Wisconsin


University of Wisconsin, 1913-1915; Sigma Chi; Theta Mu Epsilon; Phi Alpha Kappa (Honorary Agricultural Local) ; German Club; Serpents; Agricultural Club, President 1916; Polk County Club, Reporter 1916; Varsity Football '15, '16; Society Editor Alligator '17; Secretary-Treasurer Junior Academic Classes; President Combined Senior Classes; Chairman Students' Executive Committee 1917; Business Manager Seminole 1917; First Sergeant Company "A" '15, '16.






97

Fifty









e eminole








JAMES RYAN COOPER
"Blutch"
Melbourne, Fla.
LAW

John Marshall Debating Society; Vice-President John Marshall.












PHILIP KRANSHAW Naperville, Ill.
LAW

Northwestern College; Valparaiso University.











ROBERT J. DAGG
"Bob"
Carsonville, Mich.
AGRICULTURE Pi Kappa Alpha; Agricultural Club '15, '16, '17, Critic '17; German Club; Class Baseball '16; Class Football '16, '17; Varsity Baseball '17; First Sergeant Company "C" 1916; Manager Senior Football Team
'17; Local Editor Seminole '17.












Fifty-one









CheSeminote








MARTIN GEORGE FEUERHAK Winona, Minnesota ARTS AND SCIENCES

Wisconsin University; Director Glee Club; University Orchestra; Minstrels 1917.











HORACE CADWELL GORDON, JR.
Judge"
Tampa, Fla.
ARTS AND SCIENCES

Theta Chi; Farr Literary Society; Tampa Club; Class Football '15, '16; First Lieutenant Company "C" 1917.










THOMAS HAMILTON "Ham"
Gainesville, Fla. B.S., Clemson Agricultural College LAW

Pi Kappa Alpha; Assistant Plant Pathologist, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, 1909-'17.













Fifty-two









eSeminole






GORDON HART
Mary"
Lakeland, Fla. ARTS AND SCIENCES

Farr Literary Society, President 1917; Flint Chemical Society, President 1917; Polk County Club; Florida Academy of Science; Quartermaster and First Lieutenant '15, '16; Laboratory Assistant in
Chemistry.









FRITZ HATCHER Stonewall, Oklahoma ARTS AND SCIENCES

Theta Chi; Peabody Club; "F" Club; Wrestling Club; Scrub Football '14-'16; Capt. Soph. Football '15; Track Team '15, '16; Varsity Football '17; Vice'Pres. Peabody Club '15; Art Editor Seminole '16; Prohibition Oratorical Contest '14.











MORRIS HELLER "Fat"
Jacksonville, Fla. ENGINEERING

Class Football '15, '16, '17; Sergeant Company
"B" 1915.













Fifty-three










SeSeminole






GEORGE ARTHUR HELSETH "Hellie"
Oslo, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Agricultural Club, President 1917; Sergeant Company "C" 1916; Phi Alpha Kappa (Honorary Agricultural Local).










W. B. HENDERSON
"B"
Tampa, Fla.
ARTS AND SC1ENCES

Kappa Alpha; Serpent Ribbon Society; German Club; Glee Club; Dramatic Club; Minstrels; Tampa Club; Varsity Football '13, '14, '15, '16; Varsity Basketball '13, '14, Captain '15; First Lieutenant Company "B"; Secretary of Combined Senior Classes.





FRANK LASSETTER HOLLAND
"Slippery ", "Axle"
Bartow, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Alpha Tau Omega; German Club; Theta Ribbon Society; Agricultural Club, Reporter 1917; Polk County Club, Treasurer 1917; Principal Musician 1917; Vice-President Freshman Class 1914; Secretary-Treasurer Sophomore Class 1915; President Academic Classes 1916; Society Editor Alligator 1916, Assistant Editor 1917; University Minstrels '15, '16, '17; Chairman Junior Prom 1916; Pan-Hellenic Association 1916; Athletic Board 1917; Historian Class of 1917; Literary Editor Seminole 1917.









Fifty-four


















FRED L. HOUSHOLDER Gainesville, Fla.
LAW

Alpha Tau Omega; John Marshall Debating Society, Secretary '16.












P. B. HOWELL "Judge "
Branford, Fla.
LAw

Cooley Club; John Marshall Debating Society, President 1917; Friday Night Law Club.









JAMES A. JOHNSON "Jimmy"
St. Petersburg, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary; Phi Alpha Kappa (Honorary Agricultural Local); Theta Ribbon Society; German Club; Agricultural Club, Secretary and Treasurer 1914; "F" Club; "Yiddisher Twins"; Varsity Basketball 1914; Varsity Baseball '14, '16; Class Football 1915; Battalion Adjutant 1914-16; Circulation Manager Alligator
1914.








Y97 Fifty-five










eSeminole








CLIFTON WORTH LONG "Possum "
Mayo, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Farr Literary Society '14, '15; Agricultural Club '16, '17; Tennis Club '14, '15; Secretary-Treasurer Y. M. C. A. '15.







CHARLES M. MANN
Cholly"
Fernandina, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Alpha Kappa (Honorary Agricultural Local); Phi Kappa Phi (Honorary Fraternity) ; Theta Ribbon Society; German Club; Agricultural Club, President 1916, Vice-Pres. '15, Secretary-Treas. '14; Mandolin Club; Tennis Club; Captain Company "C 1916; Treasurer Freshman Class; President Y. M. C. A.; Art Editor 1917 Seminole; Vice-President Inter-Society Debating Council 1917; Delegate Student Y. M. C. A. Conference 1915, Blueridge, N. C.; Inter-Fraternity Conference 1916.



IRA MALCOLM McALPIN
"Mac"
Mayo, Fla.
TEACHERS COLLEGE

Theta Chi; Peabody Club; Masonic Club; Business Manager Alligator '15, '16; Editor-in-Chief Alligator '16, '17; Secretary-Treasurer Peabody Club; VicePresident Masonic Club; Secretary-Treasurer Athletic Association; Treasurer Wm. A. Owens Camp Sons Confederate Veterans; Inter-Fraternity Conference.












Fifty-six









eSeminole




NORRIS McELYA
Mac Major"
Gasparilla, Fla.
LAW
B.S. University of Florida; Cooley Club (Local legal fraternity); "F" Club; Rifle Club; Mandolin Club; Farr Literary Society; DeSoto County Club; Mac Club; John Marshall Debating Club, Critic '17; Scrub Football '11, '12, '13, '14, '15, '16, Captain '14, Manager '16; Class Football '11, '14, '15, '16, Captain '16; Gym Team '12, '13, '14; Track Team '11; Manager Varsity Basketball '17; Cadet Major '15; Board of Managers University Carnival '16; Student Executive Committee '17; Athletic Editor Alligator '17; Athletic Editor Seminole '17; Secretary-Treas.
urer Senior Law Class.






PHILLIPS RAMAGE McMULLEN "P. Mac"
Largo, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; "40" Club; Class Football '14, '15, '16, '17; Lieutenant Company "C" 1916.









JAMES AUGUSTUS MIXSON Mix "
Williston, Fla.
ARTS AND SCIENCES

Farr Literary Society, Vice-President 1916-17; Sons of Confederate Veterans, Second Lieutenant Commandant 1916-17; Class Football '16; Class Basketball '17; Captain Company "C" '16, '17; Freshman Class, Secretary and Treasurer '15; Assistant Literary Editor 1917 Seminole; Honor Code Committee 191516.










Fifty-seven









d eeSeminole






GEORGE R. MOSELEY "Georgia"
Gainesville, Fla.
TEACHERS COLLEGE

Pi Kappa Alpha; Captain Scrub Football 1913; Class Football '12, '15; Varsity Football '13, '14; Varsity Baseball 1914; "F" Club; Tennis Club; Captain Company "A" 1916; Junior Prom Committee 1915; Glee Club 1916.







SIDNEY DANEL PADGETT
"Sid"
Lake Butler, Fla.
ARTS AND SCIENCES

Pi Kappa Alpha; Farr Literary Society, President '17; Bradford County Club, Secretary-treasurer '16; Champion Class Football Team '14; Scrub Baseball '14, '15, '16, '17; Battalion Color Sergeant '15, '16; Local Editor Alligator '17; Laboratory Assistant in Psychology '17.






BURLEIGH KENT PANCOAST "Panny"
St. Petersburg, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Serpent Ribbon Society; Agricultural Club; Captain Company "B" '14, '15; President Sophomore Class; Vice-President Combined Senior Classes; President Agricultural Club; Inter-Society Debator '15; Director Athletic Assn. '15; Managing Editor Alligator '16, '17; Business Manager U. of F. Minstrels '17.











Fifty-eight









theSeminole












WALTER DANIEL PAYNE Punta Gorda, Fla.
LAW

Friday Night Law Club; Masonic Club; "F" Club;
John Marshall Debating Society; Manager Football Team '16; Director Athletic Assn. '16, '17; InterSociety Debator '16, '17; Winner Board of Control
Medal '16.


















WALTER ROBERTS
"Big Roberts"
Wellborn, Fla. TEACHERS COLLEGE

Peabody Club.





















Fifty-nine










)eSeminoole







THOMAS RICHARD ROBINSON "T. R."
Milton, Fla.
TEACHERS COLLEGE

Peabody Club, President 1917; Gymnasium Team; Class Football '14, '17; Scrub Football '16, '17; Light-heavy-weight Wrestling Champion '14, '15; Inter-Society Debating '16, '17.









O. S. ROBLES "Liza"
Tampa, Fla.
LAW
Pi Kappa Alpha; Theta Ribbon Society; John Marshall Society; Cooley Club (Honorary Legal, Local); Varsity Football; Varsity Basketball, Captain '16.










CARL H. ROSENBUSH "Rosie"
Green Cove Springs, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Kappa Alpha; Theta Ribbon Society; "Yiddisher Twins"; "F" Club; Varsity Baseball '16, '17; Sophomore Football; Captain Baseball Team 1917; University Orchestra.













Sixty










eSerinole






JOE DALTON ROSENTHAL
SJew "
Tampa, Fla.
ENGINEERING

Wrestling Club; Tampa Club; Benton Engineering Society; "F" Club; Scrub Football '13, '14, '15; Class Football '15; Varsity Football '16; First Lieutenant Company "A" '15, '16; Board of Directors Athletic Association '16, '17; Manager Baseball '16.









M. E. RUSSELL
"Rusty"
Key West, Fla.
TEACHERS COLLEGE

Theta Chi; Peabody Club, Vice-President '16; Summer School Dramatic Club '15, '16; FreshmanSophomore Declamation Contest '15; Junior-Senior Oratorical Contest '17.








LEWIS J. STADLER "Stad"
St. Louis, Mo.
AGRICULTURE

Phi Alpha Kappa, (Honorary Agricultural Local); Phi Kappa Phi (Honorary Fraternity); University of Missouri; President Agricultural Club 1916; Editor Seminole 1917; President of Combined Senior Academic Classes 1917; General Manager University Carnival 1916; Assistant in Animal Industry, Experiment Station, '17; Inter-Collegiate debator.











Sixty-one










CeSeminole






Z. JAY STANLEY "Coach"
Liberty, Indiana LAW

A.B., Earlham College; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Cooley Club (Honorary Legal), Vice-President '17; John Marshall Debating Society; Glee Club; Minstrels; Masonic Club; Wrestling Club; Assistant Coach Football and Baseball; Coach Basketball and Track; President Senior Law Class.









WALLACE TERVIN
"Fess ", "Clerk "
Bagdad, Fla.
LAW

Friday Night Law Club, President 1917; John Marshall Debating Society.











FORD L. THOMPSON Tommy ", Percy"
Pensacola, Fla. AGRICULTURE Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Alpha Kappa, (Honorary Agricultural Local); Agricultural Club; Band Sergeant; Student Assistant in Agriculture.












Sixty-two









le Serninole








H. L. THOMPSON Gainesville, Fla.
LAW

Cooley Club, (Local Honorary Legal); John Marshall Society; Alpha Tau Omega.











JAMES M. TILLMAN lim"
Bartow, Fla. AGRICULTURE

Alpha Tau Omega; Polk County Club; SergeantMajor Battalion '15, '16; President Freshman Class; Business Manager Seminole '16, '17; Inter-Fraternity Conference '15, '16.










HENRY R. TRIBBLE "Rat"
Lake City, Fla. AGRICULTURE

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Agricultural Club; Wrestling Club; Scrub Football '14, '15; Light weight Champion Wrestler '15; Rear Rank Private '14-'17.












Sixty-three









rleSeminole






PAUL VETTER
"Vet"
New York, N. Y.
LAW

Farr Literary Society; John Marshall Debating Society; Duval County Club, Secretary and Treasurer '17; Scrub Basketball and Baseball '15-'17; Freshman Football '15; Junior Baseball '16; U. D. C. Medal '15; Junior Law Class Poet '16.










PAUL E. WEIMER
Miami, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Theta Chi; Florida Academy of Sciences; Flint Chemical Society, Vice-President 1917; Agricultural Club; Class Football '15, '16, '17; Band Sergeant.











E. K. WILSON "Shorty "
St. Augustine, Fla.
LAW

Theta Chi; John Marshall Debating Society; Junior Football; Senior Football; Senior Basketball; Scrub Football '16.













Sixty-four










heSemninole














HARRY EVINS WOOD Smoky Joe"
Evinston, Fla.
AGRICULTURE

Theta Chi; Agricultural Club; Mandolin Club; Class Football '15, '16, '17; Varsity Baseball '17; Band Sergeant.













HORACE F. ZETROUER "Zet"
Rochelle, Fla.
TEACHERS COLLEGE

Delegate National Reunion U. C. V. 1916; Farr Literary Society, Secretary '16; Wm. A. Owens Camp, S. C. V., First Lieutenant Commander '17; Rifle Club; Scrub Football '14-'17; Class Football '16, '17; Scrub Basketball '14; Second Lieutenant Company "B" '16; Vice-President Freshman Class '15;
Circulation Manager Alligator '16.




















Sixty-five








eSeminole










HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1917

HE straight unwavering history of this class will not be attempted, being so
long and complicated that none except the four-year men could begin to understand and appreciate it. To begin with, back in September, 1913, we came here as Freshmen, perhaps the greenest bunch ever entering. Our number was 87 that year and the way we took down the Sophomore flag was a joy.
Our second year about 30 men returned, but we were all here, and the rats failed for the first time to take the flag from the Sophs.
Last year we were joined by the Junior Lawyers, increasing the size of the class to about 70. That year we began to get recognition from different places and people, and our importance swelled within our heads till they almost burst. At the end of the year we adopted a complicated set of resolutions and this year we have had one "Helluva time carrying them out.
In September, 1916, we returned for the last round-and the word round is very fit, we think. A year of activities and action never before witnessed on the campus has been this our last year.
At the time of writing this it is hard.to know whether to conclude with graduation of the class or not-the situation seems so undecided and doubtful throughout. But to continue with the history of the class:
In athletics we have done our share, putting 25 men on the varsity football squads; 20 on the baseball; 10 on basketball; and practically half of track, during our stay in school.
In other honors we have ranked along with the highest, and probably excelled in some lines: Military places, school and society positions; athletic record, and all go to show that this, the class of '17, is as it claims, not the best but as good as any class ever turned out of the University of Florida.
















Sixty-six






































































Sitxy-seven










e emnoe























J. LEO ANDERSON LESLIE S. ANDERSON GEORGE RANEY BAILEY
Andy "Leck "Jew "
Pensacola, Fla. A.B.. W. & L. Monticello, Fla.
Law University Arts and Sciences Ocala, Fla. Kappa Alpha Law
Phi Kappa Psi

























HOWARD S. BAILEY THOMAS JACKSON BARNS ELMORE DixiE EGGS Lynn Haven, Fla. "Myrtle" Dick "
Law Plant City, Fla. Georgia Engineering Law Kappa Alpha Pi Kappa Phi










Sixty-eight










Sheeminole






















WILLIAM FRANKLIN BEVIS JA1ES O. BICKLEY LEoNARD O. BOYNTON IV. F." Arcadia, Fla. "Big Boy" Bartow, Fla. Law Bartow, Fla.
Law Alpha Epsilon Upsilon (Hon.) Pi Kappa Alpha Kappa Alpha


























WILEY H. BURFORD DicKSON H. CARTER SIDNEY J. CATTS, JR.
"Buri Pensacola, Fla. '" Tabby Ocala, Fla. Law Tallahassee, Fla. Litt. B. Princeton Alpha Tau Omega Law Kappa Alpha Theta Chi










Sixty-nine










heSemrnole























SAMUEL L. CHEATHAM F. P. INGRAM JOHN F. COATES
Sam "" Bubber "John F."
Winter Haven, Fla. Dade City, Fla. Sanford, Fla.
Law Law Law Alpha Tau Omega



























H. C.. CAO. JR. L. CuRTIS CROFTO ELLIS M. DAVIS JR.
H. C." Vernon, Fla. Marianna, Fla.
Tallahassee, Fla. Teachers Law
Agriculture
Pi Kappa Alpha










Seventy










lheSeminole











C











B. M. W1MBERLY W. A. DoPsoN FRANCtS REESE EDWARDS Lovett, Fla. Macclenny, Fla. "Frank "
Law Law Jacksonville. Fla.
Agriculture





























VINCENT PHILL1PS W1LLIAM1 ROBINSON FRAZIER ARTHUR HAMILTON FULLER Phil Bob Artie"
Cambridge, Mass. Jacksonville, Fla. Nichols, Fla.
Law Law Enginee.ring Kappa Alpha Kappa Alpha










Seventy-one










e7 eminole






















GuNBY GIBBONS A. A. GREEN P. F. HAltLERI
Gumbo" Grennie Haig
Tampa, Fla. Ocala, Fla. Cameron, S. C. B.S. Spring Hill College Law Law
Law Kappa Alpha Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Alpha Tau Omega


























ELWOOD O. HALL ARTHUI ELLIS HAlMMr EDWIN I1KET hIAMPTON
Quincy, Fla. "Hanimmie Skeet"
Law Jacksonville, Fla. Gainesvillec, Fla.
Law Law
Pi Kappa Alpha Sigma Alpha Epsilon










Seventy-two

































J. H. HARRELL PILE ION DAVID HUFF M. H. JONES Nick " Pee Dee" Jonsie" Quincy, Fla. Laurens, S. C. Brewton, Ala.
Law A.B. Wofford College Law Law
Sigma Alpha Epsilon

























C. H. LiCHLITER WILLIAM L. MAHON OTTO MANECKE Lick" "Lacy " Otto" Jacksonville, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla. Brooklyn, N. Y. A.B. Washington & Lee Law Agriculture Law Sigma Alpha Epsilon Theta Chi Alpha Tau Omega










Seventy-three









ieSeminole






















JAMES MIARR ERNEST WILL1AM MATHEWS F. D. MILES
Red Dean Darlington, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla. Leesburg, Fla. Teachers College
Law Agriculture Theta Chi Pi Kappa Alpha



























W. T. MOORE, JR. LEo GEO. MORPER LEE GUEST
IV. T." Morp Jacksonville, Fla. Tallahassee, Fla. Archer, Fla. Law
Law Law Kappa Alpha










Seventy-four









OeSeeminote






















A. LEECH R1DER MAURICE BERTRAM R1HERD DETOR V. ROUSE Amze" Ri "" Pete"
Tallahassee. Fla. Lake Butler, Fla. Dover, Fla.
Teachers Law Law



























JAMEs KERSHAW SPARKMAN CHARLES A. STOCKTON DON ARTHUR STORMS Jim " Charlie Zephyrhills, Fla. Tampa, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla. Agriculture Agriculture Agriculture Alpha Tau Omega Alpha Tau. Omega










Seventy-five










lTebeminole























GEORGE STROUD PAUL C. TAYLOR G. EDWIN WALKER
Lee, Fla. "P. C." Bartow, Fla.
Law Miami, Fla. Law
Theta Chi Law
Alpha Tau Omega



























JOHN STOTHOFF WYCKOFF, JR. S. A. B. WILKINSON JUAN BiBOLINI
"Rat " Rowdy Bib "
Citra, Fla. Gainesville, Fla. Asuncion, Paraguay
Engineering Teachers Agriculture Theta Chi










Seventy-six









0eSeminole





















117 -M. F. BROWN T. HART GETZEN JOHN W. WATSON, JR.
Lawtey, Fla. 1" Get" Jack "
A.B., University of Fla. Webster, Fla. Miami. Fla.
Law Law Law
Pi Kappa Alpha Alpha Tau Omega Alpha Tau Omega


























Seveny-seven

Seventy-seven









CijeSemiole









JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY
OR various reasons, too many to relate, the 1914 Freshman class was smaller
than it ordinarily would have been, but nevertheless those of us who remain out of the 57 who entered in September, 1914, can testify that our achievements as a class have proved that it was characterized by quality, not quantity.
For instance in the Flag Rush each year, we were handicapped by uneven chances and necessarily failed to recover or to hold the flag, but when it came to the Tug-ofWar, with equal chances, we were right there and, had it not been for the judges, would have been pulling the opposing team till now.
Throughout these years many of the athletic stars have come from our class. Such men as Fuller, Sparkman, Goldsby, Stockton and Wilkinson are indispensable to the Varsity football squad. Pooser, Wood and Seymour have held up the honor of the class in baseball, and we have also had prominent representatives in basketball and track.
There is nothing which has come up during our three years here, for the betterment of the school that has not received the whole-hearted support of the class. In each case, however, we would have a clear discussion of the proposed matter at class meeting and then present our views.
The acquisition this year of about 45 Junior lawyers to our meagre number of about 15, is a fact to feel justly proud of, and it did not take them long to show us that they, too, had the old pep which alone can make a class a successful organization. They have given valuable advice in a number of questions which have come up before the class, and take as much interest in every affair as if they had entered with the rest of us in '14.
As the year closes, completing three-fourths of the journey which we set out upon, we think that it must have been a short road, but 'twas not that, only the environment and the close ties by which the members of the class are held that makes it seem so short. Indeed there are only a few months before we shall return as Seniors and then- ?















Seventy-eighl





































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SOBS

























SOPHOMORES




Eighty










CheSeminole


















































in




















SOPHOMORES



II1
-0178









eSemnoi1e







SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY
HE history of the class of '19 is necessarily short, but it is of the character to make every member justly proud. In September, 1915, our verdant band made its debut on the U. of F. campus. After purchasing our share of campus tickets, radiator keys, and other such articles, we settled down to real work. Early in our career we met and elected officers for the year, the honored men being Ham Dowling, president; L. S. Gray, vice-president, and J. A. Mixson, secretary.
The class of '19, now organized, began to show the other classes of what stuff it was made. The first demonstration was given when it took the class of '18 and its precious flag into camp in the annual Sophomore-Freshman Flag Rush. Its football team then piled up a big score against that of the hated Sophomores, and, soon after, held the mighty Senior eleven to the score of 3-0 in the final game. Then, to finish the year's good record, a Sophomore won the medal in the Sophomore-Freshman Oratorical Contest.
In September, 1916, the class of '19 again showed its mettle when 75 of its members returned to resume their studies. We realized, of course, that it was our solemn duty to show the Freshmen a good time, and this we did to the best of our ability until Dr. Murphree informed us, one morning in chapel, that we had done remarkably well, and that he would therefore excuse us from further duties along this line. Or-???? Then, after electing Paul Baker, president, Bob Harris, vicepresident, and H. G. Redstone, secretary, we again took up our victorious march, holding the Freshmen from the Old Pine Tree upon which is tacked every year the Sophomores' sacred banner. In the annual Sophomore-Freshman Football Game we surprised the whole student body by holding the fast Rat aggregation to one touchdown.
Not only have we had good inter-class athletes, but many Varsity men have come from our ranks. In football, Ham Dowling, the DeVane boys, Paul Baker, and G. P. Wood; in baseball, Oberry, Williams, Whitfield, Carruthers, and McCallum; in basketball, Harris, Oberry, Adams, and Wood; and in wrestling, Hayman, show the standard of the Sophomore class.
Having traveled the straight and narrow path this far, let us try to continue our journey until June, 1919, and may we all then receive well-deserved diplomas.













Eighty-two


























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heSeminole



















































FRESHMEN




Eighty-four








L heSeminole




















































FRESHMEN
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FRESHMEN




Eighty-six
pggg~~""rr,=s~a~~~~ rr~,
















































Eight-six








G1heSeminole





FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY TRANGE conditions surrounded the 115 Freshmen who became students at this
seat of learning in the fall of 1916. At first their outlook, to say the least, was blue, but as they gradually adapted themselves to new conditions, the blue
outlook became bright, light shone through chaos, and a love for Florida sprung up in their hearts. Before them was a great hill, the Hill of Education, which they were to ascend partly this year. Three roads, Physique Street, Mental Avenue, and
Moral Way, led up this hill.
Progress up Physique Street is best made by demonstrated athletic ability. Some
attainment has been made along this line. Without real men like Wilson, the classpresident, Branch, Brown, and Rood on the Varsity football team, would not Coach McCoy have been in trouble? In the series of games played for the class championship in football the Freshmen won every time they played; that is to say, they won the championship. Though the painted warriors of the Flag Rush failed to capture the flag, they managed to outpull their opponents in the annual tug-of-war, staged immediately after the Flag Rush. Cooper and Duncan represented the class most creditably on the Varsity basketball squad, while it is needless to mention the good work done by Blankenburg and others on the diamond. So far has the class gone up
Physique Street.
Progress up Mental Avenue is marked by individual attainment in classes, and by
debating ability. Some bright minds have already shown their quality, but the large majority are only ordinary as yet. The reason is obvious. The class is yet young.
But it has the ambition and the will, and a little later on it will surely prove deserving of praise for mental accomplishments. Mudge, Clarkson, and Branch do well in
debating, as do many others.
Moral Way, from which the other two roads branch, has been ascended so far
with little difficulty. While there are some members who lack the very finest traits of great men, on the other hand, there are those who have these traits, and who will stand for the right like Gibraltar. The Honor System has been unwaveringly supported by the class, not to mention the help afforded the Y. M. C. A. Let the Freshman be called on for genuine manhood.
The support given the miscellaneous campus activities, such as The Alligator,
the band, the various clubs, etc., by the class needs no mention. The fact that the class is extremely young, that it is in its very infancy, must be kept in mind. If it has done so well in infancy, will it not do as well or better in later years? The world of college life and opportunity in their Alma Mater lies before the Freshmen. They
have merely begun to climb the Hill of Education. Historian.











Eighty-seven








he eminole

















































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Eighty-eight












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ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS

FRITZ HATCHER ......... .........................---------------resident
C. E. CHILLINGWORTH ----------------.................------------------ ------------........ Vice-President
IRA MCALPIN ................. ---------------- ..--------- ........-----...----------Secretary-Treasurer

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

A. H. Fuller W. D. Payne Paul Hayman C. A. Robertson F. L. Holland J. D. Rosenthal Dr. W. L. Summers













Eighty-nine














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