Citation
Early piety, or, Memoirs of children

Material Information

Title:
Early piety, or, Memoirs of children eminently serious : interspersed with familiar dialogues, prayers, graces, and hymns
Portion of title:
Memoirs of children
Portion of title:
Early piety
Creator:
Burder, George, 1752-1832
Matchett, Richard J
Armstrong & Plaskitt
Place of Publication:
Baltimore
Publisher:
Armstrong & Plaskitt
Manufacturer:
R.J. Matchett
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
76, [4] p. : ; 11 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Religious life ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Religious education -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Dialogues -- 1821 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1821 ( rbgenr )
Family stories -- 1821 ( local )
Hymns -- 1821 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1821
Genre:
Dialogues ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Family stories ( local )
hymn ( aat )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Maryland -- Baltimore
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Shoemaker
Citation/Reference:
Rosenbach, A.S.W. Children's books,
General Note:
Printed wrappers.
General Note:
Four unnumbered pages of publisher's advertisements follow text and p. [4] of wrapper.
General Note:
Four unnumbered pages of publisher's advertisements follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by George Burder.

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University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027278837 ( ALEPH )
22253457 ( OCLC )
Classification:
BV4510 .B97 1821 ( lcc )

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BARLY PUBEY,

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MEMOIRS OF CHILDREN.

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-
BALTIMORE: -

PUBLISHED BY ARMSTRONG & PLASKITT.
R. J. Matchett, printer.







EARLY PIETY;
MEMOIRS OF CHILDREN,
EMINENTLY ,SERLOUS-

Interspersed with familiar Dialogues,

Prayers, Graces, and Hymns.



BY GEORGE BURDER.

—_—_—




« Hearest thou what they say 2
«“ Yea, have ye never read,— Out of the

mouths of babes ‘and sucklings thou hast per
fected praise 2_Matt. xxi. 16.

ae

| BALTIMORE:

Printed for Armstrong & Plaskitt
BY BR. J. MaTCHETT.

1821.









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PREFACE.

ee

My dear young Reader,

Tuts little book is written with
a design and a desire, at once to
profit and please you; by shewing
in the examples of children, young
as you are, the great happiness
and advantage of real and early
piety.

That you may read it with pro-
fit, you must take notice of what-
ever was good in the Children you
read of, to imitate it; and of what-
ever was bad, in order to avoid it.
- You will find, that the good
Children loved Prayer; that is to
teach you to love it tee.

They hated Sin very much; that
is to make you to hate it.



iv

Many of them died very young;
(not that they died the sooner be-
eause they were good; but being
good, they were the sooner fit to
die ;) now, you yourself may die
young too, therefore pray ear-
nestly to the Lord, for the par-
don of all your sins, and beg for
grace to make you fit to live, and
then you will be fit to die.

G. B.

March, 1812.



THE

ENTERTAINING

HUsToRnr

OF

WILLIAM AND ELIZABETH GOCB-
CHILD.

2+
CHAP. I,

Of their behaviour at School, and comin=
Home at Christmas.

Wittram and Elizabeth Goodchild,
were sent by their parents into the coun-
try, to a boarding school, where they
were put under the care of Mrs. Love-
good, a lady of singular piety and wis-
dom; remarkably fitted for the educa-
tion of youth ; for she dearly loved little
children, and was very indulgent to them,
and never failed graciously to reward
them, whenever they did well; especially
when she observed them diligent in



6

reading their bibles, in learning their cate-
chism, in secret prayer, or when they
could give a good account of the sermons
they had heard on the Lord’s-day. Upon
such occasions she would not only com-
mend and reward, but would indulge them
with some useful piece of knowledge that
was new to them.
And so by the blessing of God upon her

_| instructions, and the diligent and dutiful



behaviour of her scholars, it was truly sur-
prising what a quick progress they made
in learning and politeness. Mrs, Love-
good could by no means conceal the im-
_ provement they made from their kind pa-
rents, and therefore wrete several times
to acquaint them with all the particulars :
and nothing could be more welcome to
them than such news, I assure you.

You may imagine by observing your own
parents, (my dear reader) that it greatly
delighted their hearts, to hear of the wel-
fare and good behaviour of their dear lit-
_ tle ones, and made them exceedingly
abound in thankfulness to God, who had
_ directed them to so geod a school, and
who had bestowed upon their children
such lovely dispositions. They even
thought it long till holiday-time came,
when they expected to see them.



7

Well, Christmas came at last; and for
-my part, I cannot tell you whether parents
_ or children were most pleased with its
coming.

The appointed day for William and Eli-
zabeth to return home was now arrived:
and they took leave of Mrs. Lovegood, with
tears of affection and love, begging her
prayers for their safe journey to town,
where they got safe and sound in the even-
ing; meeting at the inn, in Aldersgate-
street, with their father’s servant, whom
he had kindly sent to conduct them home.
And home they came ; but it would be in
yain for me to attempt to tell you what a
pretty sight t»eir meeting was.

When they entered the room, after ma-
king their obeisance, they ran, and both
falling on their knees, begged their pa-
rents’ blessing. Mrs, Goodchild could not
speak for crying, she was so affected with
joy. But Mr. Goodchild, raising them up
in the most tender manner said, “ May
JESUS bless you both!” and, kissing them,
added, “God be praised for his mercy, in
giving me to see my dear children again!”

Afier they had drank tea, Elizabeth
gave her mother an account of their rules
and orders at school; how happy they lived
there; how kind Mrs, Lovegood was to



8

them; and how she taught them morning
and evening prayers, which they repeated,
‘And as you (my little reader,) might hke
to know them, and, it may be, to use them
your-elf, I will set them down. The
Morning prayer Was as follows.



Morning Prayer.

«© Almighty and most merciful God!
who hast made me, and preserved me to
this heur, look graciously upon me, and.
have mercy upon me. Thou hast promis-
ed, O Lord, that those who seek thee early,
shall find thee; and 1 am now come to seck
thy face and favour. Dear Jesus, when on
earth, thou didst suffer little children to
come unto thee: and I am come, O take
me into thy arms of love, and make my
young heart soft and tender; afraid of sin,
and‘its terrible consequences! O make me
highly to prize thy love in dying for sin-
ners! and, Lord, be pleased to give me a
share in thy love. Make me humble,
teachable, righteous, and holy.—Accept
my praise for another night’s preservatio
and be pleased to continue the same care
and protection all this day. Instruct me,
© Lord, in all useful and necessary know
ledge, especially that which concerns mj










.

eternal peace. Wherever I am to-day, be
pleased to be with me. Whatever I do to
day, may I do it to thy glory. While I live,
may I live to God; and when I die, may £
sleep in Jesus! and after death admit me
to heaven; to ascribe glory to the Father,
Son, and Holy Ghost, for ever and ever.—
Amen.”

«Our Father,” &c. &c.
Evening Prayer.

«0 Lord, my God, most high! most ho-
ly! and most gracious! Thou searchest
all hearts, and well knowest all that [have
this day done, said, or thought amiss : for-

ive all most freely for the sake of Jesus
Christ. Clothe my naked soul with the
spotless righteousness of Jesus thy dear
son: wash my unclean soul in his clean-
sing blood : sanctify my unsanctified tem-
pers and dispositions, by the Holy Spirit.
Watch over my body and sou! this’ night
whileI sleep. Graciously defend me from
every danger—Preserve also, O Lord, all
that dwell under .this roof: and bless my
dear parents, and all my relations: pros-
per and increase the ministers of thy gos-
pel: and may every one of my friends and



10

acquaintance acquaint themselyes with Je-
sus, and be at peace with him. Glory be
to thee, O.Lord, for my creation, preser-
vation, and all the comiorts of this life;
but much more for the gift of gifts, a pre-
cious Jesus. May my soul be found in
him, both now and forever more! Grant
all my petitions, and accept my praises, in
the name and for the sake of Jesus Christ,
who, with the Father and Holy Ghost, is
one God over all blessed for ever. Amen
and Amen.” ,

These prayers, you see, are both very
short and suitable; but at times they used
other petitions, not set down here, accord-
ing to their various wants, as when they
were ill, or had got well again; when they
were going a journey, or the like.

William also informed his parents, that
at school, before family prayer, a chapter
used to be read; and when it was done,
each scholar was expected to repeat some
verse or sentence, that they remember-
ed: and this kept up their attention. And
then they used to sing very pretty hymns,
which, if you should like to learn, you may
find them at the end of this book.

Well, before supper, when Mr. Good-
éhild’s family were called up to prayer,
you cannot think how glad all the servants



44

‘

were to see Master and Miss again: from
which I conclude, that they behaved well
before they left home.—Their sweet yoi-
ces made an agreeable addition to the
song of praise that every evening ascend-
ed from that happy (because pious) fami-
ly: In short, it was as the house of God,
and the very gate ofheaven. For my part,
I wish that those people who have no
prayer in their families had been there;
methinks it would have made them much
desire to repeat such pleasant scenes un-
der their own roof—Jer. x. 25.

-ro—

CHAP. II.

Of the Gallery of Pictures.

WILLIAM and Elizabeth, behaving
themselves so well, deserved indulgence;
and they had what they deserved: for
they had not been at home long, when a
great man, Mr. John Benevolent, hearing
of them, invited them to his country
house, ata very pleasant village, near Lon-
don ; and he sent his own coach for them



42

too. ‘They were most cordially received,
and kindly entertained indeed. Among
the many curious things they saw, nothing
picased them better than a gallery of fine
pictures, each of which had a spiritual
meaning; and Mr. B. was so onliging as to
print out to them the mstructive lessons
they were designed to teach. In order,
therefore, to convey to our young readers
some idea of the beautiful originals, we
will recite the following account or them.

The first picture which struck their at-
tention was a beautiful historical piece,
very highly finished by a capital hand.

The little folks as you will naturally sup-
pose, were anxious to know the meaning
of it; which gave rise to the following dia-
logue :—

Fliz. Pray, Sir, what does this picture
represent ?

Mr. B, My dears, you perceive a poor
man almost drowned.

Eliz. Yes, Sir, and how came he there?

Mr. B. He was go:ng over that great piece.
of water, in a little pasteboard boat. Being
deluded by a man in black, who ought to
have known better, he foolishly thought
that his boat would keep out the water, and -
convey him ssfely to the opposite shore,”
But as soon as the wind blew, and the waves —

i tk



43

arose, the boat overset, (you may just see
the tep of it, ) and the man fell into the
water,

Eliz Poor man! but pray, Sir, who is
that gentleman on the bank ?

Mr. B. My dear, thatis a tender hearted
good Prince : though he looks so plain, he
lives in yonder fine palace on the gh hill;
and seeing ( for he can see a great way)
this poor creature fall in, he ran immedi-
ately to his relief, flung in the rope as you
see, and bid the poor man lay fast hold,
and he would draw him out.

William. Dear Sir, how kind! how very
kind that was!

Mr. B. It was indeed:—the man can ne-
ver be sufficiently thankful to him.

Eliz. And how excessively tight he
seems to hold the rope!

Mr. B. My dear, he would not let it go
fer all the world; his life is at stake: and if
it had not been for the gentleman, he must
certainly have perished. And now chil-
dren, (added Mr. Benevolent,) Pll tell you
what spiritual instruction it is imtend-
ded to convey. The man in his paper boat,
is to shew you how every man by nature
(till taught of God,) is ready to think that
he may get to heaven by whathe can do
himself. But it is absolutely impossible;



1%

for this reason:—The Holy Law of GOR
insists upon perfect ebedience, and noth-
ing short of that will do—But no man is
now able to obey perfectly”

Therefore, unless the perfect righteousness
of another is imputed to him, he must fall
under the curse of the broken law: his own
best righteousness will fail him, as this man’s
paper boat has done; and if immediate as-
sistance is not afforded, he must perish for
ever andever. But that dear Prince is to
represent Jesus Christ, the King of kings
and Lord of lords, who came from glory on
purpose to seek and save the lost. The
rope shews you how we are saved by Faith.*
There is no merit in the man, nor in the
rope, nor inhis holding the rope. His de-
liverance from death is entirely owing to
the good prince ; and thus the whole glory
of salvation is due alone to Christ.

Eliz. (dare say the poor man will not
brag of saving himself. I am sure he
ought to be very thankful.

Mr, B. You say right; and so he was, The
good prince took him afterwards and gave
him fresh clothes, his own handsome livery,

* Faith is taking God at his word.





45

white turned up with red, and he dwells
now in his palace, as happy a5 a prince.

William. How dearly the man must love
him! hew desirous must he be to please
him! I dare say the Prince has no need to
pid him twice to do any thing, or threaten
to turn him out of doors if he is not good,
I think if I was in his place, it would be
my meat and drink to do his will, and I should
want no other wages than his approbation.

Mr. B Wellsaid, indeed. O my dear
children, remember then, thus cheerfully
to love and obey a precious Saviour, who
has redeemed us from the curse of the
law, by becoming a curse for us.

In the next picture you see two boys: he
on the left hand is named Passion, the oth-
er’s name is Patience. You may perceive
Passion is much disquieted: but Patience
sits with a Bible in his hand, as quiet as a
lamb: and he is so happy because he is
content to wait till next year for several
pretty things his guardian has promised
him:—but Passion is thus disturbed, be-
cause he is determined to have all now.
He is indeed a very wicked child; he is
descended from Dives, whom youread of
in the Bible; and Patience is decended
from Lazarus, a very good though a very
poor man, They take after their ancestors





16



very much: for, as Mr. Bunyan informs us,
in his Pilgrim’s Progress, a man came and
brought to Passion a great bag of money;
which he seized with prodigious eagerness,
and at the same time, laughing at Patience,
called him a sorry beggar ; but, however,
it was not long before he spent all he had,
in riotous living; lost his friends and his
cash together, and has been seen himself,
not long ago, begging about the streets :
whereas Patience, in time, by diligence
and industry, got a very comfortable estate,
upon which he lives, and does a great deal
of good with it. . /

William. And pray, Sir, what is this to
teach us?

Mr. B. My dear, it is this ; Never to co-
vet present things, things which regard
only this world ; but both quietly wait, and
patiently hope for your portion of Setter
things in a better world, All this world calls
good or great must either leave us or be
left by us: and it is better to have our p»r-
_ tion in heaven than on earth, for this rea-
son, also, because, if it is on earth, we are
going from it; but if 1t be in heaven, we
are going to it.

Mr B. What co vou observe, Miss Good-
child, in this next picture?



17

Eliz. Sir, lobserve a man with 2 rake
jn his hand, raking together all the muck
and straw : and-he seems to be very busy
indeed. 4

Mr. B. But do you not observe some-
thing else?

Eliz. Yes, Sir, there is an angel ever
his head, that seems to want him to look up
at a fine crown in his hand. How sweetly
the angel smiles! but the man takes no
notice. Will you please, Sir, to tellus
the meaning?

Mr. B My dears, the man who seems so
busy in raking together nothing but dirt, is
an emblem of tie men of this world, who
rise early and sit up late, eating the bread of
carefulness, and all to get money. The an-
gel represents the faithful ministers ot Je-
sus Christ, who are using all the means
they can to engage poor careless sinners to
think of eternal things and shewing them —
what a crown they are despising for mere
trash. But after all, as you observed, the ;
man takes no notice of the angel, nor of
the glorious crown, though it is worth a
thousand times more than he will ever
scrape together as long as he lives. And
thus dear children, too, too many labour —
and study only for the meat that perisheth,



| 48

while they neglect the unspeakably impor-
tant concerns of Salvation ; and thus nin-
isters labour in vain; and spend their strength
for nought. Few believe their report, andto
Sew is the armof the Lord revealed.

The very kind gentleman, after having
shown them several other pictures, of
equal merit, dismissed them, with some
pretty presents, especially a neat pocket
Bible to each; which (to them) was the
most gracious gift they could possibly re-
ceive.

When they returned home, they gave so
distinct and pleasing an account of all they
had seen, as highly delighted their pa-
rents; especially as they took care to re-
member the instructive explunation of each
piece: and were not, like most children,
pleased with them merely as picures.

William particularly observed to his
father, with what earnestness the man
in the water kept hold of the rope;
and said, he hoped the Lord would help
him, even to hold Jesus fast by faith, for
his Saviour, with the same degree of stead-
fastness.

Mr. Goodchild was so pleased with their
remarks, that he promised they should see
every thing that might be likely to ad-



\
419

vance their best interests; and according-
ly the next day they went to the Muse-
um: an account of which you have in the
following chapter. *

—Lr—
CHAP. Ill.

Of the Museum.

1 MUST remark, in the first place, that
Bully and Betsey, whenever they were to
go abroad to see any fine sight, used at-
ways to pray for a blessing upon it:—And
they never went to see any thing, or en-
gage in any diversion, upon which they dar-
ed not to ask God’s blessing.—And for
that reason never went to plays, nor play-
ed at cards: they knew that all such diver-
sions were unlawful. J

They had been told what rare curiosi-
ties, of nature and art, were to be seen at |
the Museum; and therefpre they prayed
that, from seeing the wonderful things |
which God hath made, and given wisdom
to man to make, they might be led to adore
the great Creator.

:





—
SS

20 /

The first room they were led into con-
tained a vas: variety of Serpents, snakes, ad-
ders, and such-like frightful creatures; ma-
ny of which, though beautiful to look upon,
were terrible when alive; having had sharp
stings. and mortal Poison under their
tongues.

Miss Goodchild Shuddered almost to
look upon them; but William whispered
his father, and Said, These destructive
creatures put me in mind of that old and
subtle serpent, who first persuaded Eve
to sin against God, by breaking his com.
mands, and so “brought death into the
world, and alj our woe.”

more hurtful than these vipers, now they
are dead and bottled up in spirits.”

They were then led into a dark room in
which was a transparent picture of a burn-
ing mountain in Italy, called Vesuvius;

from the top of which issued huge quanti.

ties of stones, and Tivers of liquid fire pour-
ed down its side. ‘The sight of such an



EEE '“ li
24

awful scene, though but painted, filled ev-
ery mind with solemnity, and every face
with fear. And who can help thinking, said
the minister, who accompanied them, of
that dreadful day which our eyes must be-
hold! No painted fire, nor imaginary thun-
ders then, but all real; when the elements
shall melt with fervent heat; the sun be
turned into darkness, and the moon into
blood; when the Son of man shall come in
the clouds of heaven, in great glory, and
all his holy angels with him, to take ven-
geance on his enemies, and to sentence
all the sons of Adam to happiness or mis-
ery. Qh / said the little girl, Oh that this
Judge may be our friend! then shall we be
safe. Here they were also shewn all man-
ner of birds and their nests; all sorts of
butterflies, and other insecis; curious hel-
mets and swords. all sorts of shells and
leaves, and more fine things than I could
tell you of in an hour. But nothing
pleased William more than an old ma-
nuscript of the Bible, in vellum, which
the minister said was worth all the books
there: and so it was; for what would all the
books in the world be without the Bible?
Other books may make a man wise in
worldly wisdom ; but it is only the Bible
that can make a man wise to Salvation: |

>





,
:

22

this only teaches him how to live, and how
to die; this tells him how he may be hap-
py here, and be for ever happy. Oh!
prize it, my dear reader, never let a day
pass without reading of it; and be sure,
when you read it, you pray to God to help
you to understand it.

When they came home, they made ma-
ny pretty remarks upon almost every thing
they had seen: and what was still better,

~ their minds were so much impressed, as to

lead them to pray for more admiring and
adoring thoughts of the great God, who
made all things with infinite wisdom: and
that they might ever stand in awe of him,
and not dare any more to sin against him,

Thus you see bow they improved by
whatever they saw: and inthe next chap-
ter we shall shew you what sort of compa-
ny they kept; how they spent their time to-
gether; and what use they made of the good
books they read, by being able to relate,
with so much propriety, remarkable histo.
ries of good and p.ous children, whom you
will de well to imitate.

—



25

CHAP. IV.

The pious assembly, and very remarkable
history.

WHEN the young friends of William,
Goodchild and his sister, heard they were
+dturned from boarding school, they were
yery desirous to come and see them: so a
day was fixed on for that purposes and
when should it be but Twelfth day, and it
happened that there were just twelve in
company. Well, after they had dined, it
was proposed by Mr. Goodchild, that in-
gtead of the idle diversion of choosing
king and queen, (which he knew they
were above,) they should each tell some
pretty history which they had read, that
might tend to their mutual advantage:
This being directly agreed upon, Mr. and
Mrs. Goodchild withdrew; leaving only
the young people together, that they
might speak with the greater freedom.

Miss Mild, being the eldest in company,
was desired to begin, which she was just
about to do, when Master Prayerful beg-
ged leave to ask, whether it was not pro-
per first to pray for a blessing on their con-

“

i
tee te 5







24

+
yersation? Certainly, said William Good-
child, for I have often read that text which
says, In every thing by prayer and supplica~
tion, with thanksgiving, lei your requests be
made known to God.—And 1 heartily acqui-

i

i
4
,

esce in the proposal said Miss Candour, —

for it is the custom of some very honour- —

able persons, where mamma visits, after
dinner to sing an hymn, and unite in pray-
er, which they say prevents the conversa-

tion from turning upon the failings of ab-

sent friends.

Master Serious then prayed for a few
minutes; after which, the little company
being seated, Miss Mild introduced her
story thus:

1 apprehend, my dear young friends,
that nothing can be more profitable to us,
nor indeed more encouraging than to hear
of those, like us in age and eapacity,
whose early‘piety, and whose happy deaths
have witnessed how much littte children
are the care of a compassionate Saviour
who permitted when on earth, sweh to be
brought to him, and declared, that of such
is the kingdom of heaven.

I have read of a poor boy, who came all

in dirt and rags to a gentleman’s door at.

Newington, crying for bread. Notwith,
standing his filthy condition, the Lord



25

disposed that generous man to take him
jn, end clothe him from bead to foot, and
bring him up as his own child.

This boy was a3 wicked as he was poor;
he used to take the Lord’s name in vain,
and curse and swear in a shocking manner:
indeed he was guilty of all sorts of -wick-
edness. But the gentleman, who had his
eternal, as much or more than his tempo-
ral good at heart, laboured to persuade
him of his natural depravity,—of his sin-
ful practices—of the worth of his soul,
and the bitter consequences of sinning
against God,—of the uncertainty of life,—
the certainty of death, and a future judg-
ment. He used often to pray with, and
apart to pray for him.

Nor were his prayers long unanswered :
in afew weeks time, a great change took
place in the boy’s outward behaviour;
which was once very uncivil, but now affa-
ble and courteous toall. And the change
affected not his outward conduct only, but
he began privately to weep and mourn for
his past offences; he would gladly attend
on prayer; would listen with great atten-
tion to all his Master said about eternal
things. And thus he continued to do,
when the Lord visijed him with sickness :
he was taken ill; his body was full of pain;

‘



>

26

but the distress of his soul was greater
still, His sins now stared him in the face;
he would lay and cry out, O what shall I
do! what shall I do!—I fear there is no
mercy for me!

He was often told there was mercy in
Christ for the chief of sinners; yet he
was still afraid God would not have mercy
on him, he was so vile a sinner, But at
length he was helped to lay hold on this
promise,—“Come unto me, all ye that la-
bour and are heavy laden, and I will give
you rest.” And then he would bless and
adore the free and rich grace of God, that
such a wretch as he should obtain pity
and pardon.

Thus he abounded still more and more
in prayer and praise, longing to be dissol-
ved, that he might be with Cnrist.

Yet he had at times, fears returning lest
after all he should be-deceived. But the
day before he died, a gentleman came to
see him, and blamed him much for giv-
ing way to doubts and fears; saying, it
was as though all that had been told him
were lies, to deceive him.—You say, you
fear Christ will not accept you; perhaps
you are not willing to accept Christ, “In-
deed I am!” replied the boy. ‘Why then,
child, (said he,) if thou art really willing

ee



27

to have Christ, Christ is a thousand times
more willing to have thee, and wash thee
in his blood.” Well (said the boy, leap-
ing up in his bed,) well! yea, all is well.
Christ is willing, and I am willing too;
and now Christ is mine, and 1 am his for
ever”? He continued from that moment
to his last, triumphing in full assurance of
God’s love; earnestly desiring‘his dismis-
sion, which next morning he obtained : and
the last words he uttered were, ‘Into thy
hands, O Lord, I commit my spirit ; and
so he slept in Jesus. Hewas but just
tarned of nine years of age. *

And 0! what a sweet smile of applause
sat on every countenance when the story
was finished! each of the dear young
people saying, “O that I may die the
death of the righteous, and that my latter
end may be like his,”



28

CHAP, V.

Remarkable conversion of several children
at the Orphan-house, in Georgia.

MASTER Timothy then obliged the
company with the following history.

You have, doubtless, heard of the Or-
phan-house. in Georgia, founded by the
late Rev. Mr. Whitefield. Wis heart you
know, always longed for the salvation of -
precious souls, especially of young people;
and it was not long after the school there
was settled, that the Lord was pleased,
to answer the wishes of his heart; for in

* the year 1741, Mr. Barber, the superin-

tendant of their spiritual affairs, wrote a
letter to Mr. Whitefield, which I shall take
the liberty to read.

© Bethesda, March 21, 1741.

My very dear Brother,

Never, no never, did my eyes see such
a sight, nor my ears hear such a sound, as
in the day past! and Oh! how will your —
soul rejoice, when you hear what it was!



eT ae eo) lO oe ee

29

it was nothing less wonderful than a great
number of little children in your Orphan-
house, crying out after the Lord —After
dinner, brother Periam had left them in
school, picking cotton; and, while they
were working, one of them said to another;
If we do not believe in the Lord Jesus
Christ, we shall all go to hell; and added,
that the children of God prayed to God.
Immediately the boy, to whom he spake,
fell down upon his knees, and began to
pray; and then another, till they were all
on their knees together praying.—Provi-
dence so ordered it, that some of the fam-
ily heard them, and it was not long before
the whole family were gathered around
them. O, how did the awful and pleasing
sight simke us, and melt us into a flood of
tears. The dear little lambs continued
erying out with the trembling jailor,
“What must we do to be sayed!”——
They prayed, Lord God Almighty, have
compassion on us; prick us to the heart,
and pluck us as fire-brands out of the
purning: and, O Lord Jesus Christ wash
us in thy blood! O Lord, take away our
hard stony hearts and give us hearts of
flesh. And how did the little soul plead
with God! Lord hast thou not said, “that
those that seek thee early shall find thee?”



30

and that “thou wilt not quench the smo-
king flax, nor break the bruised reed?”
And I heard one of them say, Lord, thou
hast said, “that we shall be taught of
thee?—Thus they continued crying after
the Lord, an hour or two; and I am con-
yinced, not only from what I saw but felt,
“that the Lord was present with us,” &c.

Miss Lydia, his sister, being desired to
relate something, began thus: Since the
company appear so much, and so jusuy
affected with what my brother has said, [
shall attempt to tell you, as well as I can,
the substance of another letter from the
same persor, about half a year after.

At family prayer one evening, he read —
the 25th chapter of Matthew :—spoke a
little from it, about the day of judgment, —
and had the pleasure to observe many of —
the children very attentive and much af-*
fected.

After he had, as usual, lighted them to
bed, and retired to his own chamber, a
child came and told him, that one of the
boys wanted to speak with him: He went |
directly, Before he got to the chamber, ©
he heard a noise, and when he came in, —
found many praying that the Lord Jesus —
would have mercy on them. One of them”
told him, he had a bad heart. He prayed ©



ee ee ee ee
, 31

with them: and after he had left them,
some continued praying, in deep distress,
great part of the night.

When he visited them in the morning,
asking one what he wanted ? he answered
with tears in his eyes, he wanted Jesus
Christ.

After this, it was observable, that they
sought all opportunities to be by them-
selves and pray. t

What then can we think of children that ~
never pray to God, when all converted _
people begin immediately to pray? May
this, my young friends, quicken us allto

_ more diligence in this delightful duty ! 4

| Miss Melody, not being able then to re-
collect any history, obliged her friends
with che following hymn.

I »
COME join with me, companions dear,
To bless the Saviour’s name ; :
And everlasting honors rear )
To God and to the Lamb. .

TE

For children, (O what wondrous grace !3} |
The Lord was crucifi’d : |

For Adam’s vile apostate race
The Saviour bled and dy’d?

p ®s



SS =

32

nL
Here we may love without restraint,
Nor fear to prize too high :
Christ 1s the song of every saint
On earth or in the sky.

IV.
Lord, with thy grace anoint mine eyes,
Throughout my darkness shine ;
© make me to salvation wise!
My all be ever thine!

-e-

CHAP. VI.

Containing the history of a sad wicked child,
and his miserable death.

MASTER Samuel, whose turn it was
next, said he had frequently met with this’
observation, that contraries illustrate ;
and therefore, as a contrast to those pleas-
ing histories already recited, he hoped it
might be profitable to relate an account
of a very wicked boy, in order both to warn
us against his faults, and excite our gra-
titude to God, and thankfulness to our’



33

friends, for his §race, and their instrue
tion,

The boy, whose Story Tam about to tell,
Was named Jack Perverse, and his nature
was answerable to his Name.

Though his parents sent him to a very
good school, yet he was such adunce, that
he could not read a single verse in the
‘Testament without blundering ; and when
he was reproved, used to answer again
with impertinence; and was so sulky and
obstinate, that correction only made him
worse, When any mischief was gong
forward at school, he was sure to be found,
at the head of it; by which means his
book was neglected, his task left undone,
and then to avoid punishment, he would
play truant; the consequence of which
was, that he was not only well flogged,
but a heavy log was also fastened to his
leg, and a great fool’s Cap put on his head ;
so that he became the sport and derision
of all that beheld him.

His master, in order to reclaim him,
would sometimes call him up, and spezk
to him thus:—« Child, you should remem-
ber that your good father put you under
my care, that you might improve in use-
ful knowledge, and so be fit, when you
leave school, to enter the world with

2





a

——





















credit; but if you continue your bad
ways, and neglect your learning, your
dear father will be grieved and disap-
pointed, t shall be discredited, and you
will be ruined.” :
Now, one would have thought that such
kind advice as this would have had some
weight with him; but, alas! it had none :
he still continued idle and obstinate, de.
spising both his master and his counsel.
He was not only idle, but cruel. He
used to catch flies on purpose to terment
them; and was guilty of that horrid prac-
tice of making cockchafers spin, by put-
ting a crooked pin through their tails and
hanging them by a bit of thread, which
uts them in terrible agonies.
When this was mentioned, several of
the company immediately burst into tests,
they were shocked at uny thing that was.
cruel. And Master Tender could not hel
saying, “Lam astonished at the hardness 0
that heart wl i
the agon.es of poor dumb creatures.
brings lo my mind What} once read of th
wise Athenians, who condemned a boy f
putting out the eyes of birds with a hot ne
dle, judging that such seeds of cruc
would necessardy grow UP into more ac
of violence, and endanger the lives of mel



and the happiness of mankind: the boy was
therefore put to death.—But I beg pardon
for this interruption.

Samuel then resumed his narration.
I have mentioned already his bad be-
haviour at school, and his wickedness
at his diversions; I shall only trouble you
farther with an account of his perverse
conduct at home, and his irreverent dispo-
sition at church: which I think together
make up a boy as bad as a boy can be.

In the morning he would hein bed very
late, even after he was called; hurry over
his prayers like a parrot, and sometimes,
if he thought he should not be found out,
would wholly omit them, and then if ask.
ed about them, he would te!l a lie to hide
his sin, and so make it double you know.

When his papa was at prayer in the fa-
mily, he would be looking about hin, in-
stead of making every petition his own;
and at evening prayer was often found
asleep. If he was sent on an errand he
would loiter and play by the way, some-
times quite forgetting his message, and
sometimes delivering a wrong one.

His behaviour to the servants was ex-
tremely haughty and insolentis Ways
speaking ill of them behind their backs,
and laying his own faults to their charge,

a



ag EP

as
—_——



36

and yet to their faces would fawn and flat-
ter, ifhe could get any thing by it.

But the worst of all was his irreverence
at church; he did not go there, as good
boys do, to meet with God, and learn more
of Jesus Christ, and their duty, but only
because he was obliged to go.. He never
prayed before he went, for a blessing upon
the minister, and that he might get good :
and when there, he would stare about him,
observe every body that came in, take no-
tice how this and that person were dressed,
but did not join im prayer, nor mund the
sermon, but frequently laughed at it and
the minister too. He little thought of
those wicked children we read of in the
second Book of Kings, who laughed at 2
great minister in those days, the prophet
Elisha, calling him baldhead, and making
game of him they ought highly to have
honored; and the Lord sent two frightful
bears out of the wood, and killed no less
than two and forty of them. We may see,
my friends, that God Amighty takes notice
of, is displeased with, and punishes naugh-
ty boys and girls as well as naughty men
and women; and shat he does so still, is evi-
dent, for Jack Perverse, one Sunday after-
noon, after he had been making game of
the minister and his message, he went with



37
a boy of his acquaintance, as bad as him-
self, to wash in the river, and there he
getting out of his depth, and the other be-
ing seized with the cramp, were both
drowned; and so taken away suddenly, with
all their sins unrepented of and unforgiven,
to stand before God in judgment. Thus”
we see that the way of sin is down hill, and
how children are hurried on from’ one
crime to another, till all ends in the ruin
of both soul and body. May God keep us
all, said the httle pious company, from all
the ways of'sin, and the least a pearance of
evil? Then they sung the following |

HYMN, sy Dr. Warrs.

ity

GUR tongues were made to bless the Lord,
And not speak ill of men;

When others give a railing word,
We must not rail again.

I.

The lips that dare be so profane,
To mock, and jeer, and scoff

At holy things, or holy men,
The Lord shall cut them off.





38




; iil.

When children, in their wanton piay,
Serv’d old Elisha so,

And bid the prophet go his way,

«Go up, thou baldhead, go;”

Iv.

God quickly stopt their wicked breath
And sent two raging bears,
That tore them limb from limb to death,
With blood, and groans, and tears.
‘ Vv:
_ Great God! how terrible art thou
To sinners e’er so young!—
Grant me thy grace, and teach me how
'To tame and rule my tongue.

Vi.

' Let the sweet work of pray’r and praise
Employ my youngest breath :—
Thus I’m prepar’d for longer days,

Or fit for early death.

4



CHAP, VII.

Of a very good Girl that died very happy be-
fore she wus seven years old.

MISS Goodchild then begged leave to
relate some few passages from the life of
Miss Carteret Rede, who was the daugh-
ter of a gentleman in Wiltshire.

She gave remarkable proofs of her early
piety: for being asked, when she was no
more than four years of age, who was her
greatest enemy? she replied, Sin was her
greatest enemy. Soon after, when reading
in the second chapter of St. Luke’s gos-
pel, about Joseph and Mary, “that there
was no room for them in the inn, and that _
the nazz was laid in a manger,” she burst
into a flood of tears, saying, What! was
there no room in the inn for the Lord of
glory? but must ue lie ina makger among
the beasts ? a:

One morning, when she was not well,
she began her prayer thus, O Lord, look
down upon me, and give me the know-—
ledge of thyself; take sin out of my heart,
that Imay be thy child! with several such
like expressiens,



sa

40

When she had done, she said, Ihave a

retty lesson im my book, which is about
God’s sending the Lord Jesus to die for
poor sinners. At another time, when sit-
ting by the fire, she burst into tears 5 and
peing asked what was the matter, she said,
T do not please the Lord in all Ido. At
another time, I must be more afraid of
sinning agamst God than of being whipt :
for it 1s God that gives us food, and rai-
ment, und every thing-

One evening she went to her father, and
said, Pray for me that God would take
away this W icked heart, und that I may be
with God when If die. Just before she
was taken ill, she was reading the 55th of

Isaiah, she stopt and sa.d,—Nothing but

or

the blood of Christ can cleanse me from
sin. Her mother asked her, Whether she
did not think that bemg good, and doing
good works, would save her? She replied,
Our righteousness is 2 sinful righteous-
ness; therefore it cannot save us.

A little kinswoman and she being at
play, they happened to fall out, but pre-
sently Carteret recollecting herself, said
to her cousin, Cousin, don’t we know that
Christ died for us ; why should we fail out.

Soon afier she was taken ill, and was
one evening earnest, with tears, that Christ



44

might be revealed toher; she said I must
have Christ, I cannot tell what to do with-
out him, One said, cannot your prayers —
save you? Oh no! said she, nothing but
Christ can do it. ;

At another time, not long.before her
death, she said, This scripture is come to
my mind—* He wall have mercy on whom
he will have mercy ;”"—and_ he will have
mercy on me. Soon after being asked,
Does God lift up the light of his counte-
nance upon you? She said, [hope he does.
And are you willing to goto Christ? I
hope I am.

The agonies of death coming on, the last
words she spoke to her father were, Pray
for me. _

While he prayed with her she lay very
still, and about eleven o’clock on the se-
yenth of December, 1801, she fell asleep
in Jesus.

When Miss Goodchild had finished the
history of Carteret, which she told with
great modesty, they agreed to sing the
following

HYMN.

I.

Happy’s the child whose youngest years
Receive instructions well;





e sinner’s path, and fears

Who hates th
The road that leads to hell,

ii.

«
When weidevote our youth to God,
*Tis pleasing in his eyes;
A fiow’r, when offer’d in the bud,
Is no vain sacrifice.

iit.

*Tis easier work if we begin

i To fear the Lord betimes;

} While sinners, that grow old in sin,
: ‘Are harden’d in their crimes,

" Iv.

| *Pwill save us from 2 thousand snares
‘To mind religion young +

Grace will preserve our following years,
And make our virtue strong:

—-- r

Vv.
To thee, Almighty God, to thee,
Our childhood we resign :
>T will please us to look back and see
That our whole lives were thine-



45
CHAP. VII.

Of another food Child.*

MISS CANDOUR then obliged the
company with several particulars of a
child who died in the Lord, no longer ago”
than in the year 1775. ~ ‘

Being ill, prayer was put up for him in
the public congregation; after which, he
said to some about him,—The Lord hath
answered my prayer: I know not that the
Lord loves me, and will save me: God is”
my salvation : I will trust and not be afraid.
Before this he had strong fears of death.

One day he said, O, how I love those
{wo sweet chapters, the 12th of Isaiah.
and 20th of John,—God is my salvation.
How | love my father for teaching me te
read the Bible! If Ishould live to be a
man, I would give every body in my house
a Bible.

The Lord led him into a sight of the ini-
quities of his heart : for he told one, “That
the last time he had his new clothes on he
was proud; that if his life were spared, he
should be afraid ever to putthem on again.”
On Easter Sunday he told his father, «

* Master Rogers of Brighthelmstone.



44
























find we must have a better righteousness
than our own: for I have often, when hear-
ing preaching at the chapel, thought how
good I would be: that I never would be
undutiful, or play with naughty boys any
more ; but as soon as the next day came, I
was us bad as ever: so am sure our own
righteousness will not do”

He saw his mother weeping, and said to
her, “Do not grieve ; I can tell you of one
“who had a greater trial than you have :
“Abraham, you know, was to offer up his
son.” “Yes, my dear, (said his mother,)
- but Ihave not Abraham’s faith.” “Ah, mo-
_ ther, (replied he) God can give it you.”
When he had been peevish and fretful,
he mourned over his evil tempers; and,
looking earnestly at his mother, said,—
“«Mother, passion is my besetting sin; but
the Lord will pardon me, because he loves

He told the Rev. Mr Peckwell, who
visited him, *¢It was ungrateful for people
to run away from Christ.” Mr. Peckwell,
asked him how it was that he did not run
from him? His answer was, “ Because the
Lord loves me.” But if you get well again,
do not you think you shall run away from
him ? “No, (replied he,) the Lord loves me
too well to let me.” What would you say



Te ET

45

to your playmates, if you could see them
now ? “1 would call them to Christ.”

“How kind it was in Christ to die for me!
Oh, I want to die ; because the Lord loves
me.” . :

During his illness he would frequently
say, “Lord, look upona poor afflicted child!
Moher, see your dying child! I want to die,
and go to my sisters!” _

In the morning of April the 28th, he said,
« I shall be gone before night *»—One ask-
ed, Where? «To heaven,” he said. A lit.
tle before his departure he cmed out,
“Come down, my God and take me up to
heaven; and take that devil down to hell.”
Soon after this he was released, and expir.
ed repeating these words, “My God, my
God, my God.”

ae

HYMN. ’

I.
THERE is beyond the sky
A heaven of joy and love:
And holy children, when they die,
Go to that world above.





There is a dreadful hell,
And everlasting pains;

There sinners must with devils dwell
In darkness, fire, and chains.

hatte

itl.

Can such a wretch as f
Escape this cursed end ?

And muy I hope, whene’er I die,
1 shall to heav’n ascend ?

_

_ Ty.

- Then will I read and pray
While I have life and breath;
- Lest I should be cut off to-day,
And sent ? eternal death.

a
it

ee




A CHAP. IX.
Of God’s Providence, and remarkable in-
. stances of it,

WE have seen, said Master Considerate, ~
(who sat next,) in a pleasing variety of
instances, the power of Divine Grace, in

a ts



=

47

changing the hearts of many little chil-
dren like ourselves; and as we have spo-
ken so much ot Grace, it may not be amiss
a little to consider the Providence of God,
as very prettily held out in the story of a
hermit, which I have read in a book of my
papa’s study.

A certain hermit, who had passed the
greatest part of his life inthe midst of a
lonely desart, far remote from mankind,
whose food was the fruits of the earch,
and his drink the chrystal fountain, might
have contiued his repose aud quiet, had.
not this temptation arose in his mind.
«Whether Providence guided the aci.ons
of men or no?” for, said he, if God really
directs all things, how happens it that
good men often suffer many :njuiries from
the wicked,” and wicked men so of.en
prosper ?

To clear up this matter, he determined,
though very old, io leave his retirement
and yisit the world. Accordingly he
arose at break of day, and after travelling
a long time, he perceived a beautiful
youth hastening across the plain. Good
day to you, honored father, said the youth;
and good day to you, replied the sage.
Very agreeable conversation ensued, and





45

they travelled together until night ap-
proached

Observing a stately palace just by, in
which dwelt a proud, but hospitable
knight, they stept up to the dvor, and giv-
ing 4 gentle knock, were immediately «d-
mitted An elegant supper was served
up, and numerous servants waited upon
them; after which, being fatigued, they
retired to bed, and did not awake until
morning.
| ‘They were then called up to a sumptu-
ous breakfast, and rich wines were hand-
ed round in a large golden cup.—When
they had ate and drank as much as they
pleased, they returned many thanks to the
courteous knight, and were dismissed.
No one had reason to be sorry but the
kind landlord : for the young man was so
ungrateful as to steal the golden cup.

They had not got far before the youth
| shewed the cup to the aged hermit. He
stood astonished at his ingratitude, and al-
most wished to getridofsucha companion,
but did not dare to mention his wish; how-
ever lifting up his eyes to heaven, thought
how hard it was, that generous actions
_ should be so strangely rewarded.

The weather now became cloudy ; the.
wind rustled,—the cattle scudded home





49

for shelter,—and such a storm of hail fell,
as made them glad to see an old gentle-
man’s gothic Seat, upon a rising ground,
near at hand. They hastened to the door,
where they long knocked without admit-
tance. At last the miserly master of the
house, with slow and cautious steps, came
to the door, which he opened with suspi-
cious care. They were'but half welcom-
ed: only one little faggot lighted the na-
ked walls; a poor pittance of course bre:d,
and some Stale small beer was brought for
their refreshment : even this was srudged,
and as soon as ever it began to clear up,
they were bid to be gone.

The hermit was surprised to think that
a man of such vast possessions should lead
such a miseruble life; and he almost
blamed Providence, for permitting so
much wealth to lay useless in his hands :
but how was he astonished when the young
man informed him, that he had rewarded
the miser with the golden cup, which was’ —
stolen from the former generous benefac-
tor!

Night again come on, and once more
they sought a place of rest. Looking
around, they perceived a mansion not far
off; it was neither mean nor grand. but
seemed to speak the mind of its owner, a





58

man content and benevolent. Hither they
repaired, and were kindly received ; they
were not only well entertained as to re-
freshment, but the host talked like a se-
rious, pious man.

In the morning, just hefore they depart-
ed, the youth went to the cradle, in which
was a pretty infant, (the pride and joy of
its aged futher,) and broke its neck But
oh! how looked the hermit !—Strange re-
turn, he cried, for so much hospitality i

Confused and struck with horror, the
old man was determined, at any rate, to
get rid of so vile a companion. He fled,
but the youth pursued and soon overtook
him, And as the country lay wide, and
the roads were not easy to find, a servant
of their last host went before to show the
way. They had occasion at last to pass 2
river, when the youth, who seemed to
watch every opportunity of doing mis-
chief, approached the careless guide, as
he was crossing the wooden bridge, and
pushed him into the river. He cried for
help, but in vain; he surk to rise no
more !

The hermit’s eyes now sparkled with
rage; he overcame his fears, and thus ex-
claimed,—“Detested wretch ” but before
he could speak another word, his com-
panion seemed no jonger a man; he ap-





: 54

peared as an angel from heaven, The
hermit stood astonished, and knew not
what to say. The angel thus addressed
him, ‘The Almighty Creator has a right
to do as he pleases with hisown. Leurn
the mystery of Providence ;—That vain
man, who fared sumptuously every day,
was too luxurious to be good; he was
proud of his side-board of plate, and for-
ced his guests to drink morning draughts
of wine: by losing that golden cup, he was
broke of that custom; but still welcomes
every stranger, though with less pomp and
expense *

- As for that suspicious miser, with whom
I left the cup, he may learn, that if mor-
tals will be kind, Providence can weil re-
pay their benevolence: conscious of this
his icy bosom now, for the first time, feels
the warmth of compassion.

The child of our pious friend had al-
most weaned his affections from God; but
to teach him better, the Lord to save the
father has taken the child. To all butus, —
he seemed to go off in fits, and I was or- _
dammed to call him bence. The poor fa-
ther, now humbled in tears, owns that the
punishment was just. pe

But had the false servant, whom I
drowned, returned back in safety, what a
fund of charity would have been lost: for he





52

had laid a plot against the life of his mas-
ter, and this very night intended to put it
in execution. Thus then be instructed, no
more to dispute the wisdom of Provi-
dence;

But evermore confess th’? Almighty just,
‘And what you can’t unriddle, learn to trust.

I remember, said Master Josiah, that
some good men we read of in the psalms,
have been under the same temptation: for
the Psalmist says, * That his feet had well
nigh slipt; for he was envious at the fool-
ssh. when he beheld the prosperity of the
wicked ;? but when he went to the house
of God, and learned their miserable end,
he no more repined at Providence, but was
content to be any thing here, so that he
might have Heaven at last, and Grace to
carry him there

Then they sung this pretty hymn.

:
r
pe



i en mma en
53
HYMN ON PROVIDENCE.

Be uy
God moves in a mysterious way;
His wonders to perform ;
He plants his footsieps in the sea,
‘And rides upon the storm.

Il.

Judge not the Lord by feeble sense;
But trusi him for his grace:
Behind a frowning Providence
He hides a smiling face.

iL.

is purpose will ripen fast,
Unfolding every hour;

The bud may have a bitter taste
But sweet will be the flowr.

IV.

Blind unbelief is sure to err,
‘And scan his work in vain :

Gon is his own interpreter,
And he will make it plain.



Lees Oe OO See

=
5%

CHAP, X.




A pretty history of a pious young Lady, well _
worthy the imitation of my littie reuder.

IN my father’s library, (said Master
Prayerful,) isa most excellent little book,
giving an account of Eme.ia Gxopre, from
her infincy to her death, which happened
February 2d, 1688, when she was about
sixteen, I can only promise you a few
particulars which | remember. It was re-
marked of her, that before she could
speak, if she had been crying, or out of
humour, (as you know lictle folks too of-
ten are,) if she perceived any of the fa-
mily, where she was, were about to go to
prayer, she would be perfectly silent ina
moment, and coniinue as quiet as a lamb
during the whole time of worship.

As soon as she could speak, she would
sk questions xbout God and the creation,
for instance, Whether the sun shined on
her grandfather und grandmother? and ~
when she was told that the same sun gave
li ht to all the world, she replied, « Ought
we not then to love that God who made all —
these things and gave thém to us?”



—----- -. ”

Se a

55

Before she was three years old, she
used to ask a blessing on her food, with
words of her own.

One day, when her mother had reproved
her for not giving a good account of her

lesson, she was afterwards found weeping; —

and being asked, Why do you weep? you
was not beat: she answered, I had rather
been beat than anger my motker; the
thought ef my mother’s being angry makes
me Weep.

Being sorely troubled in soul, she went
to a good woman of her acquaintance,
who asked the cause of her distress: to
which she answered, The devil takes the
good word out of the very bottom of my
heart, and ofien says to me, What needs
all this noise with your religion? other
children will get to heaven as soon as you.
Being asked what she did when so témpt-
ed? she replied, “I know no other way
than to carry them to the Lord, in prayer;
and I desire God’s people to pray for me ;
for my prayers are of no strength, nor
their’s neither, without Christ.”

One day being dressed fine, inv
red ribbons ; one said, I suppose yt
yourself very fine: she answered, “1
never think that, until I get on the clean
and fair robe of Christ’s imputed right-







56










eousness, and then I shall be truly fine an j
clean.
She would frequently give money to the
beggars, and follow them to the outwar
gate of the house where she lived, an
sed to instruct them, shewing them tha
there was a God anda hell: she would r
prove them for their wicked lives, plain:
telling them, that swearing, drinking, an
sabbath breaking, would bring them to
hell. :
She was so earnest in secret prayer, that,
every word she uttered seemed to come
from the bottom of her heart
She learned much of the scripture by
heart, and could correctly repeat many
chapters, particularly the 8th of Romans,
which she said was a whole Bible to her;
| also the 15th, 16th, and 17th chapters of
St John’s gospel; the 11th of Hebrews,
many of the Psalms, and almost all Solo-
/»mon’s Songs, &c. She was asked, Why
_ she got so much by heart, seeing she had
a Bible at hand? She answered, “1 fear
the time will come that I shall want it, and
J cannot live without the precious Bible.” |
When she was exercised with strong
pains of the gravel, her patience was truly.
admirable; sever uttering arash word, or
giving the least signs of impatience or

“7



57

say.) of many sick persons, who have said,
when it is morning, O that it were even-

ing! and when it was evemng, 0 that

it

were morning! but as for me, I must con-
fess, to the glory of free grace, that the
time, night and day is made pleasant to

me by the Lord; when it is evening, 1t

weariness. “I have heard, (she would |

is

pleasant; and when it is morning, 1 am re-

freshed ”

Being asked what supported her, she an-
swered, “Ilook onmy trouble as the fruit

of my sin.

«J am made to wonder it has not been al-

ways So with me.

«J am helped to bless the Lord that it
no worse.

«s Means are used, and I looked to him
pless them, as far as he sees good.

«I submit, whether for life or death, and

is

to

Ihave the faith that it willbe better: for
J reckon, that the sufferings of the PreseRbiua

time are not worthy to be compared wi
the glory that shall be revealed.”

Not long PErEree. died, this seriptu
came to her mind. “G

/

re

to which she replied, O reasonable de-
mand! if had a thousand hearts, thou art

worthy ofthem all,

rve me thine heart:””
:



58











On the Saturday night before her death,
she often said, This following sabbath will
be my last: and expressed a vehement de.
sire for an everlasting sabbath. ‘

Having slept till eight o’clock, and find~
ing it so late, she said, ‘she thought to
have spent it better than to sleep so long”
After this she mentioned, with admiration,
almost all the names and titles given to
Christ in his holy word.—She also spoke:
something concerning every one, to the as-/
tonishment of all that heard her. “He is,”
said she, “ the chief of ten thousands!” and
added, the chief of all to me!

Somebody, thinking that she was just de-
patting, brought @ light to see; but she
smiled, and said,—I shall not die just now!
How do you know that? Imiss that pro-
mised presence, which for many a day t
have believed 1 shall get in the moment of
death.

Through great weakness, she had not
=—tyeen able to raise her head up in bed ; but
now she arose and sat up, prayed to God,
and pleaded his promises, saying, ** Now

Jet it be according to thy precious word to
my soul! for thereis nothing in me,” ad-
| ding, “It is only upon the blood of the Lord

Jesus, and the faithfulness ef God I de-+
pend.” :

Ey



59











After this, alittle wine was given her,
and she said, “Now no more of the crea-
ture;” and immediately desired her mother
to pray. When her mother was giving her
up to God, she was observed to smile, and
as s00N as prayer was done she closed her
eyes and lips, as one falling asleep, and so
quietly resigned her soul to God.

Master Tender, who should have spoke
next, Was so very much affected, that he
pegged to be excused relating any history;
he could only say,—I pray God to make us
all like Emelia Geddje! But, however, they
sung the following

~ HYMN,

, L.

COME, children, learn to fear the Lord !
And, that your days be long,

Let not a false or spiteful word
Be found upon your tongue.

i.

Depart from mischief, practice love,
Pursue the works of peace ;

o shall the Lord your ways approve.
And set you souls at ease,

ena at



es”. hhc ..hChU Ch lee

6@

TIE,

He bids his angles pitch their tents
Round where his children dwell ;

What ills his heav’nly care prevents
No earthly tongue can tell.

TV.

O, children, come and taste his love!
Come, learn his pleasant ways;
And let your own experience prove

The sweetness of his grace.

—e-

CHAP. XI.



The history of Edward VI. king of England,’
who was a good boy and a good king.

WE have hitherto, said Master Josiah,
(who sat next,) heard of those whose lot
was cast (as most of God’s people are) in
the lower rank of life; but I have read of one”
most illustrious prince, who was much
more honourable by his grace than his
earthly dignities

Prince Edward was but just nine years
old, when, by the death of his father he be-
came King of England.



61

He was possessed of such extraordinary
qualifications, that the nation enteriain-
ed (and very justly, I think) the highest
expectation of lasting happiness and pros-
perity- ; ‘

It was among his least commendations,
that he was surprisingly learned for his
age; he was able to speak Latin fluently,
and was well versed in Greek, Italian, and
other languages; in the acquirement of
which knowledge, he was always ready to
leave his diversions when the appointed
hour of study returned.

No sooner was he settled upon the
throne, than he promoted, by every means
he could, the great work of reforming Eng-
land ftom popish idolatry and superstition,

by enacting good laws, and encouraging
and promoting all prous, learned and dili-
gent men, whether bishops or others, who
fathfully explained and enforced the
truths of the gospel

The nation, having but just shook off po-
pish superstition and cruelty, retained still
too much of what always belonged to po-
pery ; I mean persecution for conscience’s
sake,

A warrant was brought for the young
k:ng to sign, for the burning Joan of Kent,
who was condemned as an heretic. He



a

62

was extremely unwilling to do it ;—but
archbishop Cranmer, and others, using ma~-

ny arguments, at last over persuaded him. —

When he had signed his name, with tears
in his eyes, he said, “Tf [have done wrong,
Cranmer, you shall answer it at the day of
judgment.’

‘At another time, the same archbishop
had been pleading with him to permit his
popish sister Mary, (af erwards the bloody
butcher of God’s people) to have Mass per-
formed publicly in her house; he could not,
by the strongest arguments be prevailed
upon to consent. The archbishop coming
out of the king’s presence, met with Mr.
Cheeke, who had heen his schoolmaster,
and saluted him thus: Sir, you may be glad
all the days of your life, that you had the
education of such a scholar: adding, that
the king had more divinity in his little fin-
ger than they had in poth their whole bo-
dies.

In January, the beginning of the 7th year
ofhis reign, he fell sick, and in the time of
his sickness, Bishop Ridley preached be-
fore him, and much recommended works

of charity, especially to those who were ©

rich and great. After dinner the king sent
for him, and after thanking him for his ser-
mon, repeated the principal parts of it: and
then added “1 take myself to be chiefly



—

65

touched in your speech: for as in the king-
dom I am next under GOD, so ought I to
be most like Him in mercy and goodness.
Therefore, as you have given me this ge-
neral exhortation, direct me, I beseech
you, by what particular act I may best dis-
charge my duty.”

The bishop being astonished, as well he
might, declared to the king, that he was not
prepared at present to answer so weighty
a question; but, if His Majesty pleased, he
would consult with the city of London, and
return him their answer,

in consequence of this, the poor were
ranked in three classes; for each of which
the king gave some houses, and lands;and —
founded the Blue-Coat School, and St. Bar-
tholomew’s hospital in Smithfield, and the
Bridewell, by Fleet-ditch: which being |
done, he thanked God for-prolonging his
life to finish the business. lage ail

But, alas! this pious prince, of whom ~+
England was not worthy, was soon to be
removed from his earthly throne, to be
crowned with never fading glory,

When he was sixteen he was seized with
4 consumption, which daily growing upon
him, soon threatened his dissolution.

Physicians, and others, tried all the pow-
ers of physic in vain; he was given over, -
and death hastily approached.



6%
















About three hours before he died, his
eyes being closed, and thinking nobody
was within hearing, he offered up this)
prayer :—

O Lord Ged, deliver me out of this misera-
ble and wretched life, and take me amongst
thy chosen; howbert, not my will but thine be
done. Lord I commit my soul to thee; O Lord,
thou knowest how happy it were for me to be
with thee; yet,for thy chosen’s sake senil me life
and health, that I may truly serve thee. oO
Lord my God, bless thy people, end save thene
inheritance. O Lord God, save thy chosen
people of England! O my Lord God, defend

‘thes realm from popery, and maintain the true
|r fligion, that I and thy people may pruise th
holy name, for thy Son Jesos Curis’’s sake.

Then, turning his face and seeing some

_ nigh, ?e said, Are you so nigh? 1 thought you
} had been farther off Many fervent prayers
| he put up; and his last words were these =
—“T am faint, Lord have mercy upon me an
take my spirit; and so committed his piou
soul into the hands of his heavenly Father,
He died July the 6th, 1553, in kis seven-
° teenth year.
:

}



65



HYMN.

I,
WHY should I Say, *tis yet too soon
To seek for heav’n, or think of death ?
A flow’r may fade before *tis noon,
And I this day may lose my breath !

Il.

If this rebellious heart of mine
Shouldstight the gracious calls of heav’n,
Imay be harden?d in my sin,
And never have repentance giv’n.

It.

What! if the Lord in wrath should swear,
Whilst I neglect to read and pray,
That he'll refuse to lend an ear,
To all my groans another day!

ee
CHAP. XI,

Which ws the last Chapter, ind a wery pretty
one it 2s.

WILLIAM GOODCHILD being at home
was the last to speak; and hetold the ste-



66

ry of the Prodigal Son, which is recorded m
the 15th chapter of St. Luke.

You must, undoubtedly, my dear friends, ©
said he, remember reading in the Bible of
arich and great man, who had two sons.
The younger of them, though he had all
the indulgence thai a good boy could wish
for, and more than a bad one deserved,
was nevertheless so naughty as to wish to
be from under his father’s eye, and so be
able, without restraint or reproof, to in-
dulge himself in all manner of wickedness
with greediness, Accordingly he applies
to his father, and for that purpose desires
to have all that was intended for him : and
the good natured parent, unwilling to cross
his inclination, consents to his request, and
gives him a great deal of money.

The rake overjoyed with his success,
scrapes together all he could, and as soon
as ever he could set off ( Oh! it was the
worst thing he ever did in his life,)into the
country, a great way off, where his father
might neither see nor hear from him: from
which you see it is plain, he did not love
his parents, and so broke the fifth com-
mandment.

Being now (forsooth) his own master,
and neglecting GOD, Prayer, and his Bi
ble; and having no kind father to consult

'










&?

he gave the full swing to all sensual lusts
and passions; and, like most extrayagant
people, soon spent all he was worth, lost
his money and friends (such as they were)
together: and atthe same time a famine
happening, it is no wonder that he came
to want a morsel of bread.

In this distress, his pride being brought
down, he was glad of any employment to
get him a penny ; so after having lived like
a swine, he was fain to become a feeder of
swine; and still, bread being so scarce, he
could not get.a bit; then he would gladly
have filled his belly with the husks the
swine eat, but even thesewere denied him. _

Oh! how little did we think when at
home, with gond clothes on his back, a
plentiful table, warm fire-side, and a com-
fortable bed, that by one rash act he should
be brought into such distress, as to want —
clothes, food, fire, and lodging: all these.
he wanted; and instead of his pious father; ;
nis brother and other friends to converse
with, all his company were the granting
pigs, and his best apartment a hog-sty.

But, however, when he came to himself,
and used that reflection he had been long
a stranger to, he began to reason thus with
himself: «Fool that Lam! thus to.remain
in hunger and wretchedness, when in ay

Qe

°



63

father’s house there is plenty of every”
thing ! where the meanest servant has more
than enough! Iwill arise and goto my fa-
ther, and though he might well reject me,
frown at me, and call me rebel as 1 am; yet
sure he retains 2 parent’s heart : his com-
passion will kindle when he sees his son,
and L won’t conceal or deny any of my
faults; but will say—ather, J have sinned
against heaven, and before thee, and am no
more worthy ta be called thy son; give mé
the meanest place in thy house, and t will
be thankful.

No sooner said than done. Up he gets;
and though he had now no chaise or horse
to convey him heme, he trudged as fast as
he could on foot, nor would any thing stop
him till within sight of his home

The dear aged father, who had often
cast a wishful eye towards that far country,
whither this poor boy was fled, was now,
perhaps walking upon his house, or on
some lofty terrace in his garden, and sees,
what? his son? yes, it was his poor son !
but, Oh! how changed! once he was tall,
handsome, healthy looking lad; but now a
poor, meagre, ragged, filthy wreich !
Nevertheless the dear old gentleman runs
as fast as he can to meet the returning
prodigal.




















69

The yeuth, filled with love and grief
falls down before him, and, with a weep-
ing eye, 2 blushing face, and faultering
yoice, owns all his offences. The father
is now so full of joy, that he does not men-
tion one of his faults; folds him to his bo-
som, kisses away his tears, and calls aloud
for his servants; * Bring here—he eagerly
cries—bring here the best robe you can
find ; bring here the ring to ornament his
finger, and shoes for his feet; provide
quickly a handsome dinner, and let us, and
ail our neighbours rejoice : “for this my son
was dead, and is alive again: was lost, and
is found.”

Here was asolemn pause. Who could
have helped crying, if they had heard i
what a pathetic manner the story was re-
lated! All were dissolved in tears.

At length Master Tender broke silence,
and said, See here, my dear companions,
the sad result of despising and disobeying
our pious parents; and what comes from
the foolish desire of being from under their
care and authority.

Nor is this all, said Master Considerate,
thave heard the ministers say, that this
returning prodigal represents tous a re-
penting sinner, who by departing from Gon
and his ways, has plunged himself into dis-
fress and ruin; but when helped by the,



}
i
4





70

grace of God’s spirit to bethink himself,
and mourn for his offences, is like the
prodigal encouraged by the well known
tender mercics of a compassionate Saviour,
to return and confess his sin,—own the
justness of his misery, and receive pardon,
peace and happiness, as a free and unde-
served gift. May the Lord help us to go
and do likewise.

Then, with cheerful hearts and voices,
they united in the following hymn.

EARLY PIETY.

I.

WHAT blest examples do I find
Writ in the word of truth,
f children that began to mind

- Religion in their youth.

II;

Children a sweet Hosaxra sung,
And blest their Saviour’s name;

They gave him honour with their tongues
While scribes and priests blaspheme,

Hil.
Samuel, the child, was wean’d and brought
To wait upon the Lord :
Young Timothy betimes was taught
To know his Holy Word.



74

IV.
Then why should Iso long delay
What others learn so soon ?
I would not pass another day
Without this work begun.

When the little pious assembly had sung
this hymn, William Goodchild concluded
the happy opportunity with solemn pray-
er: beseeching the Lord to make them
like the good children they had been
speaking of. AndI hope, my little Read-
er, that your heart too begins to long to
be like them. Does it not?

O then, pray, and pray again! nor rest
content till Jesus Christ make you to know
and feel that he hath redeemed you with
his precious blood, and that you shall live
and reign with him in glory everlasting.
Amen, and Amen.

CONCLUSION.

William and Elizabeth Goodchild ha-
ving thus spent their hollidays at home, in
the most improving manner, were, on the
appointed day again conducted to school,
to which they returned with the utmost
pleasure ; well knowing the need they

¢



oO
im

stood in of farther instruction in every
branch of useful knowledge.

And theie, for the present, we leave
_them pursuing, with diligence and delight,
the same excellent course o! study and
_ devotion, *hat we described in the begin-
of this book : and where they are daily
growing in fayeur with God and man.

_—_—. ee oe a

err

-

ee eS ee ee
$





st

we

APPENDIX

TO THE

THIRD EDITION.

ae



AS a proof that we formed no groundless
expectation of William Goodchild’s im-
provement at school, with pleasure we sub-
join the following letter, very lately receiv-
ed by his papa, who 1s so kind as to permit
us to make it public.

—__-

Dear and Honoured Sir,

The least hint of your pleasure is a law
tome. Your last favour made me weep
with joy; the endearing expressions of your
love, and kind approbation of my conduct,
fire me with a desire to deserve both. 1
shall never think myself so happy as when
contributing any thing to your satisfaction
and pleasure,

—_—



ve ax
wae ;

And I don’t know how to do this better
- than by sending you a short account of
Master Ridgeway, a most amiable child,
and dear companion of mine, but now trans-
lated to a better country, and the best
company.

When he was only three years of age,
he discovered evident marks of a work of
grace on his heart.—Prayer and praise,
even then, were his delightful exercises.

But the two last years of his hfe, (for he —
was but five when he died,) his piety was
more remarkable, and he ripened apace for
glory.

Just before his last illness, he cheerfully
told his mama, that Christ in God;”? which words he often re- ©
peated. And when the maid was one day
covering him up in his cradle, he said, “In
heaven | shall be covered with the robe of
my Father’s righteouness.”

Not long before he died, he declared he
had (in a dream, I suppose,) seen heaven:
and with great admiration, said, “O, it is a
brave place indeed! You cannot think, and
J cannot tell, what a fine, shining, glorious
_ place it is! I saw the angels too, all stand-

ing round the Lord, and joined with them
in singing the new song! And there I
heard Jesus Christ say, J.et little children





come to me; and added, ¥ shall be there
among them next Sabbath day.

He then called for his sister, to whom he
said, «* Prepare to go to heaven :” and to
his nurse, “Faith cometh by hearing,” and
to the rest, “Prepare to meet your God !”

Since, when in agony of pain, he told his
father that he loved him dearly, yet he
loved Christ better still: for, says he, Christ
is a good God to me; he is preparing a
place for menow; when it is ready, he will
come and fetch me, and then all will be
well.

Having lain a Jonger time than usual
without taking any refreshment, he was
asked to have something; but he answer-
ed, Christ is my meat and drink.

When the much desired sabbath came
he said, in the morning, This is a most de-
lightful day ! He was often in prayer, con-
tinued cheerful all the day, frequently ex-
pressing great joy, and strong consolation
in the Lord, till in the evening, a convul-
sion fit seized him, and proved the rough
but welcome messenger, sent to convey
his happy spirit where “ the inhabitants
shall no more say, I am sick.” |

Thus, dear papa, died a young disciple.
whose life and death I have no higher wish
than to imitate. While I write, I am ever



And Grace, from Nature's dross vefin’d the gold !

76

wishing to go too: and so does dear sister

Elizabeth. who now sits by me, not willing
to leave the room, lest [ jerget to present
( what she intends to do herself soon, ) her
duty and love to her P&paand mama. Ac-
cept them ( dear papa and ma’ma ) from
both your obliged children, especially
from.

Your dutiful Son,

Wirrtam Gooncuizp.

P. S. Elizabeth says, I must not forget
Master Ridgeway’s Epitaph ;—'tus as fol-
lows : ~

Farewell, dear Babe, witli all thy sacred store,
tn triumph landed on the heawnly shore:
Sure Nature form’d thee in her softest mould,



;
;





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BOOKSELLERS,

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Watt’s Psalms and Hymns, various bind-
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Suitable for Premigni in Sunday Schools,



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Life of Henry Longden, - 60".

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Full Text



too. They were most cordially received, and kindly entertained indeed. Among the many curious things they saw, nothing pleased them better than a gallery of fine pictures, each of which had a spiritual waning; and Mr. B. was so onliging as to pint out to them the instructive lessons they were designed to teach. In order, there re, to convey to our young readers some idea of the beautiful originals, we will recite the folio xing account of them.
The first picture which struck ther attention was a beautiful historcal piece, very highly finished by a capital hand.
The little folks as you will naturally suppose, were anxious to know the meaning of it; which gave rise to the following dialogue :Eliz. Pray, S:r, whit does this picture represent?
Mr. B. Mv dears, you perceive a poor man almost drowned.
Eliz. Yes, Sir, and how came he there? .Mr. B Re was go;ng over thatgreat piece of water, in a little pasteboard boat. Being deluded by a man in black, who ought to have known better, he foolishly thought that his boat would keep out the water,.and convey him s-fely to the opposite shore. Bat as soon as the wind blew, and the wave








say.) of ally sic Perso, wh avesad whlen it is mornig.0ta twr evening!e monn!bt sfrlbd utcn
fes s, to thile9oryof cregae, thttl time, nightad aismdplsnto mec by the Lr;wen i i Iaellllig it i plesants; andI when it is moqrnin~g, I am refreheaske wbat:supportedI her, shsanawered, 1 "1look o y truble ahfruit of1 am ad t wondr it has nt been1 IIwayvS so with me,
,,I am hmelped to bls he Lord th)at it is no worse.~

bless thm ajs fra i se od


I reckoqa hesfe~ns fb rs

the glory tha sble reele. came to hemnd 'Gie m hn 4ptn to which seeied, 0rao e
mand! ifl hdatosndhat ir
worthy ofthen ll













THIRD EDITION.



AS a proof that we formed no groundless expectation of William Goodchild's improvement at school, withpleasare wesub. join the following letter, very lately received by his papa. who is so kind as to permit us to make it public.



Dear and HIonoured Sir,
The least hint of your pleasure is a law to me. Your last favour made me weep with joy; the endearing expressions of your love, and kind approbation of my conduct,I fire me with a desire to deserve both, I shall never think myself so happy as when contributing any thing to your satisfaction and pleasure.






And I don't know how better
than by sendii"g you a sho acunt of
Master Ridgeway, a moat amiable child, and dearcompanion of ine,but now translated to a better country, and the best company.
When he was only three years of age, he discovered evident marks of a work of grace on his heart.-Praver and praise, even then, were his delightful exercises.
But the two last years of his hife, (for he was but five when he died,) his piety was more remarkable, and he ripened apace for glory.
Just before his last illness, he cheerfully told his mama, that "his life was hid with Christ in God;" which words he often repeated. And when the maid was one day covering him up in his cradle, he said, "In heaven I shall be covered with the robe of my Father's righteouness."
Not long before he died, he declared he had (in a dream, I suppose,) seen heaven: and with great admiration, said, "0. it is a brave place indeed! You cannot think, and I cannot tell, what a fine, shining, glorious place it is! I saw the angels too, all standing round the Lord, and joined with them in singing the new song! And there I heard Jesus Christ sa), Let little children




26

but the distress of his soul was greater still. His sins now stared him in the face; he would lay and cry out, 0 what shall I do! what shall I do I-I fear there is no mercy for me!
He was often told thee was mercy ini Christ for the chief of sinners; yet he was still afraid God would not have mercy on him, he was so vile a sinner. But at leAgth he was helped to lay hold on this promise,-Coml unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give vou rest." And then he would bless and adore the free and rich grace of God, that such a wretch as he should obtain pity and pardon.
Thus he abounded still more and more in prayer and praise. longing to be dissolved, that lie might be with Christ.
Yet he had at times, fears returning lest after all he should be deceived. But the day before he died, a gentleman came to see him, and blamed him much for giving way to doubts and fears; saying, it was as though all that had been told him were lies, to deceive him.-You say, you fear Christ will not accept you; perhaps you are not willing to accept Christ, "In-. deed I am !" replied the boy. ",Why thbn
*liild, (said he,) if tbkou art really willing







awful scene, though but painted, filled every mind with solemnity, and every face with fear. And who can help thinking, said the minister, who accompanied them, of that dreadful day which our eyes must behold No paintedfire, nor imaginary thunders then, but all real; when the elements shall melt with fervent heat; the sun be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood; when the Son of man shall come in the clouds of heaven, in great glory, and all his holy angels with him, to take vengeance on his enemies, and to sentence all the sons of Adam to happiness or miasery. Oh .said the little girl, Oh that this Judge may be our frend! then shall we be safe. Here they were also shewn all man. ner of birds and their nests; all sorts of butterflies, and other insects; curious helmets and swords, all sorts of shells and leaves, and more fine things than I could tell you of in an hour. But nothing pleased William more than an old manuscript of the Bible, in vellum, which the minister said was worth all the book there: and so it was; for what would all the books in the world be without the Bible? Other books may make a man wise in
-wold/y wisdom; but it is only the Bible that can make a man wise to Salvation:







He was possessed of suob extraordinr



Perity.
It was among 1i leas ommndations, that hie was surprsigly learnoi for his age; he was abl to spa Latin fluently, and was uellvre r Geik4talian, and other lagags in the'aquirement of

leave hi ierin he th ppoited

No sooner 4b settled upon the
throne, thasn he oed, by every means ecouldte grat wrkof reflring .Enby enacting good la~ws, and encouraging





pish superstiion n cultrtand tl too mu~ch of what *u)ways eogd o
8ake.
A warnt was bruh frdayug k-n g i os go, for t e-9i gi o et whowa odme f hef.







m,
When children, in their wanton play,
Serv'd old Elisha so,
And bid the prophet go his way,
"Go up, thou baldhead, go;"
IV.
God quickly stopt their wicked breath
And sent two raging bears,
That tore them liin i from limb to death,
With blood, and groans, and tears.

Great God! how terrible art thou
To sinners e'er so young!Grant me thy grace, and teach me how
To tame and rule my tongue.
VI.
t the sweet work of pray'r and praise
Employ my youngest breath:Thus I'm prcepar'd for longer days,
Or fit for early death.







Th'le Nouth, file will) love and gr~ief' fafls dow n 'beforeim an, Withi a weepipag eye, a bhing fac, and fasslteing Voice, owns all hi ofee. Thei father it, now so full ofjoy, that hie does not mlention one of his faults; foldls htim to his bo som, kissesaway his ters and calls aloud for his Seryarits; .' "Bring Ehej'-he eagerly cries-bring here the best robe you can find ; bring here the ring to ornamuent his fing-er, and shoes for lit-, fct ; provide quickly a handsome dinner aleus, and all our neighsbour, rejoice: to this my son wasi dead, and. is alive again was lost, endl is found"
IHere waa solemns pause- W11n could have helped crying, if they had herdj what a pattnetic manner the stop. ase Waed I All were dissolved in tear's.
At length Master Tender broke silenee, and saii, See here, my) dear comnpanions, the sad resultof~ dvsp~sng and plsoby]ig~ our pious parents ; and what comes fo the foolish desire b~Jeing from ndrhi care atid authority.
Nor is this all, said Maseter oiea, I have heard the miinistessy htti returning prodiga ersnt ou repenting sinner, whby eari~fm and his ways, has plung~ed lims elito dis fress and ruin; baut whlen~ helped by the,







vance their best interets; and accordinglythc next day~ they went to the M~1useum.n 1.1ceount ofwhich youi have in tbe, following ebapter.




CHAP. IlL.

Of the dWaetU,.
1 MUST remark, in the first place, that .Bzlly and Betscy, whenever they weren't go abroad to see any fin sight, used always to pray for a blessing upon it:-And tIhey'.never went to see any things, or engage in any diversion, upon which they dar-. ed not to ask Go's blessing.-And for that reason never went to plays, nor playecd at cards: they knew that all such diver-. sionsa were unlawful.
They had been told what rare cuiosi ties, of nature andairt weretobsena the Mugeum; and theretlre thypae that, from seeing the wondefltii

which God hath made, and given wiso

to man to make, theyr might beLd 2adr
the great Creator.








CHAP. V.

Remarkable conlerton of several children
at the Orphan-houw, in Georgia.

MASTER Timothy then obliged the
company with the following history.
You have, doubtless, heard of the Or.
phan-house. in Georgia, founded by the late Rev. Mr. Whitefield. His heart you know, always longed for the salvation of precious souls, especially of young people; and it was not long after the school there was settled, that the Lord was pleased, to answer the wishes of his heart; for in the year 1741, Mr. Barber, the superintendant of their spiritual affairs, wrote a letter to Wdr. Whitefieh4 which I shall take
the liberty to read.

"Bethes da, March 21, 1741.

My very dear Brother,
NrvEia, no never, did my eyes see suchi
a sight, nor my ears hear such a sound, s in the day past! and Oh! how will your< soul rejoice., when yn hear what it win!




= Pe ERI Cs) cod arene | ,
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BARLY PUBEY,

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’
MEMOIRS OF CHILDREN.

Mark, %, 14.

te.

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-
BALTIMORE: -

PUBLISHED BY ARMSTRONG & PLASKITT.
R. J. Matchett, printer.




EARLY PIETY;
MEMOIRS OF CHILDREN,
EMINENTLY ,SERLOUS-

Interspersed with familiar Dialogues,

Prayers, Graces, and Hymns.



BY GEORGE BURDER.

—_—_—




« Hearest thou what they say 2
«“ Yea, have ye never read,— Out of the

mouths of babes ‘and sucklings thou hast per
fected praise 2_Matt. xxi. 16.

ae

| BALTIMORE:

Printed for Armstrong & Plaskitt
BY BR. J. MaTCHETT.

1821.






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PREFACE.

ee

My dear young Reader,

Tuts little book is written with
a design and a desire, at once to
profit and please you; by shewing
in the examples of children, young
as you are, the great happiness
and advantage of real and early
piety.

That you may read it with pro-
fit, you must take notice of what-
ever was good in the Children you
read of, to imitate it; and of what-
ever was bad, in order to avoid it.
- You will find, that the good
Children loved Prayer; that is to
teach you to love it tee.

They hated Sin very much; that
is to make you to hate it.
iv

Many of them died very young;
(not that they died the sooner be-
eause they were good; but being
good, they were the sooner fit to
die ;) now, you yourself may die
young too, therefore pray ear-
nestly to the Lord, for the par-
don of all your sins, and beg for
grace to make you fit to live, and
then you will be fit to die.

G. B.

March, 1812.
THE

ENTERTAINING

HUsToRnr

OF

WILLIAM AND ELIZABETH GOCB-
CHILD.

2+
CHAP. I,

Of their behaviour at School, and comin=
Home at Christmas.

Wittram and Elizabeth Goodchild,
were sent by their parents into the coun-
try, to a boarding school, where they
were put under the care of Mrs. Love-
good, a lady of singular piety and wis-
dom; remarkably fitted for the educa-
tion of youth ; for she dearly loved little
children, and was very indulgent to them,
and never failed graciously to reward
them, whenever they did well; especially
when she observed them diligent in
6

reading their bibles, in learning their cate-
chism, in secret prayer, or when they
could give a good account of the sermons
they had heard on the Lord’s-day. Upon
such occasions she would not only com-
mend and reward, but would indulge them
with some useful piece of knowledge that
was new to them.
And so by the blessing of God upon her

_| instructions, and the diligent and dutiful



behaviour of her scholars, it was truly sur-
prising what a quick progress they made
in learning and politeness. Mrs, Love-
good could by no means conceal the im-
_ provement they made from their kind pa-
rents, and therefore wrete several times
to acquaint them with all the particulars :
and nothing could be more welcome to
them than such news, I assure you.

You may imagine by observing your own
parents, (my dear reader) that it greatly
delighted their hearts, to hear of the wel-
fare and good behaviour of their dear lit-
_ tle ones, and made them exceedingly
abound in thankfulness to God, who had
_ directed them to so geod a school, and
who had bestowed upon their children
such lovely dispositions. They even
thought it long till holiday-time came,
when they expected to see them.
7

Well, Christmas came at last; and for
-my part, I cannot tell you whether parents
_ or children were most pleased with its
coming.

The appointed day for William and Eli-
zabeth to return home was now arrived:
and they took leave of Mrs. Lovegood, with
tears of affection and love, begging her
prayers for their safe journey to town,
where they got safe and sound in the even-
ing; meeting at the inn, in Aldersgate-
street, with their father’s servant, whom
he had kindly sent to conduct them home.
And home they came ; but it would be in
yain for me to attempt to tell you what a
pretty sight t»eir meeting was.

When they entered the room, after ma-
king their obeisance, they ran, and both
falling on their knees, begged their pa-
rents’ blessing. Mrs, Goodchild could not
speak for crying, she was so affected with
joy. But Mr. Goodchild, raising them up
in the most tender manner said, “ May
JESUS bless you both!” and, kissing them,
added, “God be praised for his mercy, in
giving me to see my dear children again!”

Afier they had drank tea, Elizabeth
gave her mother an account of their rules
and orders at school; how happy they lived
there; how kind Mrs, Lovegood was to
8

them; and how she taught them morning
and evening prayers, which they repeated,
‘And as you (my little reader,) might hke
to know them, and, it may be, to use them
your-elf, I will set them down. The
Morning prayer Was as follows.



Morning Prayer.

«© Almighty and most merciful God!
who hast made me, and preserved me to
this heur, look graciously upon me, and.
have mercy upon me. Thou hast promis-
ed, O Lord, that those who seek thee early,
shall find thee; and 1 am now come to seck
thy face and favour. Dear Jesus, when on
earth, thou didst suffer little children to
come unto thee: and I am come, O take
me into thy arms of love, and make my
young heart soft and tender; afraid of sin,
and‘its terrible consequences! O make me
highly to prize thy love in dying for sin-
ners! and, Lord, be pleased to give me a
share in thy love. Make me humble,
teachable, righteous, and holy.—Accept
my praise for another night’s preservatio
and be pleased to continue the same care
and protection all this day. Instruct me,
© Lord, in all useful and necessary know
ledge, especially that which concerns mj







.

eternal peace. Wherever I am to-day, be
pleased to be with me. Whatever I do to
day, may I do it to thy glory. While I live,
may I live to God; and when I die, may £
sleep in Jesus! and after death admit me
to heaven; to ascribe glory to the Father,
Son, and Holy Ghost, for ever and ever.—
Amen.”

«Our Father,” &c. &c.
Evening Prayer.

«0 Lord, my God, most high! most ho-
ly! and most gracious! Thou searchest
all hearts, and well knowest all that [have
this day done, said, or thought amiss : for-

ive all most freely for the sake of Jesus
Christ. Clothe my naked soul with the
spotless righteousness of Jesus thy dear
son: wash my unclean soul in his clean-
sing blood : sanctify my unsanctified tem-
pers and dispositions, by the Holy Spirit.
Watch over my body and sou! this’ night
whileI sleep. Graciously defend me from
every danger—Preserve also, O Lord, all
that dwell under .this roof: and bless my
dear parents, and all my relations: pros-
per and increase the ministers of thy gos-
pel: and may every one of my friends and
10

acquaintance acquaint themselyes with Je-
sus, and be at peace with him. Glory be
to thee, O.Lord, for my creation, preser-
vation, and all the comiorts of this life;
but much more for the gift of gifts, a pre-
cious Jesus. May my soul be found in
him, both now and forever more! Grant
all my petitions, and accept my praises, in
the name and for the sake of Jesus Christ,
who, with the Father and Holy Ghost, is
one God over all blessed for ever. Amen
and Amen.” ,

These prayers, you see, are both very
short and suitable; but at times they used
other petitions, not set down here, accord-
ing to their various wants, as when they
were ill, or had got well again; when they
were going a journey, or the like.

William also informed his parents, that
at school, before family prayer, a chapter
used to be read; and when it was done,
each scholar was expected to repeat some
verse or sentence, that they remember-
ed: and this kept up their attention. And
then they used to sing very pretty hymns,
which, if you should like to learn, you may
find them at the end of this book.

Well, before supper, when Mr. Good-
éhild’s family were called up to prayer,
you cannot think how glad all the servants
44

‘

were to see Master and Miss again: from
which I conclude, that they behaved well
before they left home.—Their sweet yoi-
ces made an agreeable addition to the
song of praise that every evening ascend-
ed from that happy (because pious) fami-
ly: In short, it was as the house of God,
and the very gate ofheaven. For my part,
I wish that those people who have no
prayer in their families had been there;
methinks it would have made them much
desire to repeat such pleasant scenes un-
der their own roof—Jer. x. 25.

-ro—

CHAP. II.

Of the Gallery of Pictures.

WILLIAM and Elizabeth, behaving
themselves so well, deserved indulgence;
and they had what they deserved: for
they had not been at home long, when a
great man, Mr. John Benevolent, hearing
of them, invited them to his country
house, ata very pleasant village, near Lon-
don ; and he sent his own coach for them
42

too. ‘They were most cordially received,
and kindly entertained indeed. Among
the many curious things they saw, nothing
picased them better than a gallery of fine
pictures, each of which had a spiritual
meaning; and Mr. B. was so onliging as to
print out to them the mstructive lessons
they were designed to teach. In order,
therefore, to convey to our young readers
some idea of the beautiful originals, we
will recite the following account or them.

The first picture which struck their at-
tention was a beautiful historical piece,
very highly finished by a capital hand.

The little folks as you will naturally sup-
pose, were anxious to know the meaning
of it; which gave rise to the following dia-
logue :—

Fliz. Pray, Sir, what does this picture
represent ?

Mr. B, My dears, you perceive a poor
man almost drowned.

Eliz. Yes, Sir, and how came he there?

Mr. B. He was go:ng over that great piece.
of water, in a little pasteboard boat. Being
deluded by a man in black, who ought to
have known better, he foolishly thought
that his boat would keep out the water, and -
convey him ssfely to the opposite shore,”
But as soon as the wind blew, and the waves —

i tk
43

arose, the boat overset, (you may just see
the tep of it, ) and the man fell into the
water,

Eliz Poor man! but pray, Sir, who is
that gentleman on the bank ?

Mr. B. My dear, thatis a tender hearted
good Prince : though he looks so plain, he
lives in yonder fine palace on the gh hill;
and seeing ( for he can see a great way)
this poor creature fall in, he ran immedi-
ately to his relief, flung in the rope as you
see, and bid the poor man lay fast hold,
and he would draw him out.

William. Dear Sir, how kind! how very
kind that was!

Mr. B. It was indeed:—the man can ne-
ver be sufficiently thankful to him.

Eliz. And how excessively tight he
seems to hold the rope!

Mr. B. My dear, he would not let it go
fer all the world; his life is at stake: and if
it had not been for the gentleman, he must
certainly have perished. And now chil-
dren, (added Mr. Benevolent,) Pll tell you
what spiritual instruction it is imtend-
ded to convey. The man in his paper boat,
is to shew you how every man by nature
(till taught of God,) is ready to think that
he may get to heaven by whathe can do
himself. But it is absolutely impossible;
1%

for this reason:—The Holy Law of GOR
insists upon perfect ebedience, and noth-
ing short of that will do—But no man is
now able to obey perfectly”

Therefore, unless the perfect righteousness
of another is imputed to him, he must fall
under the curse of the broken law: his own
best righteousness will fail him, as this man’s
paper boat has done; and if immediate as-
sistance is not afforded, he must perish for
ever andever. But that dear Prince is to
represent Jesus Christ, the King of kings
and Lord of lords, who came from glory on
purpose to seek and save the lost. The
rope shews you how we are saved by Faith.*
There is no merit in the man, nor in the
rope, nor inhis holding the rope. His de-
liverance from death is entirely owing to
the good prince ; and thus the whole glory
of salvation is due alone to Christ.

Eliz. (dare say the poor man will not
brag of saving himself. I am sure he
ought to be very thankful.

Mr, B. You say right; and so he was, The
good prince took him afterwards and gave
him fresh clothes, his own handsome livery,

* Faith is taking God at his word.


45

white turned up with red, and he dwells
now in his palace, as happy a5 a prince.

William. How dearly the man must love
him! hew desirous must he be to please
him! I dare say the Prince has no need to
pid him twice to do any thing, or threaten
to turn him out of doors if he is not good,
I think if I was in his place, it would be
my meat and drink to do his will, and I should
want no other wages than his approbation.

Mr. B Wellsaid, indeed. O my dear
children, remember then, thus cheerfully
to love and obey a precious Saviour, who
has redeemed us from the curse of the
law, by becoming a curse for us.

In the next picture you see two boys: he
on the left hand is named Passion, the oth-
er’s name is Patience. You may perceive
Passion is much disquieted: but Patience
sits with a Bible in his hand, as quiet as a
lamb: and he is so happy because he is
content to wait till next year for several
pretty things his guardian has promised
him:—but Passion is thus disturbed, be-
cause he is determined to have all now.
He is indeed a very wicked child; he is
descended from Dives, whom youread of
in the Bible; and Patience is decended
from Lazarus, a very good though a very
poor man, They take after their ancestors


16



very much: for, as Mr. Bunyan informs us,
in his Pilgrim’s Progress, a man came and
brought to Passion a great bag of money;
which he seized with prodigious eagerness,
and at the same time, laughing at Patience,
called him a sorry beggar ; but, however,
it was not long before he spent all he had,
in riotous living; lost his friends and his
cash together, and has been seen himself,
not long ago, begging about the streets :
whereas Patience, in time, by diligence
and industry, got a very comfortable estate,
upon which he lives, and does a great deal
of good with it. . /

William. And pray, Sir, what is this to
teach us?

Mr. B. My dear, it is this ; Never to co-
vet present things, things which regard
only this world ; but both quietly wait, and
patiently hope for your portion of Setter
things in a better world, All this world calls
good or great must either leave us or be
left by us: and it is better to have our p»r-
_ tion in heaven than on earth, for this rea-
son, also, because, if it is on earth, we are
going from it; but if 1t be in heaven, we
are going to it.

Mr B. What co vou observe, Miss Good-
child, in this next picture?
17

Eliz. Sir, lobserve a man with 2 rake
jn his hand, raking together all the muck
and straw : and-he seems to be very busy
indeed. 4

Mr. B. But do you not observe some-
thing else?

Eliz. Yes, Sir, there is an angel ever
his head, that seems to want him to look up
at a fine crown in his hand. How sweetly
the angel smiles! but the man takes no
notice. Will you please, Sir, to tellus
the meaning?

Mr. B My dears, the man who seems so
busy in raking together nothing but dirt, is
an emblem of tie men of this world, who
rise early and sit up late, eating the bread of
carefulness, and all to get money. The an-
gel represents the faithful ministers ot Je-
sus Christ, who are using all the means
they can to engage poor careless sinners to
think of eternal things and shewing them —
what a crown they are despising for mere
trash. But after all, as you observed, the ;
man takes no notice of the angel, nor of
the glorious crown, though it is worth a
thousand times more than he will ever
scrape together as long as he lives. And
thus dear children, too, too many labour —
and study only for the meat that perisheth,
| 48

while they neglect the unspeakably impor-
tant concerns of Salvation ; and thus nin-
isters labour in vain; and spend their strength
for nought. Few believe their report, andto
Sew is the armof the Lord revealed.

The very kind gentleman, after having
shown them several other pictures, of
equal merit, dismissed them, with some
pretty presents, especially a neat pocket
Bible to each; which (to them) was the
most gracious gift they could possibly re-
ceive.

When they returned home, they gave so
distinct and pleasing an account of all they
had seen, as highly delighted their pa-
rents; especially as they took care to re-
member the instructive explunation of each
piece: and were not, like most children,
pleased with them merely as picures.

William particularly observed to his
father, with what earnestness the man
in the water kept hold of the rope;
and said, he hoped the Lord would help
him, even to hold Jesus fast by faith, for
his Saviour, with the same degree of stead-
fastness.

Mr. Goodchild was so pleased with their
remarks, that he promised they should see
every thing that might be likely to ad-
\
419

vance their best interests; and according-
ly the next day they went to the Muse-
um: an account of which you have in the
following chapter. *

—Lr—
CHAP. Ill.

Of the Museum.

1 MUST remark, in the first place, that
Bully and Betsey, whenever they were to
go abroad to see any fine sight, used at-
ways to pray for a blessing upon it:—And
they never went to see any thing, or en-
gage in any diversion, upon which they dar-
ed not to ask God’s blessing.—And for
that reason never went to plays, nor play-
ed at cards: they knew that all such diver-
sions were unlawful. J

They had been told what rare curiosi-
ties, of nature and art, were to be seen at |
the Museum; and therefpre they prayed
that, from seeing the wonderful things |
which God hath made, and given wisdom
to man to make, they might be led to adore
the great Creator.

:


—
SS

20 /

The first room they were led into con-
tained a vas: variety of Serpents, snakes, ad-
ders, and such-like frightful creatures; ma-
ny of which, though beautiful to look upon,
were terrible when alive; having had sharp
stings. and mortal Poison under their
tongues.

Miss Goodchild Shuddered almost to
look upon them; but William whispered
his father, and Said, These destructive
creatures put me in mind of that old and
subtle serpent, who first persuaded Eve
to sin against God, by breaking his com.
mands, and so “brought death into the
world, and alj our woe.”

more hurtful than these vipers, now they
are dead and bottled up in spirits.”

They were then led into a dark room in
which was a transparent picture of a burn-
ing mountain in Italy, called Vesuvius;

from the top of which issued huge quanti.

ties of stones, and Tivers of liquid fire pour-
ed down its side. ‘The sight of such an
EEE '“ li
24

awful scene, though but painted, filled ev-
ery mind with solemnity, and every face
with fear. And who can help thinking, said
the minister, who accompanied them, of
that dreadful day which our eyes must be-
hold! No painted fire, nor imaginary thun-
ders then, but all real; when the elements
shall melt with fervent heat; the sun be
turned into darkness, and the moon into
blood; when the Son of man shall come in
the clouds of heaven, in great glory, and
all his holy angels with him, to take ven-
geance on his enemies, and to sentence
all the sons of Adam to happiness or mis-
ery. Qh / said the little girl, Oh that this
Judge may be our friend! then shall we be
safe. Here they were also shewn all man-
ner of birds and their nests; all sorts of
butterflies, and other insecis; curious hel-
mets and swords. all sorts of shells and
leaves, and more fine things than I could
tell you of in an hour. But nothing
pleased William more than an old ma-
nuscript of the Bible, in vellum, which
the minister said was worth all the books
there: and so it was; for what would all the
books in the world be without the Bible?
Other books may make a man wise in
worldly wisdom ; but it is only the Bible
that can make a man wise to Salvation: |

>


,
:

22

this only teaches him how to live, and how
to die; this tells him how he may be hap-
py here, and be for ever happy. Oh!
prize it, my dear reader, never let a day
pass without reading of it; and be sure,
when you read it, you pray to God to help
you to understand it.

When they came home, they made ma-
ny pretty remarks upon almost every thing
they had seen: and what was still better,

~ their minds were so much impressed, as to

lead them to pray for more admiring and
adoring thoughts of the great God, who
made all things with infinite wisdom: and
that they might ever stand in awe of him,
and not dare any more to sin against him,

Thus you see bow they improved by
whatever they saw: and inthe next chap-
ter we shall shew you what sort of compa-
ny they kept; how they spent their time to-
gether; and what use they made of the good
books they read, by being able to relate,
with so much propriety, remarkable histo.
ries of good and p.ous children, whom you
will de well to imitate.

—
25

CHAP. IV.

The pious assembly, and very remarkable
history.

WHEN the young friends of William,
Goodchild and his sister, heard they were
+dturned from boarding school, they were
yery desirous to come and see them: so a
day was fixed on for that purposes and
when should it be but Twelfth day, and it
happened that there were just twelve in
company. Well, after they had dined, it
was proposed by Mr. Goodchild, that in-
gtead of the idle diversion of choosing
king and queen, (which he knew they
were above,) they should each tell some
pretty history which they had read, that
might tend to their mutual advantage:
This being directly agreed upon, Mr. and
Mrs. Goodchild withdrew; leaving only
the young people together, that they
might speak with the greater freedom.

Miss Mild, being the eldest in company,
was desired to begin, which she was just
about to do, when Master Prayerful beg-
ged leave to ask, whether it was not pro-
per first to pray for a blessing on their con-

“

i
tee te 5




24

+
yersation? Certainly, said William Good-
child, for I have often read that text which
says, In every thing by prayer and supplica~
tion, with thanksgiving, lei your requests be
made known to God.—And 1 heartily acqui-

i

i
4
,

esce in the proposal said Miss Candour, —

for it is the custom of some very honour- —

able persons, where mamma visits, after
dinner to sing an hymn, and unite in pray-
er, which they say prevents the conversa-

tion from turning upon the failings of ab-

sent friends.

Master Serious then prayed for a few
minutes; after which, the little company
being seated, Miss Mild introduced her
story thus:

1 apprehend, my dear young friends,
that nothing can be more profitable to us,
nor indeed more encouraging than to hear
of those, like us in age and eapacity,
whose early‘piety, and whose happy deaths
have witnessed how much littte children
are the care of a compassionate Saviour
who permitted when on earth, sweh to be
brought to him, and declared, that of such
is the kingdom of heaven.

I have read of a poor boy, who came all

in dirt and rags to a gentleman’s door at.

Newington, crying for bread. Notwith,
standing his filthy condition, the Lord
25

disposed that generous man to take him
jn, end clothe him from bead to foot, and
bring him up as his own child.

This boy was a3 wicked as he was poor;
he used to take the Lord’s name in vain,
and curse and swear in a shocking manner:
indeed he was guilty of all sorts of -wick-
edness. But the gentleman, who had his
eternal, as much or more than his tempo-
ral good at heart, laboured to persuade
him of his natural depravity,—of his sin-
ful practices—of the worth of his soul,
and the bitter consequences of sinning
against God,—of the uncertainty of life,—
the certainty of death, and a future judg-
ment. He used often to pray with, and
apart to pray for him.

Nor were his prayers long unanswered :
in afew weeks time, a great change took
place in the boy’s outward behaviour;
which was once very uncivil, but now affa-
ble and courteous toall. And the change
affected not his outward conduct only, but
he began privately to weep and mourn for
his past offences; he would gladly attend
on prayer; would listen with great atten-
tion to all his Master said about eternal
things. And thus he continued to do,
when the Lord visijed him with sickness :
he was taken ill; his body was full of pain;

‘
>

26

but the distress of his soul was greater
still, His sins now stared him in the face;
he would lay and cry out, O what shall I
do! what shall I do!—I fear there is no
mercy for me!

He was often told there was mercy in
Christ for the chief of sinners; yet he
was still afraid God would not have mercy
on him, he was so vile a sinner, But at
length he was helped to lay hold on this
promise,—“Come unto me, all ye that la-
bour and are heavy laden, and I will give
you rest.” And then he would bless and
adore the free and rich grace of God, that
such a wretch as he should obtain pity
and pardon.

Thus he abounded still more and more
in prayer and praise, longing to be dissol-
ved, that he might be with Cnrist.

Yet he had at times, fears returning lest
after all he should be-deceived. But the
day before he died, a gentleman came to
see him, and blamed him much for giv-
ing way to doubts and fears; saying, it
was as though all that had been told him
were lies, to deceive him.—You say, you
fear Christ will not accept you; perhaps
you are not willing to accept Christ, “In-
deed I am!” replied the boy. ‘Why then,
child, (said he,) if thou art really willing

ee
27

to have Christ, Christ is a thousand times
more willing to have thee, and wash thee
in his blood.” Well (said the boy, leap-
ing up in his bed,) well! yea, all is well.
Christ is willing, and I am willing too;
and now Christ is mine, and 1 am his for
ever”? He continued from that moment
to his last, triumphing in full assurance of
God’s love; earnestly desiring‘his dismis-
sion, which next morning he obtained : and
the last words he uttered were, ‘Into thy
hands, O Lord, I commit my spirit ; and
so he slept in Jesus. Hewas but just
tarned of nine years of age. *

And 0! what a sweet smile of applause
sat on every countenance when the story
was finished! each of the dear young
people saying, “O that I may die the
death of the righteous, and that my latter
end may be like his,”
28

CHAP, V.

Remarkable conversion of several children
at the Orphan-house, in Georgia.

MASTER Timothy then obliged the
company with the following history.

You have, doubtless, heard of the Or-
phan-house. in Georgia, founded by the
late Rev. Mr. Whitefield. Wis heart you
know, always longed for the salvation of -
precious souls, especially of young people;
and it was not long after the school there
was settled, that the Lord was pleased,
to answer the wishes of his heart; for in

* the year 1741, Mr. Barber, the superin-

tendant of their spiritual affairs, wrote a
letter to Mr. Whitefield, which I shall take
the liberty to read.

© Bethesda, March 21, 1741.

My very dear Brother,

Never, no never, did my eyes see such
a sight, nor my ears hear such a sound, as
in the day past! and Oh! how will your —
soul rejoice, when you hear what it was!
eT ae eo) lO oe ee

29

it was nothing less wonderful than a great
number of little children in your Orphan-
house, crying out after the Lord —After
dinner, brother Periam had left them in
school, picking cotton; and, while they
were working, one of them said to another;
If we do not believe in the Lord Jesus
Christ, we shall all go to hell; and added,
that the children of God prayed to God.
Immediately the boy, to whom he spake,
fell down upon his knees, and began to
pray; and then another, till they were all
on their knees together praying.—Provi-
dence so ordered it, that some of the fam-
ily heard them, and it was not long before
the whole family were gathered around
them. O, how did the awful and pleasing
sight simke us, and melt us into a flood of
tears. The dear little lambs continued
erying out with the trembling jailor,
“What must we do to be sayed!”——
They prayed, Lord God Almighty, have
compassion on us; prick us to the heart,
and pluck us as fire-brands out of the
purning: and, O Lord Jesus Christ wash
us in thy blood! O Lord, take away our
hard stony hearts and give us hearts of
flesh. And how did the little soul plead
with God! Lord hast thou not said, “that
those that seek thee early shall find thee?”
30

and that “thou wilt not quench the smo-
king flax, nor break the bruised reed?”
And I heard one of them say, Lord, thou
hast said, “that we shall be taught of
thee?—Thus they continued crying after
the Lord, an hour or two; and I am con-
yinced, not only from what I saw but felt,
“that the Lord was present with us,” &c.

Miss Lydia, his sister, being desired to
relate something, began thus: Since the
company appear so much, and so jusuy
affected with what my brother has said, [
shall attempt to tell you, as well as I can,
the substance of another letter from the
same persor, about half a year after.

At family prayer one evening, he read —
the 25th chapter of Matthew :—spoke a
little from it, about the day of judgment, —
and had the pleasure to observe many of —
the children very attentive and much af-*
fected.

After he had, as usual, lighted them to
bed, and retired to his own chamber, a
child came and told him, that one of the
boys wanted to speak with him: He went |
directly, Before he got to the chamber, ©
he heard a noise, and when he came in, —
found many praying that the Lord Jesus —
would have mercy on them. One of them”
told him, he had a bad heart. He prayed ©
ee ee ee ee
, 31

with them: and after he had left them,
some continued praying, in deep distress,
great part of the night.

When he visited them in the morning,
asking one what he wanted ? he answered
with tears in his eyes, he wanted Jesus
Christ.

After this, it was observable, that they
sought all opportunities to be by them-
selves and pray. t

What then can we think of children that ~
never pray to God, when all converted _
people begin immediately to pray? May
this, my young friends, quicken us allto

_ more diligence in this delightful duty ! 4

| Miss Melody, not being able then to re-
collect any history, obliged her friends
with che following hymn.

I »
COME join with me, companions dear,
To bless the Saviour’s name ; :
And everlasting honors rear )
To God and to the Lamb. .

TE

For children, (O what wondrous grace !3} |
The Lord was crucifi’d : |

For Adam’s vile apostate race
The Saviour bled and dy’d?

p ®s
SS =

32

nL
Here we may love without restraint,
Nor fear to prize too high :
Christ 1s the song of every saint
On earth or in the sky.

IV.
Lord, with thy grace anoint mine eyes,
Throughout my darkness shine ;
© make me to salvation wise!
My all be ever thine!

-e-

CHAP. VI.

Containing the history of a sad wicked child,
and his miserable death.

MASTER Samuel, whose turn it was
next, said he had frequently met with this’
observation, that contraries illustrate ;
and therefore, as a contrast to those pleas-
ing histories already recited, he hoped it
might be profitable to relate an account
of a very wicked boy, in order both to warn
us against his faults, and excite our gra-
titude to God, and thankfulness to our’
33

friends, for his §race, and their instrue
tion,

The boy, whose Story Tam about to tell,
Was named Jack Perverse, and his nature
was answerable to his Name.

Though his parents sent him to a very
good school, yet he was such adunce, that
he could not read a single verse in the
‘Testament without blundering ; and when
he was reproved, used to answer again
with impertinence; and was so sulky and
obstinate, that correction only made him
worse, When any mischief was gong
forward at school, he was sure to be found,
at the head of it; by which means his
book was neglected, his task left undone,
and then to avoid punishment, he would
play truant; the consequence of which
was, that he was not only well flogged,
but a heavy log was also fastened to his
leg, and a great fool’s Cap put on his head ;
so that he became the sport and derision
of all that beheld him.

His master, in order to reclaim him,
would sometimes call him up, and spezk
to him thus:—« Child, you should remem-
ber that your good father put you under
my care, that you might improve in use-
ful knowledge, and so be fit, when you
leave school, to enter the world with

2


a

——





















credit; but if you continue your bad
ways, and neglect your learning, your
dear father will be grieved and disap-
pointed, t shall be discredited, and you
will be ruined.” :
Now, one would have thought that such
kind advice as this would have had some
weight with him; but, alas! it had none :
he still continued idle and obstinate, de.
spising both his master and his counsel.
He was not only idle, but cruel. He
used to catch flies on purpose to terment
them; and was guilty of that horrid prac-
tice of making cockchafers spin, by put-
ting a crooked pin through their tails and
hanging them by a bit of thread, which
uts them in terrible agonies.
When this was mentioned, several of
the company immediately burst into tests,
they were shocked at uny thing that was.
cruel. And Master Tender could not hel
saying, “Lam astonished at the hardness 0
that heart wl i
the agon.es of poor dumb creatures.
brings lo my mind What} once read of th
wise Athenians, who condemned a boy f
putting out the eyes of birds with a hot ne
dle, judging that such seeds of cruc
would necessardy grow UP into more ac
of violence, and endanger the lives of mel
and the happiness of mankind: the boy was
therefore put to death.—But I beg pardon
for this interruption.

Samuel then resumed his narration.
I have mentioned already his bad be-
haviour at school, and his wickedness
at his diversions; I shall only trouble you
farther with an account of his perverse
conduct at home, and his irreverent dispo-
sition at church: which I think together
make up a boy as bad as a boy can be.

In the morning he would hein bed very
late, even after he was called; hurry over
his prayers like a parrot, and sometimes,
if he thought he should not be found out,
would wholly omit them, and then if ask.
ed about them, he would te!l a lie to hide
his sin, and so make it double you know.

When his papa was at prayer in the fa-
mily, he would be looking about hin, in-
stead of making every petition his own;
and at evening prayer was often found
asleep. If he was sent on an errand he
would loiter and play by the way, some-
times quite forgetting his message, and
sometimes delivering a wrong one.

His behaviour to the servants was ex-
tremely haughty and insolentis Ways
speaking ill of them behind their backs,
and laying his own faults to their charge,

a
ag EP

as
—_——



36

and yet to their faces would fawn and flat-
ter, ifhe could get any thing by it.

But the worst of all was his irreverence
at church; he did not go there, as good
boys do, to meet with God, and learn more
of Jesus Christ, and their duty, but only
because he was obliged to go.. He never
prayed before he went, for a blessing upon
the minister, and that he might get good :
and when there, he would stare about him,
observe every body that came in, take no-
tice how this and that person were dressed,
but did not join im prayer, nor mund the
sermon, but frequently laughed at it and
the minister too. He little thought of
those wicked children we read of in the
second Book of Kings, who laughed at 2
great minister in those days, the prophet
Elisha, calling him baldhead, and making
game of him they ought highly to have
honored; and the Lord sent two frightful
bears out of the wood, and killed no less
than two and forty of them. We may see,
my friends, that God Amighty takes notice
of, is displeased with, and punishes naugh-
ty boys and girls as well as naughty men
and women; and shat he does so still, is evi-
dent, for Jack Perverse, one Sunday after-
noon, after he had been making game of
the minister and his message, he went with
37
a boy of his acquaintance, as bad as him-
self, to wash in the river, and there he
getting out of his depth, and the other be-
ing seized with the cramp, were both
drowned; and so taken away suddenly, with
all their sins unrepented of and unforgiven,
to stand before God in judgment. Thus”
we see that the way of sin is down hill, and
how children are hurried on from’ one
crime to another, till all ends in the ruin
of both soul and body. May God keep us
all, said the httle pious company, from all
the ways of'sin, and the least a pearance of
evil? Then they sung the following |

HYMN, sy Dr. Warrs.

ity

GUR tongues were made to bless the Lord,
And not speak ill of men;

When others give a railing word,
We must not rail again.

I.

The lips that dare be so profane,
To mock, and jeer, and scoff

At holy things, or holy men,
The Lord shall cut them off.


38




; iil.

When children, in their wanton piay,
Serv’d old Elisha so,

And bid the prophet go his way,

«Go up, thou baldhead, go;”

Iv.

God quickly stopt their wicked breath
And sent two raging bears,
That tore them limb from limb to death,
With blood, and groans, and tears.
‘ Vv:
_ Great God! how terrible art thou
To sinners e’er so young!—
Grant me thy grace, and teach me how
'To tame and rule my tongue.

Vi.

' Let the sweet work of pray’r and praise
Employ my youngest breath :—
Thus I’m prepar’d for longer days,

Or fit for early death.

4
CHAP, VII.

Of a very good Girl that died very happy be-
fore she wus seven years old.

MISS Goodchild then begged leave to
relate some few passages from the life of
Miss Carteret Rede, who was the daugh-
ter of a gentleman in Wiltshire.

She gave remarkable proofs of her early
piety: for being asked, when she was no
more than four years of age, who was her
greatest enemy? she replied, Sin was her
greatest enemy. Soon after, when reading
in the second chapter of St. Luke’s gos-
pel, about Joseph and Mary, “that there
was no room for them in the inn, and that _
the nazz was laid in a manger,” she burst
into a flood of tears, saying, What! was
there no room in the inn for the Lord of
glory? but must ue lie ina makger among
the beasts ? a:

One morning, when she was not well,
she began her prayer thus, O Lord, look
down upon me, and give me the know-—
ledge of thyself; take sin out of my heart,
that Imay be thy child! with several such
like expressiens,
sa

40

When she had done, she said, Ihave a

retty lesson im my book, which is about
God’s sending the Lord Jesus to die for
poor sinners. At another time, when sit-
ting by the fire, she burst into tears 5 and
peing asked what was the matter, she said,
T do not please the Lord in all Ido. At
another time, I must be more afraid of
sinning agamst God than of being whipt :
for it 1s God that gives us food, and rai-
ment, und every thing-

One evening she went to her father, and
said, Pray for me that God would take
away this W icked heart, und that I may be
with God when If die. Just before she
was taken ill, she was reading the 55th of

Isaiah, she stopt and sa.d,—Nothing but

or

the blood of Christ can cleanse me from
sin. Her mother asked her, Whether she
did not think that bemg good, and doing
good works, would save her? She replied,
Our righteousness is 2 sinful righteous-
ness; therefore it cannot save us.

A little kinswoman and she being at
play, they happened to fall out, but pre-
sently Carteret recollecting herself, said
to her cousin, Cousin, don’t we know that
Christ died for us ; why should we fail out.

Soon afier she was taken ill, and was
one evening earnest, with tears, that Christ
44

might be revealed toher; she said I must
have Christ, I cannot tell what to do with-
out him, One said, cannot your prayers —
save you? Oh no! said she, nothing but
Christ can do it. ;

At another time, not long.before her
death, she said, This scripture is come to
my mind—* He wall have mercy on whom
he will have mercy ;”"—and_ he will have
mercy on me. Soon after being asked,
Does God lift up the light of his counte-
nance upon you? She said, [hope he does.
And are you willing to goto Christ? I
hope I am.

The agonies of death coming on, the last
words she spoke to her father were, Pray
for me. _

While he prayed with her she lay very
still, and about eleven o’clock on the se-
yenth of December, 1801, she fell asleep
in Jesus.

When Miss Goodchild had finished the
history of Carteret, which she told with
great modesty, they agreed to sing the
following

HYMN.

I.

Happy’s the child whose youngest years
Receive instructions well;


e sinner’s path, and fears

Who hates th
The road that leads to hell,

ii.

«
When weidevote our youth to God,
*Tis pleasing in his eyes;
A fiow’r, when offer’d in the bud,
Is no vain sacrifice.

iit.

*Tis easier work if we begin

i To fear the Lord betimes;

} While sinners, that grow old in sin,
: ‘Are harden’d in their crimes,

" Iv.

| *Pwill save us from 2 thousand snares
‘To mind religion young +

Grace will preserve our following years,
And make our virtue strong:

—-- r

Vv.
To thee, Almighty God, to thee,
Our childhood we resign :
>T will please us to look back and see
That our whole lives were thine-
45
CHAP. VII.

Of another food Child.*

MISS CANDOUR then obliged the
company with several particulars of a
child who died in the Lord, no longer ago”
than in the year 1775. ~ ‘

Being ill, prayer was put up for him in
the public congregation; after which, he
said to some about him,—The Lord hath
answered my prayer: I know not that the
Lord loves me, and will save me: God is”
my salvation : I will trust and not be afraid.
Before this he had strong fears of death.

One day he said, O, how I love those
{wo sweet chapters, the 12th of Isaiah.
and 20th of John,—God is my salvation.
How | love my father for teaching me te
read the Bible! If Ishould live to be a
man, I would give every body in my house
a Bible.

The Lord led him into a sight of the ini-
quities of his heart : for he told one, “That
the last time he had his new clothes on he
was proud; that if his life were spared, he
should be afraid ever to putthem on again.”
On Easter Sunday he told his father, «

* Master Rogers of Brighthelmstone.
44
























find we must have a better righteousness
than our own: for I have often, when hear-
ing preaching at the chapel, thought how
good I would be: that I never would be
undutiful, or play with naughty boys any
more ; but as soon as the next day came, I
was us bad as ever: so am sure our own
righteousness will not do”

He saw his mother weeping, and said to
her, “Do not grieve ; I can tell you of one
“who had a greater trial than you have :
“Abraham, you know, was to offer up his
son.” “Yes, my dear, (said his mother,)
- but Ihave not Abraham’s faith.” “Ah, mo-
_ ther, (replied he) God can give it you.”
When he had been peevish and fretful,
he mourned over his evil tempers; and,
looking earnestly at his mother, said,—
“«Mother, passion is my besetting sin; but
the Lord will pardon me, because he loves

He told the Rev. Mr Peckwell, who
visited him, *¢It was ungrateful for people
to run away from Christ.” Mr. Peckwell,
asked him how it was that he did not run
from him? His answer was, “ Because the
Lord loves me.” But if you get well again,
do not you think you shall run away from
him ? “No, (replied he,) the Lord loves me
too well to let me.” What would you say
Te ET

45

to your playmates, if you could see them
now ? “1 would call them to Christ.”

“How kind it was in Christ to die for me!
Oh, I want to die ; because the Lord loves
me.” . :

During his illness he would frequently
say, “Lord, look upona poor afflicted child!
Moher, see your dying child! I want to die,
and go to my sisters!” _

In the morning of April the 28th, he said,
« I shall be gone before night *»—One ask-
ed, Where? «To heaven,” he said. A lit.
tle before his departure he cmed out,
“Come down, my God and take me up to
heaven; and take that devil down to hell.”
Soon after this he was released, and expir.
ed repeating these words, “My God, my
God, my God.”

ae

HYMN. ’

I.
THERE is beyond the sky
A heaven of joy and love:
And holy children, when they die,
Go to that world above.


There is a dreadful hell,
And everlasting pains;

There sinners must with devils dwell
In darkness, fire, and chains.

hatte

itl.

Can such a wretch as f
Escape this cursed end ?

And muy I hope, whene’er I die,
1 shall to heav’n ascend ?

_

_ Ty.

- Then will I read and pray
While I have life and breath;
- Lest I should be cut off to-day,
And sent ? eternal death.

a
it

ee




A CHAP. IX.
Of God’s Providence, and remarkable in-
. stances of it,

WE have seen, said Master Considerate, ~
(who sat next,) in a pleasing variety of
instances, the power of Divine Grace, in

a ts
=

47

changing the hearts of many little chil-
dren like ourselves; and as we have spo-
ken so much ot Grace, it may not be amiss
a little to consider the Providence of God,
as very prettily held out in the story of a
hermit, which I have read in a book of my
papa’s study.

A certain hermit, who had passed the
greatest part of his life inthe midst of a
lonely desart, far remote from mankind,
whose food was the fruits of the earch,
and his drink the chrystal fountain, might
have contiued his repose aud quiet, had.
not this temptation arose in his mind.
«Whether Providence guided the aci.ons
of men or no?” for, said he, if God really
directs all things, how happens it that
good men often suffer many :njuiries from
the wicked,” and wicked men so of.en
prosper ?

To clear up this matter, he determined,
though very old, io leave his retirement
and yisit the world. Accordingly he
arose at break of day, and after travelling
a long time, he perceived a beautiful
youth hastening across the plain. Good
day to you, honored father, said the youth;
and good day to you, replied the sage.
Very agreeable conversation ensued, and


45

they travelled together until night ap-
proached

Observing a stately palace just by, in
which dwelt a proud, but hospitable
knight, they stept up to the dvor, and giv-
ing 4 gentle knock, were immediately «d-
mitted An elegant supper was served
up, and numerous servants waited upon
them; after which, being fatigued, they
retired to bed, and did not awake until
morning.
| ‘They were then called up to a sumptu-
ous breakfast, and rich wines were hand-
ed round in a large golden cup.—When
they had ate and drank as much as they
pleased, they returned many thanks to the
courteous knight, and were dismissed.
No one had reason to be sorry but the
kind landlord : for the young man was so
ungrateful as to steal the golden cup.

They had not got far before the youth
| shewed the cup to the aged hermit. He
stood astonished at his ingratitude, and al-
most wished to getridofsucha companion,
but did not dare to mention his wish; how-
ever lifting up his eyes to heaven, thought
how hard it was, that generous actions
_ should be so strangely rewarded.

The weather now became cloudy ; the.
wind rustled,—the cattle scudded home


49

for shelter,—and such a storm of hail fell,
as made them glad to see an old gentle-
man’s gothic Seat, upon a rising ground,
near at hand. They hastened to the door,
where they long knocked without admit-
tance. At last the miserly master of the
house, with slow and cautious steps, came
to the door, which he opened with suspi-
cious care. They were'but half welcom-
ed: only one little faggot lighted the na-
ked walls; a poor pittance of course bre:d,
and some Stale small beer was brought for
their refreshment : even this was srudged,
and as soon as ever it began to clear up,
they were bid to be gone.

The hermit was surprised to think that
a man of such vast possessions should lead
such a miseruble life; and he almost
blamed Providence, for permitting so
much wealth to lay useless in his hands :
but how was he astonished when the young
man informed him, that he had rewarded
the miser with the golden cup, which was’ —
stolen from the former generous benefac-
tor!

Night again come on, and once more
they sought a place of rest. Looking
around, they perceived a mansion not far
off; it was neither mean nor grand. but
seemed to speak the mind of its owner, a


58

man content and benevolent. Hither they
repaired, and were kindly received ; they
were not only well entertained as to re-
freshment, but the host talked like a se-
rious, pious man.

In the morning, just hefore they depart-
ed, the youth went to the cradle, in which
was a pretty infant, (the pride and joy of
its aged futher,) and broke its neck But
oh! how looked the hermit !—Strange re-
turn, he cried, for so much hospitality i

Confused and struck with horror, the
old man was determined, at any rate, to
get rid of so vile a companion. He fled,
but the youth pursued and soon overtook
him, And as the country lay wide, and
the roads were not easy to find, a servant
of their last host went before to show the
way. They had occasion at last to pass 2
river, when the youth, who seemed to
watch every opportunity of doing mis-
chief, approached the careless guide, as
he was crossing the wooden bridge, and
pushed him into the river. He cried for
help, but in vain; he surk to rise no
more !

The hermit’s eyes now sparkled with
rage; he overcame his fears, and thus ex-
claimed,—“Detested wretch ” but before
he could speak another word, his com-
panion seemed no jonger a man; he ap-


: 54

peared as an angel from heaven, The
hermit stood astonished, and knew not
what to say. The angel thus addressed
him, ‘The Almighty Creator has a right
to do as he pleases with hisown. Leurn
the mystery of Providence ;—That vain
man, who fared sumptuously every day,
was too luxurious to be good; he was
proud of his side-board of plate, and for-
ced his guests to drink morning draughts
of wine: by losing that golden cup, he was
broke of that custom; but still welcomes
every stranger, though with less pomp and
expense *

- As for that suspicious miser, with whom
I left the cup, he may learn, that if mor-
tals will be kind, Providence can weil re-
pay their benevolence: conscious of this
his icy bosom now, for the first time, feels
the warmth of compassion.

The child of our pious friend had al-
most weaned his affections from God; but
to teach him better, the Lord to save the
father has taken the child. To all butus, —
he seemed to go off in fits, and I was or- _
dammed to call him bence. The poor fa-
ther, now humbled in tears, owns that the
punishment was just. pe

But had the false servant, whom I
drowned, returned back in safety, what a
fund of charity would have been lost: for he


52

had laid a plot against the life of his mas-
ter, and this very night intended to put it
in execution. Thus then be instructed, no
more to dispute the wisdom of Provi-
dence;

But evermore confess th’? Almighty just,
‘And what you can’t unriddle, learn to trust.

I remember, said Master Josiah, that
some good men we read of in the psalms,
have been under the same temptation: for
the Psalmist says, * That his feet had well
nigh slipt; for he was envious at the fool-
ssh. when he beheld the prosperity of the
wicked ;? but when he went to the house
of God, and learned their miserable end,
he no more repined at Providence, but was
content to be any thing here, so that he
might have Heaven at last, and Grace to
carry him there

Then they sung this pretty hymn.

:
r
pe
i en mma en
53
HYMN ON PROVIDENCE.

Be uy
God moves in a mysterious way;
His wonders to perform ;
He plants his footsieps in the sea,
‘And rides upon the storm.

Il.

Judge not the Lord by feeble sense;
But trusi him for his grace:
Behind a frowning Providence
He hides a smiling face.

iL.

is purpose will ripen fast,
Unfolding every hour;

The bud may have a bitter taste
But sweet will be the flowr.

IV.

Blind unbelief is sure to err,
‘And scan his work in vain :

Gon is his own interpreter,
And he will make it plain.
Lees Oe OO See

=
5%

CHAP, X.




A pretty history of a pious young Lady, well _
worthy the imitation of my littie reuder.

IN my father’s library, (said Master
Prayerful,) isa most excellent little book,
giving an account of Eme.ia Gxopre, from
her infincy to her death, which happened
February 2d, 1688, when she was about
sixteen, I can only promise you a few
particulars which | remember. It was re-
marked of her, that before she could
speak, if she had been crying, or out of
humour, (as you know lictle folks too of-
ten are,) if she perceived any of the fa-
mily, where she was, were about to go to
prayer, she would be perfectly silent ina
moment, and coniinue as quiet as a lamb
during the whole time of worship.

As soon as she could speak, she would
sk questions xbout God and the creation,
for instance, Whether the sun shined on
her grandfather und grandmother? and ~
when she was told that the same sun gave
li ht to all the world, she replied, « Ought
we not then to love that God who made all —
these things and gave thém to us?”
—----- -. ”

Se a

55

Before she was three years old, she
used to ask a blessing on her food, with
words of her own.

One day, when her mother had reproved
her for not giving a good account of her

lesson, she was afterwards found weeping; —

and being asked, Why do you weep? you
was not beat: she answered, I had rather
been beat than anger my motker; the
thought ef my mother’s being angry makes
me Weep.

Being sorely troubled in soul, she went
to a good woman of her acquaintance,
who asked the cause of her distress: to
which she answered, The devil takes the
good word out of the very bottom of my
heart, and ofien says to me, What needs
all this noise with your religion? other
children will get to heaven as soon as you.
Being asked what she did when so témpt-
ed? she replied, “I know no other way
than to carry them to the Lord, in prayer;
and I desire God’s people to pray for me ;
for my prayers are of no strength, nor
their’s neither, without Christ.”

One day being dressed fine, inv
red ribbons ; one said, I suppose yt
yourself very fine: she answered, “1
never think that, until I get on the clean
and fair robe of Christ’s imputed right-




56










eousness, and then I shall be truly fine an j
clean.
She would frequently give money to the
beggars, and follow them to the outwar
gate of the house where she lived, an
sed to instruct them, shewing them tha
there was a God anda hell: she would r
prove them for their wicked lives, plain:
telling them, that swearing, drinking, an
sabbath breaking, would bring them to
hell. :
She was so earnest in secret prayer, that,
every word she uttered seemed to come
from the bottom of her heart
She learned much of the scripture by
heart, and could correctly repeat many
chapters, particularly the 8th of Romans,
which she said was a whole Bible to her;
| also the 15th, 16th, and 17th chapters of
St John’s gospel; the 11th of Hebrews,
many of the Psalms, and almost all Solo-
/»mon’s Songs, &c. She was asked, Why
_ she got so much by heart, seeing she had
a Bible at hand? She answered, “1 fear
the time will come that I shall want it, and
J cannot live without the precious Bible.” |
When she was exercised with strong
pains of the gravel, her patience was truly.
admirable; sever uttering arash word, or
giving the least signs of impatience or

“7
57

say.) of many sick persons, who have said,
when it is morning, O that it were even-

ing! and when it was evemng, 0 that

it

were morning! but as for me, I must con-
fess, to the glory of free grace, that the
time, night and day is made pleasant to

me by the Lord; when it is evening, 1t

weariness. “I have heard, (she would |

is

pleasant; and when it is morning, 1 am re-

freshed ”

Being asked what supported her, she an-
swered, “Ilook onmy trouble as the fruit

of my sin.

«J am made to wonder it has not been al-

ways So with me.

«J am helped to bless the Lord that it
no worse.

«s Means are used, and I looked to him
pless them, as far as he sees good.

«I submit, whether for life or death, and

is

to

Ihave the faith that it willbe better: for
J reckon, that the sufferings of the PreseRbiua

time are not worthy to be compared wi
the glory that shall be revealed.”

Not long PErEree. died, this seriptu
came to her mind. “G

/

re

to which she replied, O reasonable de-
mand! if had a thousand hearts, thou art

worthy ofthem all,

rve me thine heart:””
:
58











On the Saturday night before her death,
she often said, This following sabbath will
be my last: and expressed a vehement de.
sire for an everlasting sabbath. ‘

Having slept till eight o’clock, and find~
ing it so late, she said, ‘she thought to
have spent it better than to sleep so long”
After this she mentioned, with admiration,
almost all the names and titles given to
Christ in his holy word.—She also spoke:
something concerning every one, to the as-/
tonishment of all that heard her. “He is,”
said she, “ the chief of ten thousands!” and
added, the chief of all to me!

Somebody, thinking that she was just de-
patting, brought @ light to see; but she
smiled, and said,—I shall not die just now!
How do you know that? Imiss that pro-
mised presence, which for many a day t
have believed 1 shall get in the moment of
death.

Through great weakness, she had not
=—tyeen able to raise her head up in bed ; but
now she arose and sat up, prayed to God,
and pleaded his promises, saying, ** Now

Jet it be according to thy precious word to
my soul! for thereis nothing in me,” ad-
| ding, “It is only upon the blood of the Lord

Jesus, and the faithfulness ef God I de-+
pend.” :

Ey
59











After this, alittle wine was given her,
and she said, “Now no more of the crea-
ture;” and immediately desired her mother
to pray. When her mother was giving her
up to God, she was observed to smile, and
as s00N as prayer was done she closed her
eyes and lips, as one falling asleep, and so
quietly resigned her soul to God.

Master Tender, who should have spoke
next, Was so very much affected, that he
pegged to be excused relating any history;
he could only say,—I pray God to make us
all like Emelia Geddje! But, however, they
sung the following

~ HYMN,

, L.

COME, children, learn to fear the Lord !
And, that your days be long,

Let not a false or spiteful word
Be found upon your tongue.

i.

Depart from mischief, practice love,
Pursue the works of peace ;

o shall the Lord your ways approve.
And set you souls at ease,

ena at
es”. hhc ..hChU Ch lee

6@

TIE,

He bids his angles pitch their tents
Round where his children dwell ;

What ills his heav’nly care prevents
No earthly tongue can tell.

TV.

O, children, come and taste his love!
Come, learn his pleasant ways;
And let your own experience prove

The sweetness of his grace.

—e-

CHAP. XI.



The history of Edward VI. king of England,’
who was a good boy and a good king.

WE have hitherto, said Master Josiah,
(who sat next,) heard of those whose lot
was cast (as most of God’s people are) in
the lower rank of life; but I have read of one”
most illustrious prince, who was much
more honourable by his grace than his
earthly dignities

Prince Edward was but just nine years
old, when, by the death of his father he be-
came King of England.
61

He was possessed of such extraordinary
qualifications, that the nation enteriain-
ed (and very justly, I think) the highest
expectation of lasting happiness and pros-
perity- ; ‘

It was among his least commendations,
that he was surprisingly learned for his
age; he was able to speak Latin fluently,
and was well versed in Greek, Italian, and
other languages; in the acquirement of
which knowledge, he was always ready to
leave his diversions when the appointed
hour of study returned.

No sooner was he settled upon the
throne, than he promoted, by every means
he could, the great work of reforming Eng-
land ftom popish idolatry and superstition,

by enacting good laws, and encouraging
and promoting all prous, learned and dili-
gent men, whether bishops or others, who
fathfully explained and enforced the
truths of the gospel

The nation, having but just shook off po-
pish superstition and cruelty, retained still
too much of what always belonged to po-
pery ; I mean persecution for conscience’s
sake,

A warrant was brought for the young
k:ng to sign, for the burning Joan of Kent,
who was condemned as an heretic. He
a

62

was extremely unwilling to do it ;—but
archbishop Cranmer, and others, using ma~-

ny arguments, at last over persuaded him. —

When he had signed his name, with tears
in his eyes, he said, “Tf [have done wrong,
Cranmer, you shall answer it at the day of
judgment.’

‘At another time, the same archbishop
had been pleading with him to permit his
popish sister Mary, (af erwards the bloody
butcher of God’s people) to have Mass per-
formed publicly in her house; he could not,
by the strongest arguments be prevailed
upon to consent. The archbishop coming
out of the king’s presence, met with Mr.
Cheeke, who had heen his schoolmaster,
and saluted him thus: Sir, you may be glad
all the days of your life, that you had the
education of such a scholar: adding, that
the king had more divinity in his little fin-
ger than they had in poth their whole bo-
dies.

In January, the beginning of the 7th year
ofhis reign, he fell sick, and in the time of
his sickness, Bishop Ridley preached be-
fore him, and much recommended works

of charity, especially to those who were ©

rich and great. After dinner the king sent
for him, and after thanking him for his ser-
mon, repeated the principal parts of it: and
then added “1 take myself to be chiefly
—

65

touched in your speech: for as in the king-
dom I am next under GOD, so ought I to
be most like Him in mercy and goodness.
Therefore, as you have given me this ge-
neral exhortation, direct me, I beseech
you, by what particular act I may best dis-
charge my duty.”

The bishop being astonished, as well he
might, declared to the king, that he was not
prepared at present to answer so weighty
a question; but, if His Majesty pleased, he
would consult with the city of London, and
return him their answer,

in consequence of this, the poor were
ranked in three classes; for each of which
the king gave some houses, and lands;and —
founded the Blue-Coat School, and St. Bar-
tholomew’s hospital in Smithfield, and the
Bridewell, by Fleet-ditch: which being |
done, he thanked God for-prolonging his
life to finish the business. lage ail

But, alas! this pious prince, of whom ~+
England was not worthy, was soon to be
removed from his earthly throne, to be
crowned with never fading glory,

When he was sixteen he was seized with
4 consumption, which daily growing upon
him, soon threatened his dissolution.

Physicians, and others, tried all the pow-
ers of physic in vain; he was given over, -
and death hastily approached.
6%
















About three hours before he died, his
eyes being closed, and thinking nobody
was within hearing, he offered up this)
prayer :—

O Lord Ged, deliver me out of this misera-
ble and wretched life, and take me amongst
thy chosen; howbert, not my will but thine be
done. Lord I commit my soul to thee; O Lord,
thou knowest how happy it were for me to be
with thee; yet,for thy chosen’s sake senil me life
and health, that I may truly serve thee. oO
Lord my God, bless thy people, end save thene
inheritance. O Lord God, save thy chosen
people of England! O my Lord God, defend

‘thes realm from popery, and maintain the true
|r fligion, that I and thy people may pruise th
holy name, for thy Son Jesos Curis’’s sake.

Then, turning his face and seeing some

_ nigh, ?e said, Are you so nigh? 1 thought you
} had been farther off Many fervent prayers
| he put up; and his last words were these =
—“T am faint, Lord have mercy upon me an
take my spirit; and so committed his piou
soul into the hands of his heavenly Father,
He died July the 6th, 1553, in kis seven-
° teenth year.
:

}
65



HYMN.

I,
WHY should I Say, *tis yet too soon
To seek for heav’n, or think of death ?
A flow’r may fade before *tis noon,
And I this day may lose my breath !

Il.

If this rebellious heart of mine
Shouldstight the gracious calls of heav’n,
Imay be harden?d in my sin,
And never have repentance giv’n.

It.

What! if the Lord in wrath should swear,
Whilst I neglect to read and pray,
That he'll refuse to lend an ear,
To all my groans another day!

ee
CHAP. XI,

Which ws the last Chapter, ind a wery pretty
one it 2s.

WILLIAM GOODCHILD being at home
was the last to speak; and hetold the ste-
66

ry of the Prodigal Son, which is recorded m
the 15th chapter of St. Luke.

You must, undoubtedly, my dear friends, ©
said he, remember reading in the Bible of
arich and great man, who had two sons.
The younger of them, though he had all
the indulgence thai a good boy could wish
for, and more than a bad one deserved,
was nevertheless so naughty as to wish to
be from under his father’s eye, and so be
able, without restraint or reproof, to in-
dulge himself in all manner of wickedness
with greediness, Accordingly he applies
to his father, and for that purpose desires
to have all that was intended for him : and
the good natured parent, unwilling to cross
his inclination, consents to his request, and
gives him a great deal of money.

The rake overjoyed with his success,
scrapes together all he could, and as soon
as ever he could set off ( Oh! it was the
worst thing he ever did in his life,)into the
country, a great way off, where his father
might neither see nor hear from him: from
which you see it is plain, he did not love
his parents, and so broke the fifth com-
mandment.

Being now (forsooth) his own master,
and neglecting GOD, Prayer, and his Bi
ble; and having no kind father to consult

'







&?

he gave the full swing to all sensual lusts
and passions; and, like most extrayagant
people, soon spent all he was worth, lost
his money and friends (such as they were)
together: and atthe same time a famine
happening, it is no wonder that he came
to want a morsel of bread.

In this distress, his pride being brought
down, he was glad of any employment to
get him a penny ; so after having lived like
a swine, he was fain to become a feeder of
swine; and still, bread being so scarce, he
could not get.a bit; then he would gladly
have filled his belly with the husks the
swine eat, but even thesewere denied him. _

Oh! how little did we think when at
home, with gond clothes on his back, a
plentiful table, warm fire-side, and a com-
fortable bed, that by one rash act he should
be brought into such distress, as to want —
clothes, food, fire, and lodging: all these.
he wanted; and instead of his pious father; ;
nis brother and other friends to converse
with, all his company were the granting
pigs, and his best apartment a hog-sty.

But, however, when he came to himself,
and used that reflection he had been long
a stranger to, he began to reason thus with
himself: «Fool that Lam! thus to.remain
in hunger and wretchedness, when in ay

Qe

°
63

father’s house there is plenty of every”
thing ! where the meanest servant has more
than enough! Iwill arise and goto my fa-
ther, and though he might well reject me,
frown at me, and call me rebel as 1 am; yet
sure he retains 2 parent’s heart : his com-
passion will kindle when he sees his son,
and L won’t conceal or deny any of my
faults; but will say—ather, J have sinned
against heaven, and before thee, and am no
more worthy ta be called thy son; give mé
the meanest place in thy house, and t will
be thankful.

No sooner said than done. Up he gets;
and though he had now no chaise or horse
to convey him heme, he trudged as fast as
he could on foot, nor would any thing stop
him till within sight of his home

The dear aged father, who had often
cast a wishful eye towards that far country,
whither this poor boy was fled, was now,
perhaps walking upon his house, or on
some lofty terrace in his garden, and sees,
what? his son? yes, it was his poor son !
but, Oh! how changed! once he was tall,
handsome, healthy looking lad; but now a
poor, meagre, ragged, filthy wreich !
Nevertheless the dear old gentleman runs
as fast as he can to meet the returning
prodigal.

















69

The yeuth, filled with love and grief
falls down before him, and, with a weep-
ing eye, 2 blushing face, and faultering
yoice, owns all his offences. The father
is now so full of joy, that he does not men-
tion one of his faults; folds him to his bo-
som, kisses away his tears, and calls aloud
for his servants; * Bring here—he eagerly
cries—bring here the best robe you can
find ; bring here the ring to ornament his
finger, and shoes for his feet; provide
quickly a handsome dinner, and let us, and
ail our neighbours rejoice : “for this my son
was dead, and is alive again: was lost, and
is found.”

Here was asolemn pause. Who could
have helped crying, if they had heard i
what a pathetic manner the story was re-
lated! All were dissolved in tears.

At length Master Tender broke silence,
and said, See here, my dear companions,
the sad result of despising and disobeying
our pious parents; and what comes from
the foolish desire of being from under their
care and authority.

Nor is this all, said Master Considerate,
thave heard the ministers say, that this
returning prodigal represents tous a re-
penting sinner, who by departing from Gon
and his ways, has plunged himself into dis-
fress and ruin; but when helped by the,
}
i
4





70

grace of God’s spirit to bethink himself,
and mourn for his offences, is like the
prodigal encouraged by the well known
tender mercics of a compassionate Saviour,
to return and confess his sin,—own the
justness of his misery, and receive pardon,
peace and happiness, as a free and unde-
served gift. May the Lord help us to go
and do likewise.

Then, with cheerful hearts and voices,
they united in the following hymn.

EARLY PIETY.

I.

WHAT blest examples do I find
Writ in the word of truth,
f children that began to mind

- Religion in their youth.

II;

Children a sweet Hosaxra sung,
And blest their Saviour’s name;

They gave him honour with their tongues
While scribes and priests blaspheme,

Hil.
Samuel, the child, was wean’d and brought
To wait upon the Lord :
Young Timothy betimes was taught
To know his Holy Word.
74

IV.
Then why should Iso long delay
What others learn so soon ?
I would not pass another day
Without this work begun.

When the little pious assembly had sung
this hymn, William Goodchild concluded
the happy opportunity with solemn pray-
er: beseeching the Lord to make them
like the good children they had been
speaking of. AndI hope, my little Read-
er, that your heart too begins to long to
be like them. Does it not?

O then, pray, and pray again! nor rest
content till Jesus Christ make you to know
and feel that he hath redeemed you with
his precious blood, and that you shall live
and reign with him in glory everlasting.
Amen, and Amen.

CONCLUSION.

William and Elizabeth Goodchild ha-
ving thus spent their hollidays at home, in
the most improving manner, were, on the
appointed day again conducted to school,
to which they returned with the utmost
pleasure ; well knowing the need they

¢
oO
im

stood in of farther instruction in every
branch of useful knowledge.

And theie, for the present, we leave
_them pursuing, with diligence and delight,
the same excellent course o! study and
_ devotion, *hat we described in the begin-
of this book : and where they are daily
growing in fayeur with God and man.

_—_—. ee oe a

err

-

ee eS ee ee
$


st

we

APPENDIX

TO THE

THIRD EDITION.

ae



AS a proof that we formed no groundless
expectation of William Goodchild’s im-
provement at school, with pleasure we sub-
join the following letter, very lately receiv-
ed by his papa, who 1s so kind as to permit
us to make it public.

—__-

Dear and Honoured Sir,

The least hint of your pleasure is a law
tome. Your last favour made me weep
with joy; the endearing expressions of your
love, and kind approbation of my conduct,
fire me with a desire to deserve both. 1
shall never think myself so happy as when
contributing any thing to your satisfaction
and pleasure,

—_—
ve ax
wae ;

And I don’t know how to do this better
- than by sending you a short account of
Master Ridgeway, a most amiable child,
and dear companion of mine, but now trans-
lated to a better country, and the best
company.

When he was only three years of age,
he discovered evident marks of a work of
grace on his heart.—Prayer and praise,
even then, were his delightful exercises.

But the two last years of his hfe, (for he —
was but five when he died,) his piety was
more remarkable, and he ripened apace for
glory.

Just before his last illness, he cheerfully
told his mama, that Christ in God;”? which words he often re- ©
peated. And when the maid was one day
covering him up in his cradle, he said, “In
heaven | shall be covered with the robe of
my Father’s righteouness.”

Not long before he died, he declared he
had (in a dream, I suppose,) seen heaven:
and with great admiration, said, “O, it is a
brave place indeed! You cannot think, and
J cannot tell, what a fine, shining, glorious
_ place it is! I saw the angels too, all stand-

ing round the Lord, and joined with them
in singing the new song! And there I
heard Jesus Christ say, J.et little children


come to me; and added, ¥ shall be there
among them next Sabbath day.

He then called for his sister, to whom he
said, «* Prepare to go to heaven :” and to
his nurse, “Faith cometh by hearing,” and
to the rest, “Prepare to meet your God !”

Since, when in agony of pain, he told his
father that he loved him dearly, yet he
loved Christ better still: for, says he, Christ
is a good God to me; he is preparing a
place for menow; when it is ready, he will
come and fetch me, and then all will be
well.

Having lain a Jonger time than usual
without taking any refreshment, he was
asked to have something; but he answer-
ed, Christ is my meat and drink.

When the much desired sabbath came
he said, in the morning, This is a most de-
lightful day ! He was often in prayer, con-
tinued cheerful all the day, frequently ex-
pressing great joy, and strong consolation
in the Lord, till in the evening, a convul-
sion fit seized him, and proved the rough
but welcome messenger, sent to convey
his happy spirit where “ the inhabitants
shall no more say, I am sick.” |

Thus, dear papa, died a young disciple.
whose life and death I have no higher wish
than to imitate. While I write, I am ever
And Grace, from Nature's dross vefin’d the gold !

76

wishing to go too: and so does dear sister

Elizabeth. who now sits by me, not willing
to leave the room, lest [ jerget to present
( what she intends to do herself soon, ) her
duty and love to her P&paand mama. Ac-
cept them ( dear papa and ma’ma ) from
both your obliged children, especially
from.

Your dutiful Son,

Wirrtam Gooncuizp.

P. S. Elizabeth says, I must not forget
Master Ridgeway’s Epitaph ;—'tus as fol-
lows : ~

Farewell, dear Babe, witli all thy sacred store,
tn triumph landed on the heawnly shore:
Sure Nature form’d thee in her softest mould,



;
;


ARMSTRONG & PLASKITT,
BOOKSELLERS,

BOOKBINDERS, AND STATIONERS,
Vo. 134, Market-street, Baltimore.
Have For Sale,

School Bibles and Testaments.

Webster’s, Comly’s, Baltimore, New-York,
and Universal Spelling Books.

Jess’s, Pikes’, Gough’s, and Walsh’s Arith-
metics,
Morse’s, Adam’s, Goldsmith’s, O’Neil’s,
Cumming’s and Willet’s Geographies.
Family and Pocket Bibles, various bind-
ings.

Prayer Books, various bindings,

Watt’s Psalms and Hymns, various bind-
ings.

New-York, Columbian, and New-England
Primers.

Smith and Little’s, Wyeth’s, Cole’s, and
Dyer’s Music Books,

Methodist Hymn Books, Discipline.

Fletcher’s Checks, and Wesley’s Sermons.

Red and Coloured Waters, British and —
American Ink Powder.

Copy and Cyphering Books, plain ant

ruled.
€ap Paper, No. 1, 2, 3, and 4.

Letter, do. wove.
do. do. common.
do. do. hot pressed. i

Extra English Wove, hot pressed, gilt or
plain.

American Folio Post; wove.

do. do. do. common
do. do. do. pink.

English do. extra Woye and Hot Pressed.
Do. Banking.

Blotting Paper, English and American.

Wrapping Paper in reams and bundles.

Tronmonger’s Paper, different sizes.

Tea Paper, Demy, Medium and Super-
royal sizes.

Bonnet Boards, blue and white.

Quills, from 3 dolls. to 30 dolls. per thou-
sand,

Inkstands, Lead, Pewter, and Glass.

Rodger’s and Butler’s Pen-knives well as-
sorted.

Ledgers, Day Books, Invoice, Journal,
Cash, Record, Letter, Receipt, Bill and
Bank Books, plain and faint ruled, with
or without patent backs and Russia ends;
of Imperial, Super-royal, Royal, Medium,
Demy and Cap sizes. &c. &e.

Checks on all the Banks.
Blank Books of every description, made
up at the shortest notice in the best
manner, ruled to any pattern.

Dr. CrarKe’s Commentary, of which they
are sole Agents for Baltimore.

Scripture Questions; or Catechetical Ex-
ercises. Designed for children in Sab-
bath Schools and Families. Calculated
to excite a taste for studying the Holy
Scriptures. By E. Lixcoun. Price, 450
per hundred. on

Scripture History, abridged, with cuts, in-
tended to give children and youth such
a taste of the writings of the sacred Pen-
men, as shall engage them diligently to
study the Scriptures. 8,00 per hundred.

Worlds Displayed, for the benefit of young
people, by a familiar history of some of
their inhabitants. By John Campbell.
8,00 per hundred.

The Christian Pilgrim, containing an ac-
count of the wonderful adventures and
miraculous escapes of a Christian, in his
travels from the land of Destruction to |
the New Jerusalem. 8,00.

New Testament Stories and parables. 2,50
per hundred.

The Robber’s Daughter, or the Sabbath
School Convert. A pleasing instance of ‘
the good effects of Sabbath School in-—
struction. 2,50 per hundred. f
l Life of Catharine Haldane, illustrating t
happy effects of early instruction. 5:
cents per dozen.

Present for Sunday Schools. 2,00 pr. hand.

Divine Breathings of a Pious soul. 2,40 per

. | doz,

Gilpin’s Monument of Parental Affection,
being Memoirs of a pious Youth. 2,40
per doz.

Believers’ Pocket Companion, 50 cts.





=

, =e,
“

pts

is


Suitable for Premigni in Sunday Schools,



S0ED BY ‘

ARMSTRONG & PLASKITT, (7

0.134, Market Street. ;

§ Cts,

Life of Henry Longden, - 60".

— A. Visitxomy Friend’s Family, oe the higher ce.

ses, in sunday schools, = mie oO.
Walks of Usefulness, - Selig Mets 25
¥ Ménument of Parental Affection, ae 25;

Tok OECD A; See Vo etete eae Sim
History of the - SFU de oe oe

Hymns fer Inf -afindss =) Erte ge ~ 5a
Revd Friendly Lasteyctor, by 2 3 or aes, Ag
> - = =) 12



S= Worlds Displayed, =
Hedge Thovhs,- “= = 2 = (= 15
Sabbath Schoo! Premiain, - - - - - 1
‘\} Little He and lis Beater, -- + 9 > Gr 129
ed Scripture History 4 bridged, - 9 - = (=f 12%
2 Christian Pilgrun, Pe ey ee ov eee wi



Catechismof Nature, 5 )-- 9 - = - 18h
oe Mary M. Tooker, BAe ae in, pee ge ae
} Bible Lessons, - ot ae oh A eee i
Memorial for ‘Sabbath Schocl Boys, = ~- - 6:
Memorial for pepietn stiog) Giris, a peat oer. A

SS

i Evrand Boy, - i= -

4) Stranger’s Offerine to In sfant Minds, the

¢ey Catharine Haldane, - - ono Af
Prous, Git ye est! Ge hate eA

NV Life of Joseph, - - py aea Z =
#2 Memoirof Mowhee, “= + j5- 0 = = = 0G
(i) Pious Parent's Gitt, Ae 2 ot) pe eis 6
7 Pleasing Traits, - begs Me Bae

Presents for Sunday Schoals, = ete

22 _A general assortment of Children’s Books.

ONES I Nae
ole ele ele Le we ioe *

f







ITIL

Here we may love without restraint,
Nor fear to prize too high: Christ is the song of every saint
On earth or in the sky.

IV.
Lord, with thy grace anoint mine eyes,
Throughout my darkness shine;
0 make me to salvation wise!
My all be ever thine!




CHAP. VI.

Containing the hstory of a sad wicked child,
and his miserable death.

MASTER Samuel, whose turn it was next, said he had frequently met with this observation, that contraries illustrate; and therefore, as a contrast to those pleasing histories already recited, he hoped it
mih profitable to relate an account: of a v wicked bo, in order both to wam us against his faults, and excite our gra. titude to Go and thankfulnet to og
.










Of another et CNd7CL

MISS CANDOUR*~ thn biged te
company with sevrlpatclaso child who died inl theLr, olngrao than in tile year 1775. Being ill, prayer was put pfo imi the public congregation; aterpwhich, h said to some about him,-hLodat answered my prayer: I ko that the Lord loves me and wifl iem God i my salvation: Iwill trust andot e afraid. Before this he had1 strong~ fear ofeath. One day lie said, 0, how !I lve those two sweet chapters, the 12th of' Isaiah and 20th of John.,--God is myslain How I love my father. for teachig weto

man, I would give every bodyinyhos a Bible.
The Lord led him ito a sight oftiniquities of his heart -. fr he told oe Ta the last time hei had hs neww t#~ n i was proud; that f is liflewe-r ord i shouldl'be afr~aid e'verto ute oagi*Master Rogers of Brigh thelmstone.







tu your playm,*tesdF yoUCmjar _tbem now? "I woqq r Y4
IC .4,
"How I Ind IVWa
Oh, I want to CIM44b SCt "'ria,10YO
M
During his illness' f4nhuc'n't
,;,y, I'Lj.* look upon a paWai ickcd hil Mother, see your dyingvwa ,
t K-4*, q 4T
and go to my sis Cra A
in he morning of' ";kCaftid
cc I shAll be gone before I ad, Where ? "To heaven,". heAaid..A tle before his &partar ,',4 .O
-Conie down, my God =4-taxv Ine up ti heaven;- and t-ake that, dow..ja belLI Soon afirr tbis hie was.reje'Vqd I p,pd expir ed repeating- these woo %._W(wNpa. God, my God."




HYMN.


THERE s beyond the sk A, heaven of joy andIf6ve;. And holy children wl efiih q5o to that world ,







man content and benevolent. Hither they repaired, and were kindly received ; theyv were not only well entertained as to refreshment, but the host talked like a serinous, pious man.
In the morning, justhefore they departed, the youth w ent~ito the cradle, in which was a pretty infant, (the pride and joy of its aged father,) and broke its neck But oh! how looked the hermit !-Strange return, he cried, for so much hospitality !
Cntuised and struck with horror, the old man was determined, at any rate, to get rid of so vile a companion. He fled, but the youth pursued anid soon overtook him. And as the country lay wide, and the roads were not easy to fi nd, a servant of their last host went before to show the way. They had occasion at last to pass a river, when the youth, who seemed to watch every opportunity of doing mischief, approached the careless guide, as he was crossing the wooden bridge, and pushed him into the river. He cried for help, but in vain; he sunk to rise no more !
Theermit's eyes now sparkled with rage; he overcame his fears, and thus exclaiumed,--'Detested wretch !" but before he could speak another word, his companion seemed no longer a man; he ap-










God m oves ii i'lfiayrst6ribus way,
His wonders to-pefform;
He plants his fbqtsep!i in the sea,
And rides uj m th-e ijtbjpal
IL
Judgcytot the Lord by'fe Mc stNe. It, h I 'l l- ,., ,; ,
B, t trus, him or is t rjiicc. 14ehiod a frowningl'roN iddn'ee
H.e bides a sTuOing f4c ,


His purpose w U r 1pe4
UUfOlOirig cypry

Put Swea IF.* kp.tke -49W:K.

IV.
Blind OW~fs sure In err ,
Andsc6nlibL3 working vain: gon s his own interpreter,
And he will make it plain.








66

ry ofthe Prodigal Son, which is recorded in the 15th chap er of St. Luke.
You must, undoubtedly, my dear friends, said he, remember reading in the Bible of a rich and great man, who had two sons. The younger of them, though he had -all the indulgence that a good boy could wish for, and more than a bad one deserved, was nevertheless so naughty as to wish to be from under his father's eve, and so be able, without restraint or reproof, to indulge himself in all manner of wickedness with greediness, Accordingly he applies to his father, and for that purpose desires to have all that was intended for him: and the good natured parent, unwilling to cross his inclination, consents to his request, and gives him a great deal of money.
The rake overjoyed with his success, scrapes together all he could, and as soon as ever he could set off ( Oh! it was the worst thing he ever did in his life,)into the country, a great way off, where his father might neither see nor hear from him: from which you see it is plain, he did not love his parents, and so broke the fifth com mandment.
Being now (forsooth) his own master, and neglecting GOD, Prayer, and his Bj ble, and having no kind father to consult











wil7Y should I ay, 'tis Tro seek for hcav'n, or tink of death A flow'r may fihde before 'tis noon.
And I tlia daLy may loe miy breath!
i.
If this rebellious heart of mine Shouldslight the raious calls ofhIeav'ni, I may beC hardt-Aid in my sin,
Aid never ha% e repentance givkn.


What! if the Lord i wrath should swa,
Wh~st I neglect to 'read and 1pxay That he'll refuse to lend -n car,
To all my groans anotfvkMI dy!





WMiiclk zz the fagt Chapfer, ad1 vr Peo
oUac it ig.
WILtLIAAM (OOfCI bigahomeO
was the lat to Vek ndhti tu




31

with them: and after he had left them, some continued praying, in deep distress, great part of the night.
When he visited them in the morning, asking one what he wanted ? he answered with tears in his eyes, he wanted Jesus Christ.
After this, it was observable, that they sought all opportunities _to be by themselves and pray.
What then can we think of children that never pray to God, when all converted people begin immediately to pray? May this, my young friends, quicken us all to more diligence in this delightful duty!
Miss Meoedy, not being able then to re. collect any history, obliged her friends with the following bymn.


COME join with me, companions dear,
To bless the Saviour's name; And everlasting honors rear
To God and to the Lambr
U
For children, (0 what wondrous pace!
The Lord was crucifli'd:
For Adam's vile apostate race
The Saviour blei and dy'd!







to h3e Christ, Christ is a thousand times more willing to have thee, and wash thee in his blood." "Well (said the boy, leaping up in his bed,) well! yea, all is well. Christ is willing, and I am willing too; and now Christ is mine, and I am his for ever." He continued from that moment to his last, triumphing in full assurance of God's love; earnestly desiringhis dismission, which next morning he obtained: and the last words he uttered Ivere, "Into thy hands, 0 Lord, I commit my spirit; and
-to he slept in Jesus. Be was but just turned of nine years of age. *
And 0 what a sweet smile of applause sat on every countenance when the story was finished each of the dear young people saying, "0 that I may die the death of the righteous, and that my latter end may be like AhW




30


and that "thou wilt not quench the smoking flax, nor break the bruised reed?" And I heard one of them say, Lord, thou hast said, "that we shall be taught of thee.'--Thus they continued crying after the Lord, an hour or two; and I am convinced, not only from what I saw but felt, "that the Lord was present with us," &c.
Miss LyXdia, his sister, being desired to relateisomething, began thus: Since the company appear so much, and so justly affected with what my brother has said, I shal attempt 'to tell you, as well as I can, the substance of another letter from the same person, about half a year after.
At family prayer one evening, he read the 25th chapter of Matthew :-spoke a little from it, about the day of judgment, and had the pleasure to observe many of the children very attentive and much affected.
After he had, as usual, lighted them to bed, and retired to his own chamber, a child came and told him, that one of the boys wanted to speak with him: He went directly, Before he got to the chamber, he heard a noise, and when he came in, found many praying that the Lord Jesus would have mercyon them One of them told him, he had .bad heart. He prayed




76

wishing to gn too.- and so does d1ear sister E I zabeth. who n ow sits by me, Ifot wvilinfg to leave the roomn, lest I forie(t to present ( what shie intends to do herself soon,) her duty and love to her papasd mama. AcceptI them ( dear papa -nd mamn ) rir
both your obliged children, especially from.
Your dutiful Son,
WfitaAa Go'OfIC11IL.

P. S. Elizaheth sags, I must not forget Master Ridgeway's lhpitapxh 'i as ibl. lows

Far~ell, dear JBabc, mitA st] thy sacred store, In tiium ph landed on til bear~ sh"yaore: Sm r t ur osi 'd tibee oi her sotest iiioild, Anid Gta i,n Naas'stkis rtO)i~d thse gold!




Is

arose, the boat overset, (you may just see the top of it,) and the man fell into the water.
Eliz Poor man! but pray, Sir, whq iS that gentleman on the bank?
Mr. B. My dear, that is a tenderhearted good Prince: though he looks so plain, he lives in yonder fine palace on the high hill; and seeing ( for he can see a great way) this poor creature fall in, he ran immediately to his relief, flung in the rope as you see, and bid the poor man lay fast holds and he would draw him out.
William. Dear Sir, how kind! how very kind that was!
.lr. B. It was indeed:-the man can never be sufliciently thankful to him.
Eliz. And how excessively tight he seems to hold the rope!
Mr. B. My dear, he would not let it go for all the world; his life is at stake: and if it had not been for the gentleman, he must certainly have perished. And now children, (added Mr. Benevolent,) I'll tell you what spiritual instruction it is intendded to convey. The man in his paper boat, is to whew you how every man by nature (till taught of God,) is ready to think that he may get to heaven by w-hat he can do himselE Bat it is absolutely impossible;






this only teaches him how to live, and how to die; this tells him how he may be happy here, and be for ever happy. Oh! prize it, my dear reader, never let a day pass without reading of it; and be sure, when you read it, you pray to God to help you to understand it.
When they came home, they made many pretty remarks upon almost every thing they had seen: and what was still better, their minds were so mich impressed, as to lead them to pray for more admiring and adoring thoughts of the great God, who made -all things with infinite wisdom: and that they might ever stand in awe of him, and noL dare any more jo sin against him.
Thus you see how they improved by whatever they saw: and in the next chapter we shall shew you what sort of company they kept: how they spent their time together; and what use they made of the good books they read, by being able to relate, with so much propriety, remarkable histories of good and pbus children, whom yoa will do well to imitate.




St7


self, to wash inth river~, and there he, getting out of sdepth, and tlhe other be-.

drowned; and so taen ~aysdIn wiih all their sins unrepentedo and infor iven, to stand! before o i jtidgment. Thus, we see that the way of si i dotwnhillai botrv children are hurried on from one Crune to tilotlier tilalnds in the rui of both soul and body. Ata God kee as all, said th~e litle poscmanfo l the was f'sin and 4ftheWst ap cneof









g madne&, &, Od L





EARLYPIETY;



MEMOIRS OF CHILDREN,

RMINENT SERLintvs.

interspersed with familiar Djalogiji s,

Prayers, Graces, and Hymns.



BY GEORGE BURDBR,


"Hewaest thou what they eapj
"Yea, ha-e ye never rea,- Out of Oje mnouthsw of babes and eucldngg thoic haes pem' frectepraiseP"-Matt. xxi. 16.




BALTIMORE:
Printed for Armstrong & Plaskit
BIL J. XATCHA?7.
1821.








liegave the fulsigto llensual lusts and passions ; d ik ost exi-vgnt people, won)t spnt al ewas worth,~ lost his money anfiens(sc as they were) together: and at sm time a famie ba.ppenin19, it is no wonder that le cae to %vaist a molo brad. In thjs di~stes, hi ide binbongbt

get htint apry ; soaftr avng hved like a swnh a tl to beoe feder of"

coul ntKeI ht then iewuld glv
hae fiehi blly with the hu~sks thie swine eat, but e e tm r~e denied him.
Ol! how lited, tink when at
home, with good clteso his. b~k a

tortable bed, that by on ahat be souc be b~rougyht into such]\distress, astrwant,

he wanted an intead of~ his pios# far his brother and other frilends t coves

pigs, and h is bestaparnet a o-sy',
But, however, when lie cm oiincf and used that reflection he hd-enln a stranger to,k hetvtoTao 1xswth hinsel: -Foot haI m!tutoeai ift iiurier antd wrthe4a beti







and yet to their faces would fawn and flatter, Sihe could get any hing by it.
But the worst ofa w his irreverence at church; he did not go there, as good boys do, tu meet with God, and learn more of Jesus Christ, and their duty, but only because he was obliged to go.. fe never prayed before he went, for a blessing upon the minister, and that be might get good: and when there, he would stare about him, observe every body that came in, take noticehow this and thatperson were dressed, but d(d not join in prayer, nor mind the sermon, but frequently laughed at it and the minister too. He little thought of those wicked children we read of in the second Book of Kings, who laughed at a great minister in those days, the prophet Elisha, calling him baldhead and making game of him they ought highly to have honored; and the Lord sent two frightfidul bears out of the wood, and killed no less than two and forty of them. We may see, my friends, that God Aminighty takes notice of, is displeased with, and punishes naughty boys and grls as well as naunghty men and wonin; and that he does so still, is evident, fo#ack LPerverse, one Sunday after noon, after he had been making game of the minister and his message, he went wi





59

After this, a little wine was given her, and she said, "Now no more of the creature:;" and immediately desired her mother to pray. When her mother was giving her up to God, she was observed to smile, and as soon as prayerwas done she closed her eves and lips, as one falling asleep, and so q quietly resigned her soul to God.
Master Tender, who should have spoke next, was so very much affected, that he begged to be excused relating any history; he could only say,-] pray God to make us all like Emelid Geddie! But, however, they sung the following

HYMN.

I.
(COME, children,learn to fear the Lord! And, that your days be long, Let not a false or spiteful word Be found upon your tongue.

I.
Depart from mischief, practice love,
Pursue the works of peace;
o shall the Lord your ways approve, And set you souls at ease.







stood in of farther instruction in every branch of useful knowledge
And theie, for the present, we leave them pursuing, with diligence and dehlight, the same excellent course ao study and devotion, 'hat we described min the beginof this book: and where they are daily growing in favour with God and man.








,ARASTU4ONG & ThAS IT,

BOOKSELLE~RS,
BOOKINDRSANDSTATIONRS,




Webstis Comly's Baltiore, New-York, and'Unversal Spelling Books. jess' ikes', Gough's, and Walh's Arithinctics.

Cumm ig's andt Wilet's Geographies. Fawy an Pocet Bils various bindPrayer Bok%, vafwus bnigs. Watt's Pslsand Hymins, various IdiudNew-York, Columbian, an~d New-Englanit Primers.
Sith and Little's, Wyeth's, Cole's, and Dyer's Music Blooks.
*Methodist Hymn Books, Disciplinie. Fletcher's Checks, and Wesley's Semons. Red and Coloured Wafers, Br1iish and Axperican Ink Powdr Copy and Cypherin~g Bok-c pWfi anK ruled.




\ '7

1z. Sir, I observe a man l with a rake in is hand, raking together all the muck and straw: andhe seems to be very busy indeed.
.fr. B. But do you hot observe something else ?
Eliz. Yes, Sir, there is an angel over his head, that seems to want him to look up at a&fine crown in his hand. How sweetly the angel smiles! but the man takes no notice. Will you please, Sir, to tell us the meaning ?
Mr. B My dears, the man who seems so busy in raking together nothing but dirt, is an emblem of tLe men of this world, who rise early and sit up late, eating the bread of carefilnesa, and all to getmoney. The angel represents *he faithful ministers of Jesus Christ, who are using all the means they can to engage poor careless sinners to think of eternal things and shewing them what a crown they are despising for mere trash. But after all, as you observed, the man takes no notice of the angel, nor of the glorious crown, though it is worth a thousand times more than he will eve scrape together as long as he lives. A thus dear children, too, too many labour and study only for the meat that perLsheth,














tof yteyo roiec -rht vi
man wh hreds U]P' "U64'yevrcly wa o uuiu t ,go;h a


pru o issqeba9 f Bt n fr ce i tetst-ikmoigd~gt of wn:batngta odn uh a broke o hica4s;busilwe0re evr srajle. tog it eswop n V -ens, t .f ord tht upiios xic wt wo









He bids lhis angles pitch their tents
Round where his children dwell; 'What ills his heav.rnly care prevents
No earthly tongue can tell.


0, children, come an~d taste his lov~e!
Come, learn his pleasant wa.ys; And let your own experience prove
The sweetness of his grace.




CHAP. XI.L

The histomj of FJ7Mrd VI. king of Fglndm
who was a good boqy and a good Nng.
WE have hitherto, said Xasfter Josiah, (who sat next,) heard of those whose lot W"s cast (as most of God's people are) in
thelwerrtkkof Iife; but I hs4'exead of oe motilstrious prince, who was Tu ch mor honourable by his grace than his

Prince EdwsardI was but just nine year old. whien, by the death of is father & ecame King of England.




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touched in your spezola.: for as.in, I e kingdom f am nextj4i+' ought X to
r GOD, so
he most like U-M,44" nd goodfiess.
I viercy. a
Therefore, as Qu h e this gelieral exbortationj I "direct Inc, I' beseech ,,on, by wh;it parti-ea.ar'actj may best discharge my dutv.', ,. 4
Tho'Eshop being astonished, as well be wightdecl4red to tbekiilk, fi;thc.was not prepared atpri sent to ansvf er so weighty a question; lint, ifRis Ajajesjy pleased, he would' o4nQtyitb the Ity of IA)UdonaTxa return M[ii their answer,
In c eq ence of 'this, -the poor were rallked in t ree CW4 ; lor each of which th k D ave nme houses, andlan4o'and tbunded Ife blue-CoaVSch6ol,-'rmd k.11artholomew's hospital in Smithltel( Ind the Bijd wcV, by Fleet-ditch: which.' V9 d On e' IIC IIA ank&mod pronging his life to fi,46h th bu .ness
But,'Jas this pious 'Print4e, of wh_&'WtI England, VasAxqt worthy, was soon to J3 6 rem a 6 his-cirt t1ft ne, to )AF,
crowned W t
When he was sixt eu'he lvas!. cf; q
a consuxnpti'6 .-wlkich J I y gl owlu 1 him, soon threatened is,, JU A Q
0
ers of phxs .C I
and dcathh 4 a'








th~ere~for iftdeAl miI Wpv o for ti ne U IL '
Sanue tbe~e~e i nrain T have metoe led is adbe haviour f sh ,wcens
at hs diei-ims;I sblll* ,truble-yo









lateeve fe ieWcle-, uryoe
tis pry~ iet irt-a&sIa ms sif li huh i hud o eI dot wolH hll -i he ,-i Olwfak tembue hm h ol el WH ohd


and Jat eelgpne-a fe'fu







versation? Certainly, said William Good-i child, for I have often read that text which says, In everyd thing by prayer and supplicativn, with thanksgiving, le your requests be made known to God.-And I heartily acquiesce in the proposal said Miss Candour, for it is the custom of some very honourable persons, where mamma visits, afleri dinner to sing an hymn, and unite in prayer, which they say prevents the conversation from turning upon the failings of abI sent friends.
Master seriouss theft prayed for a few
minutes; after which, the little company being seated, Miss Mid introduced her
story thus:
1 apprehend, my dear young friends,
that nothing can be more profitable to us, nor indeed more encouraging than to hear of those, like us in age and capacity, whose early'piety, and whose happy deaths have witnessed how much little children are the care of a compassionate Saviour who permitted when on earth, aueh to be brought to him, and declared, that of such
is the kingdom of heaven.
I have read of a poor boy, who came aU
in dirt and rags to a gentleman's door at Newington, crying for bread. Notwith, standing his filthy condition, the Lord'







tCap Paper, No. 1, 2, 3, and 4. Letter, do. wove.
do. do. common.
do. do. hot pressed.
Extra English Wove, hot pressed, gilt oy
plain.
American Folio Post; wove.
do. do. do. common
do. do. do. pink.
English do. extra Wove and Hot Pressed.
Do. Banking.
Blotting Paper, English and American. Wrapping Paper in reams and bundles. Ironmonger's Paper, different sizes. Tea Paper, Demy, Medium and Super
royal sizes.
Bonnet Boards, blue; and white. Quills, from 3 dolls, to 30 dolls. per thousand.
Inkstands, Lead, Pewter, and Glass. Rodger's and Butler's Pen-knives well assorted.
Ledgers, Day Books, Invoice, Journal,
Cash, Record, Letter, Receipt, Bill and Bank Books, plain and faint ruled, with or without patent backs and Russia ends; of Imperial, Super-royal, Royal, Medium,
Demy and Cap sizes. &c. &c. Checks on al the Banks.








acquaintance acquaint themselves ivith Jesus, and be at peace with him. Glory be to thee, 6~.rd, for my creation, preservation, and Il the comrtorts of this life; but much more for the gift of gifts, a pre-. cious Jesus. May my soul be found in him, both now and forever more! Grant ali my petitions, and accept my praises, in the name and for the sake ofjesus Christ, who, with the Father and Holy Ghost, is one God over all blessed for ever. Amen and Amen."
These prayers, you see, are both very short and suitable; hut at times they used other petitions, not set down here, according to their various wants, as when they were ill, or had got well again; when they were going a journey, or the like.
William also informed his parents, that at school, before family prayer, a chapter used to be read; and when it was done, each scholar was expected to repeat some verse or sentence, that they remembered: and this kept up their attention. And then they used to sing very pretty hymns, which, if you should like to learn, you may find them at the end of this book. ,Well, before supper, when Mr. Gooddhild's family were called up to prayer, you cannot think how glad all the servants







bad laid a plotagainst the life of his mis1 ter, and this very night intended to put it in execution. Thus then be instructed, no more to dispute the wisdom of Providence;

But evermore confess th' Almighty just, And what you can't unriddle, learn to trust.

I remember, said Master Josiah, that some good men we read of in the psalms, have been tinder the same temptation: for the Psalmist says, "That his feet had well nigh slipt; for he was envious at the foolish. when he beheld the prosperity of the wicked;" but when hle went to the house of God, and learned their miserable end, he no more repinedat Providence, but was content to be any thing here, so that he might have Heaven at last, and Grace to carry him there

Then they sung thispretty hymn.







On the Saturday night before her death, she often said, This following sabhath wi be my last: and expressed a vehement de sire for an everlasting sabbath.
Having slept till eight o'clock, and fiing it so late, she said, -she thought to have spent it better than to sleep so long? After this she mentioned, with admiraton, almost all the names and titles given to Christ in his holy word.-She also spoke something concerning every one, to the astonishment of all that heard her. "He is," said she, the chiefof ten thousands!" and added, the chief of all to me!
Somebody, thinking that she wasjust departing, brought alight to see; but she smiled, and said,-I shall not die just now! How do you know that ? I miss that promised presence, which for many a day I have believed 1 shall get in the moment of death.,
Through great weakness, she had not been able to raise her head up in bed; but now she arose and sat up, prayed to God, and pleaded his promises, saying, Now let it be according to thy precious word to my souL! for there is nothing in me," adding, "It is only upon the blood of the Lord Jesus, and the faithfulness of God I del pend."





8

them; and how she taught them morning and evening prayers, which they repeated. And as you (my little reader,) might like to know them, and, it may be, to use them yourelf, I will set them down.-The morning prayer was as follows.

Morning Prayer.

0 Almighty and most merciful God! who hast made me, and preserved me to this hour, look graciously upon me, and have inercy upon me. Thou hast promise. ed, 0 Lord, that those who seek thee early, shall find thee; and I am now come to seek thy face and favour. Dear Jesus, when on earth, thou didst suffer little children to come unto thee: and I am come, 0 take me into thy arms of love, and make my young heart soft and tender; afraid of sin,

andits terrible consequences! 0 make me highly to prize thy love in dying for sinners! and, Lord, be pleased to give me a share in thy love. Make me humble teachable, righteous, and holy. -Acce my praise for another night's preservation and be pleased to continue the same car and protection all this day. Instruct me
0 Lord, in all useful and necessary kno4 ledge, especially that which concerns




11

were to see Master and Miss again: from which I conclude, that they behaved well before they left home.-Their sweet voices made an agreeable addition to the song of praise that every evening ascended from that happy (because pious) family: In short, it was as the house of God, and the very gate of heaven. For my part, I wish that those people who have no prayer in their families had been there; methinks it would have made them much desire to repeat stch pleasant scenes under their own roof.-Jer. x. 25.




CHAP. II.
Of t*w Galley of Pictures.
WILLIAM and Elizabeth, behaving themselves so well, deserved indulgence; and they had what they deserved: for they had not been at* home long, when a great man, Mr. John Benevolent, hearing of them, invited them to his country house, at a very pleasant village, nearLondon; and he sent hit own coach for them







Before she wa he yeas ol, she used toaskr-a blsig-nher food, with words of her own

her f~~or no when X G ronto e lesso, li e~rbdd wing; f
and~~~ ~ ~ ben sebh ouw o been beat tan ange ymtle thoughfr m1other's ben4jg ae

Baeii5Tsrl troubled lin o] sew

who askethcas of her dit : ~to which shie anweedTh evil take


all tis noieih yu eiinIohe





ed ? se re' Ikown ohr a thnev ink hV rinpy
and feopr toPry or












Of averygodGrlW&deshpibfore she Aw,8AYaaod

TIiISS Coodchid thnbg I ev o
relate some~ fe ssags t eeo
Miss Carter(t C, 66d~g
ter of gentlemarf in Wilsir Shega rem a~kble prb 8h Iey piety: for being asked,. when shewas no more than four years f' age, wh wsher greatest eniemy? she rep1 lieSnwsher greatest enemy. 'Soona fter wheiraing in the second~ chapter, of St 1s pel, about J oseph and 'Mary; 11tb~ there was no room for them i the irm, ansd that the uABaE Was laid in~ amange,"sheburs

there no room in theimfo bthe- LoIo glory ? bu ut Uleinamige mn
the beasts? 4
One morning, when she was not welI she began Iher prayer thus, 0 Lod ook~ down upon mne, and sive metekowledge of thyslf; take snoto -yhat that I my h rbl wt eerlsc like expresion,







70

grace of God's spirit to bethink himself, and mourn for his offences, is hike the prodigal encouraged by the well known tender mercies of a compassionate Saviour, to return and confess his sin,-own the justness of his misery, and receive pardon, peace and happiness, as a free and undeserved gift. May the Lord help us to go and do likewise.
Then, with cheerful hearts and voices, they united in the following hymn.

EARLY PIETY.
I.
WHAT blest examples do I find
Writ in the word of truth, children that began to mind Relgioa in their youth.
IL
Children a sweet HosAxna sung,
And blest their Saviour's name;
They gave him honour with their tongues
While scribes and priests blaspheme.
I1I.
Samuel, the child, was wean'd and brought
To wait upon the Lord:
Young Timothy betimes was taught
To know his Holy Word.











MOIRS O P CJIIIV M.
















ftfer Onle children toc&me unto re, =4,rm, is tUckingawn 4 od j7





&

I L'Itelt, print







71


Thlen why shoul I s longdea

I wotild not pasaote ly Withoutthswr e-n

When t.helirde pios sernblylidsn this hymn, Willia Goodebjld conclude the happy opportunity with solemn prayer: hescechinpg tee Lord to make them like the good children they had been speaking of. And I hope, my little Reader, that your hieart too begins to long to be like them. Does it not ?
0 then, pray, and pray again! nor rest contenttill JesitsChrist makeyou to know and feel that be hith redeemed y-oil with hig precioLIR blood, and that you shall live and reign with him in glory everlating. Amen, and Amen.

CONCUtSION.

William and Eliabeth Goodchld ba-, ving thus spent thebi hillid~.ysathmi the most improving manner, were, on te appointed day again conducted to schooll, to which thev eundwt Itetslmdst pleasure ; wellknwnthnedhy







eousness, and then I shall be truly fine clean.
She would frequently give money to t beggars, and follow them to the outward gate of the house where she lived, i used to instruct them, shewing them ti there was a God and a hell: she would r prove them for their wicked lives, plain telling them, that swearing, drinking, an sabbath breaking, would bring them helL .
She was so earnest in secret prayer, th every word she uttered seemed to com from the bottom ofbher heart
She learned much of the scripture by heart, and could co-rectly repeat many chapters, particularly the 8th of Romans which she said was a whole Bibe to her also the 15th, 16th, and 17th chapter rs St John's gospel; the 11th of Hebrews many of the Psalms, and almost all Solo alon's Songs, &c. She was asked, Why shot so much by heart, seeing she had a Bible at hand ? She answered, "I fear the time will come tijit I shall want it, and I cannot live without the precious Bible."
When she was exercised with strong pans ofthe gravelber patience was truly admirable; oever uttering a rash word, or giving the least signs of impatience or







wa xrmly unwilling to do it;-but archbishop Cranmier, ancl voters, using many arguments, at last over peirsuiadcd him. When he had signed his ne, with tears ~ in his eves, he said, "'ff flave dhone Wrong, Uranmer, von shell answer it at thle day of judgment"
At another time, the same arebibishop had been pleading with lhim to permit his popish sister ~fa1ry, (at erwards the bloody butcher ofGod's people) to have Stass performed publicly in tier house hie could riot, by the strongest arguments be prevailed upon to Consent. The archbishop coming out ofthe ing's presence, met with -,Nr.
Cheee, whohad eenhisscrioolmaster,
andsautd imthus ir, youmay begladi

education of such a scholar: adding, that tthe king had more divinity in his litle finger than they had in both their whole boidies.
in January, the begirmingofthe 7th yesar of his reign, be fell sick, and in the time of ihis sckess, B~ishop Ridley preached befrhi, and much recommended -works of charity, especialy to those who were rich and great. After dinner the king sent for him, a~nd after thsaniig him for his sermon, repeated th~e prnclial parts of A-tdnand then added '-Itake myself to be chiefly





40

When she had done, she said, I have a pretty lesson in my book, which is about Cod's sending the Lotrd Jesus to die for poor sinners. At another time, when sitting by the fire, she burst into tears; and being asked what was the matter, she said, I do not please the Lord in all I do. At another time, I must be more afraid of sinning against God ithan of being whipt: for it is God that gives ts food, and raiment, and every thing.
One evening she went to her father, and said, Pray for me that God would take away this wicked heart, and that I may be with God when I die. Just before she was taken ill, she was reading the 55th of Isaiah, she stopt and sa-d,-Nothing but the blood of Christ can cleanse me from sin. tier mother asked her, Whether she did not think that being good, and doing good works, would save her ? She replied, Our righteousness is a sinful righteousness; therefore it cannot save us.
A little kinswoman and she being at play, they happened to falt out, but presently carteret recollecting herself, said to her cousin, Cousin, don't we know that Christ died for us; why should we fall out
Soon after she was taken ill, and was one evenitgearnest, with tears, that Christ









About three hours before he died, i eyes being closed, and thinking nobody was within hearing, lie oflered up thi prayer:
0 Lord God, dhee out of da iserabde and wetch~ed qfe, and take me among thy chosen ; howbeit, not my 'will hut thine c done. La's! I commit my soul to thee; 0 Lord' thou knowest howc happy it werej for e to b with thee; yet for thy chosen's sake sendl me Ufi Sand health,. thqa I may tritly ser7,e thee. 0 Lordnmy God, less thy peope, and save than inheritance. 0 Lord God,. save th choe People of England! 0Omy Lord God, defend this reab from poper7, and maintain the trute r ligiov, that l and It eople may praise t41 holynsaine fr thy Son~ Jsas CHxia "s sake.
Then, turning his face and seeing some nig h, I e said,. dre yost so itigh2 I thought Vr2 had been faj'AIer o~f Many fervent pray er ah put ap; and his last words were these: I am faint, Lord have mercy upon mie anti take my spirit; and so committed his piaus sousl into the hands of his heavenly Father.
He died July the 6ths, 155~3, in Iiis sevententh year.











7YWiisa asssembly, and very remarkable history.

WHiN the young friends of William, Goodrhild and his sister, heard they wee returned from boarding school, they were 0 very desirous to come and see them: so a day was fixed on for that purpose; and
-when should it be but Twelfth day, and it happened that there were just twelve in company. Well, after they had dined, it was proposed by Mr. Goodchild, that instead of the idle diversion of choosing king and queen, (which he knew they were above,) they should each tell some pretty history which they had read, that might tend to their mutual advantage: This being directly agreed upon, Mr. and Mrs. (oodchild withdrew, leaving only the young people together, that they might speak with the greater freedom.
Miss Mild, being the eldest in company, was desired to begin, which she was just about to do, when Master Prayerful begged leave to ask, whether it was not proper firsttopray for blessing on their eon-









ou im n sye. no your prayers'
Chrs c1an doitM At another tie W ogoebe he deahsesaid, ThiWsr'trei oet


merev on me. Soon atrh~gakd Dos God4 lift tip the ligh fiscone zjance-upo you P She saidi, I oeli os And are. yiou willing to g~o toCrs? I hopeIa.
T aones odeath comigon te last words sh sok to her father wee Pray

While hepaewt hrselyvr



bistory f Crteret, whc b odwt greet mpodesty, tbey agee t sngthL following HMN


Hapy' the cidwhs oug t er
Receive instructions well







credit; bt if you continue y-ourba wa~s, and neglect your learning, you*t dear father NN)] be grieved and disap pointed, I shall be discredited, and you ivill be ruined"
Now, one Would haN e thought that suc kind advwu e as this wNould have hadl some. weight With himt; but, alas! it bad noe be stilt. cont-inuedidle and obstinate, de spising both his master and his connsel.
Hec was not only idle, but cruel. Ile uised to catch fi es. on putrpoae to tomnt them~ ;and was guilty, ol that borrid prac tice of making cockchafers spin, by put ting a crooked pin through their tail san hanging then by a hit of thread, wliicb puts them) in terrible agonies.
Wfrmn this ws mentioned, several the company innnediately burst into they-) Wei Cshiocked at aiiy thing that NI cruel. And-NMaster 7k idei' could not 11e saying, "I ani aston i sied at th;e laardnes tat heart ui h can delight in~ beloldht the ,go~es of poor dumb, crvaturesand brings to my invd ,that I once redtbt wise Atheiai s, who cond jmned hqbyf potting out thre e) es olfhirds wlibho ncq die, P4s ing tat such seds of rer
-would necesa ly-gro-w sp into, moe( qfViolenv ajld edanger thlive of







Well, Christmas came at last; and for
* my part, I cannot tell you whether parents or children were most pleased with its coming.
The appointed day for William and Elizabeth to return home was now arrived: and they took leave of Mrs. Lnvegood, with tears of affection and love, begging her prayers for their safe journey to town, where they got safe and sound in the even. ing; meeting at the inn, in Aldersgatestreet, with their father's servant, whom he had kindly sent to conduct them home. And home they came ; but it would be in vain for me to attempt to tell you what a pretty sight t-eir meeting was.
When they entered the room, after making their obeisance, they ran, and both falling on their knees, legged their parents' blessing. Mrs. Goodchild could not speak for crying, she was so affected with joy. But Mr. Goodchild, raising them up in the most tender manner said, May JESUS bless you both!" and, kissing them, added, -God be praised for his mercy, iq giving me to see my dear children again!"
After they had drank tea, Elizabeth gave her mother an account of their rules and orders at school, how happy they lived there; how kind Mrs. lovegood was to

































Sit-







changing th ,M ormn itl hl dren like ouwcve;'ada e aeso


as veryprettiyhl 1 tesoyo

papa.,sstudy.

greMat part of his,.'te ifs fA lonely desert, fari remoefotmuid Whose fod was the fi; texir and his drink i h~eehri, AuWjoi hawve cEnitiued his rps n lit a not this temn~tat1fl ,-Joe)u)is id. ,,whether Providenc i~ # h ca~ n of' mn or n"fr


ttie wicked' an 4ikd n 4 prosper ?


and iit~ theWp.,Acodnlli arose at breako aii adJr raeln'



and go a oyn rjl.
CuI.0gT









CHAP. X.

.4 pretty history of a pious young Lady, well
worhy she imitation of my lime reader.

IN my father's library, (said Master Prayerful,) isa most excellet little book, giving an account of EME IA G DnnIa, from her infancy to her death, which happened February 2d, 1688, when she was about sixteen. I can only promise you a few particulars which I remember. IL was remarked of her, that before she could speak, if she had been crying, or out of hurnour, (as you know little folks too oftenl are,) if she perceived any of the family, where she was, were about to go to prayer, she would be perfectly silent in a moment, and continue as quiet as a lamb during the whole time of worship. & As soon as she could speak, she would sk questions about God and the creation, for instance, Whether the sun shined on
dfather and grandmother ? and
was told that the same sun gave
the world, she replied, "Ought
en to love that God who made all these things and gave th6m to us?"









they travelled together until night ap. proached
Observing a stately palace just by, in which dwelt a proud, but hospitable knight, they step up to the duor, and giving i gentle knock, were immediately %dmtted At elegant supper was served up, and numerous servants waited upon them; after which, being fatigued, 1hey retired to bed, and did not awake until IJmorning.
They were then called up to a sumptuotus bre-kfast, and rich wines were handed round in a large golden cup.-ANlen they had ate and drank as much as they pleased, they returned many thanks to the courteous knight, and were dismissed. No one had reason to be sorry but the kind L, adlord: for the young an was so unigrateful as to steal the golden cup. A They had not got far before the youth
the cup to the aged hermit. He. tood astonished at his ingratitude, and &I-. mostwihed to get ridofsuch acomipanion,~ but did not dare to mention his wish; how. ever lifting up his eyes to heave thought ow har t ws, that generous actions sihu beso strangely rewarded.
The >weather notw biecamne clouds; th1









There is a dreadful b-ll And everlasting pajis
Thee smer mut uithdevlsdwell



Can such a wretc~h as I Escape this cursed end ?
IiAd~ miy I hope, whene'er I die,
I shal to hdav'n ascend ?


Then will I read 3nd pray While I ave life andi breath; Lest I should be cut off to dlay, And senit V' eternal death.




CHAP. IX.

Of God's Provi~dence, mazd remarkable in.
stances of it,

WE have seenl, sajid Master Considerate, (who sat, next,) in a pleasing variety of instances, the power qf 1)ivine Grace, in




25i

disposed that generous man to take him in, and clothe him from head to foot, and bring him up as his ow n child.
This boy was as wicked as he was poor; he used to take the Lord's name in vain, and curse and swear in a shocking manner: indeed he was uilty of all sorts of wickedness. But the gentleman, who had his eternal, as much or more than his temporal good at heart, laboured to persuade him of his natural depravity,-of bhs sinful practices--of the worth of his soul, and the bitter consequences of aminning against God,-of the uncertainty of hfe,the certainty of death, and a future judgment He used often to pray witA, and apart to pray for him.
Nor were his prayers long unanswered: in a tew weeks time, a great change took place in the boy's outward behaviour; which was once very uncivi, but now affable and courteous to all. And the change affected not his outward conduct only, but he began privately to weep and mourn for his past offencei; he would gladly attend on prayer; would listen with great attention to all his Master said about eternal things. And thus he continued to do, when the Lord visited him with sickness : he was taken ill; his body was full of~ am




20
The frst room thywr oled it 02
tained a vas variety of serpents, snakes, adders, and such-hke frightful creatures; many ofw ch, though beautiful to look upon, were terrible when alive; having had sharp stings and mortal poison under their tongues
Miss Goodchild shuddered almost to look upon them; but William whispered his father, and said, These destructive creatures put me in mind of that old and subtle serpent, who first persuaded Eve to sin against God, by breaking hiscom-1 mnds, and so "brought death into the world, and all our woe"
"Yes, my dear, (said a venerable dissenting minister, who shewed the cutrosties,) and so it did; but I hope you know that Christ, the friend of sinners, came, according to his promise, to ruib e the serpenia hed; so that death to those who believe in him, is disarmed of his sting, and is no more hurtful than these vipers, now they are dead and hot tled up in spirits."
They were then led into a dark room in which was a transparent picture of a burning mountain in Italy, called Vesuvius; from the top of which issued huge quantities of stones, and rivers ofliquid fire poured down its side. The -s git of such an







68

father's house there is plenty of every thing! where themeanest servant has more than enough I will arise and go to my father, and though he might well reject me, frown at me, and call me rebel as I am; yet sure he retains a parent's heart: his compassion will kindle when he sees his son, and I won't conceal or deny any of my faults; but will say-Father, 1 have sinned against heaven, and before thee, and amn no more worthy to be called thy son; give me the meanest place in thy house, and I will be thankful.
No sooner said than done. Up he gets; and though he had now no chaise or horse to convey him e, he trudged as fast as he could on foot nor would any thing stop him til within sight of his home
The dear aged father, who had often cast a wishful eye towards thatfar country, whither this poor boy was fled, was now, perhaps walking upon his house, or on some lofty terrace in his garden, and sees, what? his son ? yes, it was his poor son! but, Oh! how changed! once he was tall, handsome, healthy looking lad; but now a poor, meagre, ragged, filthy wretch! Nevertheless the dear old gentleman runs as fast as he can to meet the returning ptodigal.






PREFACE.



My dear young Reader,
THis little book is written with a design and a desire, at once to profit and please you; by showing in the examples of children, young as you are, the great happiness and advantage of real and early piety.
That you may read it with profit, you must take notice of whatever was good in the Children you read of, to imitate it; and of whatever was bad, in order to avoid it.
You will find, that the good Children loved Prayer; that is to teach you to love it too. They hated Sin very much; that is to make you to hate it.





16

very much: for, as Mr. Bunyan informs us, in his Pilgrim's Progress, a man came and brought to Passion a great bag of money; which he seized with prodigious eagerness, and at the same time,.laughing at Patience, called him a sorry beggar; but, however, it was not long before he spent all he had, in riotous living; lost his friends and his cash together, and has been seen himself, not long ago, begging about the streets:whereas Patience, in time, by diligence and industry, got a very comfortable estate, upon which he lives, and does a great deal of good with it.
William. And pray, Sir, what is this to teach us?
.Mr. B. My dear, it is this; Never to covet present things, things which regard only this world; but both quietly wa"t and patiently hope for your portion of better things in a better -world. All this world calls good or great must either leave us or be left by us: and it is better to have our Ptr: tion in heaven thnon earth, for this ra son, also, because, if it is on earth, we are going from it; but if it be in heaven, we are going to it.
Mr D. Wha' do you observe, Miss Goodchild, in thi's next. picture





1 6

readingtheir bibles, in learning their catechism, in secret prayer, or when they could give a good account of the sermons they had heard on the Lord's-day. Upon such occasions she would not only commend and reward, but would indulge them with some useful piece of knowledge that was new to them.
And so by the blessing of God upon her instructions, and the diligent and dutiful behaviour of her scholars, it was truly surprising what a quick progress they made in learning and politeness. Mrs, Lovegood could by no means conceal the improvement they made from their kind pa. rents, and therefore wrote several times to acquaint them with all the particulars: and nothing could be more welcome to them than such news, I assure you.
You may imagine by observing your own parents, (my dear reader) that it greatly delighted their hearts, to hear of the wel. fare and good behaviour of their dear littie ones, and made them exceedingly abound in thankfulness to God, who had directed them to so good a school, and who had bestowed upon their children
-such lovely dispositions. They even thought it long till holiday-time came, when they' expected to see them.







it was nothing less wonderful than a great number of lite children in your Orphanhouse, crying out after the Lord -Afteor dinner, brother Periam had left them in school, picking cotton; and, while they were working, one ofthem said to another; If we do not believe in the Lord Jesus Christ, we shall all go to hell; and added, that the children of God prayed to God. Immediately the boy, to whom he spake, fell down upon his knees, and began to pray; and then another, till they were all on their knees together praying.-Providence so ordered it, that some of the fam. ily heard them, and it was not long before the whole family were gathered around them. 0, how did the awful and pleasing sight strike us, and melt us into a flood of tears. The dear little lambs continued erying out with the trembling jailorj, ,WVhat must we do to be saved!"They prayed, Lord God Almighty, have compassion on us; prick us to the heart, and pluck us as fire-brands out of the burning: and, O Lord Jesus Christ wash us in thy blood! O Lord, take away our hard stony hearts and give us hearts of flesh. And how did the little soul plead with God' Lord last thou not said, 'that those that seekt thee marshal ifdhee







come t u c added, Is'all- e ter
ainongt tbeaetSlbiith~dy He then callefo hi ste, to whom he said, -1 Preparto o to heaven :1, and to~ his nurse, 41Pahomt by hearing," and to the rest, "Prepr to meet your God!I" Since, when in~ agnyoain, be told his father that lie loe i dc-arly, yet he loved Chisat betrsil:fr says he, Christ is a good o om;h i rprn
plac fr menw wb~en it isready, he will comn an fetchme', and then all wiUJ be well.
Having lain a longer time than usual without aking any rc-freshment, he was asked to have something; but be answered, Christ is my meat and drink.
When the mnuch desired sabbIatlI canne he said, ini themorninug, Tis is a. msnt delightfulday! H~e was often in prayer, contimied cheerful all the day, frequently expressg great joy, and strong eonsolatiou in the Lord4, till in the evening, a conv4l sion fit seized himi, anid pwoved the rought~ but welcome mnessenger, sent to convey his happy spirit where 11the, initants shallno more say, Iamsik."~
Thus, dear papa, dida young disciple.' whose life and death I have nohigher wish fban to imniate. WhillwiteIam ee








Blank Boks of eer esrpto;'d up at the shrest notice in the bs maner rule toypattern. Dr.V CLRYnF Com r, of which they are sl gnsr more.
Scriptur %esio or Catechetia x ercises.' Dcg frcildren in Sb bath Seosud Fmles. Calculated to exieatseforstudyig the Hol Sctes By E. LiiwjaLN. Pice,45




p$Oer ue
Scthe Hstory, aridg, ithn cus n cott of the woitnerfub aed Pen

toravlds fismlaye fo a eud fi of youn their Neinain. ByO JonCmpel ,Per hudre.
Thetofth R onbers advntre 4band Sirchos Convesof Crsin, 4in trvl rmthe l affdt of Dsrctoo

Per hundrd. ,OprA4ed







friends, far hisip
tion. 'japie, Pd
The boy, wh4s 4i XTin IbPut totell. was named Ja"k A Rod 14 fi Ai4r
was answerable tivas ir; c,
Though his parenU, sent him to a very good school, yet hewa 'Surkaduncc that he could not read -it', ihb
,Iestamerit without bl6dirfilk ,,un(j,"ejj he was reproved, used a k 1 4'
with impertinence, and *A Ak3fInd obstinate, that correction I ade him

forward at school, be kassureto-be found

worse, When any 90,ni;
at the head of it; by which -imeans his book was neglected, hiwsk left imdone, and then to avoid puriLshment, he wonld play truan ; Oe
was, that be.,Was, not qnly.. VvpJ1 A6,gied, I ?aA"ed t his
but a beaVy log was a so. I eg, and ag .*p,,p eAd

so h- fcipt fogl's r
His master, n O der to recj iw h;p would ojrietimje -,*U 'him gp, APd sp to into thns: ," 01;1d, ,Ou, )kwildrviytat ber that yoyr j,,oq(I f&tf vr, P it_,yop nft my care thatyy4 inglit'l ful knowleft 6 y ,4
loave scv(14' dyiv d: WA






for shelter,--- Lna 166;a: torm df bdil FrIl, as Made them Oad to see an old gxmflt man's gothic'9 0, '464-a A s ing found, rear At hand 'Tli*ii ehed, to the door, where they without adznit
tance. At last thVidisAR), inaster of the house'Vith sl6walffl -14-Tbds steps, "me I A to the door, vfl6cl li (1 6iM wih gusoicious care. Th y 4 T4-h#lfwelcom-' ed: only one litile't4gA ligined tb tla ked walls; a poor pittance of course and sorne'Istale small beei;04slb ( fq ht fbr tber refreshment: evi!nIfi* w4i", trudged, and as soon as ever it epu to clear up, they were bid to be gfime-: '.
The herrn t was sujrisi d'i6wni tbat a man bfsuch'vast P'odsesslons sd6ld lead. such a miset-,bbe 1W -1 "afid he' ost blamed Providence;- 'To pe mit tfilk' qo much ,wetilth in his handr,
but'h6w was'hv asl o lisht d wbeni the young man infofthed lum, th: t lie 'had ieA;ard8dII the miger',with tW gd1deh &tp,' wh'eh WU4 stolen fi-o m -4 6 f6viiei- genetbus b6fleRb-i tor
Night spin come on,; and on6e T or d"' they sought a place of reA. ; iluotifig4 around, theypeiceilved alnttnsi(OW 4if.Tq OfF; it was neither 1 &Wnor krlfld, b" Seemeal to speak therrfin'&'Of itW owner, 11







THE

ENTERTAINING



0?,

WILLIAM AND ELIZABETH GOODCHILD.



CHAP. L

Of their behaiour at School and coming
Home at Chrzstmas.
WintsAx and Elizabeth Goodchild, were sent by their parents into the country, to a boarding school, where they were put under the care of Mrs. Love-good, a lady of singular piety and wis. dm; remarkably fitted for the education of youth ; for she dearly loved little children, and was very indulgent to them, and never failed graciously to reward them, whenever they did well; especially when she observed them diligent in




M1


while they neglect the unspeakably imporItant concerns of Salvation ; and thus ministers% laiin va5i; anidspenil the rrzth fo zo1 Fewj believe their report, and to few is the arm of the Lord revealed.
The very kind gentleman, after having shown them several other pictures, of equal merit, dismissed them, with some pretty presents, especially a neat pocket Bible to each; wh ich (to them) was the most gracious gift they could possibly re. ceive.
When they returned home, they gave so distinct and pleasing an account of all they had seen, is highly delighted their pa. rents; especially as they took care to remember the instructive explunatio. of each piece: and were not, like most children, pleased with them merely as picures.
William particularly observed to his father, with what earnestness the man in the water kept hold of the rope; and said, he hoped the Lord would help him, even to hold Jesus fast by faith, for his Saviour, with the same degree of steadfastness.
Mr. (ioodchild was so pleased with their remarks, that he promised they should see every thing that might be likely to ad-




iv

Many of them died very young; (not that they died the sooner because they were good; but being good, they were the sooner fit to die;) now, you yourself may (lie young too, therefore pray eariestly to the Lord, for the pardon of all your sins, and beg for grace to make you fit to live, and then you will be fit to die.
G.B.
March, iSIZ.





9

eternal peace. Wherever I am to-day, be pleased to be with me. Whatever I do to day, may do it to thy glory. Wjiile I live, may I live to God; and when I Uie, may I sleep in Jesus! and after death admit me to heaven; to ascribe glory to-the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, for ever and ever.Amen."

",Our Father," &c. &c.

E ning Prayer.

"t 0 Lord. my God, most high! most ho. ly! and most gracious! Thou searches all hearts, and well knowest all that I have this day done, said, or thought amiss : forgive all most freely for the sake of Jesus Christ. Clothe my naked soul with the spotless righteousness of Jesus thy dear son: wash my unclean soul in his cleansing blood: sanctify my unsanctified tempers and dispositions, by the Holy Spirit. Watch over my body and soul this night while I sleep. Graciously defend me from every danger -Preserve also, 0 Lord, all that dwell under .this roof: and bless my dear parents, and all my relations: prosper and increase the ministers of thy gospel: and may every one of &Y friends and







Who hates the sinner's path, and fears The road that leads to. hell.


Wile wedevote our youth to God,
'Tis pleasing in b is eyes

is no vain sacrifice.

III.
'Tis easier work- if we begin
To fea'r the Lord betimes-;;
While sinners, that grow old in sin,
Are barden'd in their crimes,


'Twill save uss from a:thousand snares
T. religion young;
Gge preserve our following years,
And make our virtue Strong.

V.
To thee, Almighty God, to the,
Ouir childhood we resign:
Twill please us to look back and see
Th~at our whoe lives were tine.






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nd we must have a better righteousness than our own : for I have often, when hearing preaching at the chapel. thought how good I would be: that'I never would be undutiful, or play with naughty boys any more; but as soon as the next day came, I was s bad as ever: so I am sure our own righteousness wll not do"
He saw his mother weeping, and said to er, Do not grieve I can tell you of one bo had a greater trial than you have: Araham, you know, was to offer up his son." *Yes, my dear, (said his mother,) but I have not Abraham's faith." "Ah, mother, (replied he) God can give it you."
When he had been peevish and fretful, be mourned over his evil tempers; and, looking earnestly at his mother, said,'Mother, passion is my besetting sin; but the Lord will pardon -me, because he loves me."
He told the Rev. Mr Peckwell, who visited him. It was ungratefil for people to run way from Christ." Mr. Peckwell, asked him how it was that he did not run from him ? His answer was, Because the Lord loves me." But if you get well a.ain, do not you think you shall run away from

tbo well to let me." Watwould you say







white turned up with red, and he dwells now 'in his palace, as happy as a prince.
Wfilliamn. How dearly the man must love him! how desirous must he be to plea~se him! I dare say the Prince has no need to bid him twice to do any thing, or threaten to turn him out of doors if he is not good. I think if I was in his place, it would be my~ meas and drink to do Me wl, and I should want no other wages than his approbation.
Mr. BI Well said, indeed. 0 my dear children, remember then, thus cheerfully to love and obey a precious Saviour, who has redeemed us from the 'curse of the law, by becoming a curse for us.
In the next picture you see two boys: he on the left hand is named Passion, the other's name is Patience. You may perceive Passion is much disquieted- but Patience sits with a Bible in his hand, as quiet as a lamle- and he is so happy because he is content to wait till next year for several pretty things his guardian has promised him-but Passion is thus disturbed, because he is determined t~o have all now. He is indeed a very wicked child; hte is descended from Dives, whom you read of in the Bible, and Patience Is decended from tazarus, a very good though a very poor man. They take after their ancestors







for this reason :The Holy Law of GOV insists upon perfect obedience, and nothing short' of that will do.-But no man is nop able to obey perfecttFy Therefore, unless the perfect righteousnes of another is imputed to him, he must fall under the curse of the broken law: his own best rvighteouszeas will fail him, as this man's paper boat has done; and it immediate assistance is not afforded, he must perish for ever and ever. But that dear Prince is to represent Jesus Christ, the King of kings and Lord of lords, who came from glory on purpose to seek and save the lost. The rope shewsyou how we are saved by Faith.* There is no merit in the man, nor in the rope, nor in his holding the rope. His deliverance from death is entirely owing to the good prince; and thus the whole glory of salvation is due alone to Christ.
El'z I date say the poor man will not brag of saving himself. J am sure he ought to be very thankful.
.Mr. B. You say right, and sobewas. The goad prince took him afterwards and gave him fresh clothes, his 9wn handsome livery,

Faith is taking God at his word.