Citation

Material Information

Title:
Putnam County Courier Journal
Creator:
Lake Street Publishing Company
Place of Publication:
Crescent City, FL
Publisher:
Lake Street Publishing Company, Juliette Laurie- Publisher\Editor
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Putnam -- Crescent City
Coordinates:
29.434441 x -81.510139

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Copyright Putnam County Courier Journal, Lake Street Publishing Company, Juliette Laurie, publisher,. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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Inside Church...................A5 Community............A3 Crossword.............B4 Faces & Places......B1 Opinion..................A2 Public Notices.......B5 Way Back When....A4 Lane and Road Closures YOUR ADDRESS HERE!For home delivery via the USPS Subscribe TodayOnly $24 a Year! Call 386-698-1644 According to the Florida Department of Transportation website there are no road and lane closures that may impact trafc through Friday, January 5. Meet the Greats will be on Wednesday, Jan uary 10 from 12-1 p.m. The Crescent City Library Board welcomes Pat Maden, a longtime resident of Crescent City, who will share memories and photos of her travels to Paris and Amsterdam. Participants are invited to bring a bag lunch. The Crescent City Library is located at 610 N Summit Street. Call 386698-2600 for more information.Serving Satsuma Pomona Park Lake Como Crescent City Seville Pierson Welaka Fruitland Georgetown East Palatka Palatka Interlachen Melrose San Mateo since 1898 www.facebook.com/put namcountycourierjournal(2 sections) Crescent City, FL (Includes 7% FL Sales Tax) Pomona Park Community Market and Breakfast is the rst Saturday of every month from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Community Center 200 E. Main St. Stay and shop with the vendors offering handmade and specialty items. One Book One Putnam ofcially kicks off on Tuesday, January 9 at the Palatka Mu nicipal Golf Course Clubhouse at 5:30 p.m. Copies of the book, Rocket Boys by Homer Hickam, Jr., are available for checkout at all ve branches of the Putnam County Library System. There are book discussions, movie screenings, STEM (Science, Technology, En gineering, and Math) workshops, contests, and special guest appearances planned. Meet the Greats Community Market and Breakfast One Book One Putnam Whats Going On? Who are these guys and what are they doing? Page A3 Putnam Countys Favorite Weekly Community Newspaper Putnam County (2 sections) Crescent City, FL (Includes 7% FL Sales Tax) Putnam County Putnam County Putnam County Putnam County Putnam County Putnam County Putnam County Putnam County Putnam County Putnam County Quilt ShowAttention quilters and ber arts enthusi asts! The Putnam County Headquarters Li brary in Palatka is sponsoring its annual quilt show. Quilters are encouraged to spend time during the show discussing their quilted items and chatting with those viewing their special art. There will be a Viewers Choice Award. Quilt Show hours: Thursday, Janu ary 11, 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; January 12, and Saturday, Janu ary 13, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Santa Fe Audubon Societys guest speaker Debra Segal, environmental scientist, will de scribe how creating treatment wetlands like Sweetwater Wetlands Park enables native plants to remove nutrients and pollutants to improve storm-water quality before discharg ing back to nature. Aquatic and wetland-de pendent wildlife are prospering. The aquifer is now recharged with cleaner water. The event will be on Tuesday, January 9 at 6:45 p.m. at the Trinity Episcopal Parish Hall on 204 Hwy 26 in Melrose. Recreation, eco-edu cation and tourism also benet. Contact Lau ra Berkelman for more information 352-4752023. Open to the public. Santa Fe Audubon 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 Steps and Beats Local authors new book on becoming a more condent dancer. Page B1 January(Left) Monday, January 16, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, members of the community marched in remembrance of Dr. King, one of the nations foremost civil rights leaders. (Right) The Mill er Enterprises Annex B uilding at one time home of the Putnam County Courier Journal was demolished after years of debate over its fate. 2017 Year in ReviewFebruary(Left) Thirty-four-yearold Keith Zalazney ar rested for robbing the T D Bank in Palatka on Saturday, February 4.(Right) Welakas Nine teenth Annual Spring fest, which took place o n Friday and Satur day February 17 and 1 8. The festival fea tured live music, food, c hildrens games, arts, crafts and antiques. March(Left) Boyz II Men and SJR State partnered to provide high school se niors the opportunity to g ive back to the com munity while earning h igher-education schol arship dollars. (Right) O n Wednesday, March 15 PCSO busted an in door grow nursery that c ontained 99 marijua na plants, with an es timated street value of $275,000.April(Left) Improvements to Eva Lyon Park and a new festival layout made the 39th annu al Catfish Festival m uch more accommo dating for festival-go ers. (Right) During a c ountywide burn ban, 27-year-old Daniel Scott Robinson Jr. was arrest ed on Friday, April 21 f or arson, in connection with a five acre brush fire in Interlachen. May(Left) Construction of a new Auto Zone, located at the corner of High way 17 and Magnolia A venue in Crescent City began on Monday, May 15. (Right) A Clay County Circuit Judge ruled to uphold the 2016 elec tion results for Putnam C ounty Sheriff that gave Gator DeLoach a razor slim victory over his op ponent Jon Kinney.June(Left) A massive live o ak damaged in 2016 during hurricane Matthew in Eva Lyon Park was sculpted into a pair of massive catfish. (Right) The First Annual Teen Police and Fire Academy took place Monday, June 19 through Friday, June 23 at the Florida Forestry Service of Welaka and was deemed a huge success.July( Left ) Daughters of the American Revolution, William Bartram Chap ter, collected nearly for ty pounds of relief items t o send to sailors affect ed in USS Fitzgerald I ncident. (Right) Sixtythree-year-old grand mother Sherry R. Johns w as arrested for burn ing down her own house o n Thursday, July 20.August(Left) One year after the passing of Chief Charlie, Welakas second new Chief of Police Walter Melton resigns after only six months on the job. (Right) A pallet of Ra men Noodles from Hitch cocks of East Palatka a nd a $550 check from the Rotary Club of Cres cent City were donat ed to Feed the Need of S outh Putnam.September(Left) On Friday, September 1, Governor Scott appointed Terry Turner to the Board of County Commissioners after the resignation of Thomas Stilwell. (Right) Monday, September 11 Hurricane Irma slams Florida as a category 5 and becomes one of the most devastating storms ever recorded.October(Left) Seminole Electric Cooperative announced a new power supply plan to continue providing power to its nine member not-forprofit distribution elec tric cooperatives. (Right) C rescent Citys Ninth An nual Trunk or Treat al most did not happen, but t hanks to the managers at the local Wendys, over 800 pounds of candy was given out at Halloween.November(Left) 27-year-old An drew Roy Donaldson w as arrested Friday, No vember 10 and charged w ith second-degree murder in the shooting death of a 37-year-old white male. (Right) On Saturday, November 18 Congressman Ted Yoho and his wife Carolyn de livered over 240 books t o Boyz II Men from the Library of Congress. December(Left) On Wednesday, November 29 Represen tative Ted Yoho rolled o ut a multi-year propos al for Putnam County t itled Project Putnam. (Right) Christmas pa rades around Putnam C ounty bring the spirit of the holiday season to area residents, like this photo from the Welaka Christmas Parade on Saturday, December 16. (2 sections) Steps and Beats Steps and Beats Steps and Beats Local authors new book Local authors new book Local authors new book Local authors new book Local authors new book on becoming a more on becoming a more on becoming a more on becoming a more Local authors new book Local authors new book Local authors new book Local authors new book Scout Report Troop 957 goes to DeLeon Springs for swimming test. Page A4

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Uncle Hickory made a New Years resolution. He swore he would quit drinking. He had been driving while he was drunk and had one of the biggest scares of his life. He claimed the angel of death had come for him. He was trembling as he told us about it. He had been to a New Years Eve party, and the celebration was quite lively. There were many kinds of alcohol, and Uncle Hickory was hard pressed to find one he didnt like. He sampled all of them, from the lightest beer to the hardest vodka. Of course, he claimed he only had a little of each. Once the old year had rolled away, and everyone had toasted the new one, it was time to head for home. Uncle Hickory wobbled his way to his car, feeling happy and light, hardly noticing the cold at all. It had snowed heavily the previous two days, and, while they had been celebrating, the wind had kicked up, causing huge drifts. Uncle Hickorys old car plowed through the drifts, sliding back and forth as he went. Suddenly the road smoothed out, Uncle Hickory said, and the car quit bucking and sliding. That was when it happened. I was traveling carefully along at about 30 miles per hour when I saw him approaching in my rear view mirror. He was floating toward me, all draped in black, closing the distance between us quickly. Uncle Hickory shook visibly as he continued. I knew who he was, and I knew he was coming for me. Even though it was slick and dangerous, I gunned the engine. I reached 50 miles per hour, and then looked in my rearview mirror. The gap between us was still getting smaller. Uncle Hickory took some deep breaths, trying to calm himself. As he was almost on my bumper, I put the pedal to the floor, rather to die from a wreck than to have that ghostly demon take me away. The speedometer climbed to 80 then to 90. I looked straight ahead, afraid to take my eyes off of the road. Finally, I glanced in my rearview mirror and no longer saw him. I felt a surge of relief flood over me when . Uncle Hickory paused, the blood draining from his face as the memory came back. We all leaned forward, anxious for the rest of the story. Just at the moment I thought Id lost him, he continued, there was a knock on my window. I turned, and there he was right by my door. I looked at my speedometer, and it said I was going more than 100 miles per hour, and still, he stayed right there. I knew at that point I only had one chance. What? we asked. What? he responded. Ill tell you what. I slammed on the brakes and then tore my way across the car and out the passenger side. I plowed through the snow and across the field, running for the light of a house I could see in the distance. I never looked back until I made it safely there. Once inside, I looked over my shoulder, and he was gone. A few days later, Bart, a friend of mine, stopped to visit with me. By the way, how is your Uncle Hickory? Hes okay, I answered. Why do you ask? Well, I was driving home New Years day after working the night shift, and I saw his car off the road, stuck deep in a field. I got out to check on him, and the closer I got the harder he gunned his engine. When I got right up beside his car, I knocked on his window. When I did, he screamed and tore out the other side of his car and took off running across the field. Bart paused, the concern showing in his face. I tried to catch up to him, but Ive never seen anyone run that fast, and I finally gave up. I just wanted to make sure he made it home safely. He did, I replied. But if we keep this just between you and me, he just might remain sober. Government Watch A2 City of Crescent CityCity Commission Meeting January 11, 6 p.m.Planning & Zoning Meeting, January 9, 6 p.m.City Hall, 3 North Summit Street. Meets 2nd Thurs of the month. 386-698-2525 www.CrescentCity-FL.com Town Council of WelakaTown Council Meeting, January 11, 6:00 p.m.Public Workshop, Tuesday, January 23, 5:30 p.m.Zoning Board Meeting, Tuesday, January 11, 5:30 p.m.Town Hall, Fourth Ave. Meets 2nd Tues of the month. 386-467-9800. www.Welaka-FL.govTown Council of Pomona ParkTown Council Meeting, January 11, 6 p.m.Beautification Committee Meeting, January 3 p.m. Town Hall Council Chambers 1775 US Hwy 17 S.TownClerk@PomonaPark.com 386-649-4902 www.PomonaPark.comPutnam County Board of County CommissionersJanuary 11, 9 a.m. Regular MeetingMeets second and fourth Tuesday in the Commission chambers, 2509 Crill Ave, Suite 100, Palatka. 386-329-0205. www.putnam-fl.com/bocc/Putnam County School Board January 16, 3:30 p.m. Regular MeetingMeets the first and third Tuesday in the School Board Meeting Room, 200 Reid Street, Palatka. 386-3290545. www.putnamschools.org OPINION A Lake Street Publishing Company Newspaper POSTMASTER: Send Address Change To Putnam County Courier Journal 320 N. Summit Street Crescent City, FL 32112USPS No. 451-140 2018 Lake Street Publishing Co. Published Every Wednesday by Lake Street Publishing Company, Inc. Periodicals Postage Paid at Crescent City, Florida.All Emails: pccjnews@gmail.com Juliette Laurie Editor / Publisher Mike Jones General Manager / Ad Sales Laura Berardi Production Assistant Beth Carter Staff WriterG.A. Teske Staff Writer If you would like to write for the Courier Journal, please give us a call or send an email. One Year Florida Subscription $24 (incl. tax)One Year Out-Of-State $28 Office Hours: 9 am to 5 pm Monday through FridayAdvertising and Legal Deadline: 5 pm Friday Classified Deadline: 10 am Monday Editorial Deadline: Noon FridayPhone: 386-698-1644 Fax: 386-698-1994 Putnam County On line: www.cjnewsfl.com From Me to YouJuliette Laurie Editor/Publisher Dear Editor: This is a thank you to everyone that helped Toys For Tots this year. Due to Hurricane Irma a lot of families were in need. We had donations from the following businesses: The Hideaway Bar & Grill collected two boxes of toys. The Cheyenne Saloon collected two boxes. Bealls Outlet collected one box. Animal Health Center collected one box. TD Bank and Center State Bank each collected one box. Winn-Dixie of Crescent City collected one box. With the help of these business a lot of children received gifts this Christmas. God bless you all and hope you all have a happy new year! Carlyn Falater and WIlliam, the Elf, Sowers Members of the Palatka New Vision Lions Club Pomona Park DISCLAIMER: Views expressed on this page do not necessarily reflect the editorial position of the Putnam County Courier Journal or its advertisers. The Putnam County Courier Journal does not knowingly publish false information and may not be held liable for the views of readers exercising their right to free expression. National Blood Donor Month National Blood Donor Month has been observed in January since 1970 with the goal of increasing blood and platelet donations during winter one of the most difficult times of year to collect enough blood products to meet patient needs. Inclement winter weather often results in canceled blood drives, and seasonal illnesses, like the flu, may cause some donors to become temporarily unable to donate. Every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood. Approximately 36,000 units of red blood cells are needed every day in the U.S. Nearly 7,000 units of platelets and 10,000 units of plasma are needed daily in the U.S. Nearly 21 million blood components are transfused each year in the U.S. The average red blood cell transfusion is approximately 3 pints. The blood type most often requested by hospitals is type O. The blood used in an emergency is already on the shelves before the event occurs. It is estimated that sickle cell disease affects 90,000 to 100,000 people in the U.S. About 1,000 babies are born with the disease each year. Sickle cell patients can require frequent blood transfusions throughout their lives. According to the American Cancer Society, more than 1.69 million people are expected to be diagnosed with cancer in 2017. Many of them will need blood, sometimes daily, during their chemotherapy treatment. A single car accident victim can require as many as 100 pints of blood. Blood can be safely donated every 56 days. Platelets can be given every seven days up to 24 times a year. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. If you would like to donate blood you can contact LifeSouth at 386328-7299 to find an event or go to their center on 6003 Crill Ave in Palatka. The Putnam County Courier Journal welcomes your letters to the Editor. Letters should be brief and legibly written. To be published, letters must include the writers signature, printed name, phone number, and hometown. We will NOT print any letters without this information. Address letters to: Editor 320 N. Summit St., Crescent City, FL 32112 or FAX to 386-698-1994, or E-mail to pccjnews@gmail.com Letters to the Editor Dear Editor: Conservatives, Republican and Democrat, economic philosophy is that if you grow the economy everyone benefitsa rising tide lifts all boats. Liberals economic philosophy is dictating how to fairly divvy up a pie that they are preventing from growing any larger. Conservatives want to give everyone economic opportunity, while Liberals want to insure no one is left behind. Conservatives favorite way to grow the economy is to lower taxes. You put more money in peoples hands, they will spend it, just ask my wife. Liberals contend that a tax cut only benefits the rich. And even though the top 20 percent of income earners pay 87 percent of the Federal Income taxes, Liberals believe they should pay even more. And when the bottom 45 percent pay $0 Federal Income tax, it is mathematically quite difficult to reduce the taxes of someone already at $0. But that is a shallow view of the economic picture. If you increase economic activity you increase everyones opportunity to make more money, which leads to even more economic activity. When people buy more stuff you need more people making more stuff. David Enzor Crescent City Uncle Hickorys New Years ResolutionDaris Howard Did that Come From?Cloak and Dagger Cloak and dagger has the same feel as the expression smoke and mirrors in that they both conjure up images of subterfuge and de ceit. A form of dra ma that was popular in France and Spain in the 18th century, which included pro tagonists who typi cally wore cloaks and carried daggers was called de cape et dpe and, in Spanish, de capa y espada, which both translate literal ly as of cloak and sword. The cloak was wrapped around one arm as a form of shield and the dag ger, or sword, was used for fighting. That appears not to be the source of the English term cloak and dagger, which was in use in English prior to the 18th century. An alternative use of the cloak was to conceal the identity, in the manner of a treacherous assas sin. That explanation seems to chime best with the earliest ex ample of a figurative allusion to cloak and dagger that I have found in print. That is found in a letter printed in The Derby Mercury, July 1769, under the title of A Speech of a Nobel Earl to a Great Per sonage: ...and those that endeavour to dis solve it [the Union of Great Britain], carry a dagger under the cloak of patriotism, to stab their country in the heart. The Noble Earl is anonymous but, given the date, we can assume that the Great Personage was George III. Other early exam ples in print also use the imagery of a dagger concealed under a cloak, like this from The Morn ing Post, September 1836: ...carrying a dagger against the Church, under the capacious cloak of economy. Cloaks and daggers had been referred to in print prior to the 1840s but, if anyone can claim to have brought the expression cloak and dagger to the English language, it was Charles Dickens. In Barnaby Rudge, 1841, he made a sar donic reference to the type of melodra mas that employed the cloak and dagger as stage devices: ...his servant brought in a very small scrap of dirty paper, tightly sealed in two places, on the inside whereof was inscribed in pret ty large text these words: A friend. Desiring of a confer ence. Immediate. Private. Burn it when youve read it. Where in the name of the Gunpowder Plot did you pick up this? said his mas ter. It was given him by a person then waiting at the door, the man replied. Wi th a cloak and dagger? said Mr Chester. From the Phase Finder: http://www. phrases.org.uk/. Did that Did that Did that Come Come Come Come From? From? From? From? Taxes and Your Economy Toys For Tots Thanks You!

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Middletons from Tennessee Visit Josh, Lynne and Kas sidy Middleton were in Putnam County befor e Christmas to visit her mother, Nora Michaels in Palatka and Joshs family in Pomona Park. While in Florida, they visited Family Universal in Orlando, befor e returning home to Cleveland Tennes see, on December 22. Christmas at the Cube The very first Christ mas Eve special was held at the South Putnam Church to proclaim the true meaning of Christmas. Pastor Brian Baker led the service in which members lit candles to let their lights shine in the beauti ful candlelight service. The South Putnam Church, affectionately known as the Cube, is located on the site of the former Y.M.C.A. on Amos Road and Union Avenue in Crescent City. A Day in the Woods Dan Middleton, his son Kolby and grand sons, Luke, Chan and Bobby enjoyed a day at the camp in the woods on Tuesday. Joining a long line of hunters in the family, Luke got his first deer in November on his first hunting trip. Community Education The Crescent City Womans Club will be hosting a Communi ty Education Night On Domestic V iolence on Wednesday, January 17 at 7 p.m. at their clubhouse on 604 N. Summit Street in Cres cent City. If you have any questions you can email Laur een Faulk ner at lfaulkner7@cfl. rr .com. Auditions There will be audi tions for a comical farce called Understanding Y our Pet with Dr. Mar la Brett. It is a play by Andr ew Frodahl. Au ditions will take place at the Cr escent City Womans Clubhouse on Monday, January 22 at 6 p.m. Auditions are open to the public and male and female roles are available. If you have any questions you can email Laur een Faulkner at lfaulkner7@cfl.rr.com. Lighting Contest The Beautification Committee of Pomona Park had a blast driv ing around Town on Thursday, December 21 to see all the homes decorated for the light ing contest. They said it was a tough, tough choice this year as there were so many stunning displays. First place went to Paula Stevens, second place went to Will McCoy and third place went to Judy Graham. Park Dedication On Satur day, De cember 23 the City of Pomona Park sur prised their mayor by dedicating the for mer Morgan Park to their Mayor, John Bergq uist. The park will now be known as Mayor John C. Bergquist, Jr. Park or just fondly ref ered to as The May ors Park. Councilman Joseph Svingala led the dedication. Present were Councilmen Dr Robert Warren, CarrieAnn Ev ans, Victor Szatkow ski, and Jim Griffin. Also present was Mayor Berquists family, County Commission ers Buddy Goddard, Bill Pickens, Larry Harvey and Chip Liabl, Supervisor or Elections Charles Overturf, Sherif f Gator DeLoach, Pomona Park Fire Chief Melvin Asher, Chaplain John Chapman, and several vol unteer firefighters. Meet the Greats Meet the Gr eats will be on Wednesday, January 10 from 12-1 p.m. The Crescent City Library Board welcomes Pat Maden, a long-time resident of Crescent City, who will share memories and photos of her travels to Paris and Amster dam. Participants are invited to bring a bag lunch. The Cr escent City Library is located at 610 N Summit Str eet. Call 386-6982600 for more infor mation. Annual Used Book Sale The Cr escent City Li brary will have their annual used book sale on Friday, January 19 fr om 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Saturday, Janu ary 20 from 9 a.m.-12 p.m.. The sale is sponsored by the Crescent City Library Boar d. Proceeds from the sale benefit the Crescent City Public Library and will go to fund new books and materials as well as library programs including Summer Reading Program. The Cr escent City Public Library is located at 610 N. Summit Street. Call 386-698-2600 for more information. Pickleball If you thought that the popular sport of Pickleball was just for the ladies, think again. The Saint Johns River Pickleball Group that plays at the Welaka firehouse courts has as many or more men playing than women, and theyre all having a blast. New members are always welcome; call Peggy Williams at 524-4053 for more in formation. Spragues Are Back Dale and Juani ta Sprague are back down south. They were in charge of the Lake Como Commu nity Center Christmas Dinner A3 COMMUNITYVisits, a Dedication, and a Book Sale Beth Carter 386-698-1644community.pccj@gmail.com Candle lighting at the Cube. Jana Conner, Jr. Grad Regent and past Sr. Regent with sisters, Abigail and Isabel Hayes at the Crescent City Moose Club Women of the Moose (WOTM) Kids Christmas Party. We Cater To CowardsFULL SERVICE GENERAL DENTISTRY 325-8081 American Dental Center of Palatka American Dental Center of Palatka American Dental Center of Palatka REITER INSURANCE AGENCYCrescent City Since 1916, Auto-Owners has partnered with independent agents to provide local service and trusted protection. Protection you need, service you deserve. (right to left) Pat Freeman, Delores Dee Craft, and Pats sister Jane, celebrated their Christmas lunch at Belles Bistro. Kolby, Josh, Dan and Tavis Middleton with Kassi dy and Bobby. Mayor John Berqguists family at the park dedication. Penny Pugh, Phoebe Goggins and Karen Moore ham it up in the photo booth at one of the re cent Tuesday Senior Lunches at Crescent City Wo mans Club. Pomona Park lighting contest winner Paula Stevens.Luke Middleton with grandfather Dan after a day in the woods. Putnam Health and Fitness Center Join the Class! Join the Class! Join the Class! Located at 213 Perry Street Pomona Park, 32181 (Bldg #2) For more information call 386-649-8784 The SilverSneakers Fitness Program is an innovative health, exercise, and wellness program helping older adults live healthy, active lifestyles. Come to one of the classes at the Putnam Health and PHFC has their own Healthways Advisor, June Dryburg, who is also the Operational Manager. June will explain every part of becoming a member. She can check with your insurance and let you know if you qualify for a free membership. member. She can check with your insurance and let you know if you qualify for a free membership. Pomona Park, 32181 (Bldg #2) member. She can check with your insurance and let you know if you member. She can check with your insurance and let you know if you qualify for a free membership. You may You may You may qualify for qualify for qualify for a a a FREE FREE FREE Membership! Membership! Membership! Kenneth L. Biggs, L.F.D. Owner CLAYTON FRANK & BIGGSFuneral Home L.L.C. Y Since 1930 ZCremation & Traditional Funeral Home386.698.1621402 Cypress Avenue 386.698.1621 402 Cypress Avenue Crescent City, Florida Biggsfuneralhome@yahoo.com Cremation & Traditional Funeral Home

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Wow! I love vaca tion time! We have so many fun activities planned! We went to DeLeon Springs to pass our swim test the oth er day because we ar e going canoeing and kayaking and camping. To pass the BSA swim check, you jump into the water and swim 75 feet us ing one of the swim stokes you like best like the br eaststroke or sidestroke. The u-turn on your back and do the back stroke for 25 feet. Oh, and you have to have at least one sharp tur n in there too. Our scoutmas ter also has us oat on our back too. W e also know the dog paddle to tread wa ter. I asked one of our leaders to time me! I jumped in the wa ter and took off. Ive been working out and playing football so I gur ed Id be able to go pretty fast and I did! Ill have to see how well I do next time and see if I can beat my time! It was great be cause all eight of us passed our test right away. We were joking around be cause the rst time we went several years ago, we had to go several times just to learn the swim strokes! Two of our scouts had never learned to swim. Now, they are two of our best swim mers. They have really good endurance and last a long time swimming without r esting. It was pretty funny to see our younger boys at the springs. One was taking his shirt off and ex claimed Are you r eady? Look at my six pack! Then he pointed at his 11 year old arm muscles and said, How about these guns?!!? We were all laughing and having a great time! We also had to teach the younger boys how to do res cues. We throw the otation device out 25 feet and r escue someone in need. Then that person gets to be rescued so the techniques are taught befor e we ever need them on a camp ing trip. Its part of that Be pr epared motto that the Boy Scouts have. Weve never had to use it and our scout lead er says he hopes we never have to. He says thats why we do lots of short little trips to Lake Stella so he knows we are prepared before we go on longer ones. Im glad we can go canoeing and kaya king and enjoy the outdoors! Pack and T roop 957 are sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. W e meet on Wednesday night at 6 p.m. at the LDS church. If you want to have lots of fun, please come partic ipate with us! Cub Scouts ar e age 8-10. Boy Scouts are ages 11-18. We also have activities for the girls too!Way Back When... A4 OUR TO WN 25 years agoJanuary 8, 1967 Magazine Article Sends Mail Avalanche to Chamber An article in a national magazine about the big bass in Crescent Lake caused a large amount of inquires to be sent to the Crescent City Chamber of Commerce. 50 years ago Years Ago...January 8, 1943 Defense Shots About two hundred people gathered in the high school to learn about the workings of the Aircraft Warning System. The meeting was under the direction of the Army and Mr. Shepherd, the district director of the system.75 years ago 10 years ago 5 years agoJanuary 9, 2013 Changes at Putnam County Animal Services Animal Control was moved under the supervision of the Department of Cor rections headed by Major John Griffin. January 9, 2008 Its Cold Gover nor Charlie Crist declared a state of emergency for 14 days due to a hard freeze. It was the hardest freeze in five years with temperatures in the mid20s. Compiled from the Crescent City News, Crescent City Journal, Crescent City Courier Journal, Putnam County Courier Journal and other local news sources. January 6, 1993 Porkys Landing has New Owners Patricia and Homer Kitchens have been owners of Por kys Landing Restaurant and Marina in Georgetown since August. They bought the business on the water be cause they figured it would be a good retirement. Lovarnso WalkerSales Consultant256 Hwy. 17 N., Palatka, FL 32177 (386) 328-8863 Ext. 117 (800) 382-3692 Ext. 117 FAX (386) 328-7222 CELL (386) 559-3512 lovarnsowalker@beckchrysler.com Dr. Walker Curing All Your Automotive Needs The pages of the Courier Journal of January 5, 1994 carried an announcement that a local resident would host a bird watching excursion. (Betsys grandmother, Ruth, spent many hours enjoying the birds on Lake Stella near her home, and brought many out of town guests to enjoy the bird ing on and around the lake.) Birdwatchers Invited Local bir d watch er Betsy Kane will lead a short excur sion to view some of the many bir ds that winter in Florida at 10 a.m. Thurs day, January 6 to the Welaka National Fish Hatchery. Bald eagles, sand hill cranes and white ibis ar e among the threatened birds that have been sighted recently. If you dont know a canary from a cardinal, come and learn. If youre an experienced birder, come share your ex pertise. Eleven Different Sizes from 5x5 to 12x20TWO LOCATIONSBehind Kangaroo on Paradise Shores Road, Crescent City(includes fenced outside storage area) and County Road 309, Fruitland386-698-2002P&FMINI WAREHOUSE STORAGE Troop 957 Passes a Swim Test Wow! I love vaca JoseScout Scribe Quitting tobacco isn't easy. Finding help should be. Tobacco Free Florida QUIT YOUR WAY GROUP QUITIs the in-person option of Tobacco Free Florida Quit Your Way services.FREE Programs cover all forms of tobacco. FREE D.O.G Gets It! Do You? Subscribe today! Only $24 a year! 386-698-1644

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Memorial services were held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Decem ber 23, 2017 at the United Pentecostal Church in Palatka with Pastor Daniel Kelly of ficiating. Memorial donations may be made to the United Pente costal Church, 1195 S. State Road 19, Palatka, FL 32177. Messages of encouragement and sympathy may be ex pressed on his online guest book at www.themastersfuneralhomes.com. Masters Funeral Home of Palatka was in char ge of ar rangements. BANNERVILLE Christine Sweat Alm a Christine Weaver Sweat, affectionately known as Mooma, 95, of Ban nerville passed away Mon day, December 25, 2017 at Cr estwood Nursing Center in Palatka following an extend ed illness. Christine was bor n July 16, 1922 in Palatka to John C. Weaver and Alma Manning Weaver. She was a lifelong resident of Putnam Coun ty and was a 1940 graduate of Mellon High School in Palatka. At the end of 1940 s he married Jessie Sweat, a marriage that lasted 53 years until his death. Chris tine was a 65+ year member of Pr ovidence Baptist Church where she had taught Sun day school and served as pianist and tr easurer in her younger years. She enjoyed reading and traveling. She was a loving mother who took care of her children and their descendants. She was preceded in death by her parents, Clifford J.C. and Alma Weaver; her husband of 64 years, Jesse Sweat; a great grandson, Levi Comer; three brothers, La mar Weaver, Joe Weaver, and Melvin W eaver; and a son-inlaw, Rocky Bridges. Surviving are five children, Beverly Pressley (Tim), Mar sha Bridges, Sherry Mc Gowan (Donnie), Jack Sweat, Sr (Judy), and Jerry Sweat (Darlene), all of Palatka; two sisters, Neva Knowles of Palatka and Norma Thomp son of Oviedo; two broth ers, Doyle Nick Weaver of Hollister and Gerald T ony Weaver of Palatka; a special sister-in-law, Thelma Carter of Palatka; a special brotherin-law, Julius Rat Sweat of Bannerville; sixteen grand children, Nita James, Joey McGowan, Donna Wheeler Donald McGowan, Jr. (Pok ey), Tracy Hedrick, Christine Lashley (Ce), Bud Bridges (little Bud), Jack Sweat, Jr. (Jay Jay), Joe Sweat, Kris ti Cornwell, Ashley Baggett, Jar ed Feagin, Sabrina Mar tinez, Lena Comer, Jerry Lee Sweat, and Jessica Sweat; numerous great grandchil dren and great great grandchildren, nieces, and neph ews. Funeral services wer e held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Decem ber 30, 2017 at Providence Baptist Chur ch with Pastor Phillip Wilkinson and Pastor Rudy Howard officiating. The family received friends one hour prior to the service at the church. Burial followed in Providence Baptist Church cemetery. Flowers are greatly appre ciated or donations may be made to Pr ovidence Baptist Church, 141 N. Providence Church Road, Palatka, FL 32177. Messages of encouragement or sympathy may be ex pressed on her online guest book at www.themastersfuneralhomes.com. Masters Funeral Home of Palatka was in char ge of ar rangements. PALATKA Ralph Charles HigginbothamRalph Charles Higginbotham, 78, of Palatka, passed from this life peacefully on Sunday, December 25, 2017 at Palatka Health Care and Rehabilitation Center. Born in Jacksonville, he has re sided in Palatka for 37 years. A plumber by trade, Ralph loved the water was a skilled bowler and loved his family very much. He was a mem ber of the Loyal Order of the Moose Lodge #184 and was of the Baptist faith. Ralph is survived by his wife of 52 years, Ora Fay Hig ginbotham; two daughters, Angela Renee Bur ney (Ardell) of Palatka, and Teresa Re nee Stroger (Fiance Chris) of Palatka; and six grandchil dren, Byron Burney, Ashley Bur ney, Courtney Stroger, Dylan Stroger, Melissa Barn hill and Mitchell Burney; t hree great-grandchildren, Mackenzey Burney, Corbin Burney and Sophia Burney. Services were held at 2 p.m. on Friday, December 29, 2017 at Johnson-Over turf Funeral Home in Palatka with Br o. Mike Stanley of ficiating. Burial followed at Bostwick Cemetery. Special thanks to Car egiv er Tot McKinney at Palatka Health Car e and Rehabilita tion Center. Memories and condolenc es may be expressed to the family at Charless Book of Memories page at www.John son-Overturffunerals.com. Arrangements wer e entrust ed to Johnson-Overturf Fu neral Home in Palatka. INTERLACHEN John S. Taylor, Sr. John Stanley Taylor, Sr., 83, of Interlachen, passed from this life peacefully af ter an extended illness on Sunday, December 24, 2017, at the Community Hospice Bailey Center for Car e in St. Augustine. Born in Penns ville Township, New Jersey, he served in the U.S. Ar my during the Korean War. Fol lowing his discharge from the Ar my, he worked in Dry Ice with the Dupont Corporation in Deepwater, New Jersey, for 30 years. Moving to Putnam County in 1992, he enjoyed fishing, golf and bowling. John was a member of the Bethel Assembly of God in Interlachen. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Helen Marie Taylor; brothers and sisters -in-law Tommy and Sarah Taylor and Charles and Cora Bell Taylor. John is survived by his lov ing wife of 59 years, Rober ta Taylor; his sons John S. T aylor (Kathy) and Donald S. Taylor (Cindy); Daughters Margaret R. Taylor and Pa tricia A. Taylor; a brother Otis T aylor (Millie) and sis ters Alma Hannah, Grace G leason, Eleanor Taylor, seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Memorial Services celebrat ing Johns life were held at 2 p.m. Sunday, December 31, 2017 at the Bethel Assembly of God in Interlachen with Pastor Mike McColley of fi ciating. Interment at a later date will be at the Jackson ville National Cemetery with Military honors bestowed by the U.S. Ar my. Flowers are gratefully ac cepted or the family requests memorial donations be sent to Bethel Assembly of God Chur ch, 119 County Road 315, Interlachen, FL 32148. Memories and condolenc es may be expressed to the family at Johns Book of Memories page at www.John son-Overturffunerals.com. Arrangements wer e entrust ed to Johnson-Overturf Fu neral Home in Interlachen. PALATKA Wallace L. Jones, Jr. W allace Linwood W.L. Jones, Jr., 91, of Palatka, passed from this life peace fully on Saturday, December 23, 2017. Bor n in Poncha toula, Louisiana, he served her oically in the U.S. Navy during World War II aboard the USS Pittsburgh which became the most decorated crew in the United States Naval history for its aid and assistance to the USS Frank lin and its crew. Following his dischar ge from the Navy in 1946 at P.S.C. Memphis, Tennessee, W.L. hitchhiked his way to Palatka where he began working on the con struction of the Hudson Pulp and Paper Mill. W .L. worked with Hudson Pulp and Pa per and Georgia Pacific from 1947 until his r etirement in 1990 as maintenance man ager. He continued to do consulting work another six years. He had also been a member of the Inter nation al Brotherhood of Electrical W orkers (IBEW) and was a 4th degree Knight with the Knights of Columbus. W.L. was a member of St. Monica Catholic Church and was in strumental in the formation of the food pantry ministry at St. Monica. W .L. always cherished time spent with his family and especially enjoyed the opportunity to travel. He was preceded in death by his wife of 55 years, Flor ence Warwick Jones, a son, L ynn Jones and a daughter Kathy Devinney. W.L. is survived by his chil dren, Janice Jones Pounds (G ary) of Hastings, Wesley Jones (Kathy) of Brunswick, Georgia and Erick Jones of Palatka, a daughter-in-law, June Edwards Jones of Tex arkana, Arkansas, two sis ters, Peggy Martin of Pascagoula, Mississippi and Jean Blair of Palatka, 13 grand children, Clint Jones (Katie), Br ett Jones (Casey), Aus tin Jones (Dana), Stephen Pounds (Audra), Katie Forte (Matt), Jonathan Pounds (Sa mantha), Cole Jones (Amity), Carter Jones (Mary Clair e), Rachel Bishop (Matt), Erica Devinney, Megan Devinney, Amanda Devinney Belcher (Casey) and Jason Devinney, 21 great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and neph ews. A mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at 10 a.m. on Thursday, December 28, 2017 at St. Monica Catho lic Church with Father Ron Camar da as officiant. Buri al with Military honors bestowed by the U.S. Navy followed at Palatka Memorial Gar dens. The family received friends Wednesday from 5-7 p.m. at Johnson-Overturf Funeral Home in Palatka. Flowers are gratefully ac cepted or the family requests memorial donations be sent to St. Monica Catho lic Church, 114 S. 4th St., Palatka, FL 32177 to assist with the Food Pantry Min istry. Memories and condolences may be expr essed to the fam ily at W.L.s Book of Memories page at www.Johnson-Over turffunerals.com. Arrangements wer e entrust ed to Johnson-Overturf Fu neral Home in Palatka. RIVERDALE Grace K. Lewis Grace K. Lewis, 90, of River dale and formerly of Palatka, passed away Thursday, December 21, 2017 at her home following a brief illness. Grace was born in River dale, a small community in St. Johns County, wher e she was residing since moving from Palatka in 2005. She and her late husband, J.T. Shorty Lewis, moved to Palatka in December 1953 to raise their children, mak ing it their home for over 46 years. During their years in Palatka, she worked keep ing the records straight and working right alongside of Shorty at both Shortys Phil lips 66 Station and Shortys Union 76 Station pumping gas and changing oil. She was a long time mem ber and very active in many pr ograms at Trinity United Methodist Church. She was a Den Mother to a Boy Scout Troop sponsored by Trinity, taught Sunday school, was a very active member of the United Methodist Womens group and the Ruth Fellow ship Circle, and enjoyed her w eekly prayer group. She remained active there until moving back home to Riv erdale. Grace was an avid mem ber of the CFO (Camps Far thest Out) group and often led breakout worship groups. She went to great lengths to learn as much as she could about the Bible as she took her relationship with the Lord very seriously. She even took courses in Discipleship, becoming certified as a Disci ple Leader. She always took pride in participating in the choir and the many cantatas T rinity performed for the commu nity. Upon moving back to River dale, she returned to the Riverdale Community United Methodist Church where she had been a mem ber as a child. She continued her worship by singing in the choir and attending ser vices faithfully and greeting everyone with her amazing smile, gaining her the cher ished nickname of Amazing Grace. She always put her childr en first. She was so loving that she stayed at home rather than being transferred into an institution because she wanted to be there to tell all of her family how much she loved them. She was preceded in death by her parents, A.H. Bill and Effie Kennedy; her hus band of 55 years, J.T. Shorty Lewis; two sisters, Frauline Helzel and Mildred Kennedy; and a brother, Chester Kennedy. Surviving are a daughter and son-in-law, Kathy and David Baker of Riverdale; sons and daughters-in-law, Raymond Lewis of Interlachen, Mickey and Liz Lewis of Macclen ny, and Charles and Karon Payne of Palatka; two sisters, Flor ence Roberts and Delores Rowley, both of Riverdale; 12 grandchildren, 25 great grandchildren, seven greatgreat grandchildren, and nu merous nieces and nephews whom she loved gr eatly. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, De cember 27, 2017 at Riverdale Community United Method ist Church, with Rev. Den nis Lewis, her grandson, and Rev. Gr eg Grant, Riverdale, officiating. Burial followed in Palatka Memorial Gardens. Calling hours were from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, De cember 26 at Masters Funer al Home in Palatka. Memorial gifts may be sent to Trinity United Methodist Church, 1400 Husson Ave., Palatka, FL 32177. Messages of encouragement or sym pathy may be expressed on her online guestbook at www. t hemastersfuneralhomes. com. Masters Funeral Home of Palatka was in charge of ar rangements. CRESCENT CITY Dorman L. Weaver, Jr. Dor man L. Weaver, Jr., 54, passed away unexpectedly, Thursday, December 21 at North Florida Regional Medi cal Center in Gainesville. Af fectionately known as Buster, he was a lifelong resident of Crescent City, graduating from Crescent City High School in 1982. Not long after he enlisted in the Air Force. Upon completion of his tour of duty he came back to south Putnam Coun ty and worked at Spartan Electr onics in Deland and the Pall Corporation, also in Deland for 22 years as a Maintenance Supervisor. Buster enjoyed listening to Bluegrass music especially The Lewis Family. He loved restoring automobiles and he recently became a member of the Mustang Club and was in the process of restoring a 1967 Mustang he recently purchased. Buster devoted his life to the care of his Mother and sister, Connie. He was preceded in death by his parents and brother, Patrick Melvin. He is survived by his life long partner, Kent Steven son of Holly Hill; his brothers, Thomas (Dee) Melvin of Hinesville, Geor gia and Wal ter Weaver of Ocala, sisters, V irginia King and Connie Weaver of Crescent City and numerous nieces and neph ews. His family welcomed guests at the funeral home for vis itation from 5 7 p.m. on Thursday, December 28. Fu neral services were held at 2 p.m. at the funeral home on Friday, December 29. Burial followed in Eden Cemetery with military honors. Anyone wishing to sign Busters online guestbook or leave messages of condolence for his family may do so at biggsfh.com. Arrangements were un der the direction of Clayton Frank & Biggs Funeral Home in Cr escent City. FRANCIS Terry G. Owens Terry Garland Owens, 59, of Francis passed away unexpectedly in Hawthorne on Wednesday, De cember 20, 2017. T erry was born in Glendale Hospital in Palatka and had been a resident of Palatka for most of his life. He was em ployed by Krebs Land Devel opment in Palatka. He loved the outdoors and enjoyed hunting and air boating. He also loved spoiling his grand children, doing things with them and taking them plac es. He was learning to play the guitar Terry was a mem ber of Loyal Order of Moose, Chapter 184 in Palatka and V ictory Christian Fellowship in East Palatka. He was preceded in death by his father, Garland Ow ens; and a sister, Rhonda Kay Owens. Surviving ar e a daughter and son-in-law, Melissa and Chester Townsend of Haw thorne; a son, Christopher O wens of Interlachen; his mother, Ina Owens of Fran cis; two brothers and sis ter-in-law, John Owens of Francis, and Glenn and Ang ie Owens of St. George, Geor gia; seven grandchildren, Emily Sullivan, Chloe Sulli van, Britteny Owens, Alexis Owens, Cassidy T ownsend, Paiton Townsend, Brandon Townsend, and one on the way; and several nieces, nephews and cousins. The family received friends on Tuesday, December 26 at 1 p.m. at Masters Funer al Home in Palatka. Funeral services followed at 2 p.m. at the funeral home with Pastor Derr ell Smith and Pastor Ben Tippett officiating. Burial fol lowed in Oak Hill East Cemetery in Palatka. Friends may sign the online r egister at www.themasters funeralhomes.com. Masters Funeral Home of Palatka was in char ge of ar rangements. INTERLACHEN Larry S. Eaton Larry S. Eaton, 82, of Interlachen, passed away unexpectedly on Tuesday, Decem ber 19, 2017 at P utnam Commu nity Medical Center in Palatka. Larry was bor n in North Conway, New Hampshire and had lived in Interlachen for the past ten years, coming from Riverside, California. He worked as a floor covering installer and had owned and operated his own flooring in stallation companies in Connecticut and later in Califor nia. He was a member of the United Pentecostal Church in Palatka and had served as a Deacon. He was a very hard working man who dropped out of school when he was 11 years old to go to work logging. Larry was a true Re naissance Man who could do just about anything. He was blessed with empathy. He was an exceptional hus band, father, brother, grandfather, and great grandfather and was a her o to his family. He was preceded in death by his wives, Winnifred Ea ton and Carol Eaton; two grandchildr en, Richard Cow CHURCH A5 Crescent City First Baptist Church of Crescent City ...... 386-698-1578 101 S. Summit St.Episcopal Church of the Holy Comforter ... 386-698-1983 Howe Memorial United Methodist Church .... First Presbyterian Church ......................... St. John the Baptist Catholic Church ....... Georgetown Georgetown United Methodist Church ..... 386-467-8855 1448 CR 309 Pomona Park First Baptist Church of Pomona Park ....... Lake Como Word of Faith Bible Church ....................... 386-698-4643 Welaka Welaka United Methodist Church ............. Satsuma Hope Lutheran Church ............................... 386-649-0631 a.m. Johnson-Overturf Funeral Home386-684-3360 Lake Como Community United Methodist Church...386-649-8480 .... Karl N. Flagg Serenity Memorial Chapel Serving your Family with Dignity & Respect Serving All Faiths 2400 Madison Street Palatka, Florida 32177 Rev. Karl N. Flagg Karla N. Flagg-Wright LaShonda T. Simmons Mt. Tabor First Baptist Church South Putnam CampusPalatka Mt. Tabor First Baptist Church Main Campus Obituaries All Saints Anglican Church Clayton Frank & Biggs Funeral Home386-698-1621 Pilgrim Congregational Church of Pomona Park... 386-649-8467 Got Hope? Johnson-Overturf Funeral Home386-325-4521 Masters Funeral Home Palatka386-325-4564 Masters Funeral Home Palatka386-325-4564 Masters Funeral Home Palatka386-325-4564 Masters Funeral Home Palatka386-325-4564 an and Nicholas Cowan; a great granddaughter; and eleven brothers and sisters. Surviving are two daugh ters, Deborah Hopkins of Riverside, Califor nia and Ter ry Cowan of Kissimmee; five br others, Morris Robinson of Maine, Zeke Eaton, Charlie Eaton, and Malcom Eaton all of New Hampshire; and Frankie Eaton of Sebring; four sisters, Ramona Fens termaker of Interlachen, Rebecca M. Ban Cedarfield (his twin sister) of Interlachen, and Abbie Eaton and Beatrice Pauze both of Sebring; six grandchildren; twelve great grandchildren; special aunt, Joyce Witham of Pomona Park; and best friend, Bill Mike of Interlachen. Johnson-Overturf Funeral Home386-325-4521

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The Arts Council of Greater Palatka is pleased to announce that their opening show for the 2018 sea son will feature artist X iao Li, who resides in Gainesville. The opening reception will be h eld Friday January 5, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the historic Larimer Arts Center on 216 Reid Street in Palatka. Lis paintings range from impressionis tic to realistic styles, e mploying rich sub tle colors. Her subject m atter encompasses scenes from the nat ural world around nor theast Florida, to still life, to portrait art. Lis love for art can be traced back to her teenage years in Chi na, when she and her m iddle school class mates, were all sent t o the countryside by their government, to the coldest part of Chi na, to be re-educated by t he peasants. She relates that life there was hard, but what a beautiful place it was! To the young Xiao the area was like an oil painting coming out the canvas of the Rus sian Masters. It was t here, she started to learn to paint. After long hours working in the fields, she and her closest friends hud dled over the smoking o il lamp and learned the basics of paint ing from a torn book. X iao says she still has some of her paintings from that time. Eight years after the students were sent to the country, the au thorities realized they h ad made a mistake and most of the stu dents, in the millions, were moved back to the city. By then Xiao was so busy studying in college, coming to America, and becom ing a Molecular Biol ogist, it was another 3 0 years before she had time to pick up a paint brush. Finally, upon retire ment her long lost d esire to pursue art became a reality. Her retirement became a new beginning. She states, Like its been said, when a door is closed on you, look around and you may find an open window. I found my window. I still remember how exited I was when I was opening the box of my first art sup plies and holding t hose paint brushes, canvases, and paint tubes. It is obvious to the viewers of her work that her talents never died, they just lay dormant waiting for the opportunity to bloom again. In her biography Xiao writes, Now, painting to me is like medi tation. When I paint, t he world disappears. There is only me, my subject, and my can vas. The peaceful ness is like a scent f rom burning incense, floating around me. It is the best of my time. Gallery Chairman, Evelyn Snyder says of her work, Xiao has an expressive and enjoyable ability and style you are sure to love viewing, and possibly taking home with you. Please join them on Friday, Janu ary 5 to welcome Xiao L i to Palatka and to The Arts Council Gal leries. The reception i s from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., is free and open to the public with light refreshments to be enjoyed. The Arts Council of Greater Palatka is the designated Lo cal Arts Agency for P utnam County and is a 501C-3 non-prof it organization and is s upported in part by The Putnam County Tourist Development Council, the City of Palatka, the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture and our members. For more info, please visit www.artsinputnam. o rg or call 386-328-8998. January 3, 2018 A6 Special to the Courier Journal Parker Parker Parker House House House Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour 4-8 p.m. Daily. 4-8 p.m. Daily. 4-8 p.m. Daily. 4-8 p.m. Daily. 4-8 p.m. Daily. 12 oz. Can Beer 12 oz. Can Beer 12 oz. Can Beer 12 oz. Can Beer 12 oz. Can Beer $1.75 & $2.75 $1.75 & $2.75 $1.75 & $2.75 $1.75 & $2.75 $1.75 & $2.75 well drinks. well drinks. well drinks. well drinks. well drinks. Longs Log Cabin Longs Log Cabin Longs Log Cabin Longs Log Cabin Longs Log Cabin Longs Log Cabin !!!Live Music!!! !!!Live Music!!! !!!Live Music!!! !!!Live Music!!! !!!Live Music!!! Sat. Jan. 6 Sat. Jan. 6 Sat. Jan. 6 Sat. Jan. 6 Sat. Jan. 6 7 p.m. to close 7 p.m. to close 7 p.m. to close 7 p.m. to close 7 p.m. to close Shayne Shayne Shayne Shayne Shayne Rammler Rammler Rammler Rammler Rammler Wed. Feb. 21 Wed. Feb. 21 Wed. Feb. 21 Wed. Feb. 21 Wed. Feb. 21 7 to 10:30 p.m. 7 to 10:30 p.m. 7 to 10:30 p.m. 7 to 10:30 p.m. 7 to 10:30 p.m. Girls Night Out Girls Night Out Girls Night Out Girls Night Out Girls Night Out Male Review Male Review Male Review Male Review Male Review Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour Happy Hour 2 for 1 2 for 1 2 for 1 2 for 1 2 for 1 Well drinks Well drinks Well drinks Well drinks Well drinks 4-6 p.m. M-F 4-6 p.m. M-F 4-6 p.m. M-F 4-6 p.m. M-F 4-6 p.m. M-F Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Wed. 7 p.m.-12 Wed. 7 p.m.-12 Wed. 7 p.m.-12 Wed. 7 p.m.-12 Wed. 7 p.m.-12 LIVE MUSIC LIVE MUSIC LIVE MUSIC LIVE MUSIC LIVE MUSIC Ever 1st urs. Ever 1st urs. Ever 1st urs. Ever 1st urs. Ever 1st urs. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades Renegades LADIES & LADIES & LADIES & LADIES & LADIES & Gentlemen Gentlemen Gentlemen Gentlemen Gentlemen NIGHT NIGHT NIGHT NIGHT NIGHT Every urs. Every urs. Every urs. Every urs. Every urs. 8-10 p.m. 8-10 p.m. 8-10 p.m. 8-10 p.m. 8-10 p.m. $10 A-U-C-D $10 A-U-C-D $10 A-U-C-D $10 A-U-C-D $10 A-U-C-D Bud Light, Bud Light, Bud Light, Bud Light, Bud Light, Ultra and wells. Ultra and wells. Ultra and wells. Ultra and wells. Ultra and wells. Fri. Jan. 5 Fri. Jan. 5 Fri. Jan. 5 Fri. Jan. 5 Fri. Jan. 5 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 309 C 309 C 309 C 309 C 309 C Sat. Jan. 6 Sat. Jan. 6 Sat. Jan. 6 Sat. Jan. 6 Sat. Jan. 6 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. Wildre Rising Wildre Rising Wildre Rising Wildre Rising Wildre Rising Fri. Jan. 12 Fri. Jan. 12 Fri. Jan. 12 Fri. Jan. 12 Fri. Jan. 12 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. Joe Santana Joe Santana Joe Santana Joe Santana Joe Santana Sat. Jan. 13 Sat. Jan. 13 Sat. Jan. 13 Sat. Jan. 13 Sat. Jan. 13 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. Fat Cactus Fat Cactus Fat Cactus Fat Cactus Fat Cactus Tue. & Sun. Tue. & Sun. Tue. & Sun. Tue. & Sun. Tue. & Sun. Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. 7-11 p.m. River Pub River Pub River Pub Bloody Mary Bloody Mary Bloody Mary Bloody Mary Bloody Mary Buet! Buet! Buet! Buet! Buet! Sun. 12-3 p.m. Sun. 12-3 p.m. Sun. 12-3 p.m. Sun. 12-3 p.m. Sun. 12-3 p.m. Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke Karaoke urs. 4:30 9 urs. 4:30 9 urs. 4:30 9 urs. 4:30 9 urs. 4:30 9 p.m. & Sun. p.m. & Sun. p.m. & Sun. p.m. & Sun. p.m. & Sun. 4:30 p.m.till 4:30 p.m.till 4:30 p.m.till 4:30 p.m.till 4:30 p.m.till Bikers Welcome! Bikers Welcome! Bikers Welcome! Bikers Welcome! Bikers Welcome! 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CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE COW CATCHER LOUNGE ~Under New Ownership~ 1712 Hwy.17 Pomona Park Poker Poker Poker Runs Runs Runs Welcome Welcome Welcome Welcome Welcome Welcome Welcome Welcome Welcome Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House Parker House ~At the intersection of County Road 309 and 308B~ L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs ongs Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Bar & Package Saturday, Jan. 6 from 7 p.m. to close2 for 1 Well Drinks Mon.-Fri. 4 to 6 p.m.Karaoke Every Wed. 7-midnight. Live Music Every 1st Thur. 7-10 p.m. I I I V V V E E E M M M U U U S S S I I I C C C L L L A A A D D D I I I E E E S S S O O O N N N L L L Y Y Y Wednesday, Feb. 21 from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 6 from 7 p.m. to close V V V E E E M M M U U U S S S C C C L L L I I I V V V E E E M M M U U U S S S I I I C C C L L L A A A D D D I I I E E E S S S O O O N N N L L L Y Y Y Serving Florida Since 1983 Lunch and Dinner SpecialsMonday-Thursday 11-9 FRUITLAND / GEORGETOWN CR 308 & 309 ON LEFT386-467-8666 www.RIVERPUBITALIANGRILLE.COM Lunch and Dinner Specials Monday-Thursday 11-9 Monday-Thursday 11-9 Well brand Featuring: Shrimp, Bacon, Cheeses, Hot Sauces, Olives, Pickles, Peppers, Pickled Okra, Pickled Asparagus, H/B Eggs, Veggies and MORE!Only$799 Build Your Own!Sundays Noon to 3 p.m. Build Your Own! Sundays Noon Sundays Noon to 3 p.m. to 3 p.m. to 3 p.m. Build Your Own! 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Casual Dining on the St. Johns River 386-524-4052 1171 CR 309 Fruitland/Georgetown www.renegadesontheriver.com At e Tiki Bar! Happy Hour! 2 for 1 well drinks!Sun. Thur. 4 7 p.m.Live Entertainment! Friday, Jan. 5 309 CSaturday, jan. 6 Friday, Jan. 12 Saturday, Jan. 13 Monday Limited Tiki Menu Available! Sunday BBQ Baked Chicken! Rolls Rolls Rolls Fri. & Sat. Fri. & Sat. Fri. & Sat. Thurs. Thurs. Thurs. Kids Eat Kids Eat Kids Eat FREE! FREE! FREE! w/ adult meal w/ adult meal w/ adult meal purchase. purchase. purchase. Join us for Join us for Join us for Triva Triva Triva Tuesdays! Tuesdays! Tuesdays! Weekday Golf Specials!Free Hot Dog w/ 18 Holes, Greens Fee & Cart Afternoons only Fish Fridays All-U-Can-Eat! Fish & Shrimp $ 14 99 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 386-467-2512 Steak Saturdays 4 p.m. to close 14 oz. Rib-eye Baked Potato, Vegetable and Soup or Salad. $ 18 99 We Serve Breakfast All Day Everyday! Fish & Shrimp Fish & Shrimp All Day! Only Restaurant Hours: Sun. Thurs. 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Only January Gallery Opening at the Larimer Arts Center Its shroom time in Florida and they have upgraded/evolved into the 1st Florida Mush room Festival! Its the s ame festival as the past five years just all the mushrooms in the world are now invited. They have gone out on a follicle and hired the major southeast ern mushroom guru, T radd Cotter. He is a total mushroom suc cess story who got in terested in mushroom r aising while living in Florida being Venus and Serena Williams gardener. He just saw a whole bunch of kinds of mushrooms growing everywhere and just started iden tifying them. Then h e got married and decided he needed to support himself a lit tle better and decided m ushrooms were the way. He is bringing a whole bunch of mush room raising stuff a nd has studied and researched Floridas mushrooms. Lee Kelly is the fea tured musician with h is happy Irish folk music. He is one of the people who start ed the Appalachian C enter for Musical Arts in Cosby, Ten nessee. T hey will have as the storyteller this year, Back in Tyme, a re-enactment couple featuring Mary Lee Sweet and her hus band, Frank, playing t he banjo. They are mushroom people. Melrose five-star restaurant Blue Water Bay will do the cook ing workshop! They a re mushroom people, too! The festival will be bigger and better this year! Check the web site for more informa tion at www.pmhigh. c om/fest.html or the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ FloridaMushroomFes tival.First Florida Mushroom FestivalSpecial to the Courier Journal

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Beyond its wonder ful scent and flavor, cinnamon bark oil also offers an array of therapeutic and healing benefits. Heres what you need to know about this essential oil. What Is Cinnamon Bark Oil? Cinnamon bark oil is obtained from the bark of trees that belong to the Cinnamomum species (also called Cinnamon zeylanicum), which comprise more than 250 aromatic evergreen trees and shrubs all throughout Asia and Australia, although it is native to Sri Lanka, Myanmar and India. Cassia oil, sassafras and Ho leaf oils fall under the same category. Cinnamon bark oil is quite rare and expensive. From 1983 to 1992, exports from Sri Lanka, which was virtually the only major supplier of cinnamon bark oil, only reached 2.8 tons. Western Europe, especially France, is the major importer of cinnamon bark oil, followed by the United States. Uses of Cinnamon Bark Oil Cinnamon bark oil has a delicate aroma and a sweet, pungent taste. It is typically used as a flavoring in toothpaste to hide the disagreeable taste of pyrophosphate, a compound that inhibits plaque calcification. In Ayurvedic medicine, cinnamon bark was used as an antiemetic, antidiar rheal, antiflatulant, and a general stimulant. Today, cinnamon bark oil has been proven to naturally: Lower cholesterol Kill bacteria Heal wounds Control blood sugar levels Relieve stomach flu caused by harmful bacteria like salmonella Because of its honeyed taste and smell, cinnamon bark oil is frequently added in meat and fast food seasonings, sauces and pickles, baked goods, confectionery, cola-type beverages, and tobacco. However, cinnamon bark oil is seldom used as a main ingredient in perfumes and soaps because it has skin-sensitizing properties. Composition of Cinnamon Bark Oil Cinnamon bark oil has no less than 90 identified compounds and over 50 minute unidentified compounds. It contains about 65 to 75 per cent cinnamon aldehyde and 4 to 10 percent eugenol compared to cinnamon leaf oil, which con tains 70 to 75 per cent eugenol and only percent cinnamon aldehyde. Unlike cinnamon bark oil, cinnamon leaf oil gives off a warm, spicy and sometimes foul scent, and does not have a smooth consistency. Usually, the higher the cinnamaldehyde content of the cinnamon bark oil, the higher its price. In the USA, the Essential Oil Association (EOA) standard specifies an aldehyde content of 55 to 78 percent. But there is no international standard set for cinnamon bark oil. Cinnamon bark oil is significantly more expensive than cinnamon leaf oil and probably among all essential oils. In 1992, cinnamon bark oil was sold at $385 per kilogram (35.2 ounces), essentially due to the raw materials high cost. By 1993 and early 1994, it was so costly that dealers in London only quoted prices upon request. In 2017, an essential oil world market report quoted a price of $295 per kilo. Benefits of Cinnamon Bark Oil Most therapeutic uses of cinnamon bark are rooted in its historical use as a traditional Chinese medicine. According to several studies, cinnamon bark oil can potentially help: Fight serious viral diseases like her pes and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Kill leukemia cancer cells as ob served in animal testing due to the fungus Antrodia cinnamonea Reverse the symptoms of Parkinsons disease Treat fungal in fections, including those caused by Candida albi cans, Histoplasma capsulatum and Aspergillus niger, which is known to cause serious sinus infections Counter cognitive decline in Alzheimers disease, a severe form of dementia, which almost 5.54 million Americans are suffer ing from right now. Check out my article on Alzheimers and discover how you can save yourself from this debilitating condition. German health authorities approve the use of cinnamon bark oil for treating mild gastrointestinal spasms, stimulating appetite and relieving indigestion based on the positive results seen in animal studies. How to Make Infused Cinnamon Bark Oil Cinnamon bark oil is made through steam distillation. In Sri Lanka, this high-value essential oil is produced by distilling the chips and variable amounts of feather ings (pieces of inner bark from twigs and twisted shoots) and quillings (broken fragments of quills). Cinnamon bark oil can only be grown and produced in tropical countries, so the ones sold in the U.S. are mostly imported. This is why its rather difficult to find in local stores, and may come with a hefty price tag. A more practical alternative that I would recommend is to create your own essential oil using cinnamon sticks, which is simpler and more pocket-friendly. Heres how: Infused Cinnamon Bark Oil What Youll Need: Cinnamon sticks Wide-mouthed glass jar Extra-virgin olive oil Procedure: 1. Fill the glass jar with cinnamon sticks without leaving any space, if possible. 2. Pour the extra-vir gin olive oil into the glass jar, soaking the cinnamon sticks completely. 3. Seal the lid tightly. 4. Put in a warm place in your kitchen. Leave it there for three weeks. 5. During the threeweek waiting period, shake the jar every day to release the oils from the cinnamon sticks and blend with the carrier oil. 6. After three weeks, your cinnamon oil infusion is ready. 7. Use a cheese cloth to filter out the sticks and other solid particles from your essential oil when transferring in a separate container. Keep at room temperature. How Does Cinnamon Bark Oil Work? To relieve stomach upset, a few drops of cinnamon bark oil in a hot cup of water or tea will do the trick. Nevertheless, I strongly suggest consulting your doctor or a natural health practitioner before taking cinnamon bark oil or any essential oil internally. For aromatherapy applications, put a few drops of cinnamon bark oil in your diffuser along with a few of your favorite essential oils. Cinnamon bark oil blends well with bergamot, cardamom, clove, frankincense, ginger grapefruit, lemon, mandarin, marjoram, nutmeg, orange, peppermint, peru balsam, petitgrain, rose, vanilla, coconut oil and ylang-ylang. Is Cinnamon Bark Oil Safe? Cinnamon bark oil has cinnamonalde hyde which, in high amounts and when used improperly on a daily basis, can be toxic to your body. In addition, cinnamon bark oil has strong psychological effects, which could possibly cause adverse ner vous system reactions. This is why its highly recommended to blend it with other essential oils during oral, topical, and aromatherapy applications. Cinnamon bark oil is relatively safe when used in small dosages and blended with mild carrier oils. Do not attempt to use it as an everyday supplement without an experts advice, especially if you have an existing illness. Pregnant and nursing mothers should avoid using cinnamon bark oil or any form of essential oil as much as possible to avoid negative consequences. Side Effects of Cinnamon Bark Oil Cinnamon bark oil causes different reactions in different people, especially sensitive individuals. Heres a list of some of its reported side effects: Skin sensitization Dermocaustic effect (burning) on skin Nausea Heart palpitations, especially when taken with coffee or black tea Headache Hypertension While cinnamon bark oil provides heaps of health benefits, I highly recommend that you see a natural holistic practitioner before incorporating it into your treatment protocol, to stay on the safe side.Pat Grillo has come a long way from where she once lived, Baltimore, Maryland, and her previous career, a certified Ado be Expert. She was a digital age pioneer in the early 90s who taught Masters Pub lication and Design at the University of Bal timore. Her education includes a Bachelor of Arts in English and a Master of Arts in Pub lication Design. She has published a series of seven Adobe Photo shop technical man uals and the Kindle Manual: Everything You Need to Know About the Kindle. In addition to the Uni versity of Baltimore, she has taught at Daytona Beach State College, St. Johns Riv er State College and Palm Coast Continu ing Education Center. She moved to Satsuma fourteen years ago and got in volved in Line Dancing with Linda Armstrong in Pomona Park because of the physical, mental and social benefits. Be cause of class size, Ar mstrong closed her class during summers and started them up again each fall. In the summer of 2015, Gril lo volunteered to keep the dance class open. This was the summer I learned how to call out steps and to dance at the same time, Grillo quipped. My idea was to teach the very ba sics so more people would get involved. A lot of people want to get out and lear n to dance but are afraid to. Thats why I start slowly to let beginners learn bit-by-bit. I use line dancing to add years to your life and life to your years. Shortly after taking over the class she met Larry Bass, a local line dance instructor and choreographer. His skill and knowl edge inspired Grillo to begin a class of her own and to write a How To, line dance book. After I completed the first draft of Steps and Beats, Grillo said, I sent a copy to Larry and asked him to critique it for me. He looked it over and helped me get it right. Its been nearly a year since Grillo taught her first beginner line dance class. Shes offering another oppor tunity for people inter ested in learning basic line dancing. The class begins January 10 and runs for six weeks thr ough February 14. The class is held at Saratoga Har bor Clubhouse, 130 River Road, Satsuma. The class meets every Tuesday and Thurs day from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. On many days participants dance up to two and a half miles, reaping great health benefits. For this class, Grillo is offering her Steps and Beats dancing book as a support guide. A CD is includ ed with the book so you dont have to go online to practice or study. But if you pr efer, there is also a dig ital copy of the book included when you purchase it, as well as an online site with downloadable files. Topics included in my book are health benefits, the dance floor, how to read a step sheet, dance ter minology and a step glossary, Grillo said. Its a pr ogressive and repetitive class, in which students are introduced to different steps and they learn a dance to accompany the moves. I assure you that line dancing is a pleasant, healthy and socially rewarding ac tivity. Its changed my life and can change yours, too.... If youd like to r eg ister, or learn more about Grillos class es, you can visit her we bsite: http://pat grillo.blogspot.com. Y ou can also contact her by email: patgrillo1@gmail.com or by phone: 386-6498566. Grillo has also writ ten three other How T o books: How to Use the Kindle, Adobe Pho toshop, and How to Grow Flowers in North Florida. G.A. Teske, author of four fantasy nov els and a coming his torical fiction novel of early Florida: www. dunnscreekfantasy. com, ga.teske@yahoo. com and on Facebook: Dunns Creek Fantasy Productions, LLC.Steps and Beats With Pat Grillo January 3, 2018 COURIER JOURNAL Section B Dr. MercolaNatural Health News & FACES PLACES The Uses for Cinnamon Bark Oil G.A. Teske Staff Writer

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N. Summit Street in Crescent City. If you have any questions you can email Laureen Faulkner at lfaulkner7@c.rr.com.Pomona Park Community Market and Breakfast is the rst Saturday of every month from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Community Center 200 E. Main St. Stay and shop with the vendors offering handmade and specialty items.The Putnam County Sheriffs Ofce Police Athletic League will be hosting a Hometown Boxing Showdown on Saturday, January 13 at 6 p.m. at the Crescent City High School Gym. Weigh-in is at 12 p.m. Tickets: Ringside: $15, Adults: $10, Students: $5, under ve is free. There will be a concession stand. Come support the local boxing team! The Lee Conlee House will be hosting an event on Friday, January 12 from 7-9 p.m. at the Florida School of the Arts Au ditorium. The event will feature 90 minutes of Sean Dietrichs inspiring stories focused on the beauty of life and people in the South. Sean Dietrich is a columnist, and novelist, known for his commentary on life in the American South. His work has appeared in Southern Living, Good Grit, The Tallahassee Democrat, South Magazine, and others. Crescent City Womans Club, 604 N. Summit St., will be having a Rummage Sale on Thursday and Friday, January 18-19 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tables are $10 for one day or $15 for two days. Food and drinks will be available. Call Donna at 561-289-1618 for reservations. Six-week line dancing workshop focus ing on the new comer. Learn the basic s teps and dances. They meet January 10 through February 14 from 10-11:30 a.m. at the Saratoga Harbor Clubhouse located at 130 River Road, Satsuma, FL 32189. It is a progressive class, so no walk-ins after rst class. Price is $35 and includes a book or $25 for class only. Register at http:// www.patriciagaydos.com. For more info mation call Pat at 386-649-8566. Happy d ancing!The Putnam County Fair will be held on March 16-24 at the Putnam County Fairgrounds in East Palatka. For more information you can visit their website at www.putnamfairandexpo.com. Anything Azalea Art Show will be juried and judged on March 3 and 4. The contest is open to those 18 and older, must be an original piece and include azaleas. Best in show wins $100. Second and third place will also receive prizes. Entry fee is $10. Applications are available at Gem City Cottage in Palatka. Entries should be oils, pastels, acrylics, watercolor, pencil, photography, crafts, sewing, sculptures, mobiles, glass, metal or wood. Steps & Beats line dancing class. Every Tuesday from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Saratoga Harbor Clubhouse located 130 River Road in Satsuma. New and beginner dancers welcome. For more infomation call Pat at 649-8566 or visit http://patgrillo. blogspot.com. Line dancing is back on Tuesdays at the Pomona Park Community Center. The rst class had 16 people! Classes will be on Tuesdays from 6-7:30 p.m. for Line Danc ing and 6-6:30 p.m. for Absolute Beginner. C all Linda Armstrong at 386-649-5025 for more information or on Facebook at / pomonaparklinedancingwithlindaarm strong. Classes are closed for December, a nd restart after the New Year.ARK Animal Rescue and the Putnam Health and Fitness Center would like you to walk a pooch, cuddle a cat, or sing a song at the Crescent City Kennel on 1952 S. Highway 17 Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. They ask that volunteers sign in. There will be auditions for a comical farce called Understanding Your Pet with Dr. Marla Brett. It is a play by Andrew Frodahl. Auditions will take place at the Crescent City Womans Clubhouse on Monday, January 22 at 6 p.m. Auditions are open to the pub lic and male and female roles are available. If you have any questions you can email Laur een Faulkner at lfaulkner7@c.rr.com. The Crescent City Womans Club will be hosting a Community Education Night On Domestic Violence on Wednesday, Janu ary 17 at 7 p.m. at their clubhouse on 604 1st & 3rd Mon. 7p.m. 318 Osceola St, Palatka 386-325-5295 PUTNAM COUNTY SHRINE CLUB Wed. 6 pm Darts/Hotdogs & Hamburgers Yelvington Rd, East Palatka 386-325-8020 PUTNAM COUNTY TEA PARTY Tues. 7 p.m.Interlachen Li brary 2 nd & 4th Mon. 6:30 p.m. American Legion off Crill Ave. SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL 1st Tues. 2 p.m. CCJSHS, Media Center 386-698-1629 W E LA K A D U PLICATE B R ID G E F riday, 10 a.m. Welaka Womans Club 386-467-8472 Lessons Available SOUTH PUTNAM WOMANS CLUB 3rd Mon. 6:30 p.m. Culver Room Crescent City Public Library 386-698-3556 ST. JOHN CATHOLIC CHURCH CARD PARTY 3rd Thurs. 10 p.m. $4 Lunch Hwy 20 Interlachen SUNDAY DINNER 1st & 2nd Sun. 11:30 a.m. Bass Capital Shrine Club 386-467-3102 THE HEART OF PUTNAM COALITION 3rd Thurs. 11 a.m. Palatka Christian Service Center 820 Reid St Palatka 386-328-0984 US COAST G U ARD AUXILIARY MEETIN G 3 rd Thurs. 7 p.m. Men & Women needed to assist w/ homeland security & boating safety VFW Meeting Hall SR 100 & Palm Ave Palatka 684-6543 US VETERANS POST 104 Mon. One Pot Meal Tues. 6 p.m. Kitchen opens 7 p.m. Dart League Wed. All Day Free Pool Thurs. 5 p.m. Kitchen opens 6 p.m. Bingo State Rd 19 Palatka 386-328-9133 VFW POST 3349 Mon. & Wed. 10 am 1 pm Selling Sandwiches Tue. 6 p.m. Bingo Wed. 1 p.m. Veterans Rd Tbl 2nd Fri. 6 p.m. Steak Night 3201 Reid St, Palatka 386-328-2863 INTERLACHEN BABE RUTH LEA G UE MEETIN G S 3 rd Thurs. 7 p.m. Lions Club Interlachen BEE K E EPERS OF PUTNAM COUNTY 3rd Tues. 5:30 p.m. Putnam County Ag Center East Palatka Contact Mickie 684-0902 / 904-692-4238 Beekeepersofputnamcounty. org CRESCENT CITY YACHT CLUB At 3 Bananas 11 S Lake St, Crescent City 2nd Fri. 7 p.m. SOUTH PUTNAM ANIMAL NETWOR KFirst Tuesday Meeting location: Crescent City Government Building (rear entrance/parking) P.O. Box 425, Crescent City Time: 6pm 386-463-2077 spanfoster@aol.com 501CRIVER PAR K NEIG H BORHOOD WATCHMeets 2nd Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. at River Park Civic Center on 309, Fruitlandstruggling with drug addiction get them the help they need. Call for a free brochure on the signs of addiction for all drugs. Narconon also offers free screenings and referrals. 800-431-1754 or DrugAbuseSolution.com. Narconon can help y ou take steps to overcome addiction in your family. Call today f or free screenings or referrals 1-800-431-1754. Meetings:Mon. and Wed at 7 p.m. at Grace Fellowship in Palatka & Friday at 7 p.m. at the Church of the Holy Comforter in Crescent City.ASSISTANCE FOR FLORIDA SERVICES Tues. 10 a.m. Trinity Episcopal Church 204 State Rd 26 Melrose 24 Hr. Hot-line 352-475-2177 CELEBRATE RECOVERY at. 7:15 p.m. Dunns Creek Baptist Church 386-328-8650PALS(People Adjusting to Limited Sight) PALS is no longer holding meetings. LEE CONLEE HOUSE Victim Advocate in Crescent City Mon. Thurs. 8 a.m. 4:30 p.m. 386-546-7675 24 hr hotline 386-325-3141 or 800-500-1119 QUIVANNO PROBIOTICS WOR K S HOP 3rd Mon. 5:30 p.m. Monahan Chiropractic Medical Clinic 905 St. Johns Ave, Palatka SENIOR FRIENDS CENTERMon. 11 a.m. Yoga Tues. 1 3 p.m. Bingo Wed. 12-3 p.m. Card Games Fri. 1 3 p.m. Bingo 3rd Thursday Covered Dinner First Friday Fun Day 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Butler Bldg Conf. Room Putnam Community Medical Center 611 Zeagler Dr Palatka 386-328-3986STRO K E S URVIVORS OF PALAT K A M on. & Fri. Mornings Free Exercise Classes Roger 386-916-9530 TAI CHI CLASS Tues. 6 p.m. Georgetown Community Center 386-467-7204 THE ED G A R JOHNSON SENIOR CENTER Tues. 10 a.m. Seniors vs Crime Wed .1:30 p.m. Cane Fu Les sons W ed. 12:30 Paint Class $7 mo. Call 386-329-0469 TOPS FLORIDA #435 Welaka Tues. 9 a.m. First Baptist Church of Welaka C. R. 309 -386-467-8935 VIOLENCE INTERVENTION & PREVENTION PRO G R AM Putnam County Health Department 2801 Kennedy St, Palatka 386-326-3200 24 Hour Helping for Sexual Violence/Abuse 386-983-1358 tial A L ADIES AROUND THE LA K E MEETIN G 1 st & 3rd Tues. 10 a.m. Crafts & Covered Dish Lunch Georges Lake Community Center 114 Saratoga St, Florahome AMERICAN LE G I ON POST 45 Sat. All you can eat breakfast 8 am 11 a.m. Cost is $7, Palatka AMERICAN LE G I ON POST 293 Sun. 5:30 p.m. Bingo 1st Mon. 6:30 p.m. Dinner Meeting 3rd Mon. 6:30 p.m. Bring dish or $2 Wed. 11 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Lunch Wed. 12:30 p.m. Bingo 4th Sat. 6:30 pm Aux. Scholar ship Dinner I nterlachen 386-684-2188 AZALEA CITY COMMUNITY THRIFT SHOP Tues. & Thurs. 9 a.m. 12 p.m. Corner Lemon and Main. be hind Howe Methodist Church C rescent City S.A.F.E. of Putnam County Adoptions by Appointment Only 112 Normal St. Hollister 904-325-0196 or 904-4600556 www.safe-pet-rescue-fl.com S.A.F.E. of Putnam County Thrift Store 819 S Moody Road Palatka Mon 12-5 p.m. Tues-Th 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m. MT. CARMEL COMMUNITY RESOURCE CENTER INC. Mon. 10 a.m. 2 p.m. 400 East Oak St, Palatka 386-937-2447 / 916-9556 PALAT K A C HRISTIAN SERVICE CENTER Mon. Fri. 9 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 2600 Peters St. Palatka 386-328-0984 SECOND TIME AROUND SHOP Tues. 12-4, Thurs. 8-12 Community United Methodist Church 1 26 Highlands Ave, Lake Como SOUTH PUTNAM CHRISTIAN SERVICE CENTER Tues. & Thurs. 10 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 219 N. Summit St.Crescent City 386698-1944 THRIFT STORE Mon. & Thurs. 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Sat. 11 a.m. 3 p.m. 4th Mon. Bag Day St. Vincent DePaul 515 Central Avenue Downtown Crescent City PUTNAM COUNTY HOME COMMUNITY EDUCATORS (HCE) 2nd Wed. Ag. Building 111 Yelvington Rd., E. Pal. Call Mary Ellen Clifton 386-649-8856 PUTNAM COUNTY MEDICAL MISSION Free Medical Care for Uninsured1st Three Friday/mo 408Summit St. Crescent City 4th Wed. for Diabetics 114 Amos Rd-Crescent City 1st & 3rd Thurs College Park Baptist Church 386-269-9786 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Mon. 7 p.m. Church of the Holy Comforter 223 N. Summit St. Crescent City 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535 ALCOHOLICS ANONY MOUS A N EW LIFE G R OUP Tues. 7 p.m. Church of the Holy Comforter 223 N. Summit St. Crescent 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS LIBERTY G R OUP Wed. 7 p.m. First Presbyterian Church 301 Cypress Ave. 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS CELEBRATION G R OUP Thur. 7 p.m. Church of the Holy Comforter 223 N. Summit St. 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Fri. 6 p.m. Lake Como Community Center, Highland Ave. 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS C E LEBRATION G ROUP S at. 4 p.m. Howe Memorial Church 252 S. Summit St., 24 Hr. Hot-line 1-904-399-8535 ADDICTION COUNSELIN G I f you know anyone who is HEALTH AND SUPPORT CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONSCRUISERS Every 4th Sat. 5-8 p.m. 900 Block, St. Johns Ave Palatka B A SS C A PITAL VFW P O ST 10177 3rd Thursday, 6:30 p.m. Meets at F.O.E. Eagles 110Shrine Club Rd Lake Como BOY SCOUTS TROOP #42 CUB SCOUTS PAC K 42 VENTURE CREW SCOUTIN G 42 Mon. 6 p.m. (only when school is in session) Howe Memorial Methodist Church 252 S. Summit St. Crescent City 386-937-8626 CREATE! ARTISTS G U ILD OF NORTH FLORIDA 4th Sat. 10:30 a.m. Larimer Art Center 216 Reid St. Palatka CRESCENT CITY MOOSE LOD G E U S 17 South Crescent City 386-649-0745CRESCENT CITY ROTARY CLUB Tuesday mornings at 7:30 a.m. at the home of the Fraternal Order of the Eagles 110 Shrine Club Road Lake Como FRATERNAL ORDER OF EA G LES INTERLACHEN Weekdays 4 p.m. Social Room Happy Hr. Tues. 5 pm Hamburgers Tues. 7 p.m. Bingo State Rd 20 Interlachen 386-684-3252 FRATERNAL ORDER OF EA G L ES 4355 Sat. 8 p.m. Band Sun. 4 p.m. Karaoke Mon. 7:30 p.m. Darts Tues. & Wed. 1 p.m. Pinochle Tues. & Thurs. 6:30 p.m. Bingo Wed. 5 p.m. Tacos Fri. 8 p.m. Karaoke 110 Shrine Club Rd, Lake Como F R UITLAND P E NINSULA H ISTORICAL S O CIETY 3 rd Tues. 7 p.m. Culver Rm., Crescent City Library 386-698-1870 G IR L SCOUTS For girls 5-11 1st & 3rd Saturday 10 a.m. 12 p.m. St. John the Baptist Catholic Church Call Luz 386-559-4119 HISTORIC CENTRAL ACADEMY 3rd Mon. 5:30 p.m. Preservation & Community Development Inc. Supporters Meeting Palatka INTERLACHEN LIONS CLUB 1st & 3rd Tues. 7 p.m. 202 Prospect Ave Interlachen 386-684-2188 PUTNAM REPUBLICAN CLUB Meets 2nd Tues. at 6 p.m. at Beef O Bradys 386-643-2808 putnamrepublicanclub.weebly. com PALAT K A DUPLICATE BRID G E CLUB Wed. 10 a.m. Bring lunch 521 South 13th St Palatka 386-328-0263 CRESCENT CITY DUPLICATE BRID G E C LUB Wed. 9:30 a.m. 604 N. Summit St.-Crescent City Lessons Available 386-698-4496 PALAT K A K I WANIS CLUB Thurs. 11:45 a.m. Lunch Sleep Inn & Suites SR19 & Hwy 100 Palatka PALAT K A N EW VISION LIONS CLUB 2nd & 4th Tues. Noon Beef OBradys on the River Palatka P O MONA P A R K N EI G H BORHOOD W A TCH 2 nd Thurs. (exc. Aug. & Dec.) 200 East Main St. PALAT K A L IONS SOCIAL SPORTSB2 Our community. Our people. All local. MISCELLANEOUS 2018 Happy New YearWIYD 1260am and WPLK 800am and 98.3 fm www.putnamradio.com SUDOKU SOLUTION CROSSWORD SOLUTION from Skeet, George, Mary, Susan, and Marcia here at NATKIM Radio WIYD 1260AM and WPLK 800AM & 98.3FM

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Before medicine and pharmaceuticals filled our remedy box, food and food ingredients were considered healing agents. Hippocrates was wise in his understanding of the special powers of food, beyond satisfying our appetites: Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food. There are many cultures that rely on herbal remedies and natural foods for everything from soothing an upset stomach to lifting our spirits when were down, to calming jittery nerves and even fending off colds and flu. Many of the best cosmetics tout ingredients to smooth skin, prevent aging, block the sun, reduce inflammation and minimize puffiness. There are four common herbs that have been used by many cultures and that are found in many of our kitchens. 1) Turmeric is a commonly used ingredient in Ayurvedic practices. In Hindu, the bright yellow color of turmeric is associated with the sun. In India, turmer ic is used in wedding and religious ceremonies and is thought to bring good fortune. Not only is it said to brighten our spirits, but it has also been found to have some anti-inflammatory properties, which are healing for the body 2) Ginger, a relatively inexpensive and easyto-find root, is considered a very healthful spice in the same family as turmeric. It is rich in many healthy components and has a strong aroma caused by the compound gingerol. Ginger has a long history of use in traditional and alter native medicine. It is most commonly used to soothe a stomach ache and combat nausea, and is frequently used by women to prevent morning sickness during pregnancy. Like turmeric it also has anti-inflammatory properties and can be helpful in reducing pain caused by osteoarthritis and menstruation. 3) Another popular spice is cinnamon, which is known for its healthy antioxidant properties and delicious sweet taste. It may help to reduce inflammation and be heart healthy. It may also be helpful in regulating blood sugar levels within the body, and even have some protective effect against developing colds. 4) Chamomile is a flower that has histor ically been associated with relaxation and calming. Many differ ent cultures have used it alongside lavender as a soothing beverage to enjoy before bedtime. Many of these ingredients can be found in our pantries, and including them in our diets is as simple as incorporating them into recipes or brewing up a delicious cup of tea. Herbal teas are a delicious and probably the easiest way to introduce these ingredients into our daily lives. Sipping tea throughout the day provides a natural break. Many tea drinkers proudly sport their mugs to stay hydrated, refreshed and alert. Tea itself (from the plant Camellia sinensis) contains many healthy compounds such as polyphenols, which are great antioxidant compounds. Studies with this phenomenal beverage are linked to many areas of health and wellness. Its no wonder that tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world. People drink tea proudly knowing they are not only enjoying something delicious, but also giving their well-being a boost. So next time you are looking to have a more healthful lifestyle, or just a good nights sleep, look no further than your tea cup.On December 16, 44 participants from Santa Fe Audubon, Alachua and Duval Audubon, and other volunteers fanned out in boats, cars, and on foot to survey all the birds that could be seen and heard for the 26th annual Mel rose Christmas Bird Count (CBC). The Melrose CBC covers a 15-mile-diameter circle centered at the intersection of SR 219 and SR 100 that en compasses parts of Clay, Putnam, Ala chua, and Bradford Counties. This dedi cated effort resulted in locating 113 species of birds. Many bir d-rich natural areas occur in this cir cle and include Lake Santa Fe, Santa Fe Swamp, Gold Head Branch State Park, the Ordway Preserve, and numerous lakes and forests. Thanks to the generous land owners who welcomed v olunteers on their property to count. Several species had unexpected high to tals: Tree Swallows, 5,590; Ring-bill Gulls, 1,500; Sandhill Cranes, 1,030; Amer ican Robins, 1,570. New species for the count were Paint ed Bunting, Wilsons W arbler, and Blue Grosbeak. Uncommon for the count were American Woodcock and Wilsons Snipe. More individual birds were seen this year over 16,000 than last years total of 7,484. The 2015 count totaled 9,265 individual birds. At the end of the day-long survey, par ticipants congregat ed at Bettys Pizza in Melr ose to tally the results, to share sto ries of the days bird ing highlights, and of course to feast on the l ocal cuisine. Laura Berkelman, Santa Fe Audubon president, compiled the list of birds that were sur veyed by twelve bird ing teams. The Melr ose CBC be gan in 1990 by Jan and Bill Bolte of Mel rose; this year marked 28 years of participa tion in the count. Begun 118 years ago in New Y ork Citys Central Park, Christ mas Bird Counts pro vide important insight into the health of the envir onment. Since birds are the most visible of our wild life and the easiest to survey, bir d survey data provide an indi cation of the overall health of the less vis ible wildlife species. An abundant and di verse avian communi ty can reflect healthy ecological habitats, while declining bird populations can sig nify disturbing trends in our land develop ment patterns and their detrimental ef fects to natural areas. Changes in the range of some bir d species have implications in assessing results of climate change. Na tional Audubon has identified 314 species of bir ds in the U.S. that will be affected by climate change. Results from the Melrose CBC combined with data fr om hun dreds of other CBC su rveys throughout the world allow or nithologists to as sess bird trends on a national and in ternational scale. If youd like to see the complete list of birds seen on the Melrose CBC, please request by email Joyce king2635@gmail.com or lberkelman@wind stream.net. January 3, 2018 B3 Special to the Courier JournalJoyce King Community Contributor Melrose Christmas Bird CountPhoto by Kris Davis. Jan Bolte, Tom Prevost, Peggy Prevost, Jill McGuire, and Andi Blount on Lake Santa Fe. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Putnam County Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing in the Commission Meeting Room, located at 2509 Crill Avenue, Suite100, Palatka, Florida, on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at 4:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard. At the hearing, the Board will consider proposed changes to the Putnam County Land Development Code: Case Number: HR 18-001, The Melrose Historic District Committee has nominated four (4) properties located within the Melrose Historic District for placement on the Countys Local Register of Historic Places. The Lee House, Parcel #18-09-23-5700-0000-0960; Located at 200 Park Street, Melrose. Baldwin Store, Parcel #18-09-23-5670-0000-0510; Located at 105 S.R. 26, Melrose The Baldwin Home, Parcel #18-09-23-5670-000-0500; Located at 103 S.R. 26, Melrose John Ross Home Parcel #18-09-23-8920-0000-0400; Located at 500 Centre Street, Melrose Case Number: R17-011, Application by: Francis Everett. The request is to Amend the Zoning Map of the two parcels in question from Commercial, General (C-3) to Commercial, Intensive (C-4). The parcel numbers for the subject properties are 38-10-27-0000-0830-0010 and 38-1027-0000-0830-0000. The properties are located at 174 and 176 S. Highway 17, E. Palatka, FL, 32139 Case Number: R17-003, Application by: Magnolia Dunes LLC; The applicant is requesting amendments to Section2: Allowed Uses and Conditions of the Magnolia Dunes Planned Unit Development (PUD). The request is to increase the number of campsite by 125, increase the number of RV spaces with hook-ups from 15 to 29, designate an additional area, adjacent to this PUD. Located at: 400 County Road 310 and 103 E Porter Street, Palatka Florida 32177 The Kenilworth subdivision plat was originally recorded in the public records of Putnam County Map Book 2, Page 4 on December 5, 1911. The entire plat consisted of 136 blocks with a total of 6,060 platted lots. In 2008, Putnam County approved the rezoning of a 92.56+/acre parcel to Planned Unit Development to allow for a commercially operated mud bogging facility known as Hog Waller Mud Bog. The approved plan designated 7.46+/acres for mud bogging activities and approximately 80+/acres for ATV riding. In 2009, the County approved an amendment to the original PUD to add 549.73+/acres. The expansion designated 3+/acres for primitive campsite use, bathroom facilities and an approximate 546.7+/acre expansion to the ATV riding area. In 2014, the PUD was further amended to add 365+/-acres and provides for additional uses of an airboat racing area, 8 cottages, 15 RV spaces and 16 tent camping sites. In 2016 the PUD was amended again to revise the hours of operation for the mud bogging, airboat racing, and ATV riding. The amendment also allowed camping 365 days a year with a total of 125 campsites. The amendment increased to number of event days to ten (10) days per month, as well as, increased the total calendar days per year for designated events to 60. The amend ment also changed buffering requirements for those areas where a six (6) foot berm is to be provided. If the Planning Commission acts on these requests at this meeting, a public hearing will then be held by the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday, February 27, 2018, at 10:00 a.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard. This hearing will also be held in the County Commissioner Meeting Room, located at 2509 Crill Ave, Suite 100, Palatka, Florida. Development Services Department, located at 2509 Crill Avenue, Suite 300, Palatka during normal business hours. You may also contact staff at (386) 326-7136 for further information. All interested persons wishing to speak on behalf of or in opposition to this request will be heard at the above stated place and time. Persons with disabilities requiring accommoda tions in order to participate should contact Sabrina Ellis at 386-326-7136 at least 24 hours in advance to request such accommodations. If a person desires to appeal any decision with respect to any matter considered at the above listed meeting, such person may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made and submitted to the Planning & Development Services Department. PUTNAM COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION By/s/ Sabrina Ellis Commission Secretary1/3/18 A Cup of Tea Can be a Solution for Everyday Wellness SMOKEYBEAR.COM Only YOU Can Prevent Wild res. FOUNDED 1920NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATE FORESTERS

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On Saturday, Janu ary 27, there will be a gathering beginning at 11 a.m. in the Pr esby terian Church Hall, on the cor ner of Cypress Avenue and Prospect Street in Crescent City, to socialize and share a finger food lunch. Your favorite finger food will be most wel come. About noon, Dr. Kathryn McLean, minister/member of St. Augustine Pr esbytery who volunteers her labyrinth consultation, will explain the Labyrinth, its purpose and place today in the spir itual life of the Church a nd other religions. Following her presen tation, everyone is invited outside to Walk the Labyrinth. A can vas version of a popular shaped Labyrinth will be laid out on the gr ounds. The walk is a solitary journey to the center and return. There will be plenty of time for questions and perhaps a conversa tion on next steps for a Labyrinth in the South Putnam area. Imagine standing in a vast open field. It is covered with a series of circles placed symmet rically inside one another, each one within the other In the center is a circle with scal loped edges. This design can be of any one of a variety of shapes. The pathway through the circles to the center winds back and forth in an also symmetrical pattern. It looks like a maze but there are no dead ends and no forks from which to choose. The return path covers the same steps. This is a labyrinth. The Labyrinth is one of the oldest contemplative and spiritual exer cises known to humankind. Those who walk t he coherent circuits of the Labyrinths path with a mindful intent, experience a peaceful present time in a spe cial space. The labyrinth is a journey to the heart of life. Throughout history Middle East ern to Celtic Europe, to Oriental and Native American Cultures, the labyrinth is considered to be a path to walk for relaxing, renewing and refocusing on what is important in life. It has long been a part of Christian tradition. Walking the labyrinth is a way to rediscover a long forgotten tradition, one that is being r eintroduced to reli gious tradition today. The labyrinth draws those who walk the path, closer to Sprit, the Divine God, and Soul in a way that transcends all creeds and beliefs. All Spiritual traditions speak of life as a path, a Spiritu al journey, with its own twists and unexpected tur ns. Walking the labyrinth can help people step foot once again on their own paths, helping them to remember their own lives as Spir itual journeys. Ther e is no right way to walk the labyrinth. In walking, we are returning to ourselves and our own experienc es, instead of having to measur e our walk against external rules or standards. In this simplicity, everything that takes place while walking becomes a mirror that allows us to look into our individual fears and anxieties. We encounter our hopes and dreams with a new depth of creative inspiration. Then all come to the labyrinth as our selves thats the great gift of its simplicity. No one else influences you about how to walk the labyrinth. You simply follow the path in your own way. The labyrinth allows you that free dom. The Labyrinth is appearing in schools, parks, chur ches, play grounds, retreat cen ters and even prisons and long ter m care centers after dropping out of human aware ness nearly 350 years. Indeed, labyrinths ar e found in many cul tures and they go far, far back in time. They have been embraced as a companion on the healing path, deepening understanding and compassion. W alking a labyrinth creates a solitary space which tran scends daily business, giving time to walk in silence. Having one simple path, unlike a maze, a labyrinth does not ask us to engage our thinking minds. Rather, it inspires con fidence and calms even for those whose lives are in major transition. It holds a quiet, safe place to trust intuition and be aware of mem ories and surroundings. When following its winding, yet defined path, we become im mersed in the jour ney itself a natural pr ocess of being here and now, leaving behind the all too nagging goals and expectations of accomplishing and getting somewhere. Walking a Labyrinth is a deep and rich ex perience. By putting one foot in front of the other, you arrive Home at the center. Here, at the center breathing in the slow pace and reflections on the path so far is r efreshing to the Soul. The walk out of the labyrinth is realis tically and symbolically an act of returning to our daily lives with gratitude for that Mys tery which allows you to be alive. Chartr es Labyrinth, named after the per manent stone labyrinth set into the floor of Chartres Cathedral in France during the Thir teenth century, has eleven concentric paths that wind through four quadrants of a circle. It is a distinctly Chris tian pattern; an equal ar med cross is visible in its elegant design. Set in the center is a rosette, a six petal de sign representing the Rose of Shar on. The Center Labyrinth is the name of the design. For more information contact Judi White 386-569-6956. Iron Man from page A1 Judy WhiteCommunity Contributor B4 Walk the Labyrinth CROSSWORD PUZZLE SUDOKUSolution is on B2. Solution is on B2. Comics Gag grouper closed to recreational harvest in Gulf state and federal waters January, 1. The same day, several species of grouper will also close to recreational and commercial har vest in Florida state waters of the Atlantic and all state waters off Monroe County. This seasonal closure includes gag, black, red, yellowmouth, and yellowfin grouper; scamp; red hind; rock hind; coney; and graysby. State waters in the Atlantic are from shore out to three nautical miles. State waters off Monroe County extend to three nautical miles in the Atlantic and out to nine nautical miles in the Gulf. Federal waters begin where state waters end and extend to 200 nautical miles. For gag grouper, state waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Taylor and Jefferson counties will reopen to harvest April 1 through June 30 and September 1 through December 31. All other Gulf state waters, except waters off Monroe County, which follows the Atlantic state season, and all Gulf federal waters will reopen June 1 through December 31. Several species of grouper, including gag, will remain closed in Atlantic state waters and off Monroe County through April 30, reopening May 1. The harvest closure was established to ensure the long-term sustainability of Atlantic grouper species by protecting them during their spawning season. A similar closure will also occur in federal waters of the Atlantic. Grouper information, including Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico grouper regulations, is available online. Go to MyFWC.com/Fishing and select Saltwater Fishing then Recreational Regulations and Groupers. Gag Grouper Season Closed D.O.G Gets It! Do You? Subscribe today! Only $24 a year! 386-698-1644

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REPO DOUBLE WIDES & SINGLE WIDES. $18 ,500 (or best offer), delivered and set up. Owner 386-312-6363. TFN FOR RENT, 2 BED/1BATH APARTMENT in the City. $650/month. No Call St. Johns Realty for more information at 386-698-1000. CRESCENT LAKE APTS 1 & 2 b edroom apts. available to those at 386-698-2205 840 Oakwood St. are an Equal Hous vider and Employer. T DD 711. This In stitution is an Equal O pportunity OAKWOOD GROVE APTS -1 BR $576/ month, 2 BR $638/ month & 3 BR $672/ month apartments. ed. Central heat/air, dry on site. Rental able for those who 386-698-2513 TDD 1800-955-8771. 629 in stitution is an equal opportunity provid er & employer. TFN N EW HOPE VILLAS APARTMENTS FARM WORKERS 100 New Hope Ave STE A, Seville, FL 32190. 2BR $606/ month, 3BR $666/ month, 4BR $701/ month. Rental as f or those who qual at 386-749-0075. stitution is an equal o pportunity pro vider & employer. 955-8771 TFN LAKEVIEW GROVE APTS. 62 or older, disabled or handi month & 2 BR $612/ month. Central heat/ able for those who 386-698-2513. TTD 1-800-955-8771. This institution is an equal opportunity pro vider & employer. TFN LEGAL NOTICEIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FLORIDA SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN and NOTICE OF ACTION you, and you are required to serve Division on or before the 3RD day BER, 2017. 321 12 (Seal) CLERK OF COURTS /s/ Anterio Smith Deputy Clerk 12/13, 12/20, 12/27/17, 1/3/18CLASSIFIEDS B5 Buildings For Sale/Rent Reduced Security Deposit Amounts!!!1&2 Bedroom Apartments Special Tax Credit Rent Quiet and Peaceful Community for Adults 62 years and Older or Disabled Persons Welcome Home to Sugar Mill Woods 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments Reduced Security Deposits Special Tax Credit Rent Rental Assistance When Available One-Story Design Active Community Room On-site Laundry One-Story Design 570 3rd Avenue Welaka, FL 32193386-467-8444Office Open Tuesday and ThursdayCome join us and love where you live!This is an equal opportunity housing provider. Real Estate For Rent SERVICE & BUSINESS DIRECTORY AIR CONDITIONINGService In Hours Not Days.100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED CHECK US ON THE WEB: WWW.SOUTHERNAIR.NET STATE LICENSE CAC058634 3849 Reid St. Palatka Recommended for Decades ANY TIME ANY KIND ANY SERVICEBefore You Fix It Or Buy It,Call 328-3212Mikes AluminumQuality Material and Installation Mike Bottelman, Owner386-649-5374 RX#0066577 CONSTRUCTION MEDICAL NORTH FLORIDA SERVICESPROPANE & NATURAL GAS PIPING AND APPLIANCE INSTALLATION35 Yrs Local Experience Specialties: Tankless Water Heaters and Gas Logs 386-559-0071 G AS APPLIANCES Pool & SPA PET SERVICES ELECTRICIAN HANDYMAN Trent Electric Inc.30+ Years ExperienceEC 0002532Commercial ResidentialLocated in Crescent City 386-698-4777 Cell: 321-229-1241jjhoffman@gmail.com Crescent City Located in Crescent City 386-698-4777 386-698-4777 386-698-4777 386-698-4777 WATCH REPAIR ANDPEST CONTROL, INC.(386) 698-BUGSKelvin L. HaireManagerP.O. Box 2 241 S. Summit St. Crescent City, FL 32112 PEST CONTROL CLEANING SERVICES Durable Medical EquipmentNEW LOCATION 120 N. 9th St. Palatka 386-325-2096 Fax: 386-326-0404 Free Local Delivery No Long Waits FENCING Clean* Licensed Bonded InsuredResidential & Commercial386-559-7191Queen Queen Advertise Here 1 in. Ad $5/weekWith a month commitmentCall 698-1644 Crescent City Kennel Inc. 1952 S. US Hwy 17 Crescent City www.cckennel.us386-698-2777Professional Water Treatment & Analysis Sparking Water Gone? 386-698-1112 Cert. # CPO-154081 Clock and Watch Repair30 Years ExperienceCall 561-222-9063 A&P / IA ServicesIRMT Fabric Floats Multiwing Sheet Metal, Antique Restorations, 337s AvionicsRussell White 386-698-1505 Fix-It ServicesWindows Screens-Pressure Washing Painting, Etc.904-540-2381 Business ID #100597 Lowman Fence CompanyFor all of your Fencing needs386-328-3778Residential & Commercial MiscellaneousAdvertise Here 2 in. Ad $10/weekWith a month commit mentCall 698-1644 ANTIQUES River City Antiqueslocated in Downtown PalatkaAntiques, Primitives, & Military CollectiblesOpen 7 Days a Week717 St. Johns Ave386-546-4217 Mathisen Services386-937-7984 Starting at $35* $0.45 per square footCarpet Cleaning Tile Cleaning*for 12 X 12 roomSpecial Offer 10% off when you mention this ad! Mathisen Services 386-937-7984 WATCH REPAIR Nails & Tales Beauty Bar Services: Manicures ~ Pedicures Facials ~ Chemical Peels ~ Back Facials ~ Collagen Induction Therapy (Micro-Needling)(Located inside Compliments & More Salon)14 N Summit St. Crescent City Tues-Fri By Appointment Only386-937-9195Call today!! John the Handyman 40 Years Experience No Job to Small 937-722-7880 CARPET Kens Carpet Wood, Vinyl, & Carpet Vertical & Wood Blinds386-325-4312 Reduced Rent Amounts!!!2 Bedroom: $450!! 3 Bedroom: $490!! 4 Bedroom: $530!! Smith Thomas Court Apartments849 Bay Lane Crescent City, FL 321122, 3 and 4 BRs Move-in Special & Rental Assist. May Be Available 386-698-4300 Equal Housing Provider Legal Notices Real Estate For Rent NOTICEBefore Digging in Areas Near Gas LinesCall 811For Emergencies698-148624-Hour AnsweringCrescent City Natural GasServing:Crescent City, Lake Crescent Estates, Lake Como, Pomona Park, Welaka, Satsuma, Dunns Creek and San Mateo INDEX AND INFORMATION DEADLINE: 10 A.M. Monday CHECK YOUR AD words, phrases or refuse any advertisement. PAID CLASSIFIEDSFIRST 20 WORDS FOR 5 25 CENTS EACH Buy 3, Get One FREEIn the following categories: Announcements, Garage Sales, Employment, Pets, Recreational, Agricultural, Merchandise and Transportation. Repairs Day Care Lost and Found Rentals Apartments For Sale For Adoption Boats for Sale For Sale/Rent Business Opp. Employment Inq. Investments Loans Farm Implements Farm Tools BarterTrades/Barters Wants/Needs EDUCATION AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, United, Delta and othersstart here with hands on training for FAA Institute of Maintenance LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE or all bids.JACDJ58V3S7924310 1995 ISUZU1/3/18LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE or all bids.1/3/18LEGAL NOTICENOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE or all bids. 1/3/18PUBLIC NOTICE improvements on Tuesday, January interested persons are invited to 1/3/18 Legal Notices ITS YOUR RIGHT TO KNOWwww.FloridaPublicNotices.com Read Floridas public notices in this newspaper or online to find out.Foreclosures Property Auctions Ordinances Notices to Contractors Warnings to Appear Bid Notices Hearing Notices And More!Whats happening in your community?