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Lake Region Monitor

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Lake Region Monitor
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Keystone Heights, Florida
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John M. Miller
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English

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University of Florida
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lrmonitor@bellsouth.net www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 352-473-2210 Fax 352-473-2210 Worth Noting Lake Region Monitor Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, June 26, 2014 42 nd Year 8th Issue 75 CENTSGreen Cove Springs looking for jingle, logo Wiley Clark, investigator, sheriffs candidate, killed in BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor A longtime law enforcement official and a 1992 candidate for Bradford County Sheriff was killed Sunday morning in a crash near Hawthorne. Wiley Clark, 72, worked as an investigator for the State Attorneys office from 1977 to 1998. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Wilber Petersen, 30, of Jacksonville was driving a tractor-trailer northbound on U.S. 301 near Southeast 57th Avenue in Alachua County. Just after 7:30 a.m., Petersen crossed the median and struck Clarks southbound 2003 Dodge pickup. Clark was pronounced dead at the scene. Petersen was taken to UF Health Shands Hospital with minor injuries. Clark served in various law enforcement agencies, including the Gainesville Police Department and Alachua County Sheriffs Office. Beginning in 1977, he was an investigator for the State Attorneys Office. He retired as the offices chief investigator in Starke to run for Bradford County Sheriff in 1992. In a five-way Democratic primary, Clark placed third behind Dolph Reddish, who was seeking to recapture the office he lost four years earlier, and Bob Milner, who would later beat Reddish in a runoff. Milner remembered Clark as an even-tempered man with a dry sense of humor. I never saw him lose his temper with anyone, recalled Milner. Milner also said Clarks personality was a perfect fit for an investigator and that Clark was an extremely skilled interviewer. After the election, Clark returned to the State Attorneys office where he led a drug task force for several years and investigated cases out of the judicial circuit. He retired again in 1998. One of the most well-known cases Clark worked on was the 1985 murder of Starke businessman Joe Banister. The 41-year-old was shot with a semiautomatic weapon as he drove on S.R. 18 between Hampton and Theressa. Clark, along with Bradford County Sheriffs investigator Don Denton, crisscrossed the United States until they tracked the killing to a self-proclaimed soldier of fortune by the name of John Wayne Hearn. Hearn eventually testified against the victims wife, Debbie Banister, telling Denton and Clark the woman hired him to kill her husband. Debbie Banister was later convicted in the murder-for-hire scheme. For years after the conviction, Clark kept a photograph of Hearn and Debbie Banister at his desk in Starke. He told media representatives the case was the most unusual he had ever worked on. Clark also served as president of the Starke Golf and Country Club and Starke Rotary Club. Former Bradford County Clark See CLARK, 3A UF weatherman visits Melrose library BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor The chief meteorologist for the University of Florida explained to young patrons of the Melrose Public Library how scientists forecast weather and why forecasting is important. Jeff Huffman brought a slide show, rain stick, model tornado and a wealth of knowledge to around two dozen children and parents at the library on June 19. Huffman is now seen on two Gainesville television stations, five North Central Florida radio outlets and 12 public radio stations throughout Florida. He showed photos of his television set to the children and explained to them how producers make images of maps on video through the use of green screens. Huffman also explained why forecasting is important, showing the group photos of hurricane and tornado damage and explaining to them that the more they know about the weather, the safer they will be. He also gave the group tips on weather safety, emphasizing the importance of heeding hurricane evacuation orders, seeking shelter during tornadoes and thunderstorms: when thunder roars, head indoors, and avoiding puddles in flooded areas: turn around, dont drown. Huffman focused on safety during thunderstorms, warning the group that on average, lightening kills one person in Florida each week. He also said that Putnam County has the most lightening strikes per square mile than any other county in the state. After the meeting, he explained that in addition to Atlantic and gulf sea breezes meeting near Palatka, the St. Johns River also destabilizes the atmosphere by cooling the air during the summer months. Huffman also said that lightning can strike up to 15 miles away from a thunderstorm and that the most dangerous strikes occur at the beginning of a storm. The meteorologist also explained the concepts of condensation, air pressure and cold fronts to the group. University of Florida Chief Meteorologist Jeff Huffman gestures to his audience while explaining what it is like to forecast the weather. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGS City officials have applied for a planning technical assistance grant from Floridas Department of Economic Opportunity that will among other things, develop a jingle and logo for the city. The $25,000, non-matching grant would pay for a study that would also identify the towns economic strengths and weaknesses, identify ways Green Cove Springs could expand businesses within certain markets and create a marketing strategy. In their grant application to the department of economic opportunity, Green Cove Springs officials wrote that they want to focus on green industries, restaurants, retail establishments, recreational outfitters, boutique hotels, a boat welcome center, arts and cultural venues and ecotourism. They also wrote that the study would identify potential uses for Green Cove Springs old city hall site and the Augusta Savage Cultural Arts Center. Last year, city officials began the process of developing a community redevelopment plan for its gateway and MLK Boulevard corridors. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor FLEMING ISLANDClay County School board member Lisa Graham, who will complete her 24th year on the board later this year, told her colleagues that the last two years on the panel have been the worst she has ever experienced in her over two decades of service. Graham made the comments during a June 19 board meeting. She said that over the last 24 months, she has had to endure board meetings with actions that reeked of revenge and payback. I have been here a lot of years and these have been the worst two years, she said, and I hate it to be that way because everyone of you is better than that, smarter than that. It breaks my heart because I really care about this school system and how we look in the State of Florida, she continued. Ive never seen a school district that has so many dedicated administrators, teachers, staff Gavel changes hands at Rotary picnic BY JAMES WILLIAMS Special to the Monitor The Keystone Heights Rotary Club eschewed its usual installation banquet this year and held a Saturday afternoon installation picnic instead. The event was held at the home of Bruce and Shelly Gibbs off Bellamy Road beyond the McRae area. The weather was breezy, but sunny and dry. The sun dappled the tops of tents and many Rotarians and their guests expressed great satisfaction with the event. Barbara Mason was especially happy; she and Rotary partner Jim Smith won $375 in a drawing. Rotarians had been buying tickets and drawing from a pack of cards all year, trying to find the king of clubs. Outgoing President Paul Fessenden liked to explain, because Keystone Heights is the king of Rotary clubs. A variety of salads, Johnnys fried chicken, rolls and fruit with adult beverages were followed by a business meeting. That was followed by an ice cream bar with Cupcakery cupcakes and assorted toppingsincluding Rotary fund-raising pecans. Fessenden handed out gifts and thanks to Jim Gill, who has served as sergeant-at-arms for many years. Gill is turning the job over to new members. Current board members were also given tokens of appreciation. Bruce Gibbs was given a Paul Harris Foundation pin. Although not a Rotarian, Gibbs has contributed funds and volunteer time to the club and its community causes. Presenting Paul Harris awards to longsuffering spouses of Rotary Club members is not unusual and is always well-deserved. Richard Segall was named Rotarian of the Year for his service as club secretary, board member and liaison to school related projects like the Clay County Science Fair and Keystone Heights High School senior scholarships. Fessenden then presented incoming President Terry Suggs with a new mallet with which to ring the clubs bell and begin each meeting. Suggs received his official club president pin from his fianc, Julie Masters. Since Rotarys motto for the coming year is Light Up Rotary, Suggs presidential pin blinks on and off. It was later revealed that the day was also the incoming presidents 49th birthday. Suggs then presented a Past President pin to Karen Fessenden who pinned it on her husband. Fessendens job is not entirely ended yet; next Saturday, June 28th is the clubs 3v3 soccer tournament at Twin Lakes Park. That event represents one of the Keystone Heights Rotary Clubs major fundraising events for community and international causes during the coming year.Graham: last 2 years on school board have been worst ever Outgoing Rotary President Paul Fessenden congratulates Secretary Richard Segall, who was chosen Rotarian of the Year. See GRAHAM, 3AJuly 4th activitiesKeystone Heights Saturday, June 28, Our Country Day Street Dance at the Keystone Airport Friday July 4, 7 a.m. Our Country Day 5K run Friday July 4, 11 a.m. Our Country Day parade Friday July 4, evening, Our Country Day fireworks Melrose Friday July 4, 11 a.m., Melrose Boat Parade Friday July 4, 4 p.m., Melrose sign installation Friday July 4, 6-9 p.m. Melrose Art walkFizz, Boom, Read! At the Keystone Heights branch libraryPreschool programs for children aged 3-5 will be offered each Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m. June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 9, and 16. Stories, songs and crafts and a related snack will be offered. There will be a special Stuffed Animal Sleepover (for stuffed reading buddies only) as well as a preschool story time program on July 15 at 6:30 p.m. Reading buddies to be picked up at the final story time, theaterevent breakfast, the following morning. For school-aged children, kindergarten through fifth grade we will offer: June 26th Thursday at 6:00pm Fire and Ice with Mad Science of NE Central Florida June 30th Monday at 2:00pm Did Someone Say Bats?! with Lubee Bat Conservancy and winged friends. July 11th Friday at 10:30am How and Why stories with Kaye Byrnes, Storyteller extraordinaire July 18th Friday at 10:30am Its a Wrap! Finale with special guest, Ronald McDonald.Melrose Bay Art GalleryMurmurations. Work by Valerie Aslakson-Jennings, guest artist showing thru June 29. Whats That Smell? Exploring Smell at Your LibraryChildren can explore the sense of smell and smelly thing at their library this summer. There will be smelly experiments, stories, crafts, and games. This free science fun program is open to all school age children and their caretaker. Thursday, July 3rd at 10 at the Melrose Public Library the fun begins. The library is located at 312 Wynnwood Avenue behind the post office. For more information about this and other childrens summer library programs contact the library at 352 475-1237. This program is a Fizz, Boom, Read, a Summer Library Program of the Putnam County Library System with refreshments provided by the Melrose Library Association.

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2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 26, 2014 Tina Bullock seeks re-election for District 3 School Board Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. INDEPENDENCE DAY SUNDAY WORSHIP Sunday, June 29, 10:30 am choir cantata: God Bless America message: Who Will Save America? Dr. Craig Moore Service followed by a covered dish lunch.Wonderful Wednesday Dinner & Bible Study5:30 pm each week July 2: What Jesus Told Us to Do Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr.4004 SE State Road 21 PO Box 744 Keystone Heights, FL 32656 (352) 473-3829 Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Keystone Heights, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Lake Region MonitorP.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091 7382 SR 21 Keystone Heights, FL 32656Phone: (352) 473-2210 (352) 473-6721 John M. Miller, Publisher Subscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six monthsEditor: Dan Hildebran Sports Editor:Cliff Smelley Advertising:Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Heather Padgett Bookkeeping:Joan Stewart-Jones (The following is a statement of intent to run for public office, submitted by the candidate.) My name is Tina Bullock and I am running for re-election to the Clay County School Board, District 3. I was born and raised in Jacksonville and graduated from Andrew Jackson High School. My father retired from the Jacksonville Fire Department and my mother has a building named in her memory due to her many volunteer duties at the Wesley Fellowship Church in Jacksonville. My inspiration to become a teacher came from my older brother, a graduate of the University of Florida who became a teacher and the chief financial officer in the Duval County School District. After receiving my B.S. in education from Jacksonville University, I began my teaching career in Clay County at Orange Park Elementary. In 1971, shortly after my husband and I were married, we moved to Keystone Heights. My love of Clay County began in the fifties when my Dad and his brothers bought a cabin on Lake Brooklyn and where our families spent many carefree days. To this day when I drive down Immokalee Road I cant help but feel nostalgic. When my son Chris was born I transferred to Keystone Heights Elementary. Returning to school, I received my M.S. Degree in Administration/ Supervision at the University of North Florida. I continued my career as assistant principal at J.L. Wilkinson Jr. High, assistant principal at Keystone Heights Elementary and retired after serving as principal of Keystone Heights Jr. Sr. High School. At each school I served at I would come home and tell my husband this is the best school ever and I finally realized that Clay County was the best school district ever. Following retirement I was site director of the Forward March Program, Florida Army National Guard, then principal of the SIAtech Charter High School in Gainesville. My husband Chuck and I will celebrate 45 years of marriage in August. Chuck is retired from the US Postal Service. My son, Chris graduated from Keystone Heights Jr. Sr. High School and the University of Florida, working at Johnnys Barbecue while in school. This experience led to his career with Cracker Barrel. My friends say that I am like the Energizer Bunny as I keep going and going, but I have always had high energy and a higher responsibility to my commitments. I was recently elected vice president of the Keystone-Lake Area Business Association and treasurer of the Keystone Heights Womans Club of which I am a former president and co-president. I am a former president of the Principals Association of Clay County and former president of the Clay County Administrators Association. I am a member and past president of the Clay County Gator Club and recipient of the Region 5 Vice President Award, Clay County Gator Club. I am a member and past president of the Lake Region Kiwanis. I also served as the Kiwanis Division 4 Lt. Governor and received the Distinguished Lt. Governor Award. I was honored to have May 30, 1997 proclaimed Tina Bullock Day, City of Keystone Heights and selected as the Keystone Heights Elementary Teacher of the Year in 1986. While maintaining my membership at the Wesley Fellowship Methodist Church in Jacksonville where I was raised, I attend the Keystone United Methodist Church. For my entire career, both professionally and personally, my focus has been on our students. When I was elected to the school board in 2012, I promised to bring my A game by being Accessible, Approachable, and Available. I will continue to serve the district in an honest and fair manner. As your District 3 school board member, I have never missed a meeting or workshop and recently received the Master Board Award Recognition from the Florida School Board Association. I support our schools by regularly attending programs, projects, events and award ceremonies. I also judge and participate in programs district wide. I serve on multiple scholarship committees and am always so proud of our Clay County students for their accomplishments. The voice of our Christmas and July Fourth parades, I am always ready and willing to volunteer to make our community and county the best that it can be! If you would like to help me continue my efforts for our schools, please let me know. I have yard signs available and if you would like one to support my campaign, I can be contacted at 352-473-3478. Thank you for your support and remember to vote on Aug. 26 for Tina Bullock, The Right Pick! BullockSandra Dunnavant running for Clay County School Board District 5 Keystone Heights Elementary School honor rollsPrincipals list (straight-A students)Third grade: Riley Barry, Abigail Corbet, Gianna Crosley, Steven Dong, Courtney Dyches, Carson Eatmon, Kenneth Edsall, Matthew Golden, Alison Herndon, Hayden Kedgley, Ian Kruzan, Mark Lewandowski, Caden Lott, Garrett McDilda, Caleb Mize, Denver Moore, Lillian Paul, Hunter Sarman, Anthony Thornton and Colton Walls; Fourth grade: Christopher Anderson, Riley Draney, Andrew Howell, Liam Kane, Taylor Korth, Ryan Krahn and Caleb Moncrief; Fifth grade: Bryson Channell, Briana Donley, Shawn Dukes, Payge Elliott, Alyssa Norman, Aidan Perkins, Piper Pascara, Rozlynn Sames, Lindsey Schrader, Lisa Strickland, Luke Van Zant, Sam Vorn, Camryn Williams and Emerald Wood; Sixth grade: Perla Alonzo, Jason Channell, Casey DeWitt, Molly Deal, Kamrey Dowdy, Remington Draney, Maddison Edgy, Kayla Elliott, Tyler Friedlin, Courtlin Gentry, Lauren Hix, Karli Jennings, Sophia Kicklighter, Vanessa Kruzan, Brendan Lee, Emily Loose, Ashton Ludwig, Sabrina Martin, Mia Moore, Noah Ogg, Jerry Payne, Felicia Pearson, Lauryn Potter, Kelsei Rehberg, Christopher Resti, Hayden Riviere, Miranda Rodriguez, Travis Sheppard, Garrett Stanley, Brianna Velazquez, Benjamin Wacha, Ashton Ward, Cody Wells, Bryson Wise, William Yeldell and Ti Yen.A-B honor rollThird grade: Kenji Alers Pacheco, Gavin Barnes, Gavin Briscoe, Jade Budny, Rachel Cantrell, Kendall Carter, Kiley Channell, Harmony Cheese, Emma Cirigliano, Nigel Clance, Joshua Crane, Victoria Curtis, Rachel Eatmon, Dalton Gilstrap, Alexander Gray, Joshua Hankins, Alyssa Harper, Tristan Hummel, Arynn James, Kori Jennings, Nathaniel Johnson, Colin Kehoe, Haley Kenney, Hailey Knapp, Kaylen Langley, Rexi Lewis, Michael Loftis, Shawn Marinello, Hayden Marion, Michael Matthews, Kimberly McCarthy, Isabelle McConnell, Jeremy Miller, Emma Moore, Kenneth Outlaw, Luke Parsons, Jillian Potter, Liza Robinson. Wilford Rogel, Taylor Schaus, Joshua Smith, Luke Tassell, Ayden Wanton. Jackson Williams, Nicholas Williams, Fourth grade: Ethan Berry, Ethan Brown, Ellie Chamberlain, Saige Dennis, Mya Dillavou. Eve Feldpausch, Abigail Freeman, Haili Geisenburg, Ethan Gillick, Coltyn Givens, Zachary Glover, Charles Groff, Jacob Hale, Blake Hand, Tobias Hartman, Megan Herndon. Lucas Horton, Lindsay Hovsepian, Kaden Hubner, Landon Hughes, Eden Jackson, Michael Jarosz, Amari Jones, Kiale Kehoe, Victoria Ketch, Karl Leitheiser, Jacob Lepanto, Jack Lewandowski, Luke Lewandowski, Deric Mortimer, Alora Nichols, Stamatia Papaioannou, Mikayla Rhoden, Emma Rogel, Rachel Roth, Savanna Sayers, Jozee Smith, Luke Snider, Flynt Standridge, Jasmine Stemp, Noah Velez, Grace Wagner, Seth Wiles and Serenity Zoller; Fifth grade: Gabrial Adams, Jason Allain, Kaitlyn Allen, Evan Andrews, Daelynn Eatmon, Danielle Finch, Jacob Georgsson, Jeremiah Glaspy, Austin Grayson, Cody Hollingsworth, Cameron Horton. Ivy Johns, Hayley Locke, Angelica Loftis, Levi Marsh, Maura Mathews, Lane Peoples, Bridgett Reese, Ian Schofield, Tristen Tate, Jason Thomas, Colton Tibbetts and Patricia Woodell; Sixth grade: Brian Armstrong, Mark Bailey, Autumn Buchanan, Derek Cunningham, Joseph Danella, Emma DeNunzio, Jolie Ference, Garrett Fisher, Matthew Forshee, Robert Freed, Danielle Garvey, Aaron Graham, Adam Graham, Zachary Hamlow, Trevor Haydt, Cinthya Hernandez, Madison Heskett, Jesse Hickey, Kinsley Hollingsworth, Julian Holmes, Nathan Jones, Destiny King, Reece Kling, Domeon Lozano, Skyler Mann, Brooke Martin, Nathan Martin, Jesse Mattox, Desirae McCauley, Amber Nance, Carson Nassif, Liam Nelson. Skyla Newton, David Ortiz, Samuel Parsons, Jay Payne, Jadelyn Roller, Leonid Sailor, Tyler Schellpeper, Max Shartis, Cory Smith, Sydney Stephenson, Tylor Thornton, Benjamin Tran, Alexandria Trejo Trejo, Alma-Nayeli Trejo Trejo, Adrien Valentine, Savannah Wilson, Destiny Wood, Isabelle Woodell and Haleah Young. (The following is a statement of intent to run for public office, submitted by the candidate.) My name if Sandra Dunnavant and I am running for the Clay County School Board District 5 seat. District 5 encompasses southeastern Clay County including eastern Middleburg, Lake Asbury, Penny Farms and Green Cove Springs. However, all Clay County voters can vote for the District 5 candidate on Aug. 26 because school board members run countywide on a nonpartisan basis. Early voting is from Aug. 16-23. I have lived in Clay County for 48 years. I began my teaching career here in 1966 and retired in 2009, although I still substitute teach in the district. I hold a bachelors degree from Texas Womans University and a masters degree from Florida State. Before I retired, I taught in eight Clay County public schools. I am currently certified in Florida for library media K-12, history K-12, English K-12, reading K-12 and elementary education. My peers selected me as teacher of the year when I was at R.A. Paterson Elementary School and again when I was at Charles E. Bennett Elementary. In 2003 I was a finalist for Clay County Teacher of the year. I have also served as president of the Clay County Education Advisory Council and school advisory committee chair at Ridgeview and Paterson Elementary Schools. I was the vice president of the Clay County Education Association, president and vice president of the Florida Association for Media in Education, a founding member of the Florida Book Award and a member of the American Library Association, American Association of School Librarians and Phi Delta Kappa. I am also a lifetime member of the Clay County Historical Society. While teaching, I sponsored the student council, junior historical society, science club and television production club. In addition to teaching in Clay County public schools, I have also worked at the district office, writing curriculum and providing training for the district information literacy program. I also served as director for the Clay County Battle of the Books in 2006 and 2007. I was an adjunct professor at the University of Central Florida. At Florida State in Tallahassee I managed FSUs NE Online distance program and served on a board to design the 2+2 undergraduate program in information studies. The university later hired me to mentor in the 2+2 program. As a member of the Florida Bureau of Preservation, I wrote preservation lesson plans for Florida teachers. I also owned and operated Oakridge Day School in Green Cove Springs and developed a birth to four-year-old preschool curriculum. I understand the needs of business owners in keeping taxes low and finding a well-educated work force. From 1987 to 1994 I was on the Green Cove Springs City Council, serving as both mayor and vice mayor. I am also a past president of the Green Cove Springs Preservation Society and Friends of the Library, Green Cove Springs. Presently, I am a member of the executive board of the Friends of the Library and president of the Village Improvement Association, which is a National Federated Womans Club. I also serve on the District 4 executive board of the Florida Federated Womans Clubs. While working for the school district, I wrote an information literacy curriculum and provided grade three through 12 teacher training workshops for the curriculum. I also organized, wrote curriculum for and directed teacher and student summer video camps. While I was at Paterson Elementary, I maintained the schools website using Front Page and BlackBoard. I also presented at the Florida Educators Technology Conference and the Florida Association for Media in Education Conference. During my time at the school district and as a city council member, I wrote and received a $5,000 Tide Grant that built fitness stations for the Paterson Elementary Playground, collaborated with Green Cove Springs officials to secure a $300,000 grant to build the city pier and co-wrote and received an $8,000 Learn and Serve Grant for students to interview citizens about life in Clay County before 1950. I am the widow of George William Dunnavant, who was the principal at Charles E. Bennett and Green Cove Springs Elementary Schools. My fatherin-law, G.W. Dunnavant, was the first bandmaster at Clay High School. Both of my sons are graduates of Clay High School. Will is a microchip engineer for Applied Materials in Fishkill, NY. Ray is an electrician in Spanaway, Wash. I have four grandchildren: Paige, Matthew, Ryan and Mariah. I have been a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Green Cove Springs since 1972. I want to bring fresh ideas and positive solutions to the Clay County School System. I am concerned about the challenges that the school board faces in educating our children and in supporting teachers and staff. Reducing drop-out, equipping students with the skills they need to find employment after high school in an ever changing economy, and looking for ways to meet the financial challenges of educating our children without increasing taxes are important issues to me. I believe that there are workable solutions to all of the challenges that the school board faces. I want to work with all the stakeholders (students, teachers, administrators, business and religious leaders, taxpayers) to ensure that the Clay County School System becomes the jewel in the crown of Northeast Florida. Construction to begin this week on C.R. 21B sidewalkBRADFORD COUNTY Floridas Department of transportation said it expects to begin work this week on a sidewalk along Southeast C.R. 21B, between Speedville and S.R. 100. DOT said the walkway will improve the ability for pedestrians to walk along C.R. 21B near Silver Lake. A fivefoot wide concrete sidewalk will be built along the east side of the road from Southeast 50th Street, north to an existing sidewalk (approximately 2,000 feet). Some of the driveways that the sidewalk will pass will have to be temporarily closed so crews can place the concrete for the sidewalk. However, residents will be contacted in advance of the work. DOT will oversee the project and hired R.E. Arnold Construction, Inc., of Archer to build the walkway at a cost of $130,500. The project is combined with two other sidewalk projects in Bradford County and one in Alachua County. It should be completed this summer. For more information on this project, contact DOT at 800-7492967, ext. 7830. Dunnavant

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Three Keystone Heights High School student-athletes were members of an age 14-and under travel softball team that captured the ASA Florida Championship earlier this month. Jacksonville Storm 2000 traveled to Altamonte Springs for the state tournament, June 13-15, and went undefeated, defeating Windermere Wildfire, Gators Gold, Santa Fe Inferno 99, and Riptide 99 to claim the state title. The three Keystone students, Molly Crawford of Starke, Ashleigh Jennings of Keystone Heights and Bailey Story of Keystone Heights, combined for 12 hits and four runs batted in over the weekend. Crawford batted 4 for 10, with 1 RBI, Jennings went 6 for 13 with 2 RBI, and Story had two hits in eight at-bats and drove in one run. Two weeks prior to the state tournament, Storm 2000 earned a berth to the ASA national tournament in San Diego by winning the Disney National Qualifier in Clermont. The team will play in Tallahassee for their first showcase tournament June 2729, and will then play local at the Storm Showcase in Lake City on July 10-13. Last year the team played in the national tournament and placed fifth out of 105 teams. Thursday, June 26, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 3A Keystone District Office 352-473-4917 clayelectric.com Rays Auto RepairEstablished 1972473-30837382 Sunrise Blvd.(Next to Hitchcocks Grocery) *** Comfortable Waiting Area ***Jones-Gallagher Funeral HomeDistinquished Caring Service for Over 50 YearsJoe Gallagher OwnerStarke 964-6200 Keystone Heights 473-3176 J B SJackson Building SupplyStarke 964-6078 Lake Butler 496-3079See us for all your Lumber & Plywood BryansHARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERHighway 100 Keystone Heights, FL 473-4006 Highway 21 Melrose, FL 475-2400Worship in the House of the Lord...Somewhere this week! Melrose Church of Christ 352-672-0920 8702 SR 21 Melrose (1-1/4 mi. N. of traffic light)Preacher: Gene Morgan Bible Study: Sunday 9 AM Worship Service 10 am & 6 pmLadies Bible Study: Fri. 4:00 PM Mid-week Bible Study: Wed. 7:30 PM What does the bible say about abiding in Jesus, His love, and His word? Then Jesus said to those Jews who believed Him, If you abide in My word, you are My disciples indeed. And you shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free. I am the vine and you are the branches. He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing. As the Father loved Me, I also have loved you; abide in My love. If you keep My commandments, you will abide in My love, just as I have kept My Fathers commandments and abide in His love. And now, little children, abide in Him, that when He appears, we may have confidence and not be ashamed before Him at His coming. rfntbttrf ntbn tt tn tt tn rfttbtt tt nbrftf ntntbtt trbrbt ttttt t Jacksonville Storm 2000, (l-r) front row: Morgan Hill, Courtney Robinson, Madison Lanoux, Ashleigh Jennings, Molly Crawford, Bailey Story and Kenlie Harvey; Second row: Coach Rebecca Hill, Caroline DePirro, Hailey Raulerson, Coach Skippy Crawford, Kirsty Granville, Savannah Brown and Coach Bobby Granville. Photo by Jennifer Fender. Championship team includes Keystone players Melrose residents hold third annual African-American Festival Residents from Putnam Hall, Keystone Heights, Johnson, Hawthorne and Florahome gathered in Melrose on June 14 for the third annual AfricanAmerican Heritage Festival at Tommys Place. Some attendees came as far away as Atlanta to enjoy old school music provided by DJ Thurman, a show by a Hawthorne car club, food, musical chairs, door prizes and childrens activities. The Rev. Greg Pelham of Melrose was the master of ceremonies for the event. Lake Region merchants, including Harveys Supermarkets, Advanced Auto Parts and Williamsons Food Store donated prizes and supplies for the event. (L-r) Cynthia Ashford, Annett Ashford and Pat Clarkserved food during the festival. The Rev. Greg Pelham (r) presents DJ Thurman with a plaque for providing music during the event over the last three years. All photos by Cornelius Clayton. Green Cove Springs council approves 2 police cars, 17 laptopsBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGS The Green Cove Springs City Council, during its June 17 meeting, approved the police departments purchase of two new Ford Utility Interceptors at a cost of $59,909.80 and 17 laptop computers for use inside patrol cars. Chief Robert Musco wrote that one of the two new vehicles will replace a 2003 Ford with over 110,000 miles and that is in need of an engine overhaul. The other would replace a 2001 Ford with 114,000 miles and in need of a transmission rebuild and engine overhaul. Musco added that the departments current fleet of laptop computers used in police cruisers have become obsolete because Microsoft no longer supports the XP operating system they run on. He asked the council to approve a $40,630 expenditure to replace the machines with funding coming from drug forfeiture accounts. Telegraph reporter Carolyn Eaves, who worked with Clark at the courthouse, said Clark was one of the most dependable people she ever worked with. She remembered him as someone who had a strong sense of right and wrong and a passion for justice. Clark was a longtime resident of Little Lake Santa Fe, but moved to Hawthorne about two years ago. Funeral services for Clark will be held today at 2 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Keystone Heights. CLARKContinued from 1A Orange Park man killed while pushing bike along BlandingBY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor ORANGE PARK-A 24-yearold Orange Park man was killed while attempting to cross Belmont Boulevard just south of Orange Park High School Friday morning. According to a Florida Highway Patrol Report, Armando A. Acosta was pushing his bicycle southbound across Belmont at its intersection with Blanding Boulevard around 6 a.m. Shad D. Devries, 42, of Orange Park was also at the intersection in a 2001 Chevrolet Silverado traveling westbound on Belmont. As Acosta was crossing the intersection, Devries attempted a right turn into the northbound lanes of Blanding and struck the pedestrian. Emergency medical workers took the victim to Orange Park Medical Center where he died. According to the FHP report, charges are pending. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGSThe development services director for the City of Green Cove Springs met with around 60 residents of a neighborhood north of the city to try to persuade them to join the municipality. Janis K. Fleet explained to residents who live on Travers Road, Gator Bay Road and Governors Creek Drive the differences between Clay County and Green Cove Springs ad valorem taxes. During the May 12 meeting, she also emphasized the benefits of living within the city, including Green Cove Springs police protection, the public works departments mowing of right of ways and maintenance of streets, city-maintained fire hydrants and street lights. She also said Green Cove Springs residents get garbage pickup twice a week compared to once a week for residents in unincorporated Clay County. Fleet added that now, citizens in the neighborhood can only vote for one county commissioner because the county votes under single-member districts. She said that if the neighborhood was within the city, residents could vote for five, at-large city council members, in addition to the county commissioner. Fleet also told the group that although they would have to pay an additional 2.9821 mills in property tax if they joined the city, that increase would be offset by the elimination of the Clay County Law Enforcement Municipal Fund Service Units 2.2503 mills and the countys 0.1110 mills for residents living in unincorporated areas. She said a home valued at $235,279 would see a net property tax increase of $115.02 by being in the city. The Travers Road-Gator Bay Road-Governors Creek Drive neighborhood is now almost surrounded by the City of Green Cove Springs. It lies behind the Magnolia Layne Shopping Center and on the west shore of Governors Creek. and I feel like we are behaving a hundred times worse than they ever thought of doing. Graham will retire from the board as the second-longest serving member in November, behind only W.E. Cherrys 28 years of service. Her son Brian is running for the seat. She characterized recent board meetings as counterproductive and unseemly. It always seems to be something ugly and unnecessary, Graham said of recent board actions. I just dont see why we have to be like this as a board. I would like for everybody to get along she added. Everybody cares about the school system. Graham implored her colleagues to work together as a team and not continue to find little ways to get at each other. She also said that in her view, the proper role of board members is to help parents work through problems with schools. Graham made her comments during a debate about a hiring freeze for district administrators, a policy she said was a case of the board micromanaging the school system. Over the past year, Graham has been on the losing end of votes that restricted Superintendent Charlie Van Zants hiring and purchasing authority. During the June 19 meeting, she told her colleagues that such policies are overreaching. I just think we need to back off of this stuff and start acting like board members, she said.GRAHAMContinued from 1A LRM Legals 6/26/14 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Personal property of the following tenants will be sold for cash or other wise disposed of to satisfy rental liens in accordance with Florida Statutes, Self Storage Facility Act, Sections 83.806-83.807. Auction will be held on Tuesday, July 15th, 2014 at 10:00 AM at Melrose Mini Storage, 827 N. SR21, Melrose, FL 32666. Phone (352) 475-5000. All items may not be available on the date of the sale. TENANT NAME Nadine Dexter UNIT# 45 DESCRIPTION Household. 6/26 2tchg 7/3-LRMLEGALS

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4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 26, 2014 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Last Will and Testament Power of Attorney & Living Wills Living Trusts Probate Administration Real Estate and Closings Deed Preparation Contracts Family and Juvenile Law Criminal and Traffic Matters 189 S. Lawrence Blvd. Keystone Heights, FLFirmofVeRonicaROwens@aol.comwww.VeRonicaROwens.com VeRonica R. Owens Attorney at Law James 4:12 There is one Lawgiver, who is able to save. Feb. 22, 1990Cooper Memorial Gets OkayBy Anne Sponholtz, LRM Editor The much awaited Gary Cooper Memorial is now off the ground as members of the Clay County School Board voted Thursday, February 15 on plans for the memorial to be located at Keystone Heights Elementary Schools Gary Cooper Field. Gary Cooper was a graduate of Keystone Heights High School, a football player and popular allaround student whose life was cut short when he was killed in Viet Nam. Following his death, the high schools football field was named in his honor. Since that time the high school has been converted into the elementary school and the former football field is presently used as a playground/athletic field for the elementary school students. Several of Mr. Coopers friends felt that because the field that bears his name is no longer used for football, it would be appropriate to have the high schools football stadium or newly constructed field house named in his honor. School Board Chairman John Thrasher was instrumental in working out an agreement that called for the school board to allocate $4,500 toward a permanent memorial at the elementary school field, where Mr. Cooper played football. After reviewing the plans for the memorial, Thrasher said he was pleased with all aspects of the memorial. Its very attractive. It will probably be located where the present sign (Gary Cooper Field) is now, Thrasher said. The memorial will include an entrance way constructed to two small brick walls. Inside the memorial will be two larger walls with two bronze plaques. The memorial will be surrounded with extensive landscaping. Several schemes were presented by a committee made up of architect Mac McCully. (who donated his time to drawing up plans for the project), Mr. Coopers friends Lynn Kirtley and Jim Davie, and Mike Elliott from the school boards facilities department, Thrasher said. Elliott said that now the scheme had been approved, he expects the project to begin to fall together and may be completed by the end of March: Thrasher commended the committee that worked on the project and said that KHES Principal Ken Blair was extremely involved and helpful as well as the superintendent (Mrs. Ann Wiggins). Kirtley, who resides in Keystone Heights and has been active in preserving the memory of Mr. Cooper for years, said he was very pleased with the school board action. Because the overall cost of the project may exceed the $4,500 allocated by the school board, Kirtley is hoping that area civic groups and individuals will come forward to help with the cost of the memorial. What I would really like to see is this be a community project, so in the end the school board doesnt have to put any money toward it, Kirtley said.May 17, 1990High Ridge, S.R. 21 named preferred corridorsBy Anne Sponholtz LRM Editor A preferred corridor has been selected for a 230 kV high power voltage line being constructed by Seminole Electric Cooperative that eventually will be 100 feet wide and 70 miles long, extending between Palatka and Duval County, part of which will cut through the Lake Region. According to Bill Phillips, manager of Clay Electric Cooperative, although a map of the corridor is still unavailable, Seminole Electric officials have said the preferred corridor will follow an existing Clay Electric right-of-way that presently has 69 kV lines running through it. This right-of-way comes out at the CR 214 landfill and crosses CR 214 into Big Tree Lakes. From there the line will go through High Ridge Estates. At the western boundary of High Ridge Estates the line will deviate from the existing rightof-way and turn south until it reaches SR 100. The line will then go west on SR 100 to Clay Electric Cooperatives substation (a new substation will be built, according to Phillips, near the present substation location). The line will then come out of the new substation back down SR 100 to SR 21 and follow SR 21 north toward Middleburg. Phillips said that a detailed map of the preferred corridor is being compiled and should be available for publication in next weeks Monitor. Phillips said that one reason for the delay in obtaining a map was that normally the preferred corridor comprises a half mile wide area; however, Seminole Electric officials are trying to narrow that area to give a more detailed view of where the line would be located and where it would not be located. The former manager of Clay Electric Cooperative spoke to the City Council on May 8, apparently before the official preferred corridor was chosen. He told City Council members that he was concerned about a resolution they had adopted that may have had the line running down S.R. 100 beginning at CR 214. This route has since been abandoned by Seminole Electric for a completely new route that has the corridor coming out to SR 100 along the western boundaries of High Ridge Estates just east of the City Limits. Tommy Millican, former manager of Clay Electric Cooperative, spoke before the Council at its May 8 meeting addressing the resolution passed by the council last month. The resolution was adopted by the Council on April 24 and sent to Seminole Electric Cooperative. In the Councils resolution it states that the Council insists that the corridor ingress to the City along the Railroad right-of-way and SR 100 and that the existing right-of-way (where 69 kV lines are now located) through Triest Subdivision and Commercial Circle area not be selected. The Council also took a position against the lines running down SR 21. Millican said he was speaking to the Council on his own behalf and that although he was retired from Clay Electric, he has no official standing there. Im here on my own behalf nor do I have any official standing with Seminole Electric. Millican, who resides on SR 100 and would have been affected if Seminole Electric had chosen to come down SR 100 from CR 214 instead of its now official preferred corridor along the western boundaries of High Ridge Estates, told the council that he felt Seminole Electrics original plan to follow the 69 kV right-of-way was correct. If you come down SR 100 (east) youll be coming by some very expensive houses and property and by the First Baptist Church where hundreds of people go and come each week. I dont think the road department will let it come between the railroad and SR 100, Millican said. I have no problem with the line as far as the electromagnetic force goes. Studies have proven theres no more hazard there than what we expose ourselves to through our electric appliances. The aesthetics doesnt bother me personally. Theres already a 25 kV in front of my house. Millican said that those individuals who live on the existing 69 kV right-of-way, which goes through Big Tree and High Ridge Estates before entering the City Limits at Ervin Triest Development and Commercial Circle, knew when they bought the property that the line was there. Every house trailer and house built was built with full knowledge the line was there. You say you want to enhance the property value on Commercial Circle, l dont think the Council can justify taking the position to enhance one property owners property value to the detriment of another. It doesnt make sense to me. Council members said they based their resolution on the feelings of the City residents, on the growth management plan and on enhancing the tax structure of the city. That (69 kV) line has been there, why move it to the detriment of others? Millican asked. The only place we have to render commercial growth inside the city is on Commercial Circle. We cant please everyone, Councilman Jack Raleigh said. They (property owners along the 69kV line) located there with full knowledge the line was there and now they want their property values to change, Millican said. They located there knowing a 69 kV line was there not a 230 kV line. Im surprised you came in here as an ex-president of Clay Electric, worried about the line being in front of your property. That tells me theres something wrong with the 230 kV line. After all, youre the expert, Raleigh said. Im not thinking anymore of my property than coming down to 100, Millican responded. Councilwoman Sutter said that a public meeting on the resolution was held and announced ahead of time and only one person showed. She said she based her vote on the growth management plan. You have to look at the impact on the number of people. It was my interpretation that the way we would go would affect the least number of residents, Councilman Bruce Peters said. Council Chairman Archie Green emphasized the importance of the City being able to develop the Commercial Circle area as a mechanism to increase its tax base. Green had told the Monitor on Monday that he had spoken with Seminole Electric Cooperative officials regarding the preferred corridor and confirmed it was slated to run down the existing right-of-way to the western edge of High Ridge Estates where it would then travel south to SR 100 to Clay Electric. From Clay Electric it would run back down SR 100 to SR 21 and down SR 21 toward Middleburg. Im very concerned about it running down SR 21, Green said. Im pleased its not running through tlie Commercial Circle area, but I think we need to be real concerned about it going down SR 21. Green said he would be meeting with Seminole Electric officials in private on Wednesday, May 16 (after press time). Green said no other council members would be in attendance.June 14, 1990Curtail swimming in Crystal Lake, By Anne Sponholtz LRM Editor The Clay County Health Department has issued a recommendation to area residents to curtail swimming in Crystal Lake pending the results of water samplings of the lake located north of SR 100 between Keystone Heights and Starke. The recommendation came following routine water sampling of all Clay County public swimming areas. That sampling resulted in the county not permitting water sports at Camp Crystal, a camp located on the lake and owned and operated by the Alachua County School Board. All other Clay County camps and public swimming areas in the Lake Region, including Camp Immokalee on Brooklyn Lake and Keystone Beach on Lake Geneva, received permits following testing. Gene Bray, Clay County environmental health director, said the survey taken in the swimming area at Camp Crystal revealed the lake had a coliform count greater than 1,600 per 100 milliliters of water. An acceptable coliform count is 1,000 per 100 milliliters. Coliform is a bacteria. Bray said health hazards associated with swimming in water with above acceptable levels of coliform could include dysentery, salmonella and hepatitis. Since the results of the Camp Crystal testing showed unacceptable levels of coliform, Bray said the county decided to check the entire lake. This sampling began last week and calls for three consecutive days of drawing samples weekly over a three week period. The tests are expected to be completed for the lake, other than for the camp permit, by the end of next week. Bray said Bradford County officials are now in the process of sampling Camp Montgomery, another camp located on Crystal Lake, but on the Bradford County portion of the lake. It has not been determined the source of the contamination, which is usually associated with human and/ or animal fecal. Bray said that once all the samples are tested from various parts of the lake, it may help pinpoint the source of the contamination. In the meantime, Camp Crystal has suspended all water sports and Bray recommends that area residents curtail swimming. Camp Crystal officials are expected to request use of Keystone Beach as an alternative water sports area for their summer campers. The request was to be made at the City Council meeting Tuesday night (after press time). Bray said this is the first time Camp Crystal has been denied a permit due to contamination of Crystal Lake. It may be the drop in elevation, but for some reason we had a lot (of samples) greater than 1,600 (per 100 milliliters), Bray said.Nov. 1, 1990My Friend Flicka back in classesBy Anne Sponholtz LRM Editor Despite the use of profanities in the story, My Friend Flicka, and complaints from parents regarding its use in the classroom, the book has been returned to the sixth grade reading classes as supplemental reading material following a review of that story and several other books. A decision by Clay Countys Instructional Review Council made up of teachers and lay public members has resulted in the retention, as part of a new reading program at the elementary school level, of My Friend Flicka and other books in question. Concerns over My Friend Flicka were raised when area parents discovered that the version of the classic used in the sixth grade classrooms, along with a companion audio tape, contained two mild profanities and one strong profanity. Formal complaints were filed, a directive from the county offices apparently put a temporary omission policy on the book, but following the matter receiving national attention the Instructional Review Council was convened on Friday, November 2. That council reviewed the books in question, which also included Little Red Riding Hood and Babe the Gallant Pig. The council looked at a wide range of matters in making their decision including content, presentation and the books value as good literature and decided the three selections would remain as supplemental reading material. This decision has received the endorsement of Superintendent Ann Wiggins. Karen Wacha, who along with her husband Ken, voiced concerns about My Friend Flicka from the time they learned of its content, said she was shocked by the decision. She said her son had already finished the book before she discovered the profanities, and it would now be up to other parents who may share her concerns. Its the children who seem to have been forgotten in all this. But if parents dont care ... what can we do, Mrs. Wacha said. Some parents have suggested that the matter now be taken to the Clay County School Board and ask that the school board address the matter. Keystone Heights Elementary School Principal Ken Blair, who spoke enthusiastically when the first decision was made to omit My Friend Flicka from the curriculum, was in a meeting until after press time and could not be reached for comment. Assistant Principal Tina Bullock was also unavailable. Dr. Winston Butler, pastor of First Baptist Church in Keystone Heights, said that since word first came out regarding the latest decision to bring the books back into the classrooms, he has already heard from eight local families who have contacted him concerned about the matter. Dr. Butler said he has advised the families to view the matter not as an obstacle but as an opportunity. He said he explained to families that a turtle can make no progress without sticking his neck out, and this was an opportunity for families to become more involved. I think were not going to make any progress until we stick our necks out, Dr. Butler said. School Board Vice-Chairman George Bush said he had not received any official word regarding the recommendation from the Instructional Review Council, but said that parents would have several opportunities to bring the matter before the board. Bush said parents could appear before the board during an item referred to as citizens requests or request that the item appear as an agended item. As an agended item the board could act on the matter. Bush said he has read al1 the books in question and in referring to My Friend Flicka Bush said, Im offended by it. I see no reason for the words being used. Bush said he feels the staff dropped the ball when they brought the recommendation to approve the new reading material to the school board. Bush said the books should have been read prior to a recommendation to approve them. If the board knew then what it knows now, I believe it would not have been purchased or at least purchased with modifications not to use those stories. I support the parents with their concerns, Bush said.The Monitor looks back to 1990

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Wight said his physical training beforehand really helped during the first five days of the climb. The summit day was tough, though. (The guides) dont want you take a lot of breaks, Wight said. I guess if you take a lot of breaks, the altitude will get to you and stuff like that, and youll until we landed in Kilmanjaro, we didnt even know if we were on the right plane. It was the right plane, though, so Wight and his friend Cochram were able to begin their climb, which would last seven days. The climb began at an altitude of 6,300 feet. During the first four days, the group Wight was a part of reached 14,100 feet. The fifth day saw Wight reach 15,500 feet, which is higher than any point in the United States with the exception of Alaskas Mount McKinley. Wight said ice and snow hit the camp at that 15,500 mark, but added the group was lucky in regard to the weather. The weather on McKinley can change in an instant, Wight said, adding that a cloud can blow over and turn 60 degrees to 35 degrees. The website of one Kilmanjaro guide service likens the climb to going from the equator to Antarctica. Wights group, though, didnt really experience extreme ice or snow conditions until they reached their campsites and were done climbing for the day. The weather never got us while we were hiking that mucha little bit here and there, but nothing real bad, Wight said. It always kind of came at night. The trek to Kilmanjaros summit day began at midnight on day six. It is a constant push from 15,500 feet to 19,340 feet. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer A picture is worth a thousand words. Multiply that by 13,000, and youll have how many feet Troy Wight climbed to get a breathtaking photo of a sunrise. Wight, who lives in Union County and works for Florida Gas in Brooker, recently climbed Mount Kilmanjaro in Tanzania, Africa. He said he probably cant make anyone he knows in this rural community understand why hed want to do such a thing. Its a small town, he said. Its mainly farmland here and country boys. Im a country boy, too. I hunt and fish like everybody else, but this is definitely not something that interests a lot of people, I dont think, around here. Yet if you were in Wights shoes when he was approximately 10 feet from Kilmanjaros peak when the sun crested, perhaps you would understand. The sight, in Wights words, was awesome. Youre actually above the clouds and looking down at all the glaciers, he said. Wight has been visiting the highest points in the United States for the past three years with his youngest daughter, Christine, who is 18. Admittedly, there isnt much to some states highest points, but Wight and his daughter did successfully reach the peak of Colorados Mount Elbert, which is the third highest point in the U.S. behind Californias Mount Whitley and Alaskas Mount McKinley. Mount Kilmanjaro, though, represented a peak that is not only approximately 5,000 feet higher than Mount Elbert, but has approximately 8,5000 feet more of elevation gain. It was, Wight said, the toughest climb hes attempted. His friend, Lester Cochram, whos the one who asked Wight if he wanted to make the climb, admitted as much as well, and Cochram has done a lot more climbing outside of the U.S. He told me point blank on the summit day on Kilmanjaro it was the number-one hardest day hes ever had, Wight said. Prior to going, Wight trained for the climb. He said he exercises regularly anyway, but made sure to focus on incline work, whether it was on his NordicTrack or walking up and down the stairs in his house. Those exercises also included wearing a 20-30-pound filled backpack, which would simulate what he and other climbers would be doing on their trek. We had to carry anywhere from 20 to 25 pounds each day, Wight said of the Kilmanjaro climb. That was mainly our water for that day, our snacks for that day and, of course, our hiking poles and any change of gear. Wight flew from Jacksonville to Washington, D.C., on Feb. 28. After a 14-hour layover, he flew approximately 13 hours to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. From there, Wight flew to Mount Kilmanjaro. Addis Ababa Bole International Airport is really too small to handle the amount of traffic it does, Wight said. The experience there was hectic and filled with uncertainty. It was just chaos, like sardines in a can, Wight said. You didnt know where you were going. You couldnt understand anything anyone said. Honest to God, Troy Wight climbed Africas Mount Kilmanjaro and explores U.S. high points with daughter Christine Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, June 26, 2014News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake RegionFEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL FAM PAK$499 lb $249 lbPRICES AVAILABLEJUNE 25 JULY 01 $299$1992 $32 $3 2LB BAG Amazing quality. Fantastic prices.Satisfaction Guaranteed FAM PAK$269lb 24-32 OZ$329 $329 lb FAM PAK$299 lb FAM PAK$119 FAM PAK$299 lb Open 7 Days a Week 8am to 8pm1371 South Walnut St. (Hwy 301) Starke (904) 368-9188 lb Unions Wight enjoys worlds beauty from up highTroy Wight poses for a picture with Mount Kilmanjaro in the background. Troy Wight took this picture of a sunrise at 19,340 feetapproximately 10 minutes Troy Wight and his daughter Christine stand atop of 14,433 feet makes it the third highest point in the United States and the second highest point in the lower 48 states. Troy and Christine are attempting to

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Outback, Sonnys and Tony and Als Deli. Now thats food someone would actually want to eat, but BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Several interesting comments were made at the Bradford County Public Library on June 12, but none of them were, My compliments to the chef. Its not known whether those who signed up for the librarys annual Food Fear Factor went home with sickening, sour stomachs, but sickening, sour stomach was the name of one of the so-called meals six courses. Well, seven courses if you include throwing all the ingredients into a blender and serving up in a glass. Not even Jack LaLanne and his juicer could come up with such a creation, but four of the nights participants drank up to break a tie in the children and adult divisions. Hannah Perron chugged her socalled drink faster than Gentry Cooksey could to be that nights winning child, while Deborah Owens came out on top over Jaime Cooksey in the adult division. Antanika Tyson was the winning teen, though she was the only teen entrant and bowed out before the final course could be served. Who could blame Tyson, though? Believe it or not, a menu consisting of shiver me liver, smothered sweet heart, 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday June 26, 2014 Florida Twin Theatre All Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451 OPEN EVERY NIGHT Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.com SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 SCREEN 1 Starts Fri. Now Showing Starts Weds. July 2nd Gerard ButlerFri 8:00 Sat 4:50, 8:00 Sun 4:50 Mon Thur 7:15Wed.-Thur 7:30 Mark Wahlberg Teo Halm How to Train Your Dragon 2 Earth to Echo Fri 7:00, 9:00 Sat 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 Sun 5:00, 7:00 Mon Tue 7:30 Wed. Kids Shows 10am & 1pm All Seats $5.00July 2nd The Nut Job Dinner is served...be afraidooey gooey polluted lungs, slimy eyeball smoothie and fish-oiled brain, along with the aforementioned sickening, sour stomach, is not even close to being as appealing as it sounds. In fact, the evenings host, Dr. Bunsen Burner (library director Robert Perone), gave a pre-meal demonstration of how to use the supplied vomit bags. No one actually needed to use the bags with the exception of Cameron Brosky, who unfortunately couldnt grab his bag in time before he tossed his cookies. Actually, cookies were not among the nights ingredients, but the ingredients were not as bad as the entries gaginducing names might imply. It was the combinations that made them hard for participants to stomachor smell. Each participant was asked to take a big whiff of each serving before attempting to consume it. Jeon Russell never even took the first bite, declaring herself out of the competition after smelling the first course, which was sickening, sour stomach. That dish was made by combining rice, mashed potato flakes, lemon bar mix, Sour Patch Kids, Kool-Aid lemonade mix, vinegar and vanilla yogurt. The event began with 17 participants, with eight dropping out in the first round. When it was time to serve the fifth course, slimy eyeball smoothie, which consisted of tonic water, seltzer water, onions, gelatin, applesauce and Spanish olives, only four participants remained. Despite Owens remark that the final course of fish-oiled brain (sardines, anchovies, clam juice, chub mackerel, unflavored gelatin, evaporated milk, baby clams and tuna) smelled like cat food, she, Perron and Gentry and Jaime Cooksey finished off, setting up the tiebreaker in which every course was blended together. The winner had to finish it off before his or her competitor. The winner and runner-up in each division received prizes, and what prizes they weregift certificates/cards good for food at such places as Chilis, Dicks Wings, Dickeys, Olive Garden, Hope Owens dreads eating seems in a state of disbelief in regard to the probably not until first fully recovering from Food Fear Factor. As Jaime Cooksey noted with a smiley emoticon on the Bradford County Telegraphs Facebook page, Not my best idea. Library Director Robert Owens is not saying a blessing for this (right) is pictured in the aftermath of losing his Cooksey looks on. Jaime Cooksey looks on in amusement as Jeon Randall gets a whiff of Sickening Sour Stomach. The smell was enough to force Randall to drop out of the competition. Perron works to down. Despite what looked close calls, she made it to the is not crazy about spinach being one of the ingredients Polluted Lungs.

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of the lymph nodes under his arm and in his neck was suffocating him. They knew immediately what they were dealing with and decided it was best to transport him to the trauma unit at Shands, where they were better equipped to handle such a serious case. At Shands, they had Powell in surgery within an hour. The surgical debridement lasted about 3.5 hours. Then the doctors came to talk to the family. The doctors told Cathy and Moore that they had removed all of the flesh, some of the muscle, all of the fatty tissue and the dead nerves from the top of Powells right hand all the way up to his shoulder and the right side of his chest and back. They said that there was a very good chance that Powell would not survive, and if he did, amputation of some or all of the affected areas was a very real possibility. Christmas day brought another surgical debridement and the same dire warning from the doctors about Powells prognosis. All we could do was wait and pray, Moore recorded in the journal she kept through the ordeal. It felt as though someone had knocked the breath out of us. It was like a horrible nightmare. Cathy remembers being in a kind of shock, knowing and understanding what was going on and trying to deal with what decisions needed to be made. I was scared, very scared, she said. I heard what they were saying, but I didnt believe it. I wouldnt believe that I was going out to eat with members of his family. According to his wife, Cathy, he got up and went to work at his restaurant (Powells Dairy Freeze in Starke) as usual on Dec. 23. He came home much sooner than usual after he started feeling ill. Cathy said he came home and told her he didnt feel well and that his arm felt as though someone had poured acid on it. He asked Cathy to take him to the emergency room at Shands Starke, and he remained there for most of the day. Cathy said she asked them if they had any idea what was wrong with her husband, and they said they did not. She took him home with prescriptions for cortisone cream and painkillers to care for him herself. About 5 a.m. the next morning (Christmas eve), Cathy called her daughter Kelly Moore and told her that Powell was much worse. His arm was swollen and bleeding, and his skin was literally dissolving before her eyes. Cathy put him in the car and headed for North Florida Regional Medical Center. Cathy said by the time she pulled up at the emergency room, Powell was having a hard time breathing. Once inside, the doctors found it necessary to intubate him because the swelling grafts and physical therapy may be needed once the infection is cured. healthy individuals. The infection begins at a break in the skin, resulting from trauma or surgery. It begins as a painful, inflamed lesion or lump on the skin, which quickly becomes much more painful than would seem appropriate given the size of the lesion. The disease progresses very quickly with increasing pain, inflammation, fever, skin discoloration and drainage. Other symptoms can include nausea, sweats, chills, dizziness and shock. Quick medical attention is necessary as the greater head start the disease gets on treatment, the greater the loss of tissue. Treatments commonly include intravenous antibiotic therapy, multiple surgical procedures to remove dead tissue and, in severe cases, amputation. Tissue The Starke campuses of Santa Fe College are once again hosting College for Kids this summer, and there is still room for rising fifth-, sixth-, seventh-, eighthand ninth-graders. College for Kids will be held Mondays-Fridays, July 7-18, from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (Half-day sessions are an option.) The cost is $270, or $135 for half-day sessions. Visit the Santa Fe College Andrews Center to register. You may also call 904-9645382. Thursday, June 26, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back Pain Back & Neck Pain Clinic NEED RELIEF FROM:Call Dr. Berry Serving the Area for 21 Years THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE AVAILABLE THERAPEUTIC MASSAGEAVAILABLE SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww.starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook Spots are still open for College for Kids programJamarian Cummings prepares to point to a location College for Kids, a program for older students, will begin July 7, so there is still time to register. BY TRACY LEE TATE Special to the Telegraph, Times and Monitor Dealing with a potentially deadly disease can be a lifechanging experience for everyone concerned, both the patient and his family. Keystone Heights resident David Powell is now on the mend from his terrifying bout with necrotizing fasciitis (see sidebar), a disease that is both deadly and unpredictable in its severity and survivability. Powell remembers very little of his ordeal. He remembers heading out with his grandson for a day of boating on Dec. 21, 2013. They trailered the boat to Palatka to put in at the St. Johns River. His grandson was backing up the trailer, and Powell decided to jump into the boat from the trailer rather than use the ladder in the back. He slipped and went in the water, splashing water into some small cuts and scratches on his arm. His last clear memories of the day are his grandson pulling the boat back out of the water so Powell could put the ladder down and get in the boat as he usually did, tying it up to wait for his grandson to go park and then turning the boat around and heading south. Powell remembers nothing of the day spent on the water despite the fact they traveled all the way to Sanfordto Lake Monroe and back, which is a seven-hour trip. Nor does he remember the next day when he watched a ball game on television and went Powell, family get through health crisis Kelly Moore and grandson Connor Roling outside his home in Keystone Heights. Murray Chrysler-DodgeJeep-Ram will host a car wash to benefit the Bradford High School cross country program on Saturday, June 28, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m.June 28 car Bradford High cross country Information for this story was taken from Wikipedia, Medicine. net and Medline Plus websites. BY TRACY LEE TATE Special to the Telegraph, Monitor and Times Flesh-eating bacterial infections (also known as necrotizing fasciitis) are rare conditions, most commonly caused by the organism Streptococcus pyogenes, the same bacteria which more commonly causes mild sore throats. Other bacteria may also cause such infections, and the exact species must be determined by culture. A related infection called MRSA is caused by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus in a particularly antibiotic resistant form. The infection starts in the tissues just below the skin and spreads along the layers of tissues that separate the muscles and fat. Infection sites are most commonly the arms, legs and abdomen. The infection proves fatal in about 40 percent of identified cases. Sources of the infection can include the normal presence of the organism on the individuals skin and exposure to waste water, as well as exposure through community contact or in a medical setting. Over 70 percent of cases show one or more of the following: diabetes, cancers, chronic diseases or substance abuse/addiction. The disease only rarely occurs in otherwise

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The second annual Gerard Warren and C.J. Spiller Celebrity Golf Tournament will take place at the Country Club at Lake City on Saturday, June 28, beginning with registration at 8:30 a.m. and a shotgun start at 9 a.m. Proceeds from the tournament will be used to help at-risk youth in Union and Columbia counties. Player entry cost is $75, which includes lunch. There will be an awards presentation, and every player will receive a gift at check-in. To register, please contact Donnell Davis at donnelldavis111@aol.com or 850-673-9533. The C.J. Spiller and Gerard Warren FUNdamentals Camp, a program of USA Football, will take place Friday, June 27, from 8:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. at the Union County High School football field. The camp is open to ages 6-15. Registration is 7:30 a.m. on June 27 and is open to the first 300 children. All participants should wear athletic footwear and apparel. T-shirts and equipment will be provided. Spiller, a 2006 UCHS graduate, went on to star at Clemson University and is currently a member of the Buffalo Bills, who took him with the ninth overall pick of the 2010 draft. Warren, a 1997 UCHS graduate, played at the University of Florida and was the number-three overall selection of the 2001 NFL draft. Warren played 11 seasons in the NFL for the Cleveland Browns, Denver Broncos, Oakland Raiders and New England Patriots. Please send email queries to donnelldavis111@gmail. com, or call 850-673-9533. 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday June 26, 2014 FOOTBALLFALL Registration is in progress! not getting the required reps in practice or the game? requires mandatory plays than the YFL for its players at ALL levels. is currently $100 per football/cheer participant. Price will increase July 1st. Package deals available for multiple siblings. Rodney Mosley (904)412-6300 Geoff Cook (352) 316-3961 email: bradfordcountycowboys@gmail.com website: www.leaguelineup.com/bradfordcountypopwarnerTHE BRADFORD COWBOYS WILL HAVE DIVISIONS: Tiny-Mite (ages 5-6-7) Mitey-Mite (ages 7-8-9) Junior Pee-Wee (ages 8-9-10 and some 11yrs old) Pee-Wee (ages 9-10-11 and some 12yrs old) Unlimited (ages 11 thru 14) No weight limit for this groupPop Warner is partnered with USA Football and its Heads-Up Football Program to teach proper blocking and tackling techniques in a better and safer way. ARMSTRONGFENCE COMPANY Securing the SoutheastCommercial Residential Rent a Fence Access ControlCall for your FREE Estimate LOCAL PEOPLE ... LOCAL SERVICE! For Rex Collins, a Haven Hospice patient, a wish to be included in two of the most important events of his daughter Chelseys life came true when she wore her high school graduation cap and gown and her wedding dress at the Custead Care Center in Orange Park recently. When Chelsey graduated Bradford High School on June 6, her father was unable to attend. Before the ceremony, Chelsey wore her graduation cap and gown to the Custead Care Center so that Rex could see her in it. The Collins family arranged for Rex to watch the graduation ceremony from his room that evening via Skype. Rex also wanted to see how his daughter was going to look on her upcoming wedding day, which was June 21, so Chelsey wore her wedding dress as well. Haven Hospice is a notfor-profit community hospice organization providing services since 1979 and licensed in Florida since 1980. It has served more than 68,000 patients and families in North Florida. For more information, visit www.havenhospice.org, or call 800-727-1889.Hospice patient gets a fathers wishRex Collins is pictured with his wife, Lisa, and his daughter, Chelsey. BY MICKEY AGNER Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor Kim Cook, a first-grade teacher at Irby Elementary School in Alachua County, was selected as Irbys Teacher of the Year in 2012-13. Later in that school term, she received an unsatisfactory evaluation because her students did not take the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test and were administered no other appropriate standardized test. Her evaluation was based on the achievement of third-grade students from a nearby school. Angered by the perceived lack of fairness, Cook joined forces with seven other teachers in Florida, the Alachua County Educational Association, the Florida Educational Association and the National Educational Association in filing a suit against the Florida Department of Education. Central to Cooks complaint was Senate Bill 736, which had been signed into law in 2011 by Gov. Rick Scott.   The bill used what was called a Value-Added Model to anticipate student academic growth with the use of the FCAT.   The anticipated student growth, compared to what students actually did achieve, was used for the purpose of evaluating teachers. The FCAT is not administered in every grade level, and the instructions for gathering appropriate test scores for students who are not tested do not adequately address the complications and led to more than a few situations similar to Cooks. Making the story politically charged is the fact that former Gov. Charlie Crist vetoed a similar bill in 2010. While the use of test scores for teacher evaluations has been the more controversial component of SB 736, it also targets tenure contracts, eliminating the practice by way of attrition. Additionally, it provides merit pay for teachers who earn a highly effective evaluation. In total, the bill addresses the issue of accountability for public education teachers. On June 4, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker dismissed the lawsuit by Cook, the six other teachers and the three teacher associations based upon the idea that the law was rational within the meaning of the law. In doing so, however, Walker acknowledged that the practice and implementation was unfair. Nevertheless, it has holding teachers accountable despite issuesUCHS football greats Spiller, Warren to host youth camp June 27 Warren golf tournament risk youth Dear Editor: The Telegraph article concerning further talks about economic development in the county made me laugh.   It is ridiculous to keep having these meetings and talking about economic development when it is obvious the county officials will continue to bend over backward to prevent the City of Starke from growing.   In the twenty years I have lived in the city of Starke I have seen no cooperation from county officials if the city made any effort to advance and grow.   Rather, the county has had its hand out demanding that the city give them something, either money or fire department, police department or free recreation for county children.   The recent brouhaha about annexation, I believe, was raised by county officials who are still grousing about the city not paying for the countys animal control operation.   What the county officials seem to forget is that city resident pay the same amount in taxes to the county each year as do county residents so they should not feel like the city is obligated to pay them anything for county operation.   The city provides services to its residents including police and fire protection, utility services including electricity, water, sewer and garbage and trash collection. I prefer to live in the city to enjoy these benefits, and so far they have met my expectations.   City residents pay for these services and ask for no contribution from the county.   Also, the city provided countywide recreation for many years at a high cost with the county refusing to give any financial support even though eighty to eighty-five percent of children in the recreation programs lived in the county, not in the city.   When the recreation cost came near a million dollars a year or County opposed to Starke growthmore it had to be discontinued as the city simply could not afford the cost. County officials and residents complained but none of them offered to help support the program financially.   One of the former county commissioners proposed a county fire department be created by taking over the citys fire department, stating the county could not afford to start a fire department otherwise.   At the time, he also proposed building two fire stations in the county to house such a department but neither of them would have been in the city.   The county was to just take the fire department with no compensation to the city for equipment, etc.   Then the Sheriff wanted to take over the Starke Police Department, in much the same manner, just take the equipment, etc., with no compensation from the county to the city.   As with the fire proposal continued coverage to the city and its resident would have been scanty.   To add insult to injury, the Sheriff wanted the city to then pay him a million dollars a year, or more, for two officers to police the city.   There was no guarantee that he would not up the cost every year.   He seemed to forget city residents were already helping fund his office through the county taxes we pay.   Eighty to ninety percent of my property taxes each year go to the county or the school system.   The remaining little bit goes to the city.   As I travel the southeast and see other states and area gaining businesses such as auto plants I wonder why not Bradford County or other areas of Florida.   I have reached the conclusion that our leaders are afraid such businesses would cause increases in wages paid, and (gasp) result in employees actually expecting decent benefits.   In closing I salute Mayor Carolyn Spooner for the way she recently stood strong for the city when attacked by county officials. James D. Powell Starke Letters editor@bctelegraph.com

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Air Force   Airman 1st Class   Jordan   B.   McCollum   graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. McCollum earned distinction as an honor graduate. graduates from basic training Thursday, June 26, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B 904-368-0687 phwww.starkedivorce.comMARGARET ANDERSON1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties Official Sports Medicine ProvidersTornadoesfor the Bradford High School KATIE TRUMBLE, DPT, ATC/L CAITLIN RAUCKHORST, A TC/L 319 West Call Street Suite A Starke, Florida 32091 Phone: (904) 368-1257 Fax: (904) 368-1258 Thursday, June 26th will make 50 years James and Barbara Balkcom have been married. James and Barbara met at a New Years Eve party during their freshman year of high school and became high school sweethearts. They continued to date two years after school before getting married. They both lived and worked in Jacksonville until 1972 when the now family of five moved to the New River area of Bradford County. James continued to serve his country working at the Air National Guard in Jacksonville as well as beginning a hog farm here in Bradford County. Barbara worked at the farm until their children were older. She then worked for Dr. Whiffen and later became the secretary at the Methodist Church for many years. James continues to work for Jacksons Building Supply and is an active member of the Fair Board in our community. James and Barbara are members of New River Baptist Church. They have raised their family in a Godly, loving home and shared it with their family. They have three children, eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Mama and Daddy we want to thank you for all the love you have shown us and shared with others and also giving us the example of a Godly marriage. We Love you and Happy 50th Anniversary, Randy, Annette and Tommy.Balkcoms celebrate 50 years Gene and Faith Murphy celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary May 17 at Bible Baptist Church fellowship hall. They have three children, Theresa, Martha and Gene, Jr.; six grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren. The celebration was given by their children, granddaughters and daughter-in-law, Kim. They celebrated with family and friends. Gene and Faith attend Bible Baptist Church. On June 27, Eddie and Marie Oden of Lake Butler will celebrate 60 years of marriage. Eddie and Marie met in Jacksonville even though neither of them lived there at the time. Marie was studying at Piedmont Nursing School in Atlanta and Eddie was in the Army stationed at Ft. Jackson, S.C. Each was home visiting their parents, who introduced the pair at church. After a brief courtship, they returned to Jacksonville to be married. After a twoyear deployment to Germany, Eddie returned to the U.S. and the young couple settled in Jacksonville. There they raised two sons, Buck and Chuck. Eddie was employed as an electrician for over 42 years through IBEW Local Union 177 and retired from Paxon Electric. Marie served as an Assistant OR Supervisor at Baptist Medical Center and, later, as an OR Supervisor at Bradford Hospital after receiving her BSN from the University of North Florida. Retirement for the Odens has been spent operating the New River Ranch and traveling. They recently traveled to Paris and Normandy in France as well as Hawaii. Their current adventure is an RV trip to the West Coast. The Odens also spend time with their four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. There will be a family celebration of their anniversary on June 29th. Odens celebrate 60 years Socials ,Autumn Griggs of Melrose has been named to the 2014 Spring Semester/Term 4 Provosts List at Troy University, Alabama. The Provosts List honors students who have earned a 3.65 or higher Grade Point Average during the previous academic period.Griggs named to Provosts List Jordan McCollum He   is the son of Kenneth A. Steele of Starke. and Theresa P. McCollum of Newport News, Va. He is a 2013 graduate of Menchville High School, Newport News, Va. Specialist Taylor Pruss of Fort Lauderdale graduated from United States Army Basic Training at Fort Jackson on June 19, 2014. SPC Pruss successfully completed an intensive nineweek program with the 3rd Platoon of Delta Company 2/39.   His training included military discipline and courtesy, physical fitness, instruction on basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare, drill Pruss graduates from basic trainingTaylor Pruss and ceremony, basic first aid and field training exercises.   Pruss achieved Expert Grenade and Sharpshooter recognition during training. SPC Pruss will report to Fort Eustis in Newport News, VA for Military Occupation Specialty training.   He is the son of Bill and Karen Pruss of Melrose, and a 2002 graduate of Keystone Heights High School. Socials ,www.StarkeJournal.com www.facebook.com/BradfordTelegraph

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6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 26, 2014 $2 OFFWITH THIS COUPON Lake ButlerCR121CR231 JJsHand Crafted Jewelry Great Gifts Polished Stones & Beads 515 South CR 231 (going South towards RMC) Lake Butler RMC 4 th of July Blowout Sale1000 South Water St. Starke, FL 32091 904 966-2221 EVERYTHING 25% OFF 25% OFF 964-(8473)13761 South US 301 Starke(1/2 mile south of walmart) Tires Wheels Vehicle Accessories Golf Carts & Parts Jo es Tires Summer Time We have Deep Blue Engel Coolers... Many Sizes!!! t Crime t BradfordCharla Chrystal Baker, 57, of Middleburg was arrested June 19 by Bradford deputies for larceny and for fraud. According to the arrest report, Baker wrote a check from her daughters closed checking account back in November 2013 to pay rent at a home in Country Club Woods of Starke. Bond was set at $7,500 for the charges. Rhonda Lynette Clayton, 38, of Sanderson was arrested June 22 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Ashley Renee Corning, 27, of Woodbine, Ga., was arrested June 17 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Robert Lee Crews, 24, of Starke was arrested June 19 by Starke police for aggravated battery and for disturbing the peace. According to the arrest report, Crews and his girlfriend got into an argument, and he poked her in the head, pushed her and threatened further harm from him and some family members. Once he was arrested by police, Crews, who had been drinking, started shouting outside the residence, causing neighbors to come out of their residences. Bond was set at $12,500 for the charges. William Franklin Crumbley, 48, of Green Cove Springs and Johnathon B. Hall, 34, of Green Cove Springs were arrested June 17 by Starke police for trafficking in drugs-controlled substance and possession of marijuana. Hall was also charged with possession of drugs-synthetic cannabinoid. According to the arrest report, the two were passengers in a vehicle pulled over in Starke because the brake and tail lights werent functioning. The driver of the vehicle, Gary A. Brock III, 27, also of Green Cove Springs, was arrested on a warrant out of St. Johns County once his information was run through dispatch. A search of the vehicle turned up the drugs in the backseat, where Crumbley and Hall were seated, resulting in their arrest. Bond for Crumbley was set at $62,000, while bond for Hall was set at $24,000. Shawn Tracy Dewdney, 49, of Starke was arrested June 20 by Starke police for failure to appear. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Lisa Ann Dexter, 33, of Starke was arrested June 21 by Starke police during a traffic stop for possession of drugs-controlled substance without a prescription and driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $35,000 for the charges. Kyle Leon Dick, 24, of Starke was arrested June 17 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Alachua for fraud, use of ID of another and resisting an officer without violence. Bond was set at $10,000 for the charges. Melissa Marie Dorough, 22, of Middleburg was arrested June 21 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. John Mason Folsom, 23, of Starke was arrested June 22 by Bradford deputies for four charges of aggravated assault with a weapon and for obstructing justice-intimidate/threaten victim, witness or informant. According to the arrest report, Folsom and the victim were traveling west on S.R. 100 from the Keystone area when he pulled up behind the victim, driving erratically and then pulling beside her in an attempt to force her off the road. The victim eventually pulled into Tonys convenience store off S.R. 100, with Folsom pulling up beside her and then verbally threatening to come get her, her brother and her family. The victim later told law enforcement that she was an Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay and Unioninformant in a narcotics case at Edwards grocery earlier in the year, and Folsom had been an employee there. The victim told the deputy she and her brother were in fear for their lives. The victim also had her 3-year-old child and another 4-year-old child in the vehicle when Folsom forced them to pull off the road. The next day, deputies were able to locate Folsom at a friends residence on C.R. 21B near the Santa Fe Lake boat ramp and arrested him. Bond was set at $250,000 for the charges. Andrew Scott Fulkerson, 29, of Starke was arrested June 21 by Starke police for battery. According to the arrest report, an officer encountered a wounded man in the Walgreens parking lot late at night who stated he had been in an argument with Fulkerson several hours earlier. The victim said Fulkerson struck him several times in the head, and he was having blurred vision. EMS was called and transported the victim to Shands Starke. Approximately an hour later, the officer went to Shands and located Fulkerson in the waiting room and arrested him. Audrey Fuller Graham, 35, of Lake Butler, Michael Glenn Starkes, 32, of Starke and Michael Dewanye Thornton, 28, of Starke were all arrested June 22 by Bradford deputies for battery after fighting broke out between people in two neighboring homes on Southeast 125th Street in the county. According to the arrest report, one of the homeowners told deputies there had been an ongoing feud between the neighbors. On the day of the arrest, both parties had been drinking and yelling at each other before punches were eventually thrown by the three arrested. Bond was set at $10,000 for Thorntons charge, while bond was set at $5,000 for Grahams charge. Beau Matthew Harrell, 27, of Worthington Springs was arrested June 21 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Rolanda Maneat Heard, 37, of Jacksonville was arrested June 22 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Henry Calvin Hendrieth, 29, of Bradford County was arrested June 19 by Lawtey police for battery. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Rodney Eric Keen, 42, and Jody Marcus Jade Keen, 20, both of Hawthorne, were arrested June 19 by Bradford deputies for dealing in stolen property and for fraud-false statements. According to the arrest report, an Alachua County deputy was at Curtis Recycling in Hampton investigating the Keens as suspects for a burglary and grand theft in Alachua County. The Alachua deputy had learned the Keens had sold a hay trailer earlier in the day to Curtis Recycling, and was there when the Keens returned again with more metal items. They were detained, the owners from Alachua identified the metal items and the Keens were arrested by Bradford deputies for dealing in stolen property and for defrauding a secondary metal recycler-less than $300. Charges will be forthcoming from Alachua for the burglary and grand theft. Bond for Rodney Keen was set at $100,000 in Bradford, while bond for Jody Keen was set at $10,000 in Bradford. James David McDaniel, 48, homeless, was arrested June 21 by Lawtey police for possession of marijuana, for disorderly intoxication, drugs-health or safety and resisting an officer. Bond was set at $30,000 for the charges. Antonio Leo Monroe, 28, of Starke was arrested June 22 by Lawtey police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Tara Meghan Palmer, 25, of Starke was arrested June 19 by Bradford deputies for three charges of child neglect and a charge of battery. According to the arrest report, one of the victims, a mom, was sitting in her home with her two children when someone knocked on the door on June 12. The victim asked who it was, and the person answered T. The victim asked again who it was, got the same answer, then told the person to come in. When the personlater identified by the victim as Palmerentered, she started spraying mace in the room and on the victim and her two children. The victims were transported to the hospital for evaluation, and Palmer was later identified by the adult victim in a photo lineup. A week later, Palmer came to the sheriffs office to be interviewed about the case and denied being at the victims home when the incident happened, but was arrested due to the victims statements. Bond was set at $8,000 for the charges. William Elzie Sanders, 31, of Starke was arrested June 18 by Bradford deputies for cruelty toward a child. According to the arrest report, Sanders got mad at his stepchildren, ages 5 to 10, over the loss of a pet turtle. Sanders sent the children to their room, but then picked the youngest one up by her hair and threw her to the floor, causing her to land on a suitcase that was on the floor and fracturing her arm. According to the report, Sanders has been arrested several times in the past three years on domestic violence charges toward the childrens mom. Bond was set at $100,000 for the charge. Sandra Danielle Stemm, 26, of Brooker was arrested June 23 by Bradford deputies on warrants issued in April for burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, larcenygrand theft over $300 and less than $5,000, five charges of fraud-pawnbroker transaction fraud and five charges of dealing in stolen property. Stemm was transported from the Alachua County jail to the Bradford jail to face the charges. Bond was set at $120,000 for the charges. Yvonne Sharise Taylor, 23, of Macclenny was arrested June 22 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Lindsey Ann Templeton, 28, of Starke was arrested June 19 by Starke police for petit theft-shoplifting. According to the arrest report, Templeton attempted to leave Walmart in Starke with various items in Walmart bagsmost of them not paid for. The value of the items came to approximately $290. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Anthony Maynard Watson, 21, of Starke was arrested June 18 by Starke police for battery. According to the arrest report, Watson got into an argument with his sister over her using his phone charger and struck her several times in the head with an open hand. Once he was transported to the jail, he was also charged by Bradford deputies with probation violation. Bond was set at $5,000 for his charges. Henry Wimberly, 24, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 22 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $25,000 for the charge.Keystone/MelroseJohn Brown, 19, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 20 by Clay deputies for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Casey Marie Gaffney, 33, of Melrose was arrested June 23 by Putnam deputies for dealing in stolen property, child neglect and larceny. Bruce Allen Guthrie, 50, of Melrose was arrested June 22 by Putnam deputies for contempt of court. Megan Howell, 29, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 19 by Clay deputies for non-support. James Shepard, 47, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 20 by Clay deputies for possession of crack cocaine. Christopher Wanton, 31, of Melrose was arrested June 22 by Clay deputies for resisting a law enforcement officer. UnionBilly James Belford, 60, of Lake Butler was arrested June 17 by Union deputies during a traffic stop for speeding, possession of drugs-cocaine, possession of marijuana and possession of narcotic equipment. William E. Wells, 40, of Lake Butler was arrested June 17 by Union deputies for disorderly intoxication and for resisting an officer. Justin Shoumond Johnson, 28, of Lake Butler was arrested June 23 by Union deputies on two warrants for failure to appearfelony offense. Kenneth Troy Thomas Jr., 28, of Atlantic Beach was arrested June 20 in St. Johns County on two warrants from Union for failure to appear-felony offense. Frederick L. Williams, 46, of Glen St. Mary was arrested June 18 by Union deputies on an outof-county warrant from Baker for failure to appear-misdemeanor offense.

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to lose David, so I just decided that I wasnt and worked from there. By Dec. 27, the spread of the infection seemed to have stopped, and the doctors were a little more optimistic that perhaps Powell would be able to keep his arm, but with a great or total decrease in mobility. By Dec. 28, the family was told that if Powell continued to improve, he would be moved to the burn unit in a few days to begin skin grafts. Powell had regained consciousness by this time and showed that he did have some mobility in his arm. On Jan. 2, the first skin graft took place, taking about 2.5 hours. Things went well, and another graft was scheduled for the following week. Doctors also began the process of weaning Powell off the ventilator, which was still assisting in his respiration even though he was breathing on his own. Powell began both physical and occupational therapy the next week, starting on a slow road to recovery. In total, Powell has undergone 15 surgeries, debridements and skin grafts. He was in the hospital from Dec. 24 until late February. He is now undergoing outpatient physical and occupational therapy and Faith. He graduated from the local schools of Bradford County. He is survived by: mother, Catherine Davis of Starke; father, Rev. James McNeal of Waldo; sister, Chrisoundra Y. McNeal of Starke; brothers, Tommy L. Covington, Jr. of Macclenny, Aaron Joshua McNeal and James Jonathan McNeal both of Waldo; grandmother, Rutha Mae McNeal of Gainesville. Funeral services will be held at 1:00 p.m. on June 28, in the Greater Allen Chapel AME Church with Rev. Cynthia Bailey conducting the services. Interment will be held in Waldo Community Cemetery. Arrangements are under the direction of Haile Funeral Home Inc. Viewing will be held on Friday, June 27, at Carl D. Haile Memorial Chapel Family Hour 3-4:00 p.m. Friends 4-7:00 p.m. and 1 hour at the church prior to the services. The Cortege will form at: 112 North Myrtle Street Apartment 1 Starke.Jacob JohnsJacob JohnsJACKSONVILLEJacob Keith Johns, 32, a lifelong resident of Jacksonville died Saturday, June 14, 2014 at Orange Park Medical Center. He was born on Nov. 2, 1981 to Susan McKenzie Dyer and the late Jefferson Jacob Luther Johns, Jr. He attended Evangel Temple. He was preceded in death by his father; his brother, Matthew Johns; and his maternal grandfather, Jasper Lee McKenzie. He is survived by: his mother, Susan McKenzie Dyer and his step-father, Natividad Barahona of Jacksonville; his daughters, Alexis Marie Evans and Breeauna Lynn Lied both of Jacksonville; his brother, Barry Johns of Jacksonville; his half brothers, Jeff Johns of Jacksonville, and Michael Lynn (Jennifer) McKenzie of Starke; his half-sisters, Lynn (Eldy) Flores of Jacksonville and Jennifer Johns of Bradenton; his maternal grandmother, Willie Mae McKenzie of Starke; and his girlfriend, Marie Parrish of Jacksonville. Funeral services will be held on Friday, June 27, at 12:00 pm at Archie Tanner Funeral Services with Brother Dean Hollingsworth officiating. Interment will follow at Crosby Lake Cemetery in Starke. The family will receive friends an hour prior to the funeral at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the funeral home to assist with expenses. Thursday, June 26, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Funeral with Burial20 Ga. Metal Casket (4 colors) Vault, Open & Closing Grave, Graveside or Chapel Service with one night visitation.............$5,595Funeral with Cremation(Rental Casket with Visitation prior to Services).................................$2,895Direct Cremation with Memorial ServiceServices held at Archer Memorial Chapel............................................$1,895 Archer Funeral Home Pre-payment accepted Within Your Means Now, Peace of Mind Always 55 North Lake Avenue Lake Butler, Florida 32054 Serving Families in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The areas largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 Does your business have a story to tell? A product or service to sell?The Bradford County Telegraph Advertising Department can provide you with the in depth coverage you desire...Call 904-964-6305or email us atDarlene Douglassdarlene@bctelegraph.comor Kevin Millerkmiller@bctelegraph.comAdvertorial Advertising Works! d Obituaries d MIDDLEBURG Ann Stevenson Brown, 83, of Middleburg died at her home Thursday, June 19, 2014. She was born in Portland, Maine on May 28, 1931 to the late George Stevenson and Thelma (Harding) Hunt. Prior to retirement, she worked in nursing homes as a L.P.N. She was of the Methodist Faith. She was preceded in death by her husband, George Brown and her daughter, Mary Starke both in 1999, also preceding her in death is her brother, Allen Hunt. Survivors are: children, Roxanna Berry of Middleburg, Janet Johnson of Lake Butler, Karol Williams of St. Louis, Mo., George Brown, Jr. of Lawtey, and Harold Paul Brown of Keystone Heights; brothers, Walter Hunt of St. Augustine and Robert Hunt of Rhoden, Maine; fifteen grandchildren; twenty-nine greatgrandchildren; and two great-greatgrandchildren. Services were held June 22 in the Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home Chapel. Interment will follow at a later date. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, of Keystone Heights.Patricia BryanST. AUGUSTINE Patricia Leigh Bryan died Thursday, June 19, 2014 after a long illness with pancreatic cancer. She retired from the Department of Corrections and later was employed at Bayview Rehab and Flagler Hospital. She is survived by: two sons, Kevin Sprow, and Daren Williams; a sister, Sandi Stoiber; and a brother, Ted Bryan. A memorial service will be held at Craig Funeral Home in St. Augustine on Sunday, June 29 at 1:00 pm. In lieu of flowers, a donation can be made to Community Hospice/Bailey Center. Craig Funeral Home Crematory Memorial Park of St. Augustine is in charge of arrangements.Wiley ClarkWiley ClarkHAWTHORNE Wiley Richard Clark, age 72, of Hawthorne passed away from injuries he sustained in an automobile accident Sunday, June 22, 2014. Mr. Clark was born in Deland, Feb. 13, 1942, to the late Wiley and Carrie (Oglesby) Clark and was a member of the Main Street Baptist Church in Leesburg. He moved to Hawthorne two years ago from Keystone Heights where he had been a longtime resident. Mr. Clark was the Chief Investigator for the State Attorneys office in Gainesville before his retirement 16 years ago. He loved working on his boat, listening to country music and working with livestock. Most of all, Mr. Clark enjoyed being a wonderful husband and father. His first wife and the mother of his children, Judith Judy Ann Clark preceded him in death. Survivors include: his wife of 36 years, Bonnie Louise (Griggs); four wonderful children and their spouses, Terri Elizabeth (Thom) ODonnell of Jacksonville, James Jimmy Richard Clark of Daytona, Billie Sue (Lavant) Durden of Swainsboro, Ga. and Jennifer Lynn (Jeffrey) McClellan of Lawtey; three siblings and their spouses, Edward (Sherri) Clark of Melbourne, Robert (Barbara) Clark of Gainesville, and Anna (James) Defoe of Tacoma, Wash. Also left behind are his five precious grandchildren, Michael, Heather, Mitchell, Rylee and Cole; along with four great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be 2:00 p.m., Thursday, June 26, in the First Baptist Church, Keystone Heights, with Reverend Daniel Findley officiating. Interment will follow at Keystone Heights Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations to The Salvation Army. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, 340 E. Walker Drive, Keystone Heights. www.jonesgallagherfh.com (352) 473-3176. PAID OBITUARYElizabeth CoakleyLAKE BUTLERElizabeth Ann Coakley, 68, of Lake Butler passed away Monday, June 16, 2014 at her residence after an extended illness. She was born July 10, 1945 in Buchannon, W.Va. to the late William B. and Nine R. Coakley. She is survived by: her daughters, Cynthia A. Rooney and Lesa R. Fox; ten grandchildren; Janell Graham, J.R. (James) Rooney, Lance Fox II, Mistee Rooney, Logann Fox, David Watson, T.J. Rooney, Kevin Fox, Elizabeth Watson, and Jonathan Watson.   She will be missed by all her family and extended family, she thought of as family, sister: Becky Watson; grandchildren: Shylow Sheffield, Laura W. Sheffield, Chris Bemis, and Bryan Bemis. All loved her very much. Services for Ms. Coakley will be held on Saturday, June 28, at 3:00 p.m. at New Beginnings Church at 3243 Southwest HWY 242, Lake City. 386-752-3805. Family invites friends for visitation at 2:00 p.m. an hour prior to services. Dinner will follow the services at the church. PAID OBITUARYRex CollinsRex CollinsSTARKEMr. Rex Donovan Collins, age 49, of Starke passed away Saturday, June 21, 2014 at Haven Hospice Custead Care Center in Orange Park. Mr. Collins was born on Aug. 17, 1964 in Jacksonville and moved to Starke 24 years ago from Keystone Heights. Rex attended Madison Street Baptist Church, was a member of Union County Riding Club and the Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch. He was a Vocational Instructor for the Florida Department of Corrections at FSP and worked over 25 years with Masters Construction Company as a carpenter. Preceding him in death was his father Clinton Collins. Survivors are: his wife of 25 years, Lisa Marie (Lawson) Collins of Starke; children, Clinton David Collins and Chelsey Marie Collins (Davin) Crews all of Starke; his mother, Zedra Montrell (Jordan) Collins of Keystone Heights; siblings, Steve Collins of Atlanta, Ga., Lynette Stucka of Greenville, S.C., Marlane (Thomas) Padgett and Lisa (Kevin) Dugger both of Starke; mother and father-in-law, David E. and Patricia Lawson of Starke, many nieces and nephews. The family will receive friends on Thursday, June 26, 2014 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at the Dewitt C. Jones Chapel of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home with funeral services beginning at 11 oclock. Interment will follow in Crosby Lake Cemetery with Reverend Mark McDowell officiating. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch, P.O. Box 2000, Boys Ranch, FL 32064. Arrangements are by JonesGallagher Funeral Home of Starke. On-line condolences may be left at www.jonesgallagherfh.com. PAID OBITUARYSTARKEMargaret Elizabeth Klug, 99, of Starke died Saturday, June 21, 2014 at Bradford Terrace Nursing Home in Starke. She was born on Sept. 14, 1914 in Buffalo, N.Y. to the late Andrew J. and Amelia Irene (Tharby) Ries. Prior to retirement she worked as office support staff in city government. She was preceded in death by her husband Nicholas Klug. Survivors are: nephew, Greg Allen of Alexandria, Va. and niece, Barbara DeWeede of New York. Memorial services and interment will be at a later date at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo, N.Y. Arrangements are by JonesGallagher Funeral Home of Starke. Lawrence KoonceRAIFORDLawrence Koonce, 51, of Raiford died Saturday, June 21, 2014 at the Shands U of F in Gainesville after an extended illness surrounded by his family. He was raised by Bill and Walter Lee Brinson. He lived in Raiford all of his life and graduated from Union County High School. He was a member of New Bethel Freewill Baptist Church in Raiford and was a painter retired from North East Florida State Hospital.   He is survived by: his partner for 28 years, Nettie Mae Stokes of Raiford; father, Elcano Reeves of Raiford: mother, Dorothy Mae Koonce of Largo; sisters, Alberta (Otis) Miller of Raiford, Laura Nichols of Largo, Patricia Brinson of Largo, Lisa, Tisa, Kinnie, and Angelee; brothers, Todd, Benard, and Curtis Koonce. Services will be held Saturday June 28, at 11:00 at the New Bethel Freewill Baptist Church of Raiford. Burial will follow at Five Sapplin Cemetery on CR 229 N Raiford. Family will receive friends Friday, June 27, for visitation from 6-8 pm at Archer Funeral Home. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.Chris McNealSTARKEChris A. McNeal, 29, of Starke, died Wednesday, June 18, 2014 at ET York Haven Hospice Gainesville. Born in Gainesville on June 7, 1985, he was a member of The Greater Allen Chapel AME Church Starke. He was of the Methodist Continued from 3B will continue for many months to come. I really dont remember much at all from the time I got into the boat until I woke up in the hospital, Powell said. I was heavily medicated there for a while and that, along with the pain and infection, probably accounts for it. Powell said he was just glad to be alive and to have more time with his family. He said he had never been a religious man, but has changed his mind some since his ordeal. I found out that I was on all these prayer lists at churches all over Bradford and Union counties, as well as here in Keystone Heights, Powell said. All these people, many of whom may never have met me, were praying for me to live. There is a sort of power there and, since according to the doctors Im really not supposed to be here, makes me think more about where that power comes from. Powell said he wants to thank all of the people who prayed for him and those who lent their support to his family during their ordeal. He said he is deeply touched by the caring showed them by the community. Powell has had to make a few lifestyle adjustments since his illness due to the fact that his use of his right arm will at best be reduced by 75 percent. He has given up his motorcycle and his straight-drive Corvette; trading both for a Corvette with an automatic transmission. He does plan to continue in his passion for speedboats, but that he will no longer boat in fresh water. When Im up to it, maybe in a month or two, Im going to take my boat down to the Keys and visit some friends, Powell said. I look forward to getting back out on the water, so long as its the ocean this time. No more freshwater for me.

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already been reported that the Florida Educational Association is in the process of appealing the ruling. Public school administrators in the local area tend to acknowledge some continuing issues with the Value-Added Model, but also indicate that assessment and teacher evaluations are more valid today than previously. Barry Sams, director of human resources for the Union County School District, said requirements for SB 736 have been amended to allow local assessments to supplant FCAT scores when FCAT scores are unavailable. Consequently, the process is more functional. Lisa Graham, the principal at Starkes Southside Elementary School and a school board member in Clay County, indicated there are still some issues with the process, but also acknowledged that it is running much smoother. Thomasenia L. Adams, the associate dean of research for the University of Floridas Faculty Development and Graduate Education Office of Educational Research College of Education,   said there are clearly some issues with the Value-Added Model and its implementation, but also said accountability in public education is here to stay. Not only is it a relevant issue in the secondary system, but it is also an issue in her workplace. Apparently, the professors for UFs College of Education are also being evaluated according to the success of their graduates. Betsy Regor, service unit coordinator for Florida Educational Association, is less understanding of the ValueAdded Model and referenced the ridiculous nature of the formula that is used to project anticipated student achievement. She also referenced the fact that it is totally unfair to evaluate teachers on the student progress of students that they do not even have contact with. Despite the Florida Educational Associations immediate appeal of the court ruling, public school teachers will continueat least for the time beingto be held accountable by way of their student test scores even though it fosters a perception of unfairness. It is true that engineers do not have their pay regulated according to the bridges that fail, or attorneys according to the number of cases they win, or physicians according to the number of patients they heal.   Of course, those professions are not paid with tax funds. Public education will continue to be accountable to the public. 8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 26, 2014 Fins, Fur & Tails Hunting season is long gone, and the summer heat is upon us. Below are some good items to remember when you are outdoors in Floridas summer heat: Remember sun protection when outside. Ticks, chiggers, yellow flies and mosquitoes are abundant.   Use protection. As the bass and crappie slow down for mid-summer, fish for bream. Offshore saltwater fishing remains hot all summer. Remember to fish pompano, whiting and sharks on the east coast surf. Tend your food plots near deer stands. Seek shelter from lightning when it rains outside. Make sure your guns are cleaned before their long summer rest. Remember that bream fishing is great for kids short attention spans. Remember that Florida has some of the most beautiful spring runs in the world. Snakebites on people are rare, but they are much more common on outside dogs.   Antivenin for dogs is very expensive. Frequent evening rains make dramatic temperature changes in our environment, causing snakes to seek more comfortable areas.   Be considerate of the nonEnjoy summer, follow precautionsvenomous ones and avoid the poisonous ones. Follow safety precautions when your family swims.Outdoors outlookThe numbers and sizes of the bass caught in our local tournaments have decreased with the onset of the midsummer heat. This is to be expected, but as the bass and crappie seek cooler temperatures in deeper locations, the bluegills and redbellies are much more available. Bluegills will bed on and off most of the summer, but they will collect in larger cluster beds around new and full moons. Look for the pungent smell of their beds, and fish upwind until they start biting. When the panfish are located, the bite is relentless and frequent, making them a favorite for kids. If the small size of panfish discourages you, think saltwater. Having made that suggestion, though, it is not the best time to fish for the big three: flounder, trout and reds. Flounder migrate offshore in the fall and are heavily fished at that time. Trout and reds are more abundant and easy to locate in cooler weather. However, they can be caught, and there are some more abundant varieties at this time of the year. Whiting, blues, pompano and permit can often be found on the eastern surf. If you have a chance to go farther south, snook fishing will be great. Sheepshead are not as large as in the spring, but readily available around structures. If you are really ambitious, tarpon are big inshore targets through the full moon in July. Offshore fishing will remain hot all summer. Remember to watch the tidal changes. The moon movements have a much more significant impact on saltwater fish.   Bass tourney resultsAt the June 11 Bald Eagle Tournament, Billy Renaldo landed the big fish and finished in first place. Jeff Humphrey and Scott Smith placed third, while Jason McClellan and Clint Sheppard placed third. Jeremy Dohrn and Buddy May won the June 12 Sampson Open Tournament, with Eddie Smith and Dillon Crews placing second. Hunter Dugger and Caleb Manning landed the big fish and placed third, while Johnathan Nash and Nicky Gay placed fourth.   On June 18, Chris Kadlec and Mark Roberts won the Bald Eagle Tournament. McClellan and Sheppard placed second, while Evan Hurst and Joe Yarborough placed third. Paul Akridge and John Breton landed the big fish. Mike Rhoads and Randal Alvarez teamed up to land the big fish and win the June 19 Sampson Open Tournament. Nash and Richard Kingsberry placed second, while John Starling and Matt Anderson placed third. Timmy Durrance and Sam Sibley teamed up for a fourth-place finish, while Cason Noles and Brandon Gay were fifth.Project Appleseed is topic of June 26 Crosshorn meetingThe June 26 Crosshorn Ministries, which starts at 7 p.m. at the Starke Golf and Country Club, will feature guest speaker Glen Smoak of Project Appleseed.   The introduction on the Crosshorn Ministries website reads:   Glen will be sharing the values of their excellent marksmanship program, as well as how-tos on civic involvement. One of their main goals is to teach traditional American marksmanship skills, especially to our youth. Heres a quote from their website: Why teach marksmanship? Because good shooting requires learning positive traits, such as patience, determination, focus, attention to details and persistence. More information on Project Appleseed can be found at www. appleseedinfo.org.Continued from 4B Akridge and John the big bass from the June Tournament. Dohrn and the June 12 Sampson Open Tournament. Smith stayed at the boat launch when her boy Durrance, 12 Sampson Tournament. She proudly proclaimed her catch to be better Renaldo won the June 11 Tournament.

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Thursday, June 26, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B 40 NoticesEQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an in tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing cus tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 ext #1005 47 Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale)FOR RENT PROFESSIONAL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/mo.up to 3,000 sq.ft. Contiguous $2,000/ mo. Warehouse 3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith & Smith Realty. 904-9649222. RETAIL SPACE in busy strip center. 1,000 sq.ft. and 2,000 sq. ft. units. South HWY 301 front age, across from the KOA Campground. Call 352235-1675. DOWNTOWN STARKE rent, $315 per month. Conference room, kitch en, utilities and more provided. 904-364-8395. 48 Homes for Sale3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced back yard. New flooring, & paint. A/C. Immaculate condition. $120,000.00. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-905349 Mobile Homes for SaleLAND/HOME PACKAGES 3 bed$399/month 4 bed$499/month waynefrier macclenny.com 904-259-4663 LIKE NEW! 2007 3 BED Doublewide 39k set up w/AC 904-259-4663 NO MONEY DOWN Use your land. 2015 5BR/3BA $599/month waynefrier macclenny.com 904-259-4663 Ends 7/31 BRAND NEW 2015 28x52 6k off $55,900 Set up w/AC. Ends 7/31 904-259-4663 50 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 2BR/1BA. CH/A, newly renovated. $500/month. On Silver Lake. Lawn care & maintenance included. Call 352-478-8321 3BR/2BA DW 12273 SE 21st Ave., Starke. $675/ month plus $650/security. Out in country. Service animals only! 904-9648637. SUITE OF OFFICES IN CLUDES Kitchen, Show er, Washer Dryer. Downtown STARKE $1000/ MO. For information Call 904-364-9022. PERMANENT ROOMS for rent at the Magnolia Hotel. Both refrigerator and microwave. Special rates, by the month. Call 904-964-4303 for more information. MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT starting at $525 per month. Hidden Oaks, Lake Butler. Call 386496-8111. NICE MOBILE HOMES in Lake Butler & Starke 2 & 3 BR single wides, fenced. DW in Lake But ler. Deposit required. Call 678-438-6828. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 OFFICES FOR LARGE STAFF. Includes living qtrs, showers, kitchen, washer & dryer. This is a living qtrs. $1000/month. Call 904-364-9022 KEYSTONE 2BR/1BA. 1 acre fenced. SW w/room addition. Clean. $525/ month plus last & security. Please call 352-475-3094 or 352-235-1143 5 Yr. 3BR/2BA house for rent. Tile floor, granite counters, Jacuzzi tub, gas wrap around porch. Lake access. Post Masters Village in Keystone Heights. $1,050/mo. plus 1-month deposit. Call Dave 352473-3560. 2BR APT DOWNTOWN STARKE. $500/month. Call 904-364-9022 to see apt. RENT A ROOM IN AN OF FICE. $300 per month. Utilities furnished, kitch en provided. 6 offices available. 4 downstairs, 2 upstairs. For info call 904-964-6305. BUILDING THAT USES METAL SHOP. (Mc Clellan Recycling) 224 E. Washington Street. Starke. $200 per month. Call 904-964-6305 SMALL TRAILER FOR RENT, One person. $350/ monthly, satellite and utilities included. $150/ deposit. 1/2 acre, pet welcome. 904-964-2747 3BR/2BA NEAR Starke Golf course. Available June 16th. $775/mo. $675/ deposit. Will accept HUD. Call Chris @ 904-7320590 3BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE on 2.5 acres in Lawtey. $750/ 2041. 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immacu late condition. No pets other than service ani mals. $875/month plus deposit. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 2BR/1.5BA $595/mo, $500 sec. Service animals only, no smoking. Washer/dry er hookup CH/A, stove, refrigerator. Call 352-4755620 MASSAGE ROOM AVAIL ABLE for rent. Inside Polished Hair Salon. 330 S Lawrence Blvd. 352-473-3717 2BR/2BA SW mobile home. CH/A, fenced yard, front & back screened porch. Qui et neighborhood. Approx. 3 miles from RMC Lake Butler Reception Cen ter. Service animals only. $625/month 1st & last, $400/deposit. Available July. Call 386-623-2407 HOUSECOUNTRY LIVING 5 MILES W. STARKE 2BR / 2BA, LR, DR, Kitchen, Utility Room, 2 car Car port, Central Heat & Air. $700. /moFirst and Last mo. Rent. Service ani mals only. Call 904-9646718 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 3BR/2BA CH/A, new flooring. $650/month. First, last and deposit. Service animals only. 352473-0464 2BR/1BA. CH/A. Large yard, very clean. $475/month plus deposit. 904-3648135 4BR/1BA. Very clean. W/D hook-up. Private area. $575/month plus deposit. 904-364-8135 NEAR LAWTEY, MOBILE HOME 14X70. Clean & nice 2BR/2BA in the country. CH/A. &700/ month $500/deposit. We take credit check. Call 904-771-2576 HOUSE for rent. In good condition. For more information call, 904-290-0083 OR 904-964-5006. 3BR/2BA SW. Between Starke & Lake Butler. $550/monthly $300/de posit. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 3BR/2BA DW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $650/month, $650/ deposit. Call 352-2356319 3BR/2BA SW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $575/month plus $575/ deposit. Please call 352-235-6319 53 A Yard SalesSAT 9AM-3PM. 15204 SE 25th Lane. 1 mile E of Hospital off SR 230. Variety of nice things, some golf and tools. Check it out! YARD SALE AT LAW TEY PARK on Friday 6/27 only. Lots of good stuff, come see us! 904-635-8207 FRI & SAT 8AM-3PM. Clothes, plus size uni toys, hunting gear, electronics, books, col lector cards & coins. 9510 SW 68th Place Hampton. EDWARDS ROAD (100 A). 7 am-? Queen BR set, 3 piece BR furniture, adult clothes, shoes, bedding, odds & ends, kids games and printers. Keystone Yard SalesRECYCLED TREASURES SALE. Friday 9am-4m Saturday 9am-12pm. Saturday $1.00 bag day. Lots of stuff. Fresh Start Fellowship 7191 S.R. 21 N Keystone Heights. Info call 352-473-6550 FRI & SAT 9AM-2PM. 6860 Crystal Lake Road. Lawn clothes, toys, furniture, bamboo flooring and other items. 57 BUILDING AT 224 E. Washington Street. $7000. Could be mower shop or recycling shop. Call 904-964-6305 PLEASE BUY MY OLD 1971 Jackson dump truck. Also pretty good, tires kind of bald. $2,800.00. Please call 904-966-128759 Personal CLARK FOUNDATION REPAIRS, INC. Correction of termite & water-dam aged wood & sills. Level ing & raising Houses/ Bldgs. Pier Replacement & alignment. We do all types of tractor work, excavation and small demolition jobs. Free Estimates: Danny (Buddy) Clark, 904-545-5241. 65 Help WantedLOCAL STARKE BUSI NESS is looking to hire a part-time and/or full-time staff member. Optional shifts are available and Military Veterans are wel come to apply! We are looking for a self-starter, goal oriented person with the willingness to learn. No experience neces sary! Please email em ployment app or resume to vtoddf@gmail.com. DRIVERS: $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on This Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 COSMETOLOGIST NEED ED must have clientele. Booth rental. Please call Donna at 904-964-5485 SCALER/SHIPPING CO ORDINATOR needed for 2nd shift. Must have working experience of scales and computers. We are an EEOC, drug free workplace. We offer 401K, health insurance, paid holidays and va cation. Apply at Gilman Building Products, CR 218 Maxville, FL or fax resume to 904-289-7736 DRIVERS, CDL-A: Home every weekend! All loaded/emp ty miles paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or walk away lease, No mon ey down. 1-866-823-0323 NEEDED: Live in nanny for 2 children. 4 days on 4 days off. Keystone Heights area. Call or text 904-614-6632. LOOKING FOR STAFF TO work with those w/intel lectual disabilities in the 1 yr. experience in pd childcare, healthcare or diploma/GED, reliable transportation & abil ity to pass background screenings. Must have a positive attitude. Call 904-964-7767 or send resume to progression services@gmail.com LOCAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL seeking de pendable, dedicated, Christ-minded individual for full-time and parttime positions. Experi AA or current college student seeking a BA in Education preferred. Call 904-964-6100 for applica tion information. BRADFORD TERRACE 808 S. Colley Rd. Starke, FL. 32091 is now accept ing applications for a Floor Tech. Exp. preferred Apply in person at or fax resume to 904-964-1497 DFWP. EOE. (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43RVs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptures 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AYard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Produce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Care59Personal Services 60Home ImprovementWord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE seeks to adopt, will be hands-on mom and dad. Financial Security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)9854592, Adam Sklar #0150789 Medical Alert Company in your area! Owning your own local distributorship. We do 70% of the work! Unlimited $ return. Investment required. Free Call (844) 2251200. Start Here Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-2103935 No experience. Company sponsored CDL training. In 3 weeks learn to drive a truck & earn $40,000+. Full benefits. 1-888-6938934. Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Hands On Training & Certifications Offered. National Average 1822 Hourly! Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1866-362-6497 earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.co m EOE MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASST CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 to work at our Lake Butler, FL facility LAKE BUTLER, FL PC GIVING YOUHEADACHES?Let the local computer repairspecialists at The Office Shop get your computer or laptop working like new again!We can diagnose, repair and clean your laptop or PC while resolving typical, infuriating issues such as: Viruses Trojans Spam Phishing Bots Slow-downs Registry Errors Failure to connect Tracking Cookies Call us at (904) 964-5764 or just bring it by 110 W. Call Street Downtown Starke Storage building with fenced yard. Can be used for tool rental, mower repair shop, metal buying & sales, record storage... (Or bldg can be changed to meet your equipment) For more info call 904-364-9022 FOR RENT OR SALE 704 N. Lake Street Starke NOW OPEN DURRANCE PUMP QUALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service STATE LICENSE #1305 rffntb b rfntfbnfffbffnbnff ffbfrfffbfnfnfbfntfnf frfntbfbfffrtffbfbffbnf fntfffrfnff Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HCaccessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity

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just finally mentally give up on it. It took more than six hours to reach the summit, Wight said. After the first two to three hours, everything everybody possessed was frozen. If I ever had to do it again, Id be more prepared, Wight said. I actually took CLIF (energy) bars with me. I had about four CLIF bars I saved just for the summit day. Well, CLIF bars are already hard as a rock. We got in that cold weather, and it was harder than steel. You couldnt eat it. All the water was gone. For probably 80 or 90 percent of the summit day, we had no water and no food. It was just tough. Wight was rewarded with the sight of that sunrise, as well as the accomplishment of making it to the top. However, climbers dont spend much time on the peak once they get there. Once you make it, youre really kind of out of it, Wight said, adding, You definitely dont jump up and down. You dont exert yourself that much because youre already so whipped, and the air is so thin. Once on the summit, Wight took his gloves off and tried to break up the ice his water had become so he could drink something. My hands have never been that cold in my life, he said. From the peak, climbers make a quick descent. Wight said it took four to four and a half hours to get back to the camp at 15,500 feet. The group continued to hike 7 miles to reach a low camp. On the seventh day, the group finished the expedition with a hike of more than 11 miles. During their time on the mountain, Wight and his group members had meals prepared for them by accompanying porters, who would set up camps and serve the meals there. After three or four days of that food, though, Wights stomach wasnt feeling so hot. He said the same held true for the other climbers. We werent used to the food, Wight said. It was really hard to eat. Theyd bring you the same stuff. Youd try your best to eat it. At the end of the climb, wellknown junk food seemed like a grand feast. Once we got off the mountain that seventh day and got down to the main check-in point, there were actually little convenience stores down there, Wight said. We didnt expect to see anything we knew, but they had Pringles, Kit-Kats, Snickers, Cokes and Nehi orange drinks. We devoured them. Though she didnt accompany him on the climb due to its expenseapproximately $4,000 for the guided hike and the flightWights daughter Christine is usually a constant companion when attempting to reach a high point. The main reason I do it is to spend time with my daughter, make memories with her and just see the country, Wight said. Wight and his daughter are attempting to reach the high points of each of the 50 states, adding that no father-daughter team has ever accomplished the feat, though several are currently trying. The U.S. high-points goal began with an unsuccessful attempt to reach the 11,239foot summit of Oregons Mount Hood. Weather caused the duo to turn back, but the experience was enjoyable. Wight suggested he and Christine attempt all of the United States high points, and they shook hands on it. Weve done 30 of them, Wight said. Every state high point is not comparable to an attempt on Mount Hoods summit. Floridas high point, which is the countrys lowest high point, is Britton Hillan elevation of 345 feet. A walk of approximately 50 feet from a parking area gets you there. Wight said the first high point of some difficulty was North Carolinas Mount Mitchell, with a peak elevation of 6,684. It was about a 12.5-mile round-trip hike, Wight said, adding, Both of us got leg cramps pretty bad. 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Last year, for example, they tackled six on one trip: Guadalupe Peak (Texas), Wheeler Peak (New Mexico), Panorama Point (Nebraska), Mount Sunflower (Kansas), Black Mesa (Oklahoma) and Mount Elbert (Colorado) in another. One trip he really enjoyed, Wight said, was spending 12 days to do Backbone Mountain (Maryland), Jerimoth Hill (Rhode Island), Katahdin (Maine), Mount Mansfield (Vermont), Mount Washington (New Hampshire) and Mount Marcy (New York). In New York, that Adirondack Mountains area up there is beautiful, Wight said. I always thought of New York as being New York City, but its not. Its gorgeous up there. Christine is starting college, and that, along with a job, will make it harder for her to go on such trips. Wight, though, is hopeful they can attempt Borah Peak (Idaho) and Kings Peak (Utah) later this year. She and I have such a blast doing this stuff, he said. Weve gotten to see so many pretty sights. Though he traveled outside the country to climb Mount Kilmanjaro, Wight said he has no desire to attempt climbing some of the worlds highest and toughest mountains, such as Everest. The goal, really, is not to climb mountains, but to simply take in the world around him. Its This is a picture of campsite at 14,100 feet. The tents can be seen in the foreground. a desire Wight said was fostered in him by his grandparents, who did a lot of traveling in a motorhome. He remembers looking at pictures of such places as Yellowstone, Yosemite and Glacier national parks. Even though they didnt climb mountains, it was just that wanting to go and see the country, Wight said. I just enjoy it. I dont know how else to say it. I love to travel and stuff like that, and see places I havent seen before.



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lrmonitor@bellsouth.net www.StarkeJournal.com Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone 352-473-2210 Fax 352-473-2210 Worth Noting Lake Region Monitor Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Keystone Heights, Florida Thursday, June 26, 2014 42 nd Year 8 th Issue 75 CENTS Green Cove Springs looking for jingle, logo Wiley Clark, investigator, sheriffs candidate, killed in BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor A longtime law enforcement official and a 1992 candidate for Bradford County Sheriff was killed Sunday morning in a crash near Hawthorne. Wiley Clark, 72, worked as an investigator for the State Attorneys office from 1977 to 1998. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, Wilber Petersen, 30, of Jacksonville was driving a tractor-trailer northbound on U.S. 301 near Southeast 57th Avenue in Alachua County. Just after 7:30 a.m., Petersen crossed the median and struck Clarks southbound 2003 Dodge pickup. Clark was pronounced dead at the scene. Petersen was taken to UF Health Shands Hospital with minor injuries. Clark served in various law enforcement agencies, including the Gainesville Police Department and Alachua County Sheriffs Office. Beginning in 1977, he was an investigator for the State Attorneys Office. He retired as the offices chief investigator in Starke to run for Bradford County Sheriff in 1992. In a five-way Democratic primary, Clark placed third behind Dolph Reddish, who was seeking to recapture the office he lost four years earlier, and Bob Milner, who would later beat Reddish in a runoff. Milner remembered Clark as an even-tempered man with a dry sense of humor. I never saw him lose his temper with anyone, recalled Milner. Milner also said Clarks personality was a perfect fit for an investigator and that Clark was an extremely skilled interviewer. After the election, Clark returned to the State Attorneys office where he led a drug task force for several years and investigated cases out of the judicial circuit. He retired again in 1998. One of the most well-known cases Clark worked on was the 1985 murder of Starke businessman Joe Banister. The 41-year-old was shot with a semiautomatic weapon as he drove on S.R. 18 between Hampton and Theressa. Clark, along with Bradford County Sheriffs investigator Don Denton, crisscrossed the United States until they tracked the killing to a self-proclaimed soldier of fortune by the name of John Wayne Hearn. Hearn eventually testified against the victims wife, Debbie Banister, telling Denton and Clark the woman hired him to kill her husband. Debbie Banister was later convicted in the murder-for-hire scheme. For years after the conviction, Clark kept a photograph of Hearn and Debbie Banister at his desk in Starke. He told media representatives the case was the most unusual he had ever worked on. Clark also served as president of the Starke Golf and Country Club and Starke Rotary Club. Former Bradford County Clark See CLARK, 3A UF weatherman visits Melrose library BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor The chief meteorologist for the University of Florida explained to young patrons of the Melrose Public Library how scientists forecast weather and why forecasting is important. Jeff Huffman brought a slide show, rain stick, model tornado and a wealth of knowledge to around two dozen children and parents at the library on June 19. Huffman is now seen on two Gainesville television stations, five North Central Florida radio outlets and 12 public radio stations throughout Florida. He showed photos of his television set to the children and explained to them how producers make images of maps on video through the use of green screens. Huffman also explained why forecasting is important, showing the group photos of hurricane and tornado damage and explaining to them that the more they know about the weather, the safer they will be. He also gave the group tips on weather safety, emphasizing the importance of heeding hurricane evacuation orders, seeking shelter during tornadoes and thunderstorms: when thunder roars, head indoors, and avoiding puddles in flooded areas: turn around, dont drown. Huffman focused on safety during thunderstorms, warning the group that on average, lightening kills one person in Florida each week. He also said that Putnam County has the most lightening strikes per square mile than any other county in the state. After the meeting, he explained that in addition to Atlantic and gulf sea breezes meeting near Palatka, the St. Johns River also destabilizes the atmosphere by cooling the air during the summer months. Huffman also said that lightning can strike up to 15 miles away from a thunderstorm and that the most dangerous strikes occur at the beginning of a storm. The meteorologist also explained the concepts of condensation, air pressure and cold fronts to the group. University of Florida Chief Meteorologist Jeff Huffman gestures to his audience while explaining what it is like to forecast the weather. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGS City officials have applied for a planning technical assistance grant from Floridas Department of Economic Opportunity that will among other things, develop a jingle and logo for the city. The $25,000, non-matching grant would pay for a study that would also identify the towns economic strengths and weaknesses, identify ways Green Cove Springs could expand businesses within certain markets and create a marketing strategy. In their grant application to the department of economic opportunity, Green Cove Springs officials wrote that they want to focus on green industries, restaurants, retail establishments, recreational outfitters, boutique hotels, a boat welcome center, arts and cultural venues and ecotourism. They also wrote that the study would identify potential uses for Green Cove Springs old city hall site and the Augusta Savage Cultural Arts Center. Last year, city officials began the process of developing a community redevelopment plan for its gateway and MLK Boulevard corridors. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor FLEMING ISLANDClay County School board member Lisa Graham, who will complete her 24th year on the board later this year, told her colleagues that the last two years on the panel have been the worst she has ever experienced in her over two decades of service. Graham made the comments during a June 19 board meeting. She said that over the last 24 months, she has had to endure board meetings with actions that reeked of revenge and payback. I have been here a lot of years and these have been the worst two years, she said, and I hate it to be that way because everyone of you is better than that, smarter than that. It breaks my heart because I really care about this school system and how we look in the State of Florida, she continued. Ive never seen a school district that has so many dedicated administrators, teachers, staff Gavel changes hands at Rotary picnic BY JAMES WILLIAMS Special to the Monitor The Keystone Heights Rotary Club eschewed its usual installation banquet this year and held a Saturday afternoon installation picnic instead. The event was held at the home of Bruce and Shelly Gibbs off Bellamy Road beyond the McRae area. The weather was breezy, but sunny and dry. The sun dappled the tops of tents and many Rotarians and their guests expressed great satisfaction with the event. Barbara Mason was especially happy; she and Rotary partner Jim Smith won $375 in a drawing. Rotarians had been buying tickets and drawing from a pack of cards all year, trying to find the king of clubs. Outgoing President Paul Fessenden liked to explain, because Keystone Heights is the king of Rotary clubs. A variety of salads, Johnnys fried chicken, rolls and fruit with adult beverages were followed by a business meeting. That was followed by an ice cream bar with Cupcakery cupcakes and assorted toppingsincluding Rotary fund-raising pecans. Fessenden handed out gifts and thanks to Jim Gill, who has served as sergeant-at-arms for many years. Gill is turning the job over to new members. Current board members were also given tokens of appreciation. Bruce Gibbs was given a Paul Harris Foundation pin. Although not a Rotarian, Gibbs has contributed funds and volunteer time to the club and its community causes. Presenting Paul Harris awards to longsuffering spouses of Rotary Club members is not unusual and is always well-deserved. Richard Segall was named Rotarian of the Year for his service as club secretary, board member and liaison to school related projects like the Clay County Science Fair and Keystone Heights High School senior scholarships. Fessenden then presented incoming President Terry Suggs with a new mallet with which to ring the clubs bell and begin each meeting. Suggs received his official club president pin from his fianc, Julie Masters. Since Rotarys motto for the coming year is Light Up Rotary, Suggs presidential pin blinks on and off. It was later revealed that the day was also the incoming presidents 49th birthday. Suggs then presented a Past President pin to Karen Fessenden who pinned it on her husband. Fessendens job is not entirely ended yet; next Saturday, June 28th is the clubs 3v3 soccer tournament at Twin Lakes Park. That event represents one of the Keystone Heights Rotary Clubs major fundraising events for community and international causes during the coming year. Graham: last 2 years on school board have been worst ever Outgoing Rotary President Paul Fessenden congratulates Secretary Richard Segall, who was chosen Rotarian of the Year. See GRAHAM, 3A July 4th activities Keystone Heights Saturday, June 28, Our Country Day Street Dance at the Keystone Airport Friday July 4, 7 a.m. Our Country Day 5K run Friday July 4, 11 a.m. Our Country Day parade Friday July 4, evening, Our Country Day fireworks Melrose Friday July 4, 11 a.m., Melrose Boat Parade Friday July 4, 4 p.m., Melrose sign installation Friday July 4, 6-9 p.m. Melrose Art walk Fizz, Boom, Read! At the Keystone Heights branch library Preschool programs for children aged 3-5 will be offered each Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m. June 11, 18, 25 and July 2, 9, and 16. Stories, songs and crafts and a related snack will be offered. There will be a special Stuffed Animal Sleepover (for stuffed reading buddies only) as well as a preschool story time program on July 15 at 6:30 p.m. Reading buddies to be picked up at the final story time, theaterevent breakfast, the following morning. For school-aged children, kindergarten through fifth grade we will offer: June 26th Thursday at 6:00pm Fire and Ice with Mad Science of NE Central Florida June 30th Monday at 2:00pm Did Someone Say Bats?! with Lubee Bat Conservancy and winged friends. July 11th Friday at 10:30am How and Why stories with Kaye Byrnes, Storyteller extraordinaire July 18th Friday at 10:30am Its a Wrap! Finale with special guest, Ronald McDonald. Melrose Bay Art Gallery Murmurations. Work by Valerie Aslakson-Jennings, guest artist showing thru June 29 Whats That Smell? Exploring Smell at Your Library Children can explore the sense of smell and smelly thing at their library this summer. There will be smelly experiments, stories, crafts, and games. This free science fun program is open to all school age children and their caretaker. Thursday, July 3rd at 10 at the Melrose Public Library the fun begins. The library is located at 312 Wynnwood Avenue behind the post office. For more information about this and other childrens summer library programs contact the library at 352 475-1237. This program is a Fizz, Boom, Read, a Summer Library Program of the Putnam County Library System with refreshments provided by the Melrose Library Association.

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2A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 26, 2014 Tina Bullock seeks re-election for District 3 School Board Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (LCMS)Sunday School 9 a.m. W orship Service at 10 a.m. 4900 NW 182nd Way Starke(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16) (904) gslcstarke@aol.com Everyone Welcome!Childrens Church 10 a.m. INDEPENDENCE DAY SUNDAY WORSHIP Sunday, June 29, 10:30 am choir cantata: God Bless America message: Who Will Save America? Dr. Craig Moore Service followed by a covered dish lunch.Wonderful Wednesday Dinner & Bible Study5:30 pm each week July 2: What Jesus Told Us to Do Dr. Tom Farmer, Jr.4004 SE State Road 21 PO Box 744 Keystone Heights, FL 32656 (352) 473-3829 Lake Region Monitor USPS 114-170 Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage Paid at Keystone Heights, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Lake Region MonitorP.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091 7382 SR 21 Keystone Heights, FL 32656Phone: (352) 473-2210 (352) 473-6721 John M. Miller, Publisher Subscription Rate in Trade Area $39.00 per year: $20.00 six months Outside Trade Area: $39.00 per year: $20.00 six monthsEditor: Dan Hildebran Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley Advertising: Kevin Miller Darlene Douglass Typesetting Eileen Gilmore Advertising and Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray Classified Adv. Heather Padgett Bookkeeping: Joan Stewart-Jones (The following is a statement of intent to run for public office, submitted by the candidate.) My name is Tina Bullock and I am running for re-election to the Clay County School Board, District 3. I was born and raised in Jacksonville and graduated from Andrew Jackson High School. My father retired from the Jacksonville Fire Department and my mother has a building named in her memory due to her many volunteer duties at the Wesley Fellowship Church in Jacksonville. My inspiration to become a teacher came from my older brother, a graduate of the University of Florida who became a teacher and the chief financial officer in the Duval County School District. After receiving my B.S. in education from Jacksonville University, I began my teaching career in Clay County at Orange Park Elementary. In 1971, shortly after my husband and I were married, we moved to Keystone Heights. My love of Clay County began in the fifties when my Dad and his brothers bought a cabin on Lake Brooklyn and where our families spent many carefree days. To this day when I drive down Immokalee Road I cant help but feel nostalgic. When my son Chris was born I transferred to Keystone Heights Elementary. Returning to school, I received my M.S. Degree in Administration/ Supervision at the University of North Florida. I continued my career as assistant principal at J.L. Wilkinson Jr. High, assistant principal at Keystone Heights Elementary and retired after serving as principal of Keystone Heights Jr. Sr. High School. At each school I served at I would come home and tell my husband this is the best school ever and I finally realized that Clay County was the best school district ever. Following retirement I was site director of the Forward March Program, Florida Army National Guard, then principal of the SIAtech Charter High School in Gainesville. My husband Chuck and I will celebrate 45 years of marriage in August. Chuck is retired from the US Postal Service. My son, Chris graduated from Keystone Heights Jr. Sr. High School and the University of Florida, working at Johnnys Barbecue while in school. This experience led to his career with Cracker Barrel. My friends say that I am like the Energizer Bunny as I keep going and going, but I have always had high energy and a higher responsibility to my commitments. I was recently elected vice president of the Keystone-Lake Area Business Association and treasurer of the Keystone Heights Womans Club of which I am a former president and co-president. I am a former president of the Principals Association of Clay County and former president of the Clay County Administrators Association. I am a member and past president of the Clay County Gator Club and recipient of the Region 5 Vice President Award, Clay County Gator Club. I am a member and past president of the Lake Region Kiwanis. I also served as the Kiwanis Division 4 Lt. Governor and received the Distinguished Lt. Governor Award. I was honored to have May 30, 1997 proclaimed Tina Bullock Day, City of Keystone Heights and selected as the Keystone Heights Elementary Teacher of the Year in 1986. While maintaining my membership at the Wesley Fellowship Methodist Church in Jacksonville where I was raised, I attend the Keystone United Methodist Church. For my entire career, both professionally and personally, my focus has been on our students. When I was elected to the school board in 2012, I promised to bring my A game by being Accessible, Approachable, and Available. I will continue to serve the district in an honest and fair manner. As your District 3 school board member, I have never missed a meeting or workshop and recently received the Master Board Award Recognition from the Florida School Board Association. I support our schools by regularly attending programs, projects, events and award ceremonies. I also judge and participate in programs district wide. I serve on multiple scholarship committees and am always so proud of our Clay County students for their accomplishments. The voice of our Christmas and July Fourth parades, I am always ready and willing to volunteer to make our community and county the best that it can be! If you would like to help me continue my efforts for our schools, please let me know. I have yard signs available and if you would like one to support my campaign, I can be contacted at 352-473-3478. Thank you for your support and remember to vote on Aug. 26 for Tina Bullock, The Right Pick! Bullock Sandra Dunnavant running for Clay County School Board District 5 Keystone Heights Elementary School honor rolls Principals list (straight-A students) Third grade: Riley Barry, Abigail Corbet, Gianna Crosley, Steven Dong, Courtney Dyches, Carson Eatmon, Kenneth Edsall, Matthew Golden, Alison Herndon, Hayden Kedgley, Ian Kruzan, Mark Lewandowski, Caden Lott, Garrett McDilda, Caleb Mize, Denver Moore, Lillian Paul, Hunter Sarman, Anthony Thornton and Colton Walls; Fourth grade: Christopher Anderson, Riley Draney, Andrew Howell, Liam Kane, Taylor Korth, Ryan Krahn and Caleb Moncrief; Fifth grade: Bryson Channell, Briana Donley, Shawn Dukes, Payge Elliott, Alyssa Norman, Aidan Perkins, Piper Pascara, Rozlynn Sames, Lindsey Schrader, Lisa Strickland, Luke Van Zant, Sam Vorn, Camryn Williams and Emerald Wood; Sixth grade: Perla Alonzo, Jason Channell, Casey DeWitt, Molly Deal, Kamrey Dowdy, Remington Draney, Maddison Edgy, Kayla Elliott, Tyler Friedlin, Courtlin Gentry, Lauren Hix, Karli Jennings, Sophia Kicklighter, Vanessa Kruzan, Brendan Lee, Emily Loose, Ashton Ludwig, Sabrina Martin, Mia Moore, Noah Ogg, Jerry Payne, Felicia Pearson, Lauryn Potter, Kelsei Rehberg, Christopher Resti, Hayden Riviere, Miranda Rodriguez, Travis Sheppard, Garrett Stanley, Brianna Velazquez, Benjamin Wacha, Ashton Ward, Cody Wells, Bryson Wise, William Yeldell and Ti Yen. A-B honor roll Third grade: Kenji Alers Pacheco, Gavin Barnes, Gavin Briscoe, Jade Budny, Rachel Cantrell, Kendall Carter, Kiley Channell, Harmony Cheese, Emma Cirigliano, Nigel Clance, Joshua Crane, Victoria Curtis, Rachel Eatmon, Dalton Gilstrap, Alexander Gray, Joshua Hankins, Alyssa Harper, Tristan Hummel, Arynn James, Kori Jennings, Nathaniel Johnson, Colin Kehoe, Haley Kenney, Hailey Knapp, Kaylen Langley, Rexi Lewis, Michael Loftis, Shawn Marinello, Hayden Marion, Michael Matthews, Kimberly McCarthy, Isabelle McConnell, Jeremy Miller, Emma Moore, Kenneth Outlaw, Luke Parsons, Jillian Potter, Liza Robinson. Wilford Rogel, Taylor Schaus, Joshua Smith, Luke Tassell, Ayden Wanton. Jackson Williams, Nicholas Williams, Fourth grade: Ethan Berry, Ethan Brown, Ellie Chamberlain, Saige Dennis, Mya Dillavou. Eve Feldpausch, Abigail Freeman, Haili Geisenburg, Ethan Gillick, Coltyn Givens, Zachary Glover, Charles Groff, Jacob Hale, Blake Hand, Tobias Hartman, Megan Herndon. Lucas Horton, Lindsay Hovsepian, Kaden Hubner, Landon Hughes, Eden Jackson, Michael Jarosz, Amari Jones, Kiale Kehoe, Victoria Ketch, Karl Leitheiser, Jacob Lepanto, Jack Lewandowski, Luke Lewandowski, Deric Mortimer, Alora Nichols, Stamatia Papaioannou, Mikayla Rhoden, Emma Rogel, Rachel Roth, Savanna Sayers, Jozee Smith, Luke Snider, Flynt Standridge, Jasmine Stemp, Noah Velez, Grace Wagner, Seth Wiles and Serenity Zoller; Fifth grade: Gabrial Adams, Jason Allain, Kaitlyn Allen, Evan Andrews, Daelynn Eatmon, Danielle Finch, Jacob Georgsson, Jeremiah Glaspy, Austin Grayson, Cody Hollingsworth, Cameron Horton. Ivy Johns, Hayley Locke, Angelica Loftis, Levi Marsh, Maura Mathews, Lane Peoples, Bridgett Reese, Ian Schofield, Tristen Tate, Jason Thomas, Colton Tibbetts and Patricia Woodell; Sixth grade: Brian Armstrong, Mark Bailey, Autumn Buchanan, Derek Cunningham, Joseph Danella, Emma DeNunzio, Jolie Ference, Garrett Fisher, Matthew Forshee, Robert Freed, Danielle Garvey, Aaron Graham, Adam Graham, Zachary Hamlow, Trevor Haydt, Cinthya Hernandez, Madison Heskett, Jesse Hickey, Kinsley Hollingsworth, Julian Holmes, Nathan Jones, Destiny King, Reece Kling, Domeon Lozano, Skyler Mann, Brooke Martin, Nathan Martin, Jesse Mattox, Desirae McCauley, Amber Nance, Carson Nassif, Liam Nelson. Skyla Newton, David Ortiz, Samuel Parsons, Jay Payne, Jadelyn Roller, Leonid Sailor, Tyler Schellpeper, Max Shartis, Cory Smith, Sydney Stephenson, Tylor Thornton, Benjamin Tran, Alexandria Trejo Trejo, Alma-Nayeli Trejo Trejo, Adrien Valentine, Savannah Wilson, Destiny Wood, Isabelle Woodell and Haleah Young. (The following is a statement of intent to run for public office, submitted by the candidate.) My name if Sandra Dunnavant and I am running for the Clay County School Board District 5 seat. District 5 encompasses southeastern Clay County including eastern Middleburg, Lake Asbury, Penny Farms and Green Cove Springs. However, all Clay County voters can vote for the District 5 candidate on Aug. 26 because school board members run countywide on a nonpartisan basis. Early voting is from Aug. 16-23. I have lived in Clay County for 48 years. I began my teaching career here in 1966 and retired in 2009, although I still substitute teach in the district. I hold a bachelors degree from Texas Womans University and a masters degree from Florida State. Before I retired, I taught in eight Clay County public schools. I am currently certified in Florida for library media K-12, history K-12, English K-12, reading K-12 and elementary education. My peers selected me as teacher of the year when I was at R.A. Paterson Elementary School and again when I was at Charles E. Bennett Elementary. In 2003 I was a finalist for Clay County Teacher of the year. I have also served as president of the Clay County Education Advisory Council and school advisory committee chair at Ridgeview and Paterson Elementary Schools. I was the vice president of the Clay County Education Association, president and vice president of the Florida Association for Media in Education, a founding member of the Florida Book Award and a member of the American Library Association, American Association of School Librarians and Phi Delta Kappa. I am also a lifetime member of the Clay County Historical Society. While teaching, I sponsored the student council, junior historical society, science club and television production club. In addition to teaching in Clay County public schools, I have also worked at the district office, writing curriculum and providing training for the district information literacy program. I also served as director for the Clay County Battle of the Books in 2006 and 2007. I was an adjunct professor at the University of Central Florida. At Florida State in Tallahassee I managed FSUs NE Online distance program and served on a board to design the 2+2 undergraduate program in information studies. The university later hired me to mentor in the 2+2 program. As a member of the Florida Bureau of Preservation, I wrote preservation lesson plans for Florida teachers. I also owned and operated Oakridge Day School in Green Cove Springs and developed a birth to four-year-old preschool curriculum. I understand the needs of business owners in keeping taxes low and finding a well-educated work force. From 1987 to 1994 I was on the Green Cove Springs City Council, serving as both mayor and vice mayor. I am also a past president of the Green Cove Springs Preservation Society and Friends of the Library, Green Cove Springs. Presently, I am a member of the executive board of the Friends of the Library and president of the Village Improvement Association, which is a National Federated Womans Club. I also serve on the District 4 executive board of the Florida Federated Womans Clubs. While working for the school district, I wrote an information literacy curriculum and provided grade three through 12 teacher training workshops for the curriculum. I also organized, wrote curriculum for and directed teacher and student summer video camps. While I was at Paterson Elementary, I maintained the schools website using Front Page and BlackBoard. I also presented at the Florida Educators Technology Conference and the Florida Association for Media in Education Conference. During my time at the school district and as a city council member, I wrote and received a $5,000 Tide Grant that built fitness stations for the Paterson Elementary Playground, collaborated with Green Cove Springs officials to secure a $300,000 grant to build the city pier and co-wrote and received an $8,000 Learn and Serve Grant for students to interview citizens about life in Clay County before 1950. I am the widow of George William Dunnavant, who was the principal at Charles E. Bennett and Green Cove Springs Elementary Schools. My fatherin-law, G.W. Dunnavant, was the first bandmaster at Clay High School. Both of my sons are graduates of Clay High School. Will is a microchip engineer for Applied Materials in Fishkill, NY. Ray is an electrician in Spanaway, Wash. I have four grandchildren: Paige, Matthew, Ryan and Mariah. I have been a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Green Cove Springs since 1972. I want to bring fresh ideas and positive solutions to the Clay County School System. I am concerned about the challenges that the school board faces in educating our children and in supporting teachers and staff. Reducing drop-out, equipping students with the skills they need to find employment after high school in an ever changing economy, and looking for ways to meet the financial challenges of educating our children without increasing taxes are important issues to me. I believe that there are workable solutions to all of the challenges that the school board faces. I want to work with all the stakeholders (students, teachers, administrators, business and religious leaders, taxpayers) to ensure that the Clay County School System becomes the jewel in the crown of Northeast Florida. Construction to begin this week on C.R. 21B sidewalk BRADFORD COUNTY Floridas Department of transportation said it expects to begin work this week on a sidewalk along Southeast C.R. 21B, between Speedville and S.R. 100. DOT said the walkway will improve the ability for pedestrians to walk along C.R. 21B near Silver Lake. A fivefoot wide concrete sidewalk will be built along the east side of the road from Southeast 50th Street, north to an existing sidewalk (approximately 2,000 feet). Some of the driveways that the sidewalk will pass will have to be temporarily closed so crews can place the concrete for the sidewalk. However, residents will be contacted in advance of the work. DOT will oversee the project and hired R.E. Arnold Construction, Inc., of Archer to build the walkway at a cost of $130,500. The project is combined with two other sidewalk projects in Bradford County and one in Alachua County. It should be completed this summer. For more information on this project, contact DOT at 800-7492967, ext. 7830. Dunnavant

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Three Keystone Heights High School student-athletes were members of an age 14-and under travel softball team that captured the ASA Florida Championship earlier this month. Jacksonville Storm 2000 traveled to Altamonte Springs for the state tournament, June 13-15, and went undefeated, defeating Windermere Wildfire, Gators Gold, Santa Fe Inferno 99, and Riptide 99 to claim the state title. The three Keystone students, Molly Crawford of Starke, Ashleigh Jennings of Keystone Heights and Bailey Story of Keystone Heights, combined for 12 hits and four runs batted in over the weekend. Crawford batted 4 for 10, with 1 RBI, Jennings went 6 for 13 with 2 RBI, and Story had two hits in eight at-bats and drove in one run. Two weeks prior to the state tournament, Storm 2000 earned a berth to the ASA national tournament in San Diego by winning the Disney National Qualifier in Clermont. The team will play in Tallahassee for their first showcase tournament June 2729, and will then play local at the Storm Showcase in Lake City on July 10-13. Last year the team played in the national tournament and placed fifth out of 105 teams. Thursday, June 26, 2014 Lake Region Monitor 3A Keystone District Office 352-473-4917 clayelectric.com Rays Auto RepairEstablished 1972473-30837382 Sunrise Blvd.(Next to Hitchcocks Grocery) *** Comfortable Waiting Area ***Jones-Gallagher Funeral HomeDistinquished Caring Service for Over 50 YearsJoe Gallagher OwnerStarke 964-6200 Keystone Heights 473-3176 J B SJackson Building SupplyStarke 964-6078 Lake Butler 496-3079See us for all your Lumber & Plywood BryansHARDWARE & GARDEN CENTERHighway 100 Keystone Heights, FL 473-4006 Highway 21 Melrose, FL 475-2400Worship in the House of the Lord...Somewhere this week! Melrose Church of Christ 352-672-0920 8702 SR 21 Melrose (1-1/4 mi. N. of traffic light)Preacher: Gene Morgan Bible Study: Sunday 9 AM Worship Service 10 am & 6 pmLadies Bible Study: Fri. 4:00 PM Mid-week Bible Study: Wed. 7:30 PM What does the bible say about abiding in Jesus, His love, and His word? Then Jesus said to those Jews who believed Him, If you abide in My word, you are My disciples indeed. And you shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free. I am the vine and you are the branches. He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing. As the Father loved Me, I also have loved you; abide in My love. If you keep My commandments, you will abide in My love, just as I have kept My Fathers commandments and abide in His love. And now, little children, abide in Him, that when He appears, we may have confidence and not be ashamed before Him at His coming. rfntbttrf ntbn tt tn tt tn rfttbtt t t nbrftf ntntbtt trbrbt ttttt t Jacksonville Storm 2000, (l-r) front row: Morgan Hill, Courtney Robinson, Madison Lanoux, Ashleigh Jennings, Molly Crawford, Bailey Story and Kenlie Harvey; Second row: Coach Rebecca Hill, Caroline DePirro, Hailey Raulerson, Coach Skippy Crawford, Kirsty Granville, Savannah Brown and Coach Bobby Granville. Photo by Jennifer Fender. Championship team includes Keystone players Melrose residents hold third annual African-American Festival Residents from Putnam Hall, Keystone Heights, Johnson, Hawthorne and Florahome gathered in Melrose on June 14 for the third annual AfricanAmerican Heritage Festival at Tommys Place. Some attendees came as far away as Atlanta to enjoy old school music provided by DJ Thurman, a show by a Hawthorne car club, food, musical chairs, door prizes and childrens activities. The Rev. Greg Pelham of Melrose was the master of ceremonies for the event. Lake Region merchants, including Harveys Supermarkets, Advanced Auto Parts and Williamsons Food Store donated prizes and supplies for the event. (L-r) Cynthia Ashford, Annett Ashford and Pat Clarkserved food during the festival. The Rev. Greg Pelham (r) presents DJ Thurman with a plaque for providing music during the event over the last three years. All photos by Cornelius Clayton. Green Cove Springs council approves 2 police cars, 17 laptops BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGS The Green Cove Springs City Council, during its June 17 meeting, approved the police departments purchase of two new Ford Utility Interceptors at a cost of $59,909.80 and 17 laptop computers for use inside patrol cars. Chief Robert Musco wrote that one of the two new vehicles will replace a 2003 Ford with over 110,000 miles and that is in need of an engine overhaul. The other would replace a 2001 Ford with 114,000 miles and in need of a transmission rebuild and engine overhaul. Musco added that the departments current fleet of laptop computers used in police cruisers have become obsolete because Microsoft no longer supports the XP operating system they run on. He asked the council to approve a $40,630 expenditure to replace the machines with funding coming from drug forfeiture accounts. Telegraph reporter Carolyn Eaves, who worked with Clark at the courthouse, said Clark was one of the most dependable people she ever worked with. She remembered him as someone who had a strong sense of right and wrong and a passion for justice. Clark was a longtime resident of Little Lake Santa Fe, but moved to Hawthorne about two years ago. Funeral services for Clark will be held today at 2 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Keystone Heights. CLARK Continued from 1A Orange Park man killed while pushing bike along Blanding BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor ORANGE PARK-A 24-yearold Orange Park man was killed while attempting to cross Belmont Boulevard just south of Orange Park High School Friday morning. According to a Florida Highway Patrol Report, Armando A. Acosta was pushing his bicycle southbound across Belmont at its intersection with Blanding Boulevard around 6 a.m. Shad D. Devries, 42, of Orange Park was also at the intersection in a 2001 Chevrolet Silverado traveling westbound on Belmont. As Acosta was crossing the intersection, Devries attempted a right turn into the northbound lanes of Blanding and struck the pedestrian. Emergency medical workers took the victim to Orange Park Medical Center where he died. According to the FHP report, charges are pending. BY DAN HILDEBRAN Monitor Editor GREEN COVE SPRINGSThe development services director for the City of Green Cove Springs met with around 60 residents of a neighborhood north of the city to try to persuade them to join the municipality. Janis K. Fleet explained to residents who live on Travers Road, Gator Bay Road and Governors Creek Drive the differences between Clay County and Green Cove Springs ad valorem taxes. During the May 12 meeting, she also emphasized the benefits of living within the city, including Green Cove Springs police protection, the public works departments mowing of right of ways and maintenance of streets, city-maintained fire hydrants and street lights. She also said Green Cove Springs residents get garbage pickup twice a week compared to once a week for residents in unincorporated Clay County. Fleet added that now, citizens in the neighborhood can only vote for one county commissioner because the county votes under single-member districts. She said that if the neighborhood was within the city, residents could vote for five, at-large city council members, in addition to the county commissioner. Fleet also told the group that although they would have to pay an additional 2.9821 mills in property tax if they joined the city, that increase would be offset by the elimination of the Clay County Law Enforcement Municipal Fund Service Units 2.2503 mills and the countys 0.1110 mills for residents living in unincorporated areas. She said a home valued at $235,279 would see a net property tax increase of $115.02 by being in the city. The Travers Road-Gator Bay Road-Governors Creek Drive neighborhood is now almost surrounded by the City of Green Cove Springs. It lies behind the Magnolia Layne Shopping Center and on the west shore of Governors Creek. and I feel like we are behaving a hundred times worse than they ever thought of doing. Graham will retire from the board as the second-longest serving member in November, behind only W.E. Cherrys 28 years of service. Her son Brian is running for the seat. She characterized recent board meetings as counterproductive and unseemly. It always seems to be something ugly and unnecessary, Graham said of recent board actions. I just dont see why we have to be like this as a board. I would like for everybody to get along she added. Everybody cares about the school system. Graham implored her colleagues to work together as a team and not continue to find little ways to get at each other. She also said that in her view, the proper role of board members is to help parents work through problems with schools. Graham made her comments during a debate about a hiring freeze for district administrators, a policy she said was a case of the board micromanaging the school system. Over the past year, Graham has been on the losing end of votes that restricted Superintendent Charlie Van Zants hiring and purchasing authority. During the June 19 meeting, she told her colleagues that such policies are overreaching. I just think we need to back off of this stuff and start acting like board members, she said. GRAHAM Continued from 1A LRM Legals 6/26/14 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Personal property of the following tenants will be sold for cash or other wise disposed of to satisfy rental liens in accordance with Florida Statutes, Self Storage Facility Act, Sections 83.806-83.807. Auction will be held on Tuesday, July 15 th 2014 at 10:00 AM at Melrose Mini Storage, 827 N. SR21, Melrose, FL 32666. Phone (352) 475-5000. All items may not be available on the date of the sale. TENANT NAME Nadine Dexter UNIT# 45 DESCRIPTION House hold. 6/26 2tchg 7/3-LRM LEGALS

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4A Lake Region Monitor Thursday, June 26, 2014 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now survive DIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Last Will and Testament Power of Attorney & Living Wills Living Trusts Probate Administration Real Estate and Closings Deed Preparation Contracts Family and Juvenile Law Criminal and Traffic Matters 189 S. Lawrence Blvd. Keystone Heights, FLFirmofVeRonicaROwens@aol.comwww.VeRonicaROwens.com VeRonica R. Owens Attorney at Law James 4:12 There is one Lawgiver, who is able to save. Feb. 22, 1990 Cooper Memorial Gets Okay By Anne Sponholtz, LRM Editor The much awaited Gary Cooper Memorial is now off the ground as members of the Clay County School Board voted Thursday, February 15 on plans for the memorial to be located at Keystone Heights Elementary Schools Gary Cooper Field. Gary Cooper was a graduate of Keystone Heights High School, a football player and popular allaround student whose life was cut short when he was killed in Viet Nam. Following his death, the high schools football field was named in his honor. Since that time the high school has been converted into the elementary school and the former football field is presently used as a playground/athletic field for the elementary school students. Several of Mr. Coopers friends felt that because the field that bears his name is no longer used for football, it would be appropriate to have the high schools football stadium or newly constructed field house named in his honor. School Board Chairman John Thrasher was instrumental in working out an agreement that called for the school board to allocate $4,500 toward a permanent memorial at the elementary school field, where Mr. Cooper played football. After reviewing the plans for the memorial, Thrasher said he was pleased with all aspects of the memorial. Its very attractive. It will probably be located where the present sign (Gary Cooper Field) is now, Thrasher said. The memorial will include an entrance way constructed to two small brick walls. Inside the memorial will be two larger walls with two bronze plaques. The memorial will be surrounded with extensive landscaping. Several schemes were presented by a committee made up of architect Mac McCully. (who donated his time to drawing up plans for the project), Mr. Coopers friends Lynn Kirtley and Jim Davie, and Mike Elliott from the school boards facilities department, Thrasher said. Elliott said that now the scheme had been approved, he expects the project to begin to fall together and may be completed by the end of March: Thrasher commended the committee that worked on the project and said that KHES Principal Ken Blair was extremely involved and helpful as well as the superintendent (Mrs. Ann Wiggins). Kirtley, who resides in Keystone Heights and has been active in preserving the memory of Mr. Cooper for years, said he was very pleased with the school board action. Because the overall cost of the project may exceed the $4,500 allocated by the school board, Kirtley is hoping that area civic groups and individuals will come forward to help with the cost of the memorial. What I would really like to see is this be a community project, so in the end the school board doesnt have to put any money toward it, Kirtley said. May 17, 1990 High Ridge, S.R. 21 named preferred corridors By Anne Sponholtz LRM Editor A preferred corridor has been selected for a 230 kV high power voltage line being constructed by Seminole Electric Cooperative that eventually will be 100 feet wide and 70 miles long, extending between Palatka and Duval County, part of which will cut through the Lake Region. According to Bill Phillips, manager of Clay Electric Cooperative, although a map of the corridor is still unavailable, Seminole Electric officials have said the preferred corridor will follow an existing Clay Electric right-of-way that presently has 69 kV lines running through it. This right-of-way comes out at the CR 214 landfill and crosses CR 214 into Big Tree Lakes. From there the line will go through High Ridge Estates. At the western boundary of High Ridge Estates the line will deviate from the existing rightof-way and turn south until it reaches SR 100. The line will then go west on SR 100 to Clay Electric Cooperatives substation (a new substation will be built, according to Phillips, near the present substation location). The line will then come out of the new substation back down SR 100 to SR 21 and follow SR 21 north toward Middleburg. Phillips said that a detailed map of the preferred corridor is being compiled and should be available for publication in next weeks Monitor. Phillips said that one reason for the delay in obtaining a map was that normally the preferred corridor comprises a half mile wide area; however, Seminole Electric officials are trying to narrow that area to give a more detailed view of where the line would be located and where it would not be located. The former manager of Clay Electric Cooperative spoke to the City Council on May 8, apparently before the official preferred corridor was chosen. He told City Council members that he was concerned about a resolution they had adopted that may have had the line running down S.R. 100 beginning at CR 214. This route has since been abandoned by Seminole Electric for a completely new route that has the corridor coming out to SR 100 along the western boundaries of High Ridge Estates just east of the City Limits. Tommy Millican, former manager of Clay Electric Cooperative, spoke before the Council at its May 8 meeting addressing the resolution passed by the council last month. The resolution was adopted by the Council on April 24 and sent to Seminole Electric Cooperative. In the Councils resolution it states that the Council insists that the corridor ingress to the City along the Railroad right-of-way and SR 100 and that the existing right-of-way (where 69 kV lines are now located) through Triest Subdivision and Commercial Circle area not be selected. The Council also took a position against the lines running down SR 21. Millican said he was speaking to the Council on his own behalf and that although he was retired from Clay Electric, he has no official standing there. Im here on my own behalf nor do I have any official standing with Seminole Electric. Millican, who resides on SR 100 and would have been affected if Seminole Electric had chosen to come down SR 100 from CR 214 instead of its now official preferred corridor along the western boundaries of High Ridge Estates, told the council that he felt Seminole Electrics original plan to follow the 69 kV right-of-way was correct. If you come down SR 100 (east) youll be coming by some very expensive houses and property and by the First Baptist Church where hundreds of people go and come each week. I dont think the road department will let it come between the railroad and SR 100, Millican said. I have no problem with the line as far as the electromagnetic force goes. Studies have proven theres no more hazard there than what we expose ourselves to through our electric appliances. The aesthetics doesnt bother me personally. Theres already a 25 kV in front of my house. Millican said that those individuals who live on the existing 69 kV right-of-way, which goes through Big Tree and High Ridge Estates before entering the City Limits at Ervin Triest Development and Commercial Circle, knew when they bought the property that the line was there. Every house trailer and house built was built with full knowledge the line was there. You say you want to enhance the property value on Commercial Circle, l dont think the Council can justify taking the position to enhance one property owners property value to the detriment of another. It doesnt make sense to me. Council members said they based their resolution on the feelings of the City residents, on the growth management plan and on enhancing the tax structure of the city. That (69 kV) line has been there, why move it to the detriment of others? Millican asked. The only place we have to render commercial growth inside the city is on Commercial Circle. We cant please everyone, Councilman Jack Raleigh said. They (property owners along the 69kV line) located there with full knowledge the line was there and now they want their property values to change, Millican said. They located there knowing a 69 kV line was there not a 230 kV line. Im surprised you came in here as an ex-president of Clay Electric, worried about the line being in front of your property. That tells me theres something wrong with the 230 kV line. After all, youre the expert, Raleigh said. Im not thinking anymore of my property than coming down to 100, Millican responded. Councilwoman Sutter said that a public meeting on the resolution was held and announced ahead of time and only one person showed. She said she based her vote on the growth management plan. You have to look at the impact on the number of people. It was my interpretation that the way we would go would affect the least number of residents, Councilman Bruce Peters said. Council Chairman Archie Green emphasized the importance of the City being able to develop the Commercial Circle area as a mechanism to increase its tax base. Green had told the Monitor on Monday that he had spoken with Seminole Electric Cooperative officials regarding the preferred corridor and confirmed it was slated to run down the existing right-of-way to the western edge of High Ridge Estates where it would then travel south to SR 100 to Clay Electric. From Clay Electric it would run back down SR 100 to SR 21 and down SR 21 toward Middleburg. Im very concerned about it running down SR 21, Green said. Im pleased its not running through tlie Commercial Circle area, but I think we need to be real concerned about it going down SR 21. Green said he would be meeting with Seminole Electric officials in private on Wednesday, May 16 (after press time). Green said no other council members would be in attendance. June 14, 1990 Curtail swimming in Crystal Lake, By Anne Sponholtz LRM Editor The Clay County Health Department has issued a recommendation to area residents to curtail swimming in Crystal Lake pending the results of water samplings of the lake located north of SR 100 between Keystone Heights and Starke. The recommendation came following routine water sampling of all Clay County public swimming areas. That sampling resulted in the county not permitting water sports at Camp Crystal, a camp located on the lake and owned and operated by the Alachua County School Board. All other Clay County camps and public swimming areas in the Lake Region, including Camp Immokalee on Brooklyn Lake and Keystone Beach on Lake Geneva, received permits following testing. Gene Bray, Clay County environmental health director, said the survey taken in the swimming area at Camp Crystal revealed the lake had a coliform count greater than 1,600 per 100 milliliters of water. An acceptable coliform count is 1,000 per 100 milliliters. Coliform is a bacteria. Bray said health hazards associated with swimming in water with above acceptable levels of coliform could include dysentery, salmonella and hepatitis. Since the results of the Camp Crystal testing showed unacceptable levels of coliform, Bray said the county decided to check the entire lake. This sampling began last week and calls for three consecutive days of drawing samples weekly over a three week period. The tests are expected to be completed for the lake, other than for the camp permit, by the end of next week. Bray said Bradford County officials are now in the process of sampling Camp Montgomery, another camp located on Crystal Lake, but on the Bradford County portion of the lake. It has not been determined the source of the contamination, which is usually associated with human and/ or animal fecal. Bray said that once all the samples are tested from various parts of the lake, it may help pinpoint the source of the contamination. In the meantime, Camp Crystal has suspended all water sports and Bray recommends that area residents curtail swimming. Camp Crystal officials are expected to request use of Keystone Beach as an alternative water sports area for their summer campers. The request was to be made at the City Council meeting Tuesday night (after press time). Bray said this is the first time Camp Crystal has been denied a permit due to contamination of Crystal Lake. It may be the drop in elevation, but for some reason we had a lot (of samples) greater than 1,600 (per 100 milliliters), Bray said. Nov. 1, 1990 My Friend Flicka back in classes By Anne Sponholtz LRM Editor Despite the use of profanities in the story, My Friend Flicka, and complaints from parents regarding its use in the classroom, the book has been returned to the sixth grade reading classes as supplemental reading material following a review of that story and several other books. A decision by Clay Countys Instructional Review Council made up of teachers and lay public members has resulted in the retention, as part of a new reading program at the elementary school level, of My Friend Flicka and other books in question. Concerns over My Friend Flicka were raised when area parents discovered that the version of the classic used in the sixth grade classrooms, along with a companion audio tape, contained two mild profanities and one strong profanity. Formal complaints were filed, a directive from the county offices apparently put a temporary omission policy on the book, but following the matter receiving national attention the Instructional Review Council was convened on Friday, November 2. That council reviewed the books in question, which also included Little Red Riding Hood and Babe the Gallant Pig. The council looked at a wide range of matters in making their decision including content, presentation and the books value as good literature and decided the three selections would remain as supplemental reading material. This decision has received the endorsement of Superintendent Ann Wiggins. Karen Wacha, who along with her husband Ken, voiced concerns about My Friend Flicka from the time they learned of its content, said she was shocked by the decision. She said her son had already finished the book before she discovered the profanities, and it would now be up to other parents who may share her concerns. Its the children who seem to have been forgotten in all this. But if parents dont care ... what can we do, Mrs. Wacha said. Some parents have suggested that the matter now be taken to the Clay County School Board and ask that the school board address the matter. Keystone Heights Elementary School Principal Ken Blair, who spoke enthusiastically when the first decision was made to omit My Friend Flicka from the curriculum, was in a meeting until after press time and could not be reached for comment. Assistant Principal Tina Bullock was also unavailable. Dr. Winston Butler, pastor of First Baptist Church in Keystone Heights, said that since word first came out regarding the latest decision to bring the books back into the classrooms, he has already heard from eight local families who have contacted him concerned about the matter. Dr. Butler said he has advised the families to view the matter not as an obstacle but as an opportunity. He said he explained to families that a turtle can make no progress without sticking his neck out, and this was an opportunity for families to become more involved. I think were not going to make any progress until we stick our necks out, Dr. Butler said. School Board Vice-Chairman George Bush said he had not received any official word regarding the recommendation from the Instructional Review Council, but said that parents would have several opportunities to bring the matter before the board. Bush said parents could appear before the board during an item referred to as citizens requests or request that the item appear as an agended item. As an agended item the board could act on the matter. Bush said he has read al1 the books in question and in referring to My Friend Flicka Bush said, Im offended by it. I see no reason for the words being used. Bush said he feels the staff dropped the ball when they brought the recommendation to approve the new reading material to the school board. Bush said the books should have been read prior to a recommendation to approve them. If the board knew then what it knows now, I believe it would not have been purchased or at least purchased with modifications not to use those stories. I support the parents with their concerns, Bush said. The Monitor looks back to 1990

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Wight said his physical training beforehand really helped during the first five days of the climb. The summit day was tough, though. (The guides) dont want you take a lot of breaks, Wight said. I guess if you take a lot of breaks, the altitude will get to you and stuff like that, and youll until we landed in Kilmanjaro, we didnt even know if we were on the right plane. It was the right plane, though, so Wight and his friend Cochram were able to begin their climb, which would last seven days. The climb began at an altitude of 6,300 feet. During the first four days, the group Wight was a part of reached 14,100 feet. The fifth day saw Wight reach 15,500 feet, which is higher than any point in the United States with the exception of Alaskas Mount McKinley. Wight said ice and snow hit the camp at that 15,500 mark, but added the group was lucky in regard to the weather. The weather on McKinley can change in an instant, Wight said, adding that a cloud can blow over and turn 60 degrees to 35 degrees. The website of one Kilmanjaro guide service likens the climb to going from the equator to Antarctica. Wights group, though, didnt really experience extreme ice or snow conditions until they reached their campsites and were done climbing for the day. The weather never got us while we were hiking that mucha little bit here and there, but nothing real bad, Wight said. It always kind of came at night. The trek to Kilmanjaros summit day began at midnight on day six. It is a constant push from 15,500 feet to 19,340 feet. BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer A picture is worth a thousand words. Multiply that by 13,000, and youll have how many feet Troy Wight climbed to get a breathtaking photo of a sunrise. Wight, who lives in Union County and works for Florida Gas in Brooker, recently climbed Mount Kilmanjaro in Tanzania, Africa. He said he probably cant make anyone he knows in this rural community understand why hed want to do such a thing. Its a small town, he said. Its mainly farmland here and country boys. Im a country boy, too. I hunt and fish like everybody else, but this is definitely not something that interests a lot of people, I dont think, around here. Yet if you were in Wights shoes when he was approximately 10 feet from Kilmanjaros peak when the sun crested, perhaps you would understand. The sight, in Wights words, was awesome. Youre actually above the clouds and looking down at all the glaciers, he said. Wight has been visiting the highest points in the United States for the past three years with his youngest daughter, Christine, who is 18. Admittedly, there isnt much to some states highest points, but Wight and his daughter did successfully reach the peak of Colorados Mount Elbert, which is the third highest point in the U.S. behind Californias Mount Whitley and Alaskas Mount McKinley. Mount Kilmanjaro, though, represented a peak that is not only approximately 5,000 feet higher than Mount Elbert, but has approximately 8,5000 feet more of elevation gain. It was, Wight said, the toughest climb hes attempted. His friend, Lester Cochram, whos the one who asked Wight if he wanted to make the climb, admitted as much as well, and Cochram has done a lot more climbing outside of the U.S. He told me point blank on the summit day on Kilmanjaro it was the number-one hardest day hes ever had, Wight said. Prior to going, Wight trained for the climb. He said he exercises regularly anyway, but made sure to focus on incline work, whether it was on his NordicTrack or walking up and down the stairs in his house. Those exercises also included wearing a 20-30-pound filled backpack, which would simulate what he and other climbers would be doing on their trek. We had to carry anywhere from 20 to 25 pounds each day, Wight said of the Kilmanjaro climb. That was mainly our water for that day, our snacks for that day and, of course, our hiking poles and any change of gear. Wight flew from Jacksonville to Washington, D.C., on Feb. 28. After a 14-hour layover, he flew approximately 13 hours to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. From there, Wight flew to Mount Kilmanjaro. Addis Ababa Bole International Airport is really too small to handle the amount of traffic it does, Wight said. The experience there was hectic and filled with uncertainty. It was just chaos, like sardines in a can, Wight said. You didnt know where you were going. You couldnt understand anything anyone said. Honest to God, Troy Wight climbed Africas Mount Kilmanjaro and explores U.S. high points with daughter Christine Regional News Regional News B Section Thursday, June 26, 2014 News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region FEATURES CRIME SOCIALS OBITUARIES EDITORIAL FAM PAK$499 lb $249 lbPRICES AVAILABLEJUNE 25 JULY 01 $299$1992 $32 $3 2LB BAG Amazing quality. Fantastic prices.Satisfaction Guaranteed FAM PAK$269lb 24-32 OZ$329 $32 9 lb FAM PAK$29 9 lb FAM PAK$119 FAM PAK$299 lb Open 7 Days a Week 8am to 8pm1371 South Walnut St. (Hwy 301) Starke (904) 368-9188 lb Unions Wight enjoys worlds beauty from up high Troy Wight poses for a picture with Mount Kilmanjaro in the background. Troy Wight took this picture of a sunrise at 19,340 feetapproximately 10 minutes Troy Wight and his daughter Christine stand atop of 14,433 feet makes it the third highest point in the United States and the second highest point in the lower 48 states. Troy and Christine are attempting to

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Outback, Sonnys and Tony and Als Deli. Now thats food someone would actually want to eat, but BY CLIFF SMELLEY Staff Writer Several interesting comments were made at the Bradford County Public Library on June 12, but none of them were, My compliments to the chef. Its not known whether those who signed up for the librarys annual Food Fear Factor went home with sickening, sour stomachs, but sickening, sour stomach was the name of one of the so-called meals six courses. Well, seven courses if you include throwing all the ingredients into a blender and serving up in a glass. Not even Jack LaLanne and his juicer could come up with such a creation, but four of the nights participants drank up to break a tie in the children and adult divisions. Hannah Perron chugged her socalled drink faster than Gentry Cooksey could to be that nights winning child, while Deborah Owens came out on top over Jaime Cooksey in the adult division. Antanika Tyson was the winning teen, though she was the only teen entrant and bowed out before the final course could be served. Who could blame Tyson, though? Believe it or not, a menu consisting of shiver me liver, smothered sweet heart, 2B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 26, 2014 Florida Twin Theatre All Seats $6.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451 OPEN EVERY NIGHT Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.com SCREEN 1 SCREEN 2 SCREEN 1 Starts Fri. Now Showing Starts Weds. July 2nd Gerard ButlerFri 8:00 Sat 4:50, 8:00 Sun 4:50 Mon Thur 7:15Wed.-Thur 7:30 Mark Wahlberg Teo Halm How to Train Your Dragon 2 Earth to Echo Fri 7:00, 9:00 Sat 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 Sun 5:00, 7:00 Mon Tue 7:30 Wed. Kids Shows 10am & 1pm All Seats $5.00July 2nd The Nut Job Dinner is served...be afraid ooey gooey polluted lungs, slimy eyeball smoothie and fish-oiled brain, along with the aforementioned sickening, sour stomach, is not even close to being as appealing as it sounds. In fact, the evenings host, Dr. Bunsen Burner (library director Robert Perone), gave a pre-meal demonstration of how to use the supplied vomit bags. No one actually needed to use the bags with the exception of Cameron Brosky, who unfortunately couldnt grab his bag in time before he tossed his cookies. Actually, cookies were not among the nights ingredients, but the ingredients were not as bad as the entries gaginducing names might imply. It was the combinations that made them hard for participants to stomachor smell. Each participant was asked to take a big whiff of each serving before attempting to consume it. Jeon Russell never even took the first bite, declaring herself out of the competition after smelling the first course, which was sickening, sour stomach. That dish was made by combining rice, mashed potato flakes, lemon bar mix, Sour Patch Kids, Kool-Aid lemonade mix, vinegar and vanilla yogurt. The event began with 17 participants, with eight dropping out in the first round. When it was time to serve the fifth course, slimy eyeball smoothie, which consisted of tonic water, seltzer water, onions, gelatin, applesauce and Spanish olives, only four participants remained. Despite Owens remark that the final course of fish-oiled brain (sardines, anchovies, clam juice, chub mackerel, unflavored gelatin, evaporated milk, baby clams and tuna) smelled like cat food, she, Perron and Gentry and Jaime Cooksey finished off, setting up the tiebreaker in which every course was blended together. The winner had to finish it off before his or her competitor. The winner and runner-up in each division received prizes, and what prizes they weregift certificates/cards good for food at such places as Chilis, Dicks Wings, Dickeys, Olive Garden, Hope Owens dreads eating seems in a state of disbelief in regard to the probably not until first fully recovering from Food Fear Factor. As Jaime Cooksey noted with a smiley emoticon on the Bradford County Telegraphs Facebook page, Not my best idea. Library Director Robert Owens is not saying a blessing for this (right) is pictured in the aftermath of losing his Cooksey looks on. Jaime Cooksey looks on in amusement as Jeon Randall gets a whiff of Sickening Sour Stomach. The smell was enough to force Randall to drop out of the competition. Perron works to down. Despite what looked close calls, she made it to the is not crazy about spinach being one of the ingredients Polluted Lungs.

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of the lymph nodes under his arm and in his neck was suffocating him. They knew immediately what they were dealing with and decided it was best to transport him to the trauma unit at Shands, where they were better equipped to handle such a serious case. At Shands, they had Powell in surgery within an hour. The surgical debridement lasted about 3.5 hours. Then the doctors came to talk to the family. The doctors told Cathy and Moore that they had removed all of the flesh, some of the muscle, all of the fatty tissue and the dead nerves from the top of Powells right hand all the way up to his shoulder and the right side of his chest and back. They said that there was a very good chance that Powell would not survive, and if he did, amputation of some or all of the affected areas was a very real possibility. Christmas day brought another surgical debridement and the same dire warning from the doctors about Powells prognosis. All we could do was wait and pray, Moore recorded in the journal she kept through the ordeal. It felt as though someone had knocked the breath out of us. It was like a horrible nightmare. Cathy remembers being in a kind of shock, knowing and understanding what was going on and trying to deal with what decisions needed to be made. I was scared, very scared, she said. I heard what they were saying, but I didnt believe it. I wouldnt believe that I was going out to eat with members of his family. According to his wife, Cathy, he got up and went to work at his restaurant (Powells Dairy Freeze in Starke) as usual on Dec. 23. He came home much sooner than usual after he started feeling ill. Cathy said he came home and told her he didnt feel well and that his arm felt as though someone had poured acid on it. He asked Cathy to take him to the emergency room at Shands Starke, and he remained there for most of the day. Cathy said she asked them if they had any idea what was wrong with her husband, and they said they did not. She took him home with prescriptions for cortisone cream and painkillers to care for him herself. About 5 a.m. the next morning (Christmas eve), Cathy called her daughter Kelly Moore and told her that Powell was much worse. His arm was swollen and bleeding, and his skin was literally dissolving before her eyes. Cathy put him in the car and headed for North Florida Regional Medical Center. Cathy said by the time she pulled up at the emergency room, Powell was having a hard time breathing. Once inside, the doctors found it necessary to intubate him because the swelling grafts and physical therapy may be needed once the infection is cured. healthy individuals. The infection begins at a break in the skin, resulting from trauma or surgery. It begins as a painful, inflamed lesion or lump on the skin, which quickly becomes much more painful than would seem appropriate given the size of the lesion. The disease progresses very quickly with increasing pain, inflammation, fever, skin discoloration and drainage. Other symptoms can include nausea, sweats, chills, dizziness and shock. Quick medical attention is necessary as the greater head start the disease gets on treatment, the greater the loss of tissue. Treatments commonly include intravenous antibiotic therapy, multiple surgical procedures to remove dead tissue and, in severe cases, amputation. Tissue The Starke campuses of Santa Fe College are once again hosting College for Kids this summer, and there is still room for rising fifth-, sixth-, seventh-, eighthand ninth-graders. College for Kids will be held Mondays-Fridays, July 7-18, from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (Half-day sessions are an option.) The cost is $270, or $135 for half-day sessions. Visit the Santa Fe College Andrews Center to register. You may also call 904-9645382. Thursday, June 26, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 3B Dr. Virgil A. BerryCHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN Modern methods with old-fashioned concern. Auto Accidents Work Injuries Headaches Neck and Back Pain Back & Neck Pain Clinic NEED RELIEF FROM:Call Dr. Berry Serving the Area for 21 Years THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE AVAILABLE THERAPEUTIC MASSAGEAVAILABLE SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)B anquet Hall Driving Range Check out our web pagewww .starkegolf.com M emberships Available E xcellent Driving RangeP ro Shop Gift CertificatesG olf Lessons by AppointmentP rofessionally Run Tournaments H ome of the Strawberry Invitational Li ke us on facebook Spots are still open for College for Kids program Jamarian Cummings prepares to point to a location College for Kids, a program for older students, will begin July 7, so there is still time to register. BY TRACY LEE TATE Special to the Telegraph, Times and Monitor Dealing with a potentially deadly disease can be a lifechanging experience for everyone concerned, both the patient and his family. Keystone Heights resident David Powell is now on the mend from his terrifying bout with necrotizing fasciitis (see sidebar), a disease that is both deadly and unpredictable in its severity and survivability. Powell remembers very little of his ordeal. He remembers heading out with his grandson for a day of boating on Dec. 21, 2013. They trailered the boat to Palatka to put in at the St. Johns River. His grandson was backing up the trailer, and Powell decided to jump into the boat from the trailer rather than use the ladder in the back. He slipped and went in the water, splashing water into some small cuts and scratches on his arm. His last clear memories of the day are his grandson pulling the boat back out of the water so Powell could put the ladder down and get in the boat as he usually did, tying it up to wait for his grandson to go park and then turning the boat around and heading south. Powell remembers nothing of the day spent on the water despite the fact they traveled all the way to Sanfordto Lake Monroe and back, which is a seven-hour trip. Nor does he remember the next day when he watched a ball game on television and went Powell, family get through health crisis Kelly Moore and grandson Connor Roling outside his home in Keystone Heights. Murray Chrysler-DodgeJeep-Ram will host a car wash to benefit the Bradford High School cross country program on Saturday, June 28, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. June 28 car Bradford High cross country Information for this story was taken from Wikipedia, Medicine. net and Medline Plus websites. BY TRACY LEE TATE Special to the Telegraph, Monitor and Times Flesh-eating bacterial infections (also known as necrotizing fasciitis) are rare conditions, most commonly caused by the organism Streptococcus pyogenes, the same bacteria which more commonly causes mild sore throats. Other bacteria may also cause such infections, and the exact species must be determined by culture. A related infection called MRSA is caused by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus in a particularly antibiotic resistant form. The infection starts in the tissues just below the skin and spreads along the layers of tissues that separate the muscles and fat. Infection sites are most commonly the arms, legs and abdomen. The infection proves fatal in about 40 percent of identified cases. Sources of the infection can include the normal presence of the organism on the individuals skin and exposure to waste water, as well as exposure through community contact or in a medical setting. Over 70 percent of cases show one or more of the following: diabetes, cancers, chronic diseases or substance abuse/addiction. The disease only rarely occurs in otherwise

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The second annual Gerard Warren and C.J. Spiller Celebrity Golf Tournament will take place at the Country Club at Lake City on Saturday, June 28, beginning with registration at 8:30 a.m. and a shotgun start at 9 a.m. Proceeds from the tournament will be used to help at-risk youth in Union and Columbia counties. Player entry cost is $75, which includes lunch. There will be an awards presentation, and every player will receive a gift at check-in. To register, please contact Donnell Davis at donnelldavis111@aol.com or 850-673-9533. The C.J. Spiller and Gerard Warren FUNdamentals Camp, a program of USA Football, will take place Friday, June 27, from 8:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. at the Union County High School football field. The camp is open to ages 6-15. Registration is 7:30 a.m. on June 27 and is open to the first 300 children. All participants should wear athletic footwear and apparel. T-shirts and equipment will be provided. Spiller, a 2006 UCHS graduate, went on to star at Clemson University and is currently a member of the Buffalo Bills, who took him with the ninth overall pick of the 2010 draft. Warren, a 1997 UCHS graduate, played at the University of Florida and was the number-three overall selection of the 2001 NFL draft. Warren played 11 seasons in the NFL for the Cleveland Browns, Denver Broncos, Oakland Raiders and New England Patriots. Please send email queries to donnelldavis111@gmail. com, or call 850-673-9533. 4B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 26, 2014 FOOTBALLFALL Registration is in progress! not getting the required reps in practice or the game? requires mandatory plays than the YFL for its players at ALL levels. is currently $100 per football/cheer participant. Price will increase July 1st. Package deals available for multiple siblings. Rodney Mosley (904)412-6300 Geoff Cook (352) 316-3961 email: bradfordcountycowboys@gmail.com website: www.leaguelineup.com/bradfordcountypopwarnerTHE BRADFORD COWBOYS WILL HAVE DIVISIONS: Tiny-Mite (ages 5-6-7) Mitey-Mite (ages 7-8-9) Junior Pee-Wee (ages 8-9-10 and some 11yrs old) Pee-Wee (ages 9-10-11 and some 12yrs old) Unlimited (ages 11 thru 14) No weight limit for this groupPop Warner is partnered with USA Football and its Heads-Up Football Program to teach proper blocking and tackling techniques in a better and safer way. ARMSTRONGFENCE COMPANY Securing the SoutheastCommercial Residential Rent a Fence Access ControlCall for your FREE Estimate LOCAL PEOPLE ... LOCAL SERVICE! For Rex Collins, a Haven Hospice patient, a wish to be included in two of the most important events of his daughter Chelseys life came true when she wore her high school graduation cap and gown and her wedding dress at the Custead Care Center in Orange Park recently. When Chelsey graduated Bradford High School on June 6, her father was unable to attend. Before the ceremony, Chelsey wore her graduation cap and gown to the Custead Care Center so that Rex could see her in it. The Collins family arranged for Rex to watch the graduation ceremony from his room that evening via Skype. Rex also wanted to see how his daughter was going to look on her upcoming wedding day, which was June 21, so Chelsey wore her wedding dress as well. Haven Hospice is a notfor-profit community hospice organization providing services since 1979 and licensed in Florida since 1980. It has served more than 68,000 patients and families in North Florida. For more information, visit www.havenhospice.org, or call 800-727-1889. Hospice patient gets a fathers wish Rex Collins is pictured with his wife, Lisa, and his daughter, Chelsey. BY MICKEY AGNER Special to the Telegraph-TimesMonitor Kim Cook, a first-grade teacher at Irby Elementary School in Alachua County, was selected as Irbys Teacher of the Year in 2012-13. Later in that school term, she received an unsatisfactory evaluation because her students did not take the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test and were administered no other appropriate standardized test. Her evaluation was based on the achievement of third-grade students from a nearby school. Angered by the perceived lack of fairness, Cook joined forces with seven other teachers in Florida, the Alachua County Educational Association, the Florida Educational Association and the National Educational Association in filing a suit against the Florida Department of Education. Central to Cooks complaint was Senate Bill 736, which had been signed into law in 2011 by Gov. Rick Scott. The bill used what was called a Value-Added Model to anticipate student academic growth with the use of the FCAT. The anticipated student growth, compared to what students actually did achieve, was used for the purpose of evaluating teachers. The FCAT is not administered in every grade level, and the instructions for gathering appropriate test scores for students who are not tested do not adequately address the complications and led to more than a few situations similar to Cooks. Making the story politically charged is the fact that former Gov. Charlie Crist vetoed a similar bill in 2010. While the use of test scores for teacher evaluations has been the more controversial component of SB 736, it also targets tenure contracts, eliminating the practice by way of attrition. Additionally, it provides merit pay for teachers who earn a highly effective evaluation. In total, the bill addresses the issue of accountability for public education teachers. On June 4, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker dismissed the lawsuit by Cook, the six other teachers and the three teacher associations based upon the idea that the law was rational within the meaning of the law. In doing so, however, Walker acknowledged that the practice and implementation was unfair. Nevertheless, it has holding teachers accountable despite issues UCHS football greats Spiller, Warren to host youth camp June 27 Warren golf tournament risk youth Dear Editor: The Telegraph article concerning further talks about economic development in the county made me laugh. It is ridiculous to keep having these meetings and talking about economic development when it is obvious the county officials will continue to bend over backward to prevent the City of Starke from growing. In the twenty years I have lived in the city of Starke I have seen no cooperation from county officials if the city made any effort to advance and grow. Rather, the county has had its hand out demanding that the city give them something, either money or fire department, police department or free recreation for county children. The recent brouhaha about annexation, I believe, was raised by county officials who are still grousing about the city not paying for the countys animal control operation. What the county officials seem to forget is that city resident pay the same amount in taxes to the county each year as do county residents so they should not feel like the city is obligated to pay them anything for county operation. The city provides services to its residents including police and fire protection, utility services including electricity, water, sewer and garbage and trash collection. I prefer to live in the city to enjoy these benefits, and so far they have met my expectations. City residents pay for these services and ask for no contribution from the county. Also, the city provided countywide recreation for many years at a high cost with the county refusing to give any financial support even though eighty to eighty-five percent of children in the recreation programs lived in the county, not in the city. When the recreation cost came near a million dollars a year or County opposed to Starke growth more it had to be discontinued as the city simply could not afford the cost. County officials and residents complained but none of them offered to help support the program financially. One of the former county commissioners proposed a county fire department be created by taking over the citys fire department, stating the county could not afford to start a fire department otherwise. At the time, he also proposed building two fire stations in the county to house such a department but neither of them would have been in the city. The county was to just take the fire department with no compensation to the city for equipment, etc. Then the Sheriff wanted to take over the Starke Police Department, in much the same manner, just take the equipment, etc., with no compensation from the county to the city. As with the fire proposal continued coverage to the city and its resident would have been scanty. To add insult to injury, the Sheriff wanted the city to then pay him a million dollars a year, or more, for two officers to police the city. There was no guarantee that he would not up the cost every year. He seemed to forget city residents were already helping fund his office through the county taxes we pay. Eighty to ninety percent of my property taxes each year go to the county or the school system. The remaining little bit goes to the city. As I travel the southeast and see other states and area gaining businesses such as auto plants I wonder why not Bradford County or other areas of Florida. I have reached the conclusion that our leaders are afraid such businesses would cause increases in wages paid, and (gasp) result in employees actually expecting decent benefits. In closing I salute Mayor Carolyn Spooner for the way she recently stood strong for the city when attacked by county officials. James D. Powell Starke Letters editor@bctelegraph.com

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Air Force Airman 1st Class Jordan B. McCollum graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. McCollum earned distinction as an honor graduate. graduates from basic training Thursday, June 26, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 5B 904-368-0687 phwww.starkedivorce.comMARGARET ANDERSON1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL (US 301 North)Family Law & Will Preparation30 years experience Margaret will continue to serve clients in Alachua County as well as Bradford & Union counties Official Sports Medicine ProvidersTornadoesfor the Bradford High School KATIE TRUMBLE, DPT, A T C/L CAITLIN RAUCKHORST, A T C/L 319 West Call Street Suite A Starke, Florida 32091 Phone: (904) 368-1257 Fax: (904) 368-1258 Thursday, June 26th will make 50 years James and Barbara Balkcom have been married. James and Barbara met at a New Years Eve party during their freshman year of high school and became high school sweethearts. They continued to date two years after school before getting married. They both lived and worked in Jacksonville until 1972 when the now family of five moved to the New River area of Bradford County. James continued to serve his country working at the Air National Guard in Jacksonville as well as beginning a hog farm here in Bradford County. Barbara worked at the farm until their children were older. She then worked for Dr. Whiffen and later became the secretary at the Methodist Church for many years. James continues to work for Jacksons Building Supply and is an active member of the Fair Board in our community. James and Barbara are members of New River Baptist Church. They have raised their family in a Godly, loving home and shared it with their family. They have three children, eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Mama and Daddy we want to thank you for all the love you have shown us and shared with others and also giving us the example of a Godly marriage. We Love you and Happy 50th Anniversary, Randy, Annette and Tommy. Balkcoms celebrate 50 years Gene and Faith Murphy celebrated their 50 th wedding anniversary May 17 at Bible Baptist Church fellowship hall. They have three children, Theresa, Martha and Gene, Jr.; six grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren. The celebration was given by their children, granddaughters and daughter-in-law, Kim. They celebrated with family and friends. Gene and Faith attend Bible Baptist Church. On June 27, Eddie and Marie Oden of Lake Butler will celebrate 60 years of marriage. Eddie and Marie met in Jacksonville even though neither of them lived there at the time. Marie was studying at Piedmont Nursing School in Atlanta and Eddie was in the Army stationed at Ft. Jackson, S.C. Each was home visiting their parents, who introduced the pair at church. After a brief courtship, they returned to Jacksonville to be married. After a twoyear deployment to Germany, Eddie returned to the U.S. and the young couple settled in Jacksonville. There they raised two sons, Buck and Chuck. Eddie was employed as an electrician for over 42 years through IBEW Local Union 177 and retired from Paxon Electric. Marie served as an Assistant OR Supervisor at Baptist Medical Center and, later, as an OR Supervisor at Bradford Hospital after receiving her BSN from the University of North Florida. Retirement for the Odens has been spent operating the New River Ranch and traveling. They recently traveled to Paris and Normandy in France as well as Hawaii. Their current adventure is an RV trip to the West Coast. The Odens also spend time with their four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. There will be a family celebration of their anniversary on June 29th. Odens celebrate 60 years Socials Autumn Griggs of Melrose has been named to the 2014 Spring Semester/Term 4 Provosts List at Troy University, Alabama. The Provosts List honors students who have earned a 3.65 or higher Grade Point Average during the previous academic period. Griggs named to Provosts List Jordan McCollum He is the son of Kenneth A. Steele of Starke. and Theresa P. McCollum of Newport News, Va. He is a 2013 graduate of Menchville High School, Newport News, Va. Specialist Taylor Pruss of Fort Lauderdale graduated from United States Army Basic Training at Fort Jackson on June 19, 2014. SPC Pruss successfully completed an intensive nineweek program with the 3rd Platoon of Delta Company 2/39. His training included military discipline and courtesy, physical fitness, instruction on basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare, drill Pruss graduates from basic training Taylor Pruss and ceremony, basic first aid and field training exercises. Pruss achieved Expert Grenade and Sharpshooter recognition during training. SPC Pruss will report to Fort Eustis in Newport News, VA for Military Occupation Specialty training. He is the son of Bill and Karen Pruss of Melrose, and a 2002 graduate of Keystone Heights High School. Socials www.StarkeJournal.com www.facebook.com/BradfordTelegraph

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6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 26, 2014 $2 OFFWITH THIS COUPON Lake ButlerCR121CR231 JJsHand Crafted Jewelry Great Gifts Polished Stones & Beads 515 South CR 231 (going South towards RMC) Lake Butler RMC 4 th of July Blowout S ale1000 South Water St. Starke, FL 32091 904 966-2221 EVERYTHING 25% OFF 25% OFF 964-(8473)13761 South US 301 Starke(1/2 mile south of walmart) Tires Wheels Vehicle Accessories Golf Carts & Parts Jo es Tires Summer Time We have Deep Blue Engel Coolers... Many Sizes!!! t Crime t Bradford Charla Chrystal Baker, 57, of Middleburg was arrested June 19 by Bradford deputies for larceny and for fraud. According to the arrest report, Baker wrote a check from her daughters closed checking account back in November 2013 to pay rent at a home in Country Club Woods of Starke. Bond was set at $7,500 for the charges. Rhonda Lynette Clayton, 38, of Sanderson was arrested June 22 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Ashley Renee Corning, 27, of Woodbine, Ga., was arrested June 17 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Robert Lee Crews, 24, of Starke was arrested June 19 by Starke police for aggravated battery and for disturbing the peace. According to the arrest report, Crews and his girlfriend got into an argument, and he poked her in the head, pushed her and threatened further harm from him and some family members. Once he was arrested by police, Crews, who had been drinking, started shouting outside the residence, causing neighbors to come out of their residences. Bond was set at $12,500 for the charges. William Franklin Crumbley, 48, of Green Cove Springs and Johnathon B. Hall, 34, of Green Cove Springs were arrested June 17 by Starke police for trafficking in drugs-controlled substance and possession of marijuana. Hall was also charged with possession of drugs-synthetic cannabinoid. According to the arrest report, the two were passengers in a vehicle pulled over in Starke because the brake and tail lights werent functioning. The driver of the vehicle, Gary A. Brock III, 27, also of Green Cove Springs, was arrested on a warrant out of St. Johns County once his information was run through dispatch. A search of the vehicle turned up the drugs in the backseat, where Crumbley and Hall were seated, resulting in their arrest. Bond for Crumbley was set at $62,000, while bond for Hall was set at $24,000. Shawn Tracy Dewdney, 49, of Starke was arrested June 20 by Starke police for failure to appear. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Lisa Ann Dexter, 33, of Starke was arrested June 21 by Starke police during a traffic stop for possession of drugs-controlled substance without a prescription and driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $35,000 for the charges. Kyle Leon Dick, 24, of Starke was arrested June 17 by Bradford deputies on an out-of-county warrant from Alachua for fraud, use of ID of another and resisting an officer without violence. Bond was set at $10,000 for the charges. Melissa Marie Dorough, 22, of Middleburg was arrested June 21 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. John Mason Folsom, 23, of Starke was arrested June 22 by Bradford deputies for four charges of aggravated assault with a weapon and for obstructing justice-intimidate/threaten victim, witness or informant. According to the arrest report, Folsom and the victim were traveling west on S.R. 100 from the Keystone area when he pulled up behind the victim, driving erratically and then pulling beside her in an attempt to force her off the road. The victim eventually pulled into Tonys convenience store off S.R. 100, with Folsom pulling up beside her and then verbally threatening to come get her, her brother and her family. The victim later told law enforcement that she was an Recent arrests in Bradford, Clay and Union informant in a narcotics case at Edwards grocery earlier in the year, and Folsom had been an employee there. The victim told the deputy she and her brother were in fear for their lives. The victim also had her 3-year-old child and another 4-year-old child in the vehicle when Folsom forced them to pull off the road. The next day, deputies were able to locate Folsom at a friends residence on C.R. 21B near the Santa Fe Lake boat ramp and arrested him. Bond was set at $250,000 for the charges. Andrew Scott Fulkerson, 29, of Starke was arrested June 21 by Starke police for battery. According to the arrest report, an officer encountered a wounded man in the Walgreens parking lot late at night who stated he had been in an argument with Fulkerson several hours earlier. The victim said Fulkerson struck him several times in the head, and he was having blurred vision. EMS was called and transported the victim to Shands Starke. Approximately an hour later, the officer went to Shands and located Fulkerson in the waiting room and arrested him. Audrey Fuller Graham, 35, of Lake Butler, Michael Glenn Starkes, 32, of Starke and Michael Dewanye Thornton, 28, of Starke were all arrested June 22 by Bradford deputies for battery after fighting broke out between people in two neighboring homes on Southeast 125 th Street in the county. According to the arrest report, one of the homeowners told deputies there had been an ongoing feud between the neighbors. On the day of the arrest, both parties had been drinking and yelling at each other before punches were eventually thrown by the three arrested. Bond was set at $10,000 for Thorntons charge, while bond was set at $5,000 for Grahams charge. Beau Matthew Harrell, 27, of Worthington Springs was arrested June 21 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Rolanda Maneat Heard, 37, of Jacksonville was arrested June 22 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Henry Calvin Hendrieth, 29, of Bradford County was arrested June 19 by Lawtey police for battery. Bond was set at $1,000 for the charge. Rodney Eric Keen, 42, and Jody Marcus Jade Keen, 20, both of Hawthorne, were arrested June 19 by Bradford deputies for dealing in stolen property and for fraud-false statements. According to the arrest report, an Alachua County deputy was at Curtis Recycling in Hampton investigating the Keens as suspects for a burglary and grand theft in Alachua County. The Alachua deputy had learned the Keens had sold a hay trailer earlier in the day to Curtis Recycling, and was there when the Keens returned again with more metal items. They were detained, the owners from Alachua identified the metal items and the Keens were arrested by Bradford deputies for dealing in stolen property and for defrauding a secondary metal recycler-less than $300. Charges will be forthcoming from Alachua for the burglary and grand theft. Bond for Rodney Keen was set at $100,000 in Bradford, while bond for Jody Keen was set at $10,000 in Bradford. James David McDaniel, 48, homeless, was arrested June 21 by Lawtey police for possession of marijuana, for disorderly intoxication, drugs-health or safety and resisting an officer. Bond was set at $30,000 for the charges. Antonio Leo Monroe, 28, of Starke was arrested June 22 by Lawtey police for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Tara Meghan Palmer, 25, of Starke was arrested June 19 by Bradford deputies for three charges of child neglect and a charge of battery. According to the arrest report, one of the victims, a mom, was sitting in her home with her two children when someone knocked on the door on June 12. The victim asked who it was, and the person answered T. The victim asked again who it was, got the same answer, then told the person to come in. When the personlater identified by the victim as Palmerentered, she started spraying mace in the room and on the victim and her two children. The victims were transported to the hospital for evaluation, and Palmer was later identified by the adult victim in a photo lineup. A week later, Palmer came to the sheriffs office to be interviewed about the case and denied being at the victims home when the incident happened, but was arrested due to the victims statements. Bond was set at $8,000 for the charges. William Elzie Sanders, 31, of Starke was arrested June 18 by Bradford deputies for cruelty toward a child. According to the arrest report, Sanders got mad at his stepchildren, ages 5 to 10, over the loss of a pet turtle. Sanders sent the children to their room, but then picked the youngest one up by her hair and threw her to the floor, causing her to land on a suitcase that was on the floor and fracturing her arm. According to the report, Sanders has been arrested several times in the past three years on domestic violence charges toward the childrens mom. Bond was set at $100,000 for the charge. Sandra Danielle Stemm, 26, of Brooker was arrested June 23 by Bradford deputies on warrants issued in April for burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, larcenygrand theft over $300 and less than $5,000, five charges of fraud-pawnbroker transaction fraud and five charges of dealing in stolen property. Stemm was transported from the Alachua County jail to the Bradford jail to face the charges. Bond was set at $120,000 for the charges. Yvonne Sharise Taylor, 23, of Macclenny was arrested June 22 by Lawtey police during a traffic stop for possession of marijuana. Lindsey Ann Templeton, 28, of Starke was arrested June 19 by Starke police for petit theft-shoplifting. According to the arrest report, Templeton attempted to leave Walmart in Starke with various items in Walmart bagsmost of them not paid for. The value of the items came to approximately $290. Bond was set at $500 for the charge. Anthony Maynard Watson, 21, of Starke was arrested June 18 by Starke police for battery. According to the arrest report, Watson got into an argument with his sister over her using his phone charger and struck her several times in the head with an open hand. Once he was transported to the jail, he was also charged by Bradford deputies with probation violation. Bond was set at $5,000 for his charges. Henry Wimberly, 24, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 22 by Bradford deputies for driving while license suspended or revoked. Bond was set at $25,000 for the charge. Keystone/Melrose J ohn Brown, 19, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 20 by Clay deputies for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Casey Marie Gaffney, 33, of Melrose was arrested June 23 by Putnam deputies for dealing in stolen property, child neglect and larceny. Bruce Allen Guthrie, 50, of Melrose was arrested June 22 by Putnam deputies for contempt of court. Megan Howell, 29, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 19 by Clay deputies for non-support. James Shepard, 47, of Keystone Heights was arrested June 20 by Clay deputies for possession of crack cocaine. Christopher Wanton, 31, of Melrose was arrested June 22 by Clay deputies for resisting a law enforcement officer. Union Billy James Belford, 60, of Lake Butler was arrested June 17 by Union deputies during a traffic stop for speeding, possession of drugs-cocaine, possession of marijuana and possession of narcotic equipment. William E. Wells, 40, of Lake Butler was arrested June 17 by Union deputies for disorderly intoxication and for resisting an officer. Justin Shoumond Johnson, 28, of Lake Butler was arrested June 23 by Union deputies on two warrants for failure to appearfelony offense. Kenneth Troy Thomas Jr., 28, of Atlantic Beach was arrested June 20 in St. Johns County on two warrants from Union for failure to appear-felony offense. Frederick L. Williams, 46, of Glen St. Mary was arrested June 18 by Union deputies on an outof-county warrant from Baker for failure to appear-misdemeanor offense.

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to lose David, so I just decided that I wasnt and worked from there. By Dec. 27, the spread of the infection seemed to have stopped, and the doctors were a little more optimistic that perhaps Powell would be able to keep his arm, but with a great or total decrease in mobility. By Dec. 28, the family was told that if Powell continued to improve, he would be moved to the burn unit in a few days to begin skin grafts. Powell had regained consciousness by this time and showed that he did have some mobility in his arm. On Jan. 2, the first skin graft took place, taking about 2.5 hours. Things went well, and another graft was scheduled for the following week. Doctors also began the process of weaning Powell off the ventilator, which was still assisting in his respiration even though he was breathing on his own. Powell began both physical and occupational therapy the next week, starting on a slow road to recovery. In total, Powell has undergone 15 surgeries, debridements and skin grafts. He was in the hospital from Dec. 24 until late February. He is now undergoing outpatient physical and occupational therapy and Faith. He graduated from the local schools of Bradford County. He is survived by: mother, Catherine Davis of Starke; father, Rev. James McNeal of Waldo; sister, Chrisoundra Y. McNeal of Starke; brothers, Tommy L. Covington, Jr. of Macclenny, Aaron Joshua McNeal and James Jonathan McNeal both of Waldo; grandmother, Rutha Mae McNeal of Gainesville. Funeral services will be held at 1:00 p.m. on June 28, in the Greater Allen Chapel AME Church with Rev. Cynthia Bailey conducting the services. Interment will be held in Waldo Community Cemetery. Arrangements are under the direction of Haile Funeral Home Inc. Viewing will be held on Friday, June 27, at Carl D. Haile Memorial Chapel Family Hour 3-4:00 p.m. Friends 4-7:00 p.m. and 1 hour at the church prior to the services. The Cortege will form at: 112 North Myrtle Street Apartment 1 Starke. Jacob Johns Jacob Johns JACKSONVILLEJacob Keith Johns, 32, a lifelong resident of Jacksonville died Saturday, June 14, 2014 at Orange Park Medical Center. He was born on Nov. 2, 1981 to Susan McKenzie Dyer and the late Jefferson Jacob Luther Johns, Jr. He attended Evangel Temple. He was preceded in death by his father; his brother, Matthew Johns; and his maternal grandfather, Jasper Lee McKenzie. He is survived by: his mother, Susan McKenzie Dyer and his step-father, Natividad Barahona of Jacksonville; his daughters, Alexis Marie Evans and Breeauna Lynn Lied both of Jacksonville; his brother, Barry Johns of Jacksonville; his half brothers, Jeff Johns of Jacksonville, and Michael Lynn (Jennifer) McKenzie of Starke; his half-sisters, Lynn (Eldy) Flores of Jacksonville and Jennifer Johns of Bradenton; his maternal grandmother, Willie Mae McKenzie of Starke; and his girlfriend, Marie Parrish of Jacksonville. Funeral services will be held on Friday, June 27, at 12:00 pm at Archie Tanner Funeral Services with Brother Dean Hollingsworth officiating. Interment will follow at Crosby Lake Cemetery in Starke. The family will receive friends an hour prior to the funeral at the funeral home. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the funeral home to assist with expenses. Thursday, June 26, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 7B Funeral with Burial20 Ga. Metal Casket (4 colors) Vault, Open & Closing Grave, Graveside or Chapel Service with one night visitation. . . . . . .$5,595Funeral with Cremation(Rental Casket with Visitation prior to Services). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,895Direct Cremation with Memorial ServiceServices held at Archer Memorial Chapel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,895 Archer Funeral Home Pre-payment accepted Within Your Means Now, Peace of Mind Always 55 North Lake Avenue Lake Butler, Florida 32054 Serving F amilies in North Florida since 1973 S TARKE OFFICE OPEN 8:30 to 5:30 MON-FRIHwy 301 North, Starke 904-964-2010 (Next to Best Western) The area s largest supplier of Colored GraniteWhen Quality Counts, You Can Count On UsPrimary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.Member of Better Business Bureau Monument Builders of North America Florida Monument BuildersFL Lic. # F037700 Does your business have a story to tell? A product or service to sell?The Bradford County Telegraph Advertising Department can provide you with the in depth coverage you desire...Call 904-964-6305or email us atDarlene Douglassdarlene@bctelegraph.comor Kevin Millerkmiller@bctelegraph.comAdvertorial Advertising Works! d Obituaries d MIDDLEBURG Ann Stevenson Brown, 83, of Middleburg died at her home Thursday, June 19, 2014. She was born in Portland, Maine on May 28, 1931 to the late George Stevenson and Thelma (Harding) Hunt. Prior to retirement, she worked in nursing homes as a L.P.N. She was of the Methodist Faith. She was preceded in death by her husband, George Brown and her daughter, Mary Starke both in 1999, also preceding her in death is her brother, Allen Hunt. Survivors are: children, Roxanna Berry of Middleburg, Janet Johnson of Lake Butler, Karol Williams of St. Louis, Mo., George Brown, Jr. of Lawtey, and Harold Paul Brown of Keystone Heights; brothers, Walter Hunt of St. Augustine and Robert Hunt of Rhoden, Maine; fifteen grandchildren; twenty-nine greatgrandchildren; and two great-greatgrandchildren. Services were held June 22 in the Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home Chapel. Interment will follow at a later date. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, of Keystone Heights. Patricia Bryan ST. AUGUSTINE Patricia Leigh Bryan died Thursday, June 19, 2014 after a long illness with pancreatic cancer. She retired from the Department of Corrections and later was employed at Bayview Rehab and Flagler Hospital. She is survived by: two sons, Kevin Sprow, and Daren Williams; a sister, Sandi Stoiber; and a brother, Ted Bryan. A memorial service will be held at Craig Funeral Home in St. Augustine on Sunday, June 29 at 1:00 pm. In lieu of flowers, a donation can be made to Community Hospice/Bailey Center. Craig Funeral Home Crematory Memorial Park of St. Augustine is in charge of arrangements. Wiley Clark Wiley Clark HAWTHORNE Wiley Richard Clark, age 72, of Hawthorne passed away from injuries he sustained in an automobile accident Sunday, June 22, 2014. Mr. Clark was born in Deland, Feb. 13, 1942, to the late Wiley and Carrie (Oglesby) Clark and was a member of the Main Street Baptist Church in Leesburg. He moved to Hawthorne two years ago from Keystone Heights where he had been a longtime resident. Mr. Clark was the Chief Investigator for the State Attorneys office in Gainesville before his retirement 16 years ago. He loved working on his boat, listening to country music and working with livestock. Most of all, Mr. Clark enjoyed being a wonderful husband and father. His first wife and the mother of his children, Judith Judy Ann Clark preceded him in death. Survivors include: his wife of 36 years, Bonnie Louise (Griggs); four wonderful children and their spouses, Terri Elizabeth (Thom) ODonnell of Jacksonville, James Jimmy Richard Clark of Daytona, Billie Sue (Lavant) Durden of Swainsboro, Ga. and Jennifer Lynn (Jeffrey) McClellan of Lawtey; three siblings and their spouses, Edward (Sherri) Clark of Melbourne, Robert (Barbara) Clark of Gainesville, and Anna (James) Defoe of Tacoma, Wash. Also left behind are his five precious grandchildren, Michael, Heather, Mitchell, Rylee and Cole; along with four great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be 2:00 p.m., Thursday, June 26, in the First Baptist Church, Keystone Heights, with Reverend Daniel Findley officiating. Interment will follow at Keystone Heights Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations to The Salvation Army. Arrangements are under the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home, 340 E. Walker Drive, Keystone Heights. www.jonesgallagherfh.com (352) 473-3176. PAID OBITUARY Elizabeth Coakley LAKE BUTLERElizabeth Ann Coakley, 68, of Lake Butler passed away Monday, June 16, 2014 at her residence after an extended illness. She was born July 10, 1945 in Buchannon, W.Va. to the late William B. and Nine R. Coakley. She is survived by: her daughters, Cynthia A. Rooney and Lesa R. Fox; ten grandchildren; Janell Graham, J.R. (James) Rooney, Lance Fox II, Mistee Rooney, Logann Fox, David Watson, T.J. Rooney, Kevin Fox, Elizabeth Watson, and Jonathan Watson. She will be missed by all her family and extended family, she thought of as family, sister: Becky Watson; grandchildren: Shylow Sheffield, Laura W. Sheffield, Chris Bemis, and Bryan Bemis. All loved her very much. Services for Ms. Coakley will be held on Saturday, June 28, at 3:00 p.m. at New Beginnings Church at 3243 Southwest HWY 242, Lake City. 386-752-3805. Family invites friends for visitation at 2:00 p.m. an hour prior to services. Dinner will follow the services at the church. PAID OBITUARY Rex Collins Rex Collins STARKEMr. Rex Donovan Collins, age 49, of Starke passed away Saturday, June 21, 2014 at Haven Hospice Custead Care Center in Orange Park. Mr. Collins was born on Aug. 17, 1964 in Jacksonville and moved to Starke 24 years ago from Keystone Heights. Rex attended Madison Street Baptist Church, was a member of Union County Riding Club and the Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch. He was a Vocational Instructor for the Florida Department of Corrections at FSP and worked over 25 years with Masters Construction Company as a carpenter. Preceding him in death was his father Clinton Collins. Survivors are: his wife of 25 years, Lisa Marie (Lawson) Collins of Starke; children, Clinton David Collins and Chelsey Marie Collins (Davin) Crews all of Starke; his mother, Zedra Montrell (Jordan) Collins of Keystone Heights; siblings, Steve Collins of Atlanta, Ga., Lynette Stucka of Greenville, S.C., Marlane (Thomas) Padgett and Lisa (Kevin) Dugger both of Starke; mother and father-in-law, David E. and Patricia Lawson of Starke, many nieces and nephews. The family will receive friends on Thursday, June 26, 2014 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at the Dewitt C. Jones Chapel of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home with funeral services beginning at 11 oclock. Interment will follow in Crosby Lake Cemetery with Reverend Mark McDowell officiating. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch, P.O. Box 2000, Boys Ranch, FL 32064. Arrangements are by JonesGallagher Funeral Home of Starke. On-line condolences may be left at www.jonesgallagherfh.com. PAID OBITUARY STARKEMargaret Elizabeth Klug, 99, of Starke died Saturday, June 21, 2014 at Bradford Terrace Nursing Home in Starke. She was born on Sept. 14, 1914 in Buffalo, N.Y. to the late Andrew J. and Amelia Irene (Tharby) Ries. Prior to retirement she worked as office support staff in city government. She was preceded in death by her husband Nicholas Klug. Survivors are: nephew, Greg Allen of Alexandria, Va. and niece, Barbara DeWeede of New York. Memorial services and interment will be at a later date at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo, N.Y. Arrangements are by JonesGallagher Funeral Home of Starke. Lawrence Koonce RAIFORDLawrence Koonce, 51, of Raiford died Saturday, June 21, 2014 at the Shands U of F in Gainesville after an extended illness surrounded by his family. He was raised by Bill and Walter Lee Brinson. He lived in Raiford all of his life and graduated from Union County High School. He was a member of New Bethel Freewill Baptist Church in Raiford and was a painter retired from North East Florida State Hospital. He is survived by: his partner for 28 years, Nettie Mae Stokes of Raiford; father, Elcano Reeves of Raiford: mother, Dorothy Mae Koonce of Largo; sisters, Alberta (Otis) Miller of Raiford, Laura Nichols of Largo, Patricia Brinson of Largo, Lisa, Tisa, Kinnie, and Angelee; brothers, Todd, Benard, and Curtis Koonce. Services will be held Saturday June 28, at 11:00 at the New Bethel Freewill Baptist Church of Raiford. Burial will follow at Five Sapplin Cemetery on CR 229 N Raiford. Family will receive friends Friday, June 27, for visitation from 6-8 pm at Archer Funeral Home. Archer Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Chris McNeal STARKEChris A. McNeal, 29, of Starke, died Wednesday, June 18, 2014 at ET York Haven Hospice Gainesville. Born in Gainesville on June 7, 1985, he was a member of The Greater Allen Chapel AME Church Starke. He was of the Methodist Continued from 3B will continue for many months to come. I really dont remember much at all from the time I got into the boat until I woke up in the hospital, Powell said. I was heavily medicated there for a while and that, along with the pain and infection, probably accounts for it. Powell said he was just glad to be alive and to have more time with his family. He said he had never been a religious man, but has changed his mind some since his ordeal. I found out that I was on all these prayer lists at churches all over Bradford and Union counties, as well as here in Keystone Heights, Powell said. All these people, many of whom may never have met me, were praying for me to live. There is a sort of power there and, since according to the doctors Im really not supposed to be here, makes me think more about where that power comes from. Powell said he wants to thank all of the people who prayed for him and those who lent their support to his family during their ordeal. He said he is deeply touched by the caring showed them by the community. Powell has had to make a few lifestyle adjustments since his illness due to the fact that his use of his right arm will at best be reduced by 75 percent. He has given up his motorcycle and his straight-drive Corvette; trading both for a Corvette with an automatic transmission. He does plan to continue in his passion for speedboats, but that he will no longer boat in fresh water. When Im up to it, maybe in a month or two, Im going to take my boat down to the Keys and visit some friends, Powell said. I look forward to getting back out on the water, so long as its the ocean this time. No more freshwater for me.

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already been reported that the Florida Educational Association is in the process of appealing the ruling. Public school administrators in the local area tend to acknowledge some continuing issues with the Value-Added Model, but also indicate that assessment and teacher evaluations are more valid today than previously. Barry Sams, director of human resources for the Union County School District, said requirements for SB 736 have been amended to allow local assessments to supplant FCAT scores when FCAT scores are unavailable. Consequently, the process is more functional. Lisa Graham, the principal at Starkes Southside Elementary School and a school board member in Clay County, indicated there are still some issues with the process, but also acknowledged that it is running much smoother. Thomasenia L. Adams, the associate dean of research for the University of Floridas Faculty Development and Graduate Education Office of Educational Research College of Education, said there are clearly some issues with the Value-Added Model and its implementation, but also said accountability in public education is here to stay. Not only is it a relevant issue in the secondary system, but it is also an issue in her workplace. Apparently, the professors for UFs College of Education are also being evaluated according to the success of their graduates. Betsy Regor, service unit coordinator for Florida Educational Association, is less understanding of the ValueAdded Model and referenced the ridiculous nature of the formula that is used to project anticipated student achievement. She also referenced the fact that it is totally unfair to evaluate teachers on the student progress of students that they do not even have contact with. Despite the Florida Educational Associations immediate appeal of the court ruling, public school teachers will continueat least for the time beingto be held accountable by way of their student test scores even though it fosters a perception of unfairness. It is true that engineers do not have their pay regulated according to the bridges that fail, or attorneys according to the number of cases they win, or physicians according to the number of patients they heal. Of course, those professions are not paid with tax funds. Public education will continue to be accountable to the public. 8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 26, 2014 Fins, Fur & Tails Hunting season is long gone, and the summer heat is upon us. Below are some good items to remember when you are outdoors in Floridas summer heat: Remember sun protection when outside. Ticks, chiggers, yellow flies and mosquitoes are abundant. Use protection. As the bass and crappie slow down for mid-summer, fish for bream. Offshore saltwater fishing remains hot all summer. Remember to fish pompano, whiting and sharks on the east coast surf. Tend your food plots near deer stands. Seek shelter from lightning when it rains outside. Make sure your guns are cleaned before their long summer rest. Remember that bream fishing is great for kids short attention spans. Remember that Florida has some of the most beautiful spring runs in the world. Snakebites on people are rare, but they are much more common on outside dogs. Antivenin for dogs is very expensive. Frequent evening rains make dramatic temperature changes in our environment, causing snakes to seek more comfortable areas. Be considerate of the nonEnjoy summer, follow precautions venomous ones and avoid the poisonous ones. Follow safety precautions when your family swims. Outdoors outlook The numbers and sizes of the bass caught in our local tournaments have decreased with the onset of the midsummer heat. This is to be expected, but as the bass and crappie seek cooler temperatures in deeper locations, the bluegills and redbellies are much more available. Bluegills will bed on and off most of the summer, but they will collect in larger cluster beds around new and full moons. Look for the pungent smell of their beds, and fish upwind until they start biting. When the panfish are located, the bite is relentless and frequent, making them a favorite for kids. If the small size of panfish discourages you, think saltwater. Having made that suggestion, though, it is not the best time to fish for the big three: flounder, trout and reds. Flounder migrate offshore in the fall and are heavily fished at that time. Trout and reds are more abundant and easy to locate in cooler weather. However, they can be caught, and there are some more abundant varieties at this time of the year. Whiting, blues, pompano and permit can often be found on the eastern surf. If you have a chance to go farther south, snook fishing will be great. Sheepshead are not as large as in the spring, but readily available around structures. If you are really ambitious, tarpon are big inshore targets through the full moon in July. Offshore fishing will remain hot all summer. Remember to watch the tidal changes. The moon movements have a much more significant impact on saltwater fish. Bass tourney results At the June 11 Bald Eagle Tournament, Billy Renaldo landed the big fish and finished in first place. Jeff Humphrey and Scott Smith placed third, while Jason McClellan and Clint Sheppard placed third. Jeremy Dohrn and Buddy May won the June 12 Sampson Open Tournament, with Eddie Smith and Dillon Crews placing second. Hunter Dugger and Caleb Manning landed the big fish and placed third, while Johnathan Nash and Nicky Gay placed fourth. On June 18, Chris Kadlec and Mark Roberts won the Bald Eagle Tournament. McClellan and Sheppard placed second, while Evan Hurst and Joe Yarborough placed third. Paul Akridge and John Breton landed the big fish. Mike Rhoads and Randal Alvarez teamed up to land the big fish and win the June 19 Sampson Open Tournament. Nash and Richard Kingsberry placed second, while John Starling and Matt Anderson placed third. Timmy Durrance and Sam Sibley teamed up for a fourth-place finish, while Cason Noles and Brandon Gay were fifth. Project Appleseed is topic of June 26 Crosshorn meeting The June 26 Crosshorn Ministries, which starts at 7 p.m. at the Starke Golf and Country Club, will feature guest speaker Glen Smoak of Project Appleseed. The introduction on the Crosshorn Ministries website reads: Glen will be sharing the values of their excellent marksmanship program, as well as how-tos on civic involvement. One of their main goals is to teach traditional American marksmanship skills, especially to our youth. Heres a quote from their website: Why teach marksmanship? Because good shooting requires learning positive traits, such as patience, determination, focus, attention to details and persistence. More information on Project Appleseed can be found at www. appleseedinfo.org. Continued from 4B Akridge and John the big bass from the June Tournament. Dohrn and the June 12 Sampson Open Tournament. Smith stayed at the boat launch when her boy Durrance, 12 Sampson Tournament. She proudly proclaimed her catch to be better Renaldo won the June 11 Tournament.

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Thursday, June 26, 2014 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B 40 Notices EQUAL HOUSING OP PORTUNITY. All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin, or an in tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal cus todians, pregnant women and people securing cus tody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina tion, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, the tollfree telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. For further information call Florida Commission on Human Relations, Lisa Sutherland 850-488-7082 ext #1005 47 Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) FOR RENT PROFESSION AL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft. $1,000/mo.up to 3,000 sq.ft. Contiguous $2,000/ mo. Warehouse 3,000 sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith & Smith Realty. 904-9649222. RETAIL SPACE in busy strip center. 1,000 sq.ft. and 2,000 sq. ft. units. South HWY 301 front age, across from the KOA Campground. Call 352235-1675. DOWNTOWN STARKE rent, $315 per month. Conference room, kitch en, utilities and more provided. 904-364-8395. 48 Homes for Sale 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced back yard. New flooring, & paint. A/C. Immaculate condition. $120,000.00. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 49 Mobile Homes for Sale LAND/HOME PACKAGES 3 bed$399/month 4 bed$499/month waynefrier macclenny.com 904-259-4663 LIKE NEW! 2007 3 BED Doublewide 39k set up w/AC 904-259-4663 NO MONEY DOWN Use your land. 2015 5BR/3BA $599/month waynefrier macclenny.com 904-259-4663 Ends 7/31 BRAND NEW 2015 28x52 6k off $55,900 Set up w/AC. Ends 7/31 904-259-4663 50 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 2BR/1BA. CH/A, newly renovated. $500/month. On Silver Lake. Lawn care & maintenance included. Call 352-478-8321 3BR/2BA DW 12273 SE 21st Ave., Starke. $675/ month plus $650/security. Out in country. Service animals only! 904-9648637. SUITE OF OFFICES IN CLUDES Kitchen, Show er, Washer Dryer. Down town STARKE $1000/ MO. For information Call 904-364-9022. PERMANENT ROOMS for rent at the Magnolia Hotel. Both refrigerator and microwave. Special rates, by the month. Call 904-964-4303 for more information. MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT starting at $525 per month. Hidden Oaks, Lake Butler. Call 386496-8111. NICE MOBILE HOMES in Lake Butler & Starke 2 & 3 BR single wides, fenced. DW in Lake But ler. Deposit required. Call 678-438-6828. WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bed room MH, clean, close to prison. Call 352-468-1323 OFFICES FOR LARGE STAFF. Includes living qtrs, showers, kitchen, washer & dryer. This is a living qtrs. $1000/month. Call 904-364-9022 KEYSTONE 2BR/1BA. 1 acre fenced. SW w/room addition. Clean. $525/ month plus last & security. Please call 352-475-3094 or 352-235-1143 5 Yr. 3BR/2BA house for rent. Tile floor, granite counters, Jacuzzi tub, gas wrap around porch. Lake access. Post Masters Vil lage in Keystone Heights. $1,050/mo. plus 1-month deposit. Call Dave 352473-3560. 2BR APT DOWNTOWN STARKE. $500/month. Call 904-364-9022 to see apt. RENT A ROOM IN AN OF FICE. $300 per month. Utilities furnished, kitch en provided. 6 offices available. 4 downstairs, 2 upstairs. For info call 904-964-6305. BUILDING THAT USES METAL SHOP. (Mc Clellan Recycling) 224 E. Washington Street. Starke. $200 per month. Call 904-964-6305 SMALL TRAILER FOR RENT, One person. $350/ monthly, satellite and utilities included. $150/ deposit. 1/2 acre, pet wel come. 904-964-2747 3BR/2BA NEAR Starke Golf course. Available June 16th. $775/mo. $675/ deposit. Will accept HUD. Call Chris @ 904-7320590 3BR/2BA DOUBLEWIDE on 2.5 acres in Lawtey. $750/ 2041. 3BR/2BA living room, din ing room, family room, laundry room. Back porch is screened in. Storage shed. Large fenced & paint. A/C. Immacu late condition. No pets other than service ani mals. $875/month plus deposit. Near downtown & schools. 823 Parkwood Place. 912-843-2194 or 912-281-9053 2BR/1.5BA $595/mo, $500 sec. Service animals only, no smoking. Washer/dry er hookup CH/A, stove, refrigerator. Call 352-4755620 MASSAGE ROOM AVAIL ABLE for rent. Inside Polished Hair Salon. 330 S Lawrence Blvd. 352-473-3717 2BR/2BA SW mobile home. CH/A, fenced yard, front & back screened porch. Qui et neighborhood. Approx. 3 miles from RMC Lake Butler Reception Cen ter. Service animals only. $625/month 1st & last, $400/deposit. Available July. Call 386-623-2407 HOUSECOUNTRY LIVING 5 MILES W. STARKE 2BR / 2BA, LR, DR, Kitchen, Utility Room, 2 car Car port, Central Heat & Air. $700. /moFirst and Last mo. Rent. Service ani mals only. Call 904-9646718 KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 3BR/2BA CH/A, new flooring. $650/month. First, last and deposit. Service animals only. 352473-0464 2BR/1BA. CH/A. Large yard, very clean. $475/month plus deposit. 904-3648135 4BR/1BA. Very clean. W/D hook-up. Private area. $575/month plus deposit. 904-364-8135 NEAR LAWTEY, MOBILE HOME 14X70. Clean & nice 2BR/2BA in the country. CH/A. &700/ month $500/deposit. We take credit check. Call 904-771-2576 HOUSE for rent. In good condition. For more infor mation call, 904-290-0083 OR 904-964-5006. 3BR/2BA SW. Between Starke & Lake Butler. $550/monthly $300/de posit. 904-305-8287 or 904-263-3999 3BR/2BA DW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $650/month, $650/ deposit. Call 352-2356319 3BR/2BA SW. Outside Starke city limits. CH/A. $575/month plus $575/ deposit. Please call 352-235-6319 53 A Yard Sales SAT 9AM-3PM. 15204 SE 25th Lane. 1 mile E of Hospital off SR 230. Va riety of nice things, some golf and tools. Check it out! YARD SALE AT LAW TEY PARK on Friday 6/27 only. Lots of good stuff, come see us! 904-635-8207 FRI & SAT 8AM-3PM. Clothes, plus size uni toys, hunting gear, electronics, books, col lector cards & coins. 9510 SW 68th Place Hampton. EDWARDS ROAD (100 A). 7 am-? Queen BR set, 3 piece BR furniture, adult clothes, shoes, bedding, odds & ends, kids games and printers. Keystone Yard Sales RECYCLED TREASURES SALE. Friday 9am-4m Saturday 9am-12pm. Saturday $1.00 bag day. Lots of stuff. Fresh Start Fellowship 7191 S.R. 21 N Keystone Heights. Info call 352-473-6550 FRI & SAT 9AM-2PM. 6860 Crystal Lake Road. Lawn clothes, toys, furniture, bamboo flooring and other items. 57 BUILDING AT 224 E. Washington Street. $7000. Could be mower shop or recycling shop. Call 904-964-6305 PLEASE BUY MY OLD 1971 Jackson dump truck. Also pretty good, tires kind of bald. $2,800.00. Please call 904-966-1287 59 Personal CLARK FOUNDATION RE PAIRS, INC. Correction of termite & water-dam aged wood & sills. Level ing & raising Houses/ Bldgs. Pier Replacement & alignment. We do all types of tractor work, excavation and small demolition jobs. Free Es timates: Danny (Buddy) Clark, 904-545-5241. 65 Help Wanted LOCAL STARKE BUSI NESS is looking to hire a part-time and/or full-time staff member. Optional shifts are available and Military Veterans are wel come to apply! We are looking for a self-starter, goal oriented person with the willingness to learn. No experience neces sary! Please email em ployment app or resume to vtoddf@gmail.com. DRIVERS: $5,000 SIGN-ON BONUS! Great Pay! Consistent Freight, Great Miles on This Regional Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-855-515-8447 COSMETOLOGIST NEED ED must have clientele. Booth rental. Please call Donna at 904-964-5485 SCALER/SHIPPING CO ORDINATOR needed for 2nd shift. Must have working experience of scales and computers. We are an EEOC, drug free workplace. We offer 401K, health insurance, paid holidays and va cation. Apply at Gilman Building Products, CR 218 Maxville, FL or fax resume to 904-289-7736 DRIVERS, CDL-A: Home every weekend! All loaded/emp ty miles paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or walk away lease, No mon ey down. 1-866-823-0323 NEEDED: Live in nanny for 2 children. 4 days on 4 days off. Keystone Heights area. Call or text 904-614-6632. LOOKING FOR STAFF TO work with those w/intel lectual disabilities in the 1 yr. experience in pd childcare, healthcare or diploma/GED, reliable transportation & abil ity to pass background screenings. Must have a positive attitude. Call 904-964-7767 or send resume to progression services@gmail.com LOCAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL seeking de pendable, dedicated, Christ-minded individual for full-time and parttime positions. Experi AA or current college student seeking a BA in Education preferred. Call 904-964-6100 for applica tion information. BRADFORD TERRACE 808 S. Colley Rd. Starke, FL. 32091 is now accept ing applications for a Floor Tech. Exp. preferred Apply in person at or fax resume to 904-964-1497 DFWP. EOE. (904) 964-6305 (352) 473-2210 (386) 496-2261 Classified Ads Where one call does it all! Bradford Union Clay 40Notices 41Auctions 42M otor Vehicles & Accessories43R Vs & Campers 44Boats &ATVs 45Land for Sale 46Real Estate Out of Area 47Commercial Property (Rent, Lease, Sale) 48Homes for Sale 49Mobile Homes for Sale 50For Rent 61Scriptur es 62Vacation/Travel 63Love Lines 64Business Opportunities65Help Wanted 66In vestme nt O ppo rtunities67Hunting Land for Rent 68Carpet Cleaning 69Food Supplements 70Money to Lend 71Farm Equipment 72Computers & Accessories51Lost/Found 52Animals & Pets53AY ard Sales53BKeystone Yard Sales53CLake Butler Y ard Sales54Pr oduce 55Wanted 56Antiques 57For Sale 58Child/Adult Home Car e59Personal Services 60Home Impr ovementW ord Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon964-6305 473-2210 496-2261 C lassified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. T O PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE seeks to adopt, will be hands-on mom and dad. Financial Security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)9854592, Adam Sklar #0150789 Medical Alert Company in your area! Owning your own local distributorship. We do 70% of the work! Unlimited $ return. Investment required. Free Call (844) 2251200. Start Here Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-2103935 No experience. Company sponsored CDL training. In 3 weeks learn to drive a truck & earn $40,000+. Full benefits. 1-888-6938934. Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Hands On Training & Certifications Offered. National Average 1822 Hourly! Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1866-362-6497 earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.co m EOE MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASST CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 to work at our Lake Butler, FL facility LAKE BUTLER, FL PC GIVING YOUHEADACHES?Let the local computer repairspecialists at The Office Shop get your computer or laptop working like new again!We can diagnose, repair and clean your laptop or PC while resolving typical, infuriating issues such as: Viruses Trojans Spam Phishing Bots Slow-downs Registry Errors Failure to connect Tracking Cookies Call us at (904) 964-5764 or just bring it by 110 W. Call Street Downtown Starke Storage building with fenced yard. Can be used for tool rental, mower repair shop, metal buying & sales, record storage... (Or bldg can be changed to meet your equipment) For more info call 904-364-9022 FOR RENT OR SALE 704 N. Lake Street Starke NOW OPEN DURRANCE PUMP Q UALITY SERVICE SINCE 1964 Pumps Sales Parts Service ST ATE LICENSE #1305 rffntb b rfntfbnfffbffnbnff ffbfrfffbfnfnfbfntfnf frfntbfbfffrtffbfbffbnf fntfffrfnff Southern Villas of StarkeAsk about our 1&2 BR Apartments HC & non-HC Units. Central AC/ Heat, on-site laundry, playground, private, quiet atmosphere. 1001 Southern Villas Dr. Starke, FL Equal Housing Opportunity 801 South Water Street Starke, FL 32091 TDD/TTY 711 1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC & Non-HC accessible apartments.This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Equal Housing Opportunity

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just finally mentally give up on it. It took more than six hours to reach the summit, Wight said. After the first two to three hours, everything everybody possessed was frozen. If I ever had to do it again, Id be more prepared, Wight said. I actually took CLIF (energy) bars with me. I had about four CLIF bars I saved just for the summit day. Well, CLIF bars are already hard as a rock. We got in that cold weather, and it was harder than steel. You couldnt eat it. All the water was gone. For probably 80 or 90 percent of the summit day, we had no water and no food. It was just tough. Wight was rewarded with the sight of that sunrise, as well as the accomplishment of making it to the top. However, climbers dont spend much time on the peak once they get there. Once you make it, youre really kind of out of it, Wight said, adding, You definitely dont jump up and down. You dont exert yourself that much because youre already so whipped, and the air is so thin. Once on the summit, Wight took his gloves off and tried to break up the ice his water had become so he could drink something. My hands have never been that cold in my life, he said. From the peak, climbers make a quick descent. Wight said it took four to four and a half hours to get back to the camp at 15,500 feet. The group continued to hike 7 miles to reach a low camp. On the seventh day, the group finished the expedition with a hike of more than 11 miles. During their time on the mountain, Wight and his group members had meals prepared for them by accompanying porters, who would set up camps and serve the meals there. After three or four days of that food, though, Wights stomach wasnt feeling so hot. He said the same held true for the other climbers. We werent used to the food, Wight said. It was really hard to eat. Theyd bring you the same stuff. Youd try your best to eat it. At the end of the climb, wellknown junk food seemed like a grand feast. Once we got off the mountain that seventh day and got down to the main check-in point, there were actually little convenience stores down there, Wight said. We didnt expect to see anything we knew, but they had Pringles, Kit-Kats, Snickers, Cokes and Nehi orange drinks. We devoured them. Though she didnt accompany him on the climb due to its expenseapproximately $4,000 for the guided hike and the flightWights daughter Christine is usually a constant companion when attempting to reach a high point. The main reason I do it is to spend time with my daughter, make memories with her and just see the country, Wight said. Wight and his daughter are attempting to reach the high points of each of the 50 states, adding that no father-daughter team has ever accomplished the feat, though several are currently trying. The U.S. high-points goal began with an unsuccessful attempt to reach the 11,239foot summit of Oregons Mount Hood. Weather caused the duo to turn back, but the experience was enjoyable. Wight suggested he and Christine attempt all of the United States high points, and they shook hands on it. Weve done 30 of them, Wight said. Every state high point is not comparable to an attempt on Mount Hoods summit. Floridas high point, which is the countrys lowest high point, is Britton Hillan elevation of 345 feet. A walk of approximately 50 feet from a parking area gets you there. Wight said the first high point of some difficulty was North Carolinas Mount Mitchell, with a peak elevation of 6,684. It was about a 12.5-mile round-trip hike, Wight said, adding, Both of us got leg cramps pretty bad. Wight and his daughter have taken several trips on which they attempted multiple high 10B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, June 26, 2014 HWY 301, STARKE | 904.964.7200murrayfordsuperstore.comTHIS IS FORD COUNTRY *WITH APPROVED CREDIT, $2,661 DUE AT SIGNING, 36 MONTH LEASE, NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. *All prices net of rebates, dealer retains all rebates if any. See dealer for details. **Art for illustration purposes only, prior sale subject to early deadlines. 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Last year, for example, they tackled six on one trip: Guadalupe Peak (Texas), Wheeler Peak (New Mexico), Panorama Point (Nebraska), Mount Sunflower (Kansas), Black Mesa (Oklahoma) and Mount Elbert (Colorado) in another. One trip he really enjoyed, Wight said, was spending 12 days to do Backbone Mountain (Maryland), Jerimoth Hill (Rhode Island), Katahdin (Maine), Mount Mansfield (Vermont), Mount Washington (New Hampshire) and Mount Marcy (New York). In New York, that Adirondack Mountains area up there is beautiful, Wight said. I always thought of New York as being New York City, but its not. Its gorgeous up there. Christine is starting college, and that, along with a job, will make it harder for her to go on such trips. Wight, though, is hopeful they can attempt Borah Peak (Idaho) and Kings Peak (Utah) later this year. She and I have such a blast doing this stuff, he said. Weve gotten to see so many pretty sights. Though he traveled outside the country to climb Mount Kilmanjaro, Wight said he has no desire to attempt climbing some of the worlds highest and toughest mountains, such as Everest. The goal, really, is not to climb mountains, but to simply take in the world around him. Its This is a picture of campsite at 14,100 feet. The tents can be seen in the foreground. a desire Wight said was fostered in him by his grandparents, who did a lot of traveling in a motorhome. He remembers looking at pictures of such places as Yellowstone, Yosemite and Glacier national parks. Even though they didnt climb mountains, it was just that wanting to go and see the country, Wight said. I just enjoy it. I dont know how else to say it. I love to travel and stuff like that, and see places I havent seen before.