Daily Commercial

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Daily Commercial
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Halifax Media Group
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Rod Dixon
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Leesburg, Floirda
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University of Florida
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Minimumcharges apply. Cannot be combined with other coupons or offers. Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq.ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Cannot be used for restoration services. Must present coupon at time of ser vice. Valid at participating locations only. Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details.BEYOND CARPET CLEANINGCARPET | TILE & GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT1-800-STEEMERstanleysteemer.com728-1668 | 394-1739 CARPET CLEANING SPECIAL AIR DUCT CLEANING SPECIALrf rf$50 OFF3$99ROOMS& A HALLfla#CAC1816408 EXTENDED OFFERS! TAYLOR RINEHART CROWNED MISS LAKE COUNTY FAIR, A3 MANATEE ZONES: Authorities are keeping a close watch A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Retirees help caregivers cope C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, April 7, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 97 4 sections INDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C8 LEGALS D2 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10. 86 / 69 Afternoon showers/T-storm. 50 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writer millardives@dailycommercial.com Sumter County prosecu tors say alleged drug dealer Leonard Antonio Massey Jr. liked to barter crack cocaine for use of a vehicle even if it was just long enough for the customer to gather the money they owed. During a pre-hearing last week for Masseys murder trial, which starts today, As sistant State Attorney Pete Magrino pointed to a 2010 case in the Royal community of Wildwood, where Massey and other suspects were ac cused of beating up a cus tomer and burning his vehi cle after a disagreement over money that was owed. However, after an encoun ter between the victim and the suspects in the Sumter County jail, the victim be came uncooperative with in vestigators and the case was never prosecuted, Magrino said. But Masseys business practice of swapping drugs for use of vehicles came to an end on Jan. 11, 2011 af ter he allegedly spotted Ger ald Devon Patterson, an acquaintance, driv ing the 1996 Toyota Camry of Richard Len, a customer who owed Massey $200 for drugs. According to prose cutors, Sumter Coun ty Sheriffs reports and ar guments during last weeks pre-trial hearing, Massey got in the car. Massey, Patterson and a third passenger drove to Lens job in Marion County, picked him up and drove back to Royal. An argument en sued between Massey and Len over the mon ey. During the ride, Len made a telephone call to his wife, WILDWOOD Masseys first-degree murder trial begins today MASSEY THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writer theresacampbell@dailycommercial.com Under bright oodlights with luminaries lighting the way, hundreds of cancer survivors, family members and friends walked around the track of Leesburg High School in the wee hours Sun day for the Relay for Life of Leesburg and Lady Lake, a 16-hour event to raise aware ness and funds for the Amer ican Cancer Society. The supporters wanted to show cancer doesnt sleep. They also wanted cancer vic tims to know theyre not alone. It was empowering to know that I am not the only one, said uterine cancer survivor Wanda Linger, 41, of Bushnell, who cherished meeting other survivors at her rst Relay for Life, an up beat event lled with music, food, games and an Iron Man contest and prizes. Even though Linger was tired, she stayed for the en tire relay, which began at 2 p.m. Saturday and ended with the 6 a.m. closing cere mony and nal lap. I am nine months cancer free, Linger said. The Re lay for Life was her chance to celebrate. LEESBURG Hundreds walk to raise cancer awareness THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Erin Mann, Jeanine Rubino and Molly Rowe walk in the Relay for Life fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. JIM KUHNHENN Associated Press WASHINGTON Lacking congressional support to raise wag es or end gender pay disparities, President Barack Obama is again imposing his policies on federal contractors, in keeping with presi dents tradition of ex erting their powers on a fraction of the econ omy they directly con trol. Obama will sign an executive order Tues day barring federal contractors from retal iating against employ ees who discuss their pay with each other. The order is similar to language in a Senate bill aimed at closing a pay gap between men and women. That mea sure is scheduled for a vote this week, but is unlikely to pass. The president also will direct the Labor Department to adopt rules requiring federal contractors to provide compensation data based on sex and race. He plans to sign the two executive orders during an event at the White House where he will be joined by Lil ly Ledbetter, whose name appears on a pay discrimination law Obama signed in 2009. The moves showcase Obamas efforts to seek action without con gressional approval and demonstrate that even without legisla tion, the president can drive economic poli cy. At the same time, they show the limits of his ambition when he doesnt have the sup port of Congress for his initiatives. Republicans say Obama is pushing his executive powers too far and should do more Obama uses executive actions to test workplace ideas ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writer roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com A sk Dr. Len Lucero about Chris P. Bacon, the cel ebrated pig born with non-working hind legs, and youd think he was talking about a child, especially when he says its like a brother to his own children. We (my family) have always been close to him, Lucero said of the pot-bellied porker, who will appear in a PBS documen tary series Nature at 8 p.m. on Wednesday in an episode enti tled My Bionic Pet. I was very excited about be ing contacted for the show and cant wait to see it, Lucero said. If you go to PBS Nature and type in Chris P. Bacon, they have some really good teasers out there. Weve been anticipat ing this for a while now, and Im anxious to see what ends up on the segment, because the shoot took a long time a whole day actually. SUMTERVILLE Chris P. Bacon is back on TV PHOTO COURTESY OF DR. LEN LUCERO Chris P. Bacon will appear in a PBS documentary series called Nature at 8 p.m. on Wednesday in an episode entitled My Bionic Pet. SEE TRIAL | A2 SEE BACON | A2 SEE WALK | A2 SEE OBAMA | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 HOW TO REACH US APRIL 6 CASH 3 ............................................... 6-9-1 Afternoon .......................................... 0-5-8 PLAY 4 ............................................. 3-3-7-8 Afternoon ....................................... 1-5-7-6 FLORIDA LOTTERY APRIL 5 FANTASY 5 ........................... 8-10-11-24-33 FLORIDA LOTTO ............... 9-23-24-38-40-47 POWERBALL .................. 11-21-26-33-3429 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875 The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher. Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday. Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service. 365-8200 In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail ................... 365-8200 Classied ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing 787-0600 ACCOUNTING ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATION SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. Tax Total 6 Mos. Tax Total 1 Yr. Tax Total Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATION STEVE SKAGGS publisher 352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.com MARY MANNING-JACOBS advertising director 352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.com NEWSROOM CONTACTS TOM MCNIFF executive editor 352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.com WHITNEY WILLARD copy desk chief 352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.com PAUL RYAN digital editor 352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.com TO REPORT LOCAL NEWS SCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor 352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.com REPORTERS LIVI STANFORD county government, schools 352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.com ROXANNE BROWN South Lake County 352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.com MILLARD IVES police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 ................. theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.com AUSTIN FULLER business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 ......................... austin.fuller@dailycommercial.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTS Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by call ing 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com. FRANK JOLLEY sports editor 352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.com GOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTS Email news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com. CALENDAR Email upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. saying he was being held against his will with a gun and needed $200 but the call abruptly ended on Lens end. The following day, Lens gold Camry was found burning off County Road 216A in Wildwood. A little more than a week later, Lens body was found off County Road 228 in Wildwood, with multiple gunshot wounds. Massey was already in the Sumter County jail on unrelated drug charges when he was charged with being the trigger man in the shooting. It seems (Massey) didnt have much pa tience, Magrino said in an interview outside the Sumter County court room last week. Jury selection in Masseys rst-degree murder trial for the Len shooting is expected to start today, and testimo ny could start as early as Tuesday. Patterson is one of the witnesses slated to take the stand. His tri al on rst-degree murder charges in the case was re cently halted after he ac cepted a plea deal that downgraded his charge to second-degree murder that will likely send him to prison for 20 years in exchange for his truthful testimony against Massey. Another witness sched uled to take the stand against Massey will be his own sister, Latonia M. La timer. She is accused of allowing her vehicle to be used to take Lens body to the backyard of an aban doned home off of Coun ty Road 227 in Wildwood. She will likely get pro bation on the accessory charge, also in exchange for her truthful testimo ny. Magrino added the third passenger in the car during the 2011 incident got out before the shoot ing and was not charged. The 2010 and 2011 cas es occurred within just over a mile of each other in Royal. Last week, Sumter County Judge William Hallman III ruled, over the defenses objections, that the 2010 case could be used against Massey in this weeks trial, citing there were enough simi larities between the two. TRIAL FROM PAGE A1 For those who dont know Chris P. Bacons story, a lady came to the Eastside Veterinary Clinic in Cler mont, where Lucero used to work, about 15 months ago to inquire about putting down the animal. But one look at the piglet, who weighed less than 1 pound, stirred something in Lucero. I told her if she surrendered (the pig) to me, I would try to give it the best life possible, Lucero said. The doctor took the pig to his Summerville home and built a tiny rear-end wheelchair out of KNex blocks, a childrens building toy similar to Legos. A video posted on YouTube showing Chris P. Bacon scooting around in his wheeled contraption went viral, and the pig got national television expo sure (the Today show, Anderson Cooper, TMX, Discovery network, etc.), his own Facebook page with 107,174 likes and even worldwide T-shirt sales. Hes healthy and happy and thats all you can ask for, Lucero said. I guess I did my job. Beyond that, he inspires me, and as I keep seeing over and over again, he in spires many others as well. Once called a cute little pig, Chris P. Bacon is not that little any more, having added 72 pounds to his frame since Lucero rst got him. The PBS episode is about ani mals given a second chance at life through human intervention and prosthetics, or in Chris P. Bacons case, the mobile device Lucero built for him. A lot of people probably dont realize what goes into a 15to 20-minute segment, Lucero said of the TV shoot at his home. I know I didnt. It was take after take after take, and Im pretty sure Chris did better than I did. These days, Chris P. Bacon re mains a busy pig, making appear ances at schools and hospitals. I hope and really think Chris is inspiring a lot of people but, if nothing else, every person who meets him ends up with a huge smile on their face. Last weekend, Lucero and Chris P. Bacon made an appearance at the MDA Muscle Walk in Orlando and, last month, participated in the Boating and Beach Bash for people with disabilities in Boca Raton. Lucero has written a childrens book about acceptance, the rst of a three-part series featuring Chris P. Bacon, himself and his family. The doctor also hopes to drum up interest in a movie deal about the pig on wheels. BACON FROM PAGE A1 FILE PHOTO Chris P. Bacon has added 72 pounds to his 1-pound frame since Lucero rst got him. Mary Shaner of Lady Lake was joined by her infant granddaugh ter, Tinslee Price, 4 months old, one of the youngest relay partici pants. She stayed all night and slept for a little while. This is her rst relay, rst of many, said Shaner, who has been involved in Relay for Life for 15 years. We relay for many friends affect ed by cancer, Shaner said, recall ing she became more involved in Relay for Life in 2009 after her sons teenage girlfriend was diagnosed with bone cancer. Since then, we have been full blast into it, Shaner said of serving on committees and forming a fam ily-and-friends relay team. The Family and Friends of Cops Against Cancer team, headed by Leesburg Police Captain Rob Hicks, was out in force, too. Its so wonderful to support American Cancer Society, Cops Against Cancer and Relay for Life. This is just a wonderful cause in trying to help raise awareness, and I feel honored to be a part of it, said Jeanine Rubino. Rubino walked with Erin Mann and Molly Rowe as they made their nal lap around the track. I think everybody has been af fected by cancer one way or the other, Mann said. This is some thing that the community can do to get involved to come out here and support people who are ght ing cancer. Chuck Kirk, event chair for Relay for Life of Leesburg and Lady Lake, hailed the relay a success, bring ing in an estimated $50,000 and up to 700 attendees at the peak of the event. This was awesome and a great day, Kirk said after the closing cer emony. We started out with a huge opening ceremony, better than we have had in a couple of years, and it went through the entire day. Even with the heat, people stayed out. This group of really passionate people really made a difference, and when you think of all the chal lenges, the economy, what they have done is just phenomenal. Leesburg Regional Medical Cen ter employees were among the re lays biggest supporters. Janice Collins of LRMC said she enjoys being able to cheer for the survivors at the event. Its showing them that we are here to help them and support them, she said, and thats what the relay is all about. WALK FROM PAGE A1 to work with Congress. His new executive or ders are sure to lead to criticism that he is plac ing an undue burden on companies and increas ing their costs. Federal contracting covers about one-quar ter of the U.S. workforce and includes compa nies ranging from Boe ing to small parts sup pliers and service providers. As a result, presidential directives can have a wide and di rect impact. Such ac tions also can be large ly symbolic, designed to spur action in the broader economy. This really is about giving people access to more information both to help them make deci sions at the policy level but also for individuals, said Heather Boushey, executive director and chief economist at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. She has been working with the administration to get compensation in formation about the na tions workforce. This is denitely an encouraging rst step, she said. Federal contractors, however, worry that ad ditional compensation data could be used to fuel wage related law suits, said James Plun kett, director of labor policy at the U.S. Cham ber of Commerce. Whats more, he said, such orders create a two-tiered system where rules apply to federal contractors but not to other employers. Those contractors, knowing that their business re lies on the government, are less likely to put up a ght, he said. Federal contractors ultimately know that they have to play nice ly to a certain extent with the federal govern ment, he said. In a separate action Monday, Obama in tends to announce 24 schools that will share more than $100 mil lion in grants to rede sign themselves to bet ter prepare high school students for college or for careers. The awards are part of an order Obama signed last year. Money for the program comes from fees that companies pay for visas to hire foreign workers for specialized jobs. The moves represent a return to economic is sues for the president after two weeks devot ed almost exclusively to diplomacy and the nal deadline for health in surance coverage. A trip to Asia in two weeks is sure to change the fo cus once again. Still, Obama has de clared this a year of ac tion, whether Congress supports him or not. In February, Obama signed an executive or der increasing the hour ly minimum wage for federal contractors from $7.25 per to $10.10. While White House of cials estimated such an increase would affect only a small percentage of federal contract work ers, they said the move could encourage states or individual business es to act on their own to increase workers wages. Obama has also pushed his workplace initiatives beyond just federal contractors where possible. Last month he in structed the Labor De partment to come up with new workplace overtime rules for all employers, a power the administration has un der the Fair Labor Stan dards Act. But presidents have most direct power over the workforce that is paid with taxpayers money. Through executive ac tions, Obama also has drawn attention to areas where he has chosen not to act on his own. The White House has resisted pressure from gay rights advocates who want have Obama to sign an anti-discrim ination executive order that would protect gays and lesbians working for federal contractors. The White House wants the House to approve a Senate-passed bill ex tending those protec tions to all Americans. OBAMA FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO President Barack Obama works at his desk in the Oval Ofce of the White House in Washington, on Jan. 27.

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARD STEVE SKAGGS ....................................... PUBLISHER TOM MCNIFF .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITOR SCOTT CALLAHAN ................................. NEWS EDITOR WHITNEY WILLARD .......................... COPY DESK CHIEF GENE PACKWOOD ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONIST Voices www.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875 EDITORIALS Editorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. COLUMNS Columns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch. HAVE YOUR SAY The Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication. You can submit your letters by: Email (preferred) to: letters@dailycommercial.com By regular mail to: Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007 By fax to: 325-365-1951 H ow do you spell conscious uncoupling? Where I came from, we always spelled it the way Tammy Wynette sang it, which is D-I-V-O-R-C-E. I had one of them myself, sev eral decades ago. Thats when I discovered that even uncontest ed divorces still prove bad mar riages are like hell: Its a lot easier to get in than it is to get out. So when approximately 176 friends posted on their Facebook pages and Twitter accounts that movie star Gwyneth Paltrow and rock star husband Chris Mar tin announced their conscious uncoupling via her website Goop, I felt a moment of genu ine sympathy. Then I laughed so hard my sternum started to hurt. Seriously? Conscious un coupling? Posted on a website called Goop? From a woman who named her kid Apple? And who shills, at $425 a go (so to speak), a colon-cleanse regime also called Goop? Forget about the movies: This is a woman who needs a script writer to prepare her lines in life. Paltrow needs to do what ele mentary school teachers call ex hibiting mastery over her native language. She seems to be do ing less well with using her own words than she did with singing in her own voice. (And dont you think the real reason they broke up is because she made that Country Strong movie? I do. She couldnt just let her spouse have his music career without making a lm where she played a character inspired by Im not making this up music, um, personality Britney Spears? My money is that Country Strong, where Paltrow hams it up as a substance-friendly sing er named Kelly Canter, although decidedly not the kind of cantor found in a synagogue, was the beginning of the end of that mar riage.) In addition to needing a writer, she also needs an editor and maybe a therapist because some of her sayings seem to have become infamous enough to generate their own line of snarky T-shirts. I would rath er die than let my kid eat Cup-aSoup, she announced on an ep isode of Conan. Heres another Paltrow gem: Were human be ings and the sun is the sun how can it be bad for you? I dont think anything thats natural can be bad for you. Guess Gwyneth never heard of melanoma, which is natures own sunshiny gift. Actually, death is also natural (and organic!), but I hear thats very bad for you, too. But those declarations are vi olently sane compared to what Paltrow recently said during her interview with E! News. Without irony, mind you, the woman whose net worth is around $140 million was all wistful about the simple lives of women with children who dont have to deal with the hassle of being movie stars but instead work regular jobs: I think its dif ferent when you have an ofce job, because its routine and, you know, you can do all the stuff in the morning and then you come home in the evening I think to have a regular job and be a mom is not as of course there are challenges, but its not like being on set. And most working-stiff moms with regular jobs would, Im sure, agree: There are challeng es, and its not like being on a set. Unless, of course, were talking about the set of Lockup: Ex treme Dinnertime Tantrums. Making up words Goop and mangling phrases conscious uncoupling that render a signicant event mean ingless by bankrupting its signif icance doesnt help anybody ac cept, understand or cope with lifes vicissitudes. Calling something by another name doesnt change what it is. Consider those buses you see at every airport with Elegant Lim ousine Transport italicized in aking gold paint on their side. They are not really limousines, are they? Theyre buses. Theres nothing whatsoever wrong with them because they no doubt provide adequate transportation. To refer to them by another name is, however, pretentious, misleading and disingenuous. Sure, their owners can do whatever they want and who re ally cares? Yet, if we contort and misalign words to t eccentric meanings, we obscure rather than explain what were trying to communicate. Life isnt easy for anybody, and divorce is always hard. But its still probably easier if youre brave enough to spell it out. Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her web site at http://www.ginabarreca.com. OTHER VOICES Gina Barreca MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Gwyneth needs to recouple with reality I f you drive down Buckeye Road at the southern edge of Lima, Ohio, youll pass an industrial complex where General Dy namics makes armored vehicles for the U.S. military. But if you stop and take a photo graph, you just might nd yourself detained by military police, have your camera cons cated and your digital photos deleted. Which is exactly what happened to two staffers for the Toledo Blade newspaper on Friday, in an unacceptable violation of the First Amend ment and common sense. According to the Blade staff writer Tyrel Linkhorn and photographer Jetta Fraser had just covered a news event at another Lima-ar ea factory and decided to take photos of oth er businesses for future use, a common media practice. Linkhorn, who was driving, pulled into a circular driveway at the Joint Systems Manufacturing Center also known as the Lima Army Tank Plant and stopped short of an unmanned security booth. Fraser took her photos, and as they were preparing to leave they were approached by military police. The staffers, who were wearing credentials from their newspaper, identied themselves as journalists. Fraser, who was in the passen ger seat, refused a request for her drivers li cense because she wasnt driving; she was sub sequently handcuffed and removed from the car. After more than an hour, the two were al lowed to leave but without Frasers camer as. When the equipment was nally retrieved seven hours later, the photos of the tank plant, and of another location, had been deleted. Several lines were crossed here. Law en forcement ofcials have the right, even the responsibility, to investigate suspicious ac tivity. But its hard to imagine a scenario in which a person with a camera standing in broad daylight taking a photograph of some thing openly visible to the public indeed, which is visible to the world through Google Maps clears the hurdle of suspicious activi ty. And to delete the work of a photojournalist is indefensible. Unfortunately, this is not an isolated inci dent. In the years since 9/11, various police agencies have acted with occasional callous disregard for the First Amendment rights of journalists and photojournalists, as well as citizens documenting public occurrences particularly police activities. The Blade has led a complaint with the FBI, and we urge a quick and detailed inves tigation followed by a public accounting. But we also urge law enforcement ofcials at all levels to reacquaint themselves with the First Amendment rights of citizens and journalists, and to issue new policies and training direc tives as necessary. Distributed by MCT Information Services A VOICE Its law enforcement versus the First Amendment, and citizens are losing Classic DOONESBURY 1972 Without irony, mind you, the woman whose net worth is around $140 million was all wistful about the simple lives of women with children who dont have to deal with the hassle of being movie stars but instead work regular jobs: I think its different when you have an office job, because its routine and, you know, you can do all the stuff in the morning and then you come home in the evening I think to have a regular job and be a mom is not as of course there are challenges, but its not like being on set.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 Sports sports@dailycommercial.com B1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com NCAA: Kentucky, UConn face off for NCAA title / B4 DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP NCAA President Mark Emmert answers a question at a news conference on Sunday in Arlington, Texas. PATRIC SCHNEIDER / AP Former President George H. W. Bush congratulates Matt Jones after Jones won the Houston Open golf tournament on Sunday in Humble, Texas. Emmert: Unionization grossly inappropriate EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer ARLINGTON, Tex as The NCAA pres ident called an effort to unionize players a grossly inappropri ate way to solve prob lems in college sports while insisting the as sociation has plans to change the school-ath lete relationship. Mark Emmert said Sunday that the NCAA wants to allow the big conferences with mon eymaking teams to write their own rules, and those changes could solve many ath letes complaints more effectively than union ization. To be perfectly frank, the notion of using a union-employee mod el to address the chal lenges that exist in in tercollegiate athletics is something that strikes most people as a gross ly inappropriate solu tion to the problems, Emmert said at his an nual news conference, held the day before col lege basketballs na tional championship. He said it would throw away the en tire collegiate model for athletics. The NCAA has spent the last three years writing up plans to change its governance structure to allow the ve biggest confer ences to have different rules from hundreds of smaller schools. Be cause smaller schools have fought against costly changes such as paying athletes sti pends, the indepen dence of the big schools could break a logjam. Although the issues have been simmer ing for years, they have drawn attention in re cent weeks with a law suit led by former KURT VOIGT AP Sports Writer HUMBLE, Texas Matt Jones told his caddy he was about to make a 42-yard chip-in on the rst playoff hole at the Houston Open. The Australian did just that on Sunday, earning his rst PGA Tour win in spectacular fashion and changing his immediate travel plans in the process. Jones, who began the day six shots off the lead, shot a nal-round 66 and ended the tournament 15 under to earn his rst trip to the Masters with the dramatic win over Matt Kuchar. He earned nearly $1.2 million for the win, also making amends for a di sastrous missed putt last September that appeared destined to keep him from playing at Augusta Nation al. Destiny, however, had other plans for the 33-yearold who played collegiately at Arizona State. Going to Augusta is amazing, Jones said. The win means everything to me right now because thats what we play for is to win. To have Augusta as a reward for that win is amazing. In September, Jones lipped out an 8-foot birdie putt on the last hole of the BMW Championship a putt that would have earned him a trip to next weeks Masters by sending him to the Tour Championship. Jones playoff chip-in tops Kuchar in Houston Open MARK DIDTLER Associated Press ST. PETERSBURG Yu Darvish allowed sev en hits over seven innings in his season debut, Elvis Andrus hit a two-run homer, and the Texas Rangers avoided a three-game sweep by beating the Tampa Bay Rays 3-0 on Sunday Darvish (1-0) struck out six and walked one. Sidelined by neck stiffness, it was his rst outing since a spring training game on March 16. Darvish got his 500th career strikeout, com ing in 401 2-3 innings, by fanning David DeJe sus and Wil Myers in the rst. According to the Rangers, it is the fewest innings for a starter to reach 500 strikeouts in major league history. TIM REYNOLDS Associated Press MIAMI LeBron James scored 38 points, Mario Chalmers added 15 and the Miami Heat survived a 3-point barrage from New Yorks J.R. Smith on the way to dealing the Knicks playoff hopes a big blow with a 102-91 victory on Sun day. Chris Bosh added 14 points and Ray Allen had 12 for the Heat, who remained atop the Eastern Conference standings. Smith made a Knicks-record 10 3-pointers, on an NBA-record 22 attempts, and nished with 32 points. Raymond Felton scored 14 for New York WILFREDO LEE / AP Miami Heat guard Norris Cole comes up with a loose ball against New York Knicks guard Raymond Felton (2) on Sunday in Miami. The Heat won 102-91. CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP Florida center Patric Young (4) goes after a loose ball against Connecticut during the second half of the NCAA seminal game on Saturday in Arlington, Texas. Gators: Successful season despite Final Four flop MARK LONG AP Sports Writer ARLINGTON, Texas Scottie Wilbekin sat hunched in his locker, his eyes red, his voice hush and his legs still cramping. Teammates Casey Prather, Will Yeguete and Patric Young were a few feet away, also ght ing back tears while try ing to nd words to ex plain how they played so poorly on college basketballs biggest stage. It was a painful end ing for Floridas four se niors, the mainstays of coach Billy Donovans team. But when the disap pointment ees, when the vivid details of how Floridas national semi nal unfolded Saturday night at AT&T Stadi um fade, the Gators will be able to smile about what will go down as one of the most suc cessful seasons in school history. This team was so special, something Im never going to forget for all my life, Young said after a 63-53 loss to Connecticut. We ac complished a lot just by loving each other and being really committed and loving playing with one another. So Im just really going to cher ish everything that we had this year and its go ing to be something Ill never forget. Florida won a school-record 30 con secutive games, set an other mark with 32 con secutive home wins, became the rst team to go 18-0 in the South eastern Conferences regular season, swept the league tourna ment and earned the top overall seed in the NCAA tournament for the second time. And after losing in a regional nal the last three years, the Gators nally made it to the Fi nal Four. They talked all week about not being satis ed with just getting here and nishing the journey. They recited Donovans recent an ecdote about getting to a potential stopping point while climbing Mount Everest, and in stead of settling for the small accomplishment, nding the fortitude to make it the rest of the way despite potential pitfalls and adversity. Florida tried. The Huskies got in the way again. The Gators (36-3) lost to UConn in early De cember on Shabazz Napiers buzzer-beat er, which many called lucky. The rematch was ERIC GAY / AP Florida guard Lexx Edwards sits dejected in the locker room after his team lost to Connecticut 63-53. LeBrons 38 points lead Heat to win over Knicks SEE HEAT | B2 SEE GATORS | B2 Darvish returns as Rangers beat Rays SEE RAYS | B2 SEE NCAA | B2 SEE GOLF | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 American League At A Glance East W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 4 3 .571 New York 3 3 .500 Toronto 3 4 .429 1 Baltimore 2 4 .333 1 Boston 2 4 .333 1 Central W L Pct GB Detroit 4 1 .800 Chicago 3 3 .500 1 Cleveland 3 3 .500 1 Minnesota 3 3 .500 1 Kansas City 2 3 .400 2 West W L Pct GB Seattle 4 1 .800 Houston 3 3 .500 1 Texas 3 3 .500 1 Oakland 2 3 .400 2 Los Angeles 2 4 .333 2 Saturdays Games Minnesota 7, Cleveland 3 Toronto 4, N.Y. Yankees 0 Detroit 7, Baltimore 6 Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Seattle 3, Oakland 1 L.A. Angels 5, Houston 1 Milwaukee 7, Boston 6, 11 innings Tampa Bay 5, Texas 4 Sundays Games Minnesota 10, Cleveland 7 N.Y. Yankees 6, Toronto 4 Baltimore 3, Detroit 1 Milwaukee 4, Boston 0 Texas 3, Tampa Bay 0 Chicago White Sox 5, Kansas City 1 Houston 7, L.A. Angels 4 Seattle at Oakland, late Todays Games Baltimore (Jimenez 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 0-1), 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 0-1) at Houston (Cosart 1-0), 2:10 p.m. Oakland (Kazmir 1-0) at Minnesota (Correia 0-0), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Erlin 0-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Texas (Scheppers 0-0) at Boston (Lackey 1-0), 7:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Moore 0-1) at Kansas City (Vargas 0-0), 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Paulino 0-0) at Colorado (Lyles 1-0), 8:40 p.m. Tuesdays Games Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Texas at Boston, 6:10 p.m. San Diego at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. National League All Times EDT East W L Pct GB Miami 5 2 .714 Atlanta 4 2 .667 Washington 4 2 .667 Philadelphia 3 3 .500 1 New York 2 4 .333 2 Central W L Pct GB Milwaukee 4 2 .667 Pittsburgh 4 2 .667 St. Louis 3 3 .500 1 Chicago 2 4 .333 2 Cincinnati 2 4 .333 2 West W L Pct GB San Francisco 5 1 .833 Los Angeles 4 3 .571 1 Colorado 3 3 .500 2 San Diego 2 4 .333 3 Arizona 1 7 .125 5 Saturdays Games N.Y. Mets 6, Cincinnati 3 Philadelphia 2, Chicago Cubs 0 San Francisco 7, L.A. Dodgers 2 Atlanta 6, Washington 2 St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 1 Milwaukee 7, Boston 6, 11 innings Miami 5, San Diego 0 Colorado 9, Arizona 4 Sundays Games Cincinnati 2, N.Y. Mets 1 San Diego 4, Miami 2 Washington 2, Atlanta 1 Milwaukee 4, Boston 0 Pittsburgh 2, St. Louis 1 Chicago Cubs 8, Philadelphia 3 Arizona at Colorado, late San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, late Tondays Games Milwaukee at Philadelphia, ppd., rain Cincinnati (Cingrani 0-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 0-0), 4:15 p.m. San Diego (Erlin 0-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Paulino 0-0) at Colorado (Lyles 1-0), 8:40 p.m. Tuesdays Games Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 4:35 p.m. Miami at Washington, 7:05 p.m. San Diego at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB x-Toronto 45 32 .584 x-Brooklyn 42 34 .553 2 New York 33 45 .423 12 Boston 23 54 .299 22 Philadelphia 17 60 .221 28 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 53 23 .697 x-Washington 40 37 .519 13 x-Charlotte 39 38 .506 14 Atlanta 33 42 .440 19 Orlando 22 55 .286 31 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 53 24 .688 x-Chicago 45 32 .584 8 Cleveland 31 47 .397 22 Detroit 28 49 .364 25 Milwaukee 14 63 .182 39 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 59 17 .776 x-Houston 50 25 .667 8 Dallas 46 31 .597 13 Memphis 45 31 .592 14 New Orleans 32 44 .421 27 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 55 20 .733 Portland 49 28 .636 7 Minnesota 38 38 .500 17 Denver 33 43 .434 22 Utah 24 52 .316 31 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 54 23 .701 Golden State 47 29 .618 6 Phoenix 45 31 .592 8 Sacramento 27 49 .355 26 L.A. Lakers 25 51 .329 28 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Saturdays Games Orlando 100, Minnesota 92 Chicago 96, Washington 78 Brooklyn 105, Philadelphia 101 Charlotte 96, Cleveland 94, OT Detroit 115, Boston 111 Toronto 102, Milwaukee 98 Sundays Games Miami 102, New York 91 L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Dallas at Sacramento, late Atlanta at Indiana, late Denver at Houston, late Memphis at San Antonio, late Oklahoma City at Phoenix, late Utah at Golden State, late New Orleans at Portland, late Todays Games No games scheduled Tuesdays Games Detroit at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Brooklyn at Miami, 8 p.m. Dallas at Utah, 9 p.m. Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Houston at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. WTA Family Circle Cup Results Sunday At The Family Circle Tennis Center Charleston, S.C. Purse: $710,000 (Premier) Surface: Green Clay-Outdoor Singles Championship Andrea Petkovic (14), Germany, def. Jana Cepelova, Slovakia, 7-5, 6-2. TV 2 DAY SCOREBOARD CONTACT US SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (col lege scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycom mercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED COLLEGE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPNU NC State at Clemson MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. MLB Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees 4 p.m. MLB Regional coverage, Cincinnati at St. Louis or Oakland at Minnesota 7 p.m. ESPN Texas at Boston 8:10 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay at Kansas City MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 9 p.m. CBS NCAA Division I tournament, championship, UConn vs. Kentucky, at Arlington, Texas SOCCER 2:55 p.m. NBCSN Premier League, Sunderland at Tottenham and Carmelo Anthony managed only 13, on 4 for 17 shooting. Anthony had two points after halftime, while James had 22. The Heat (53-23) en sured they would n ish the day still ahead of Indiana atop the East standings. New York (33-45) has only four games left and will be either two or three losses behind Atlan ta when Sunday ends, depending on the out come of the later game between the Hawks and Pacers. Miamis lead was 15 with just under 9 minutes to go after a 3-pointer by Allen, be fore the Knicks came up with one last ral ly and made it more than a little interesting. Iman Shumpert missed a wide-open 3 with 3:30 left that would have gotten New York within four. Instead, James had a layup at the other end and after Smith made his ninth 3 of the game, Chalm ers answered with one of his own, making Mi amis lead 97-88. So Smith made an other, giving the Knicks life. And Miami again answered, this time Bosh doing the longrange honors and re storing the nine-point edge with 1:32 remain ing. Smith missed two more 3s from there his 20th and 21st at tempts of the day and that just about sealed things for the Knicks. HEAT FROM PAGE B1 far from a uke, with the Huskies dominating the nal 30 minutes of the game. During the last break, with just a few seconds left on the clock, Flori das seniors huddled on the court with tears in their eyes. It was over, and every one knew it. Obviously the four seniors, we came to gether and we have been through a lot, Yeguete said. Just n ishing up doing all the things we done this year, I think its really special. Going to a Final Four is something spe cial as well. I think were going to continue to just cherish our friend ship and were going to stay close after this. This game is not changing anything, re gardless of how I feel, about my relationship with them. Theyre great guys. I love them, love to be around them. I just wish them the best and I know theyre going to be successful in life. The seniors nished with a program-record 120 victories, including 13 in the NCAA tour nament. They also won three SEC titles. They provided Dono van with a unique com bination of players who stayed in school, com mitted to the process, got better every year and ended up with sig nicant roles for the one of the nations top teams. It wasnt enough to beat UConn. But it surely will cement this group as one of Dono vans best, right behind that star-studded team that won back-to-back national titles in 2006 and 2007. Everybody will re member this season for the team that we were able to become, Wil bekin said. At the be ginning of the year, it didnt look like we would be much of a team. Then throughout the year, we just really came together and did a lot of special things, broke a number of re cords at the school and won some really tough games. Unfortunately, we didnt go out the way we would like to, but only one team is going to do that. So we just have to try and remember all the good things that we did before this point. Even though its hard right now, Im sure that Ill look back on this year and be really proud of the guys that were standing next to me. The guys behind them should be worth watch ing, too. Sharp-shooter Mi chael Frazier II, dynam ic guard Kasey Hill, ver satile forward Dorian Finney-Smith and big man Chris Walker are a solid nucleus to build around next season. Throw in transfers Eli Carter, Alex Murphy and Damontre Har ris, as well as incoming freshmen Chris Chioz za, Brandone Francis and Devin Robinson, and the Gators could be a contender again in 2015. They have a tough act to follow, though. The No. 1 question I ask myself every year is: Did our team play as close as possible to their potential? Donovan said. Maybe more so than any team that Ive coached based on the talent level, we played way beyond our poten tial as a team. GATORS FROM PAGE B1 Andrus put the Rang ers up 2-0 with his ho mer off Joel Peralta (01) in the eighth. Donnie Murphy made it 3-0 on an RBI ineld during the ninth. Neal Cotts replaced Alexi Ogando for the Rangers with two on and two outs in the eighth, and struck out Matt Joyce on a 3-2 pitch. Joakim Soria pitched the ninth for his rst save. Alex Cobb scattered three hits, walked one and struck out six in seven shutout innings for the Rays. Only one runner reached second against the Tampa Bay right-hander. Tampa Bay had run ners on second and third with one out in the fth, but failed to score when Myers hit an in eld pop y and Ben Zobrist ew out. Darvish got three consecutive outs af ter allowing Evan Lon gorias double to lead off the sixth. He also worked out of a jam during the seventh af ter Ryan Hanigan hit a leadoff double. The Rays were 0 for 11 with runners in scoring position. Notes: Darvish was activated from the 15day disabled list and RHP Nick Martinez was optioned to Dou ble-A Frisco. ... Rangers RHP Colby Lewis (hip surgery) gave up four runs and four hits over ve innings in a rehab start for Triple-A Round Rock. ... Texas LHP Joe Saunders (bruised left ankle) is not expected to be ready for his regular bullpen session Mon day and could miss his next start. ... Texas RHP Tanner Scheppers (00) will face Boston RHP John Lackey (1-0) Mon day night in the opener of a three-games series at Fenway Park. ... Tam pa Bay LHP Matt Moore (0-1) and Royals LHP Ja son Vargas (0-0) are the scheduled starters for Monday nights game in Kansas City. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 athletes about to go to trial and a National La bor Relations Board directors ruling that Northwestern football players should be able to form a union. If the NCAA loses the unionization ght or the lawsuit, led by former UCLA basketball play er Ed OBannon, it could drastically alter the rela tionship between NCAA schools and 460,000 col lege athletes. But, Emmert said, nothing the NCAA might do in coming months will be a di rect response to either of those legal cases: Those are conversa tions that have been go ing on for several years now, he said. Neither Emmert nor the administrators who joined him for the news conference sounded overly concerned about drawing up contingen cy plans in case unions start sprouting up in the aftermath of the Northwestern case. Theres 50 differ ent sets of rules for 50 different states, Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby said. So, were a long way from having unions. I think about it a lot. Havent spent any time talking about it. Im not going to specu late on it. Its a long way down the road. Bowlsby and a pan el that included pres idents at Wake Forest, Kansas State and the fu ture president at Ohio State agreed that many of the NCAAs thorniest issues, including pay ing athletes and im proving their long-term health care, could be more easily resolved if the ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and SEC were given autonomy to draw up their own regulations. I think most of Di vision I memberships see that were standing at a fork in the road, Kansas State president Kirk Schulz said. What were going to put out there again is not per fect, but I believe that the vast majori ty of members recog nize that some of these things must change and that we need to do it rapidly. NCAA FROM PAGE B1 Shell Houston Open Leading Scores Sunday At The Golf Club of Houston Humble, Texas Purse: $6.4 million Yardage: 7,441; Par: 72 Final FedEx Cup points in parentheses Jones won on rst playoff hole Matt Jones (500), $1,152,000 68-68-71-66 Matt Kuchar (300), $691,200 66-67-68-72 Sergio Garcia (190), $435,200 67-65-73-70 Cameron Tringale (135), $307,200 68-68-69-71 Shawn Stefani (110), $256,000 67-69-73-69 Rickie Fowler (100), $230,400 70-70-68-71 Brice Garnett (80), $186,240 68-71-72-69 Retief Goosen (80), $186,240 68-71-71-70 Russell Henley (80), $186,240 73-69-72-66 Rory McIlroy (80), $186,240 70-71-74-65 Ryan Palmer (80), $186,240 70-68-73-69 Erik Compton (59), $125,440 66-73-73-69 Ben Curtis (59), $125,440 67-70-71-73 J.B. Holmes (59), $125,440 66-73-71-71 Phil Mickelson (59), $125,440 68-70-72-71 Chris Stroud (59), $125,440 68-72-71-70 Martin Flores (54), $99,200 68-72-72-70 Lee Westwood (54), $99,200 70-72-71-69 Jonathan Byrd (50), $77,568 68-74-73-68 Graham DeLaet (50), $77,568 70-71-72-70 Jason Gore (50), $77,568 67-71-74-71 Freddie Jacobson (50), $77,568 68-72-74-69 Charl Schwartzel (50), $77,568 67-75-70-71 Luke Donald (44), $50,651 71-71-71-71 Michael Putnam (44), $50,651 68-72-73-71 Jim Renner (44), $50,651 66-72-74-72 Steve Stricker (44), $50,651 68-69-76-71 Nicholas Thompson (44), $50,651 71-69-74-70 Jimmy Walker (44), $50,651 71-65-77-71 Andres Romero (44), $50,651 72-69-70-73 Kevin Chappell (38), $37,952 71-72-76-66 Jon Curran, $37,952 69-72-69-75 Ryo Ishikawa (38), $37,952 69-74-71-71 Hunter Mahan (38), $37,952 69-72-71-73 Carl Pettersson (38), $37,952 69-74-72-70 After briey tying Kuchar in the mid dle of the round on Sunday, Jones chanc es at redemption for last year appeared n ished after he bogeyed the next-to-last hole in regulation. The set back left Jones at 14 under, two shots back of Kuchar. However, Jones in the rst of his two memorable moments on the 18th rolled in a 46-foot putt for bird ie. That pulled the Aus tralian within one shot of Kuchar, who was watching his closest challenger from the tee. I was going to threeputt before I left it short, Jones said. I didnt care about n ishing second or third or fourth; it didnt mat ter. I was only trying to get the win. Kuchar went on to bogey the nal hole of regulation after sending his second shot into the water. That set the stage for the playoff in the soggy conditions at the Golf Club of Houston. Jones sent his tee shot on the rst hole of the playoff into the right fairway bunker. He then landed just short of the greenside bunker with his sec ond shot, while Kuchar found the bunker from the fairway. It was the second straight miss of the 18th green from the fairway for Kuchar, who sent his fairway metal on the 72nd hole into the water before recovering to make bo gey and reach the play off. Jones didnt leave Kuchar any room for error in the playoff, sending his chip over the greenside bun ker and watching as it rolled in causing a roar from the gal lery and leaving Jones standing with his arm raised in celebration. I walked up there and told my caddy I was going to chip it in, Jones said. ... You dont know if its going to lip out, low or high, but when I saw it dis appear its probably the happiest Ive been on the golf course. Jones is the sec ond straight Austra lian to win on the PGA Tour, following Steven Bowditchs win at the Texas Open last week. GOLF FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Orioles best Tigers 3-1, handing them first loss LARRY LAGE AP Sports Writer DETROIT Chris Tillman outpitched Justin Verlander, allowing one run while work ing into the ninth and the Baltimore Orioles beat the Detroit Tigers 3-1 Sunday to avoid getting swept. Tillman (1-0) gave up ve hits, including Torii Hunters solo homer in the fourth, in 8 1/3 innings. Tommy Hunt er entered with one out in the ninth and Victor Martinez on second base and retired the last two batters for his sec ond save. Verlander (0-1) gave up two runs on ve hits and two walks over eight innings. YANKEES 6, BLUE JAYS 4 TORONTO CC Sabathia pitched six innings for his rst victory of the season, Brett Gardner hit a two-run home run and the New York Yankees beat the Toronto Blue Jays 6-4 on Sunday afternoon. Sabathia (1-1) allowed four runs and seven hits, walked none and struck out six. Sabathia was hit hard in Tuesdays opening day loss at Houston, allowing six runs and eight hits, including two home runs, in six innings. TWINS 10, INDIANS 7 CLEVELAND Chris Co labello drove in four runs, Brian Dozier scored three times and the Minnesota Twins outslugged the Cleve land Indians 10-7 on Sunday. Colabello, who played sev en seasons of independent ball in Canada before sign ing with the Twins in 2012, broke a 6-6 tie with a threerun double in the sixth in ning off Blake Wood (0-1). The 30-year-old Colabello leads the AL with 11 RBIs af ter six games. Joe Mauer had three hits and scored twice for the Twins, who took two of three in the series and will play their home opener Monday against Oakland. ANGELS 7, ASTROS 4 HOUSTON Scott Feld man threw seven strong in nings, ve Astros hom ered, and Houston snapped a three-game losing streak with a 7-4 victory over the Los Angeles Angels on Sun day. Feldman (2-0) did not al low a hit until two outs in the fourth, when Josh Hamilton managed an ineld hit. WHITE SOX 5, ROYALS 1 KANSAS CITY, Mo. Chris Sale gave up four sin gles in eight scoreless innings as the Chicago White Sox de feated the Kansas City Royals 5-1 on Sunday. Alexei Ramirez and Tyler Flowers each drove in a pair of runs as the White Sox won the series nale after drop ping the rst two games. Sale (2-0) struck out six and walked one. In his previous four starts against the Roy als, the White Sox had backed him with one run, enough to beat James Shields 1-0 in the 2012 opener. BREWERS 4, RED SOX 0 BOSTON Yovani Gallar do made his second straight scoreless start and the Mil waukee Brewers completed a three-game sweep of the Boston Red Sox with a 4-0 victory Sunday. The World Series champi on Red Sox, who never had a losing record last year, fell to 2-4 and matched their lon gest skid of 2013. They were swept just once last sea son, in a three-game series against the Texas Rangers from May 3-5. NATIONAL LEAGUE REDS 2, METS 1 NEW YORK Alfredo Si mon pitched seven impres sive innings in his rst start in more than two years and be gan the go-ahead rally with his second career hit, helping the Cincinnati Reds beat the New York Mets 2-1 Sunday to salvage a win in the threegame series. Joey Votto had a sacrice y and Ryan Ludwick a tiebreak ing single off Jonathon Niese (0-1), who was making his rst start of the season after a being slowed by shoulder and elbow injuries this spring. PADRES 4, MARLINS 2 MIAMI Pinch-hitter Alexi Amarista celebrated his 25th birthday by delivering a go-ahead, three-run homer in the seventh inning to lift the San Diego Padres to a 4-2 victory over the Miami Mar lins on Sunday. Ian Kennedy (1-1) allowed one run and three hits in six innings for the Padres. He struck out ve. Four relievers then helped the Padres end a four-game losing streak, including two against the Marlins to be gin the series. Huston Street pitched the ninth for his sec ond save. NATIONALS 2, BRAVES 1 WASHINGTON Ian Des mond led off the seventh in ning with a home run the only run of the game scored on a hit and the Wash ington Nationals and their makeshift lineup avoided a sweep Sunday with a 2-1 win over the Atlanta Braves. Desmond ripped a downthe-middle fastball from Alex Wood (1-1) well into the left eld bleachers, the Nationals rst hit since the rst inning. But it was enough to win on a day when four Washington pitchers combined to allow eight hits. PIRATES 2, CARDINALS 1 PITTSBURGH Tony Sanchez hit a tiebreaking RBI double in the seventh inning and the Pittsburgh Pirates edged the St. Louis Cardinals 2-1 on Sunday. Sanchezs double to deep center eld with two outs came off Cardinals ace Adam Wainwright (1-1) and snapped a 1-1 tie. The hit by the rookie re serve catcher scored Pedro Alvarez, who led off the in ning with a walk, and was Sanchezs second game-win ning hit of the week. CARLOS OSORIO / AP Baltimore Orioles Matt Wieters, right, is congratulated after his solo home run by teammate J.J. Hardy during the ninth inning against the Detroit Tigers on Sunday in Detroit. NBA GOLF MICHAEL MAROT AP Sports Writer INDIANAPOLIS Jeff Teague scored 25 points in the Atlan ta Hawks 107-88 rout Sunday of the reeling Indiana Pacers, who were held to a fran chise-low 23 points in the rst half of an em barrassing performance on their home oor. The Hawks (34-42) have won three of four and extended their lead over the Knicks for the nal playoff spot in the Eastern Confer ence to two full games. The Pacers (53-25) have lost four of ve and fell a full game be hind Miami in their quest for the No. 1 seed in the East. Paul George scored 18 points and David West had 17 on a night AllStar center Roy Hib bert did not play the nal 30 minutes. Atlanta jumped to a 9-0 lead, extended the margin to 33-11 after one and 55-23 at the half. CLIPPERS 120, LAKERS 97 LOS ANGELES Blake Grifn and Chris Paul scored 23 points apiece, and the Los Angeles Clippers hung another rout on the Lakers, winning 12097 Sunday to take three of four games this sea son from their belea guered Staples Center co-tenants. It wasnt quite the blowout of the Clip pers previous two wins 48 points on March 6 and 36 points on Jan. 10 but they were easily in com mand as the designat ed home team. J.J. Redick added 15 points and DeAndre Jor dan had 11 points and 12 rebounds for the Pa cic Division-winning Clippers, who improved to 32-6 at home. DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer AUGUSTA, Ga. The biggest thrill of his life was making a 20-foot putt across the 18th green at Augusta Na tional, and moments later he was wearing a green jacket. It could have been a replay from last year at the Masters, except the big moment wasnt for Adam Scott. On this Sunday at Au gusta National, the end less smile belonged to 11-year-old Leo Cheng of Northridge, Calif. He was among eight winners from different age groups at the inaugural Drive, Chip and Putt contest. I just had a vision of Adam Scott making that putt, said Cheng, who won the boys 10-11 di vision. The nal shot in the skills challenge was a putt from the same spot where Scott made bird ie last year in the Mas ters, which he won in a playoff. Cheng and other sev en kids didnt win a green jacket. Chengs parents bought him a dark green sports coat to wear, win or lose, for making it to the nals of the skills challenge sponsored by Augusta National, the USGA and the PGA of America. To make Chengs day even more memora ble, Scott showed up at the trophy presentation wearing the real green jacket. Its amazing to see so many people out there and the kids having a fun time, Scott said. This was a Sunday unlike any other at Au gusta National. Natalie Pietromonaco of Auburn, Calif., was on one side of the prac tice green standing over a 6-foot putt as Fred Couples watched from the other side. RAINIER EHRHARDT / AP Back row, from left, Ted Bishop, president of The PGA of America; Tom OToole, president of the U.S. Golf Association; and Billy Payne, chairman of Augusta National Golf Club, stand with winners of the Drive, Chip and Putt contest on Sunday at Augusta National. TENNIS PETE IACOBELLI AP Sports Writer CHARLESTON, S.C. An drea Petkovic ended a sur prising week at the Fam ily Circle Cup by winning her rst WTA tournament in three years, outlasting Jana Cepelova for a 7-5, 6-2 victo ry Sunday. Petkovic was once ranked ninth in the world before several injuries slowed her progress and cost her much of the 2012 season. Petkovics powerful fore hand and grind-it-out mindset helped her oust three straight top 10 seeds in No. 4 Sabine Lisicki, No. 9 Lucie Safarova and No. 6 Eugenie Bouchard on the way to the nals. The 26-year-old German used that same formula against Cepelova, a rising 20-year-old from Slovakia competing in her rst WTA nal. I still have a long way to go for me and I have a lot of po tential, Petkovic said. But I feel Im on the right track. Cepelova led 5-4 and was a point away from capturing the rst set. But Petkovic ral lied to win that game and be gin a run of eight in a row to take control of the match. A Sunday for the ages at Augusta National MIC SMITH / AP Andrea Petkovic celebrates after defeating Jana Cepelova for the Family Circle Cup on Sunday in Charleston, S.C. Germanys Petkovic wins Family Circle Cup R. BRENT SMITH / AP Indiana Pacers forward Paul George (24) tips the ball away from Atlanta Hawks guard Jeff Teague on Sunday in Indianapolis. Hawks race away from Pacers 107-88

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 CHRIS LINES AP Auto Racing Writer SAKHIR, Bahrain Lewis Hamilton edged Mercedes teammate Nico Rosberg after an in tense race-long duel to take victory by just one second at the Bahrain Grand Prix on Sunday. The two Mercedes were predictably in a different league to their rivals and recorded their second one-two nish in eight days after Hamiltons victory last weekend in Malaysia. With no team orders, the two were allowed to race for the lead and there were several close calls when the pair came inches away from col liding, providing a thrill ing spectacle under the lights at the Bahrain In ternational Circuit. It was very, very fair and it was very hard to keep him behind, Hamilton said. He was very fast on the option tires and I was on the knife-edge the whole time. ... Me and Nico havent had a race like that since back in our karting days. In our rst (karting) race, he led all day and I over took him on the last lap and won, and I thought for sure he is going to do that to me today. Force Indias Ser gio Perez was third in his rst podium nish since 2012 and Nico Hulkenberg fth. AUTO RACING COLLEGE BASKETBALL GOLF JOHN NICHOLSON AP Sports Writer RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. Lexi Thomp son left Michelle Wie behind Sunday off the tee and on the lead erboard in the Kraft Na bisco Championship. The 19-year-old Thompson closed with a bogey-free 4-under 68 at Mission Hills for a three-stroke victo ry over Wie. Thomp son birdied four of the rst nine holes to open a ve-stroke lead and parred the nal nine. Wie birdied the nal hole for a 71. She used her driver only four times, choosing to hit fairway-metal sting ers on the other 10 driv ing holes leaving her as much as 60 yards be hind Thompson. When both hit 3-woods, Thompson also had the advantage. Thompson became the second-youngest major winner in LPGA Tour history at 19 years, 1 month, 27 days. Mor gan Pressel set the re cord in her 2007 victo ry at Mission Hills at 18 years, 10 months, 9 days. Thompson nished at 14-under 274 for her fourth LPGA Tour vic tory. She opened with a 73, shot a tourna ment-best 64 on Fri day and had a 69 on Saturday to tie for the lead with Wie at 10 un der. The 6-foot Florida player had only one bo gey when she missed a 3-footer on the par-5 18th Saturday in her last 55 holes. Thompson won the 2011 Navistar LPGA in Alabama at 16 to be come the youngest winner in tour history, a mark broken by Lydia Ko in the 2012 Canadi an Womens Open. Last year, Thompson won the LPGA Malaysia and Lorena Ochoa Invita tional. The 24-year-old Wie made her 12th start in the event. She was ninth in 2003 at age 13, fourth the following year and tied for third at 16 in 2006. She also was sixth in 2011. Wie has two tour vic tories, winning the 2009 Lorena Ochoa Invita tional and 2010 Cana dian Womens Open. Hamilton takes Bahrain Grand Prix HASAN JAMALI / AP Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton of Britain celebrates after winning the Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix on Sunday at Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir, Bahrain. JIM OCONNELL AP Basketball Writer ARLINGTON, Texas Connecticut and Ken tucky couldnt have met in last years champion ship game and few peo ple gave them a chance to be in this years. No. 7 seed Connecti cut and eighth-seeded Kentucky meet Monday night in one of the un likeliest NCAA champi onship games ever. Neither was around in last years postseason Connecticut because of a tournament ban over academic issues; Ken tucky because it didnt make the eld. And nei ther looked like nation al title contenders at times this season. Kentucky (29-10) and its outstanding fresh men went from presea son No. 1 to out of the rankings after some bad losses. And Connecticut (31-8) was not a popular postseason pick after nishing tied for third in the American Athlet ic Conference with mul tiple losses to Louisville and SMU. In the tournament, the Huskies have stopped some of the countrys top guards and put themselves in position for their fourth national championship, the previous three un der Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame coach Jim Calhoun. Hopefully we have an opportunity to fall back on our defense, second-year coach Kev in Ollie said. We have been doing that the whole year. If Kentucky has a chance to win in the nal minute, that de fense better pay atten tion to guard Aaron Harrison, one of ve freshmen starters. He has hit huge 3-pointers in the Wild cats last three games. Harrison rattled in a 26-footer with 5.7 sec onds to go in the 7473 win over Wisconsin in the seminals. He made almost the exact same shot with 2.3 sec onds left against Michi gan for a 75-72 win that sent the Wildcats to the Final Four. Against Lou isville, he hit a 3 with 39 seconds left to give Ken tucky the lead for good in a 74-69. The biggest thing is hes not afraid to miss, Kentucky coach John Calipari said. Hes OK with it. Hes comfort able in his own skin. ... If youre going to make those kind of shots, you absolutely cannot be afraid to miss them. These two programs have combined to win six of the last 18 NCAA titles. UConn and Kentucky meet for national title DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Connecticut guard Shabazz Napier, left, drives to the basket over Florida forward Dorian Finney-Smith on Saturday in Arlington, Texas. Lexi Thompson outduels Michelle Wie for Kraft title CHRIS CARLSON / AP Lexi Thompson watches her tee shot on the third hole during the nal round of the Kraft Nabisco Championship on Sunday in Rancho Mirage, Calif.

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Living Healthy Send your health news to features @dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 MEDICINE: Parents urge OK for Duchenne drug / C6 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LEESBURG Cleanup event planned for Venetian Gardens scenic shoreline The City of Leesburg and the Lake County Water Authority have teamed up to provide a fun way to help clean up litter at Venetian Gardens as part of the annual Love Our Lakes program. Volunteers can bring a canoe or kayak, or reserve one with the Water Authority, for the event from 9 a.m. to noon, April 17. Teams will paddle along the northwest shore of Lake Harris to collect litter around the 64-acre Venetian Gardens waterfront park and collection supplies will be provided. Participants should meet at the Leesburg Community Building parking lot on Dozier Circle. For directions and to reserve a spot, call the Water Authority at 352343-3777, ext. 0. Reservations must be made by April 11. LAKE COUNTY Immunization program begins in middle schools The Department of Health in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County schools through May for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Upcoming dates for immuniza tions are: Tavares Middle School on Tuesday and Mount Dora Middle on Thursday. For information, call the Department of Health at 352-7715500 or go to www.lakechd.com. LAURAN NEERGAARD Associated Press WASHINGTON Edwin Pacheco was in and out of the hospital for months. Hed survived one organ transplant and desperate ly needed another. But he wasnt the only one suffer ing. Few people asked how his wife was holding up as she kept vigil, cornered hard-to-understand doc tors and held job and fam ily together. Everybody was like, Oh, youre a good caregiv er. But inside, Im dying, Minerva Pacheco of New York recalls of those tu multuous days. Then one day in the in tensive care waiting room at Monteore Medical Center, a pair of strangers introduced themselves as volunteer coaches for care givers and offered a shoul der. Its part of an unusual program that recruits re tirees and specially trains them to help overwhelmed family members cope with a scary hospital stay for their own health, and so they can better care for their loved one. The caregiver needs to be taken care of, too, said Monteore coach Dave Wolffe, a retired high school guidance counsel or who spotted Pachecos distress. If theyre sick, or they break down, feel help less or hopeless, theyre not going to be too helpful to the patient. The coaches offer more than emotional support and a sympathetic ear. Theyre trained to help people navigate a com plex hospital system and to help them locate com munity resources that may ease the strain, too. They can track down a doctor to answer a care givers questions. Or nd someone to translate all the medical jargon. Or alert a professional to signs of depression. Or gen tly probe about just how prepared the family real ly is for continuing care at home: Are they com fortable giving injections, or cleaning a wound or might they need some more planning with the discharge team? Todays caregivers are being asked to do a lot of things theyre really not equipped to do, said so cial worker Randi Kaplan, who directs the Monteo re Caregiver Support Cen ter. The program evolved as the hospital realized, were ignoring a very, very overstressed population. Millions of Americans regularly care for older or impaired adult relatives or friends, and a hospitaliza tion only adds to the stress. Yet research shows that pa tients who have supportive care from family or friends during a hospitalization fare better. You dont eat right, you dont sleep right, said Pa checo, who hadnt known she could seek help for herself as her husband worsened between his rst transplant in December 2012 and the one that nal ly restored his health last summer. Youre scared to ask whats next. Families need an advo cate, said Dr. Paul Levin, Retirees help caregivers cope RICHARD DREW / AP In this photo, Caregiver Center Director Randi Kaplan, center, of Monteore Medical Center, talks with Janet Lipson, left, acting as a caregiver, and volunteer David Wolffe, during a training session at the hospital in the Bronx, New York. MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer WASHINGTON A simple test appears very good at ruling out heart attacks in people who go to emergency rooms with chest pain, a big public health issue and a huge worry for patients. A large study in Sweden found that the blood test plus the usual electro cardiogram of the heartbeat were 99 percent accurate at showing which patients could safely be sent home rather than be admitted for obser vation and more diagnostics. Of nearly 9,000 patients judged low risk by the blood test and with normal electrocardiograms, only 15 went on to suffer a heart attack in the next month, and not a single one died. We believe that with this strat egy, 20 to 25 percent of admissions to hospitals for chest pain may be avoided, said Dr. Nadia Bandstein of the Karolinska University Hospi tal in Stockholm. She helped lead the study, pub lished in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and presented Sunday at the cardiology colleges Test accurately rules out heart attacks in the ER SEE TEST | C5 MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Chief Medical Writer WASHINGTON New research is boosting hopes that weight-loss surgery can put some patients di abetes into remission for years and perhaps in some cases, for good. Doctors on Monday gave longer results from a land mark study showing that stomach-reducing opera tions are better than med ications for treating dia besity, the deadly duo of obesity and Type 2 diabe tes. Millions of Americans have this and cant make enough insulin or use what they do make to process food. Many experts were skep tical that the benets seen after a year would last. Now, three-year results show an even greater ad vantage for surgery. Blood-sugar levels were normal in 38 percent and 25 percent of two groups given surgery, but in only 5 percent of those treated with medications. The results are quite re markable and could rev olutionize care, said one independent expert, Dr. Robert Siegel, a cardiolo gist at Cedars-Sinai Medi cal Center in Los Angeles. No one dreamed, at least I didnt, that obesi ty surgery could have such broad effects long before it caused patients to lose weight, he said. Some pa tients were able to stop us ing insulin a few days after surgery. At three years, more than 90 percent of the sur gical patients required no insulin, and nearly half had needed it at the start of the study, said its leader, Dr. Philip Schauer of the Cleveland Clinic. In con trast, insulin use rose in the medication group, from 52 percent at the start to 55 percent at three years. The results were report ed Monday at an Ameri can College of Cardiology conference in Washington. They also were published online by the New England Journal of Medicine. Doctors are reluctant to call surgery a possible cure because they cant guaran tee diabetes wont come back. But some patients, like Heather Britton, have passed the ve-year mark Surgery gives long-term help for diabetics TONY DEJAK / AP Heather Britton talks about her weight-loss surgery at her home in Bay Village, Ohio. SEE COPE| C4 SEE SURGERY | C4

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 when some experts consider cure or pro longed remission a pos sibility. Before the study, she was taking drugs for diabetes, high blood pressure and high cho lesterol; she takes none now. Its a miracle, said Britton, a 55-yeear-old computer programmer from suburban Cleve land. It saved my life. I have no doubt that I would have had serious complications from my diabetes because the disease killed her moth er and grandmothers at a young age, she said. About 26 million Americans have diabe tes, and two-thirds of them are overweight or obese. Diabetes is a leading cause of heart disease, strokes, kidney failure, eye trouble and other problems. Its treated with var ious drugs and insu lin, and doctors urge weight loss and exer cise, but few people can drop enough pounds to make a difference. Bar iatric surgery currently is mostly a last resort for very obese people who have failed less drastic ways to lose weight. It costs $15,000 to $25,000 and Medi care covers it for very obese people with dia betes. Gastric bypass is the most common type: Through keyhole sur gery, doctors reduce the stomach to a small pouch and reconnect it to the small intestine. Another type is sleeve gastrectomy, in which the size of the stomach is reduced less drastically. Schauers study test ed these two operations versus medication alone in 150 mildly obese peo ple with severe diabetes. Their A1c levels a key blood-sugar measure were over 9 on average at the start. A healthy A1c is 6 or below and the study aimed for that, even though the American Di abetes Association sets an easier target of 7. After three years, re searchers had follow-up on 91 percent of the orig inal 150 patients. The medication groups A1c averaged 8.4; the surgery groups were at 6.7 and 7, with gastric bypass being a little better. The surgery groups also shed more pounds 25 percent and 21 per cent of their body weight versus 4 percent for the medication group. Some cholesterol and other heart risk factors also improved in the surgery groups and they required fewer medi cines for these than at the start. Doctors dont know how surgery produces these benets, but food makes the gut produce hormones to spur insu lin, and trimming away part of it affects many hormones and metab olism. Four patients needed a second surgery within a year but none did af ter that. Out-of-control diabetes has complica tions, too many pa tients lose limbs or wind up on dialysis when their kidneys fail, and some need transplants. An obesity surgery equipment company sponsored the study, and some of the re searchers are paid con sultants; the federal government also gave grant support. Dr. Robert Ratner, chief scientic and medical ofcer for the American Diabetes Association, said he was very en couraged that so many stayed in the study, and said it will remain im portant to follow partic ipants longer, because many people who have weight-loss surgery re gain substantial weight down the road. Any way you lose weight is benecial for curbing diabetes, he said, but we need to be concerned about the cost and complications of treatments. Diets cost less and have fewer side effects, Ratner said. One other common type of obesity surgery, stomach banding, was not part of this study. Its use has declined in re cent years as other types of surgery have shown long-term benets for keeping weight off. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) COPE FROM PAGE C1 Monteores vice chair man of orthopedic sur gery, who tells the vol unteer coaches, and medical students, how caregivers can get lost in the shufe. Years ago, Levins old est daughter had a roll er-blading accident and was run over by a bus, suffering life-threaten ing injuries while at col lege hundreds of miles from home. In a hospital where he knew no one, even Levin had a hard time cornering doctors, got conicting reports and once watched his daughter wheeled off to deal with a dangerous complication without any explanation. Im a trauma special ist who knows the sys tem, knew the ques tions to ask, but I couldnt get a straight answer, Levin said. Many hospitals of fer support groups for caregivers, or services from a social worker or other professional. The volunteer coach es are different: Retir ees with no background in health care under go training to support caregivers in hopes that families will let their guard down with a peer. They make dai ly rounds through Mon teores waiting rooms and nursing stations to offer the services of the support center, where families can talk with a coach or a social work er, research caregiver resources online, or just relax in a quiet room. There are no statistics on similar volunteer ini tiatives, but Monteore and a handful of com munity hospitals have modeled programs on one at Northern West chester Hospital in New York. This caregiver coach idea is very innovative, said Lynn Feinberg of AARP, who tracks ef forts to help caregiv ers and says too of ten whats missing is someone to call at a moments notice, rather than awaiting a month ly support group meet ing. Utilizing retirees is really a win-win, to provide that basic emo tional, practical sup port and advice. It takes strong su pervision to know the boundaries, cautioned Carol Levine of the non prot United Hospital Fund, which provided a startup grant to Mon teore and has created online caregiver guides. They are not there to be nurses or social workers, she said. In stead, the program re ally treats people with respect and dignity and understanding that theyre in a difcult sit uation. Monteore put its 21 volunteers through a training course that stresses those bound aries, teaches nonjudg mental listening and lets them role-play dif cult situations. The sup port services dont ex pire when the patient goes home, Kaplan said. Caregivers still can call or come in indenitely, but there are no home visits. Does the program make a clinical differ ence? The hospital has begun a pilot study comparing whether cancer patients stick with a grueling che motherapy-and-radi ation treatment better when their caregivers are coached in provid ing support. Like many of the coaches, Wolffe, 69, had been a caregiver. He sought out Monteores support center while his wife, Janet Lipson, was undergoing com plex cancer treatment. When she recovered, the couple became vol unteer coaches to give back. Wolffe recalls a moth er of three with termi nal cancer whose own parents didnt under stand how badly chemo sapped her strength un til Lipson explained it. Later, Wolffe brought in professionals for advice on telling the young children about their mothers illness. Mostly, Wolffe says, caregivers need to vent: Sometimes I know I have to bite my tongue because I want to say something. But they just need me to listen. RICHARD DREW / AP Janet Lipson, left, is counseled by volunteer David Wolffe, and observed by Caregiver Center Director Randi Kaplan, of Monteore Medical Center. SURGERY FROM PAGE C1 TONY DEJAK / AP Heather Britton holds a photo of herself made before her weight-loss surgery, at her home in Bay Village, Ohio.

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 LAURAN NEERGAARD and MARY CLARE JALONICK Associated Press WASHINGTON Friends and family will be able to take the rst step to save a loved one from an overdose of heroin or powerful painkillers called opi oids. The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved an easy-to-use device that automatically in jects the right dose of an overdose antidote named naloxone before an ambulance arrives. Doctors could prescribe it for family members or caregivers to keep on hand, in a pocket or a medicine cabinet. Opioids include legal prescription painkillers, such as OxyContin and Vicodin, as well as ille gal street drugs like her oin. Called Evzio, the de vice contains naloxone, a long-used antidote for overdoses that is usually administered by syringe in ambulances or emer gency rooms. But with the rise in drug over dose deaths, there has been a growing push to equip more people with the protection. The FDA said Evzios design makes it easy for anyone to adminis ter. Once Evzio is turned on, it provides verbal in structions, much like de brillators that laymen frequently use to help people who collapse with cardiac arrest. It is about the size of a credit card or small cellphone. The antidote is not a substitute for immediate medical care, the FDA said, as anyone who has overdosed will need ad ditional treatment. Still uncertain is how much the antidote will cost. Executives of the drugs manufacturer, kalo, Inc., of Richmond, Va., said it is too soon to say, but they are working with health insurers to get broad coverage. Eric Edwards of kalo says the antidote is in tended not just for her oin or prescription drug addicts, but also for peo ple who have accidental overdoses, unexpected drug interactions or are on very high doses of the drugs. People who over dose may suffer slower breathing or heart rates or loss of consciousness. FDA Commission er Margaret Hamburg said in a statement that 16,000 people die every year due to opioid-relat ed overdoses, and that drug overdose deaths are now the leading cause of injury death in the Unit ed States, surpassing mo tor vehicle crashes. She said the increase in over dose deaths has largely been driven by prescrip tion drug overdoses. While the larger goal is to reduce the need for products like these by preventing opioid ad diction and abuse, they are extremely import ant innovations that will help to save lives, Hamburg said. The announcement follows several state ef forts to widen access to the antidote. At least 17 states and the District of Columbia now allow naloxone common ly known by the brand name Narcan to be distributed to the pub lic. Some of those states allow for third parties, such as a family mem ber or friend of an intra venous drug user, to be prescribed it. On Thurs day, the state of New York announced that every state and local law enforcement ofcer will now carry syringes and inhalers of naloxone. annual conference in Washington. Chest pain sends more than 15 million people to emergen cy rooms in the United States and Europe each year, and it usually turns out to be due to anxi ety, indigestion or other less-serious things than a heart attack. Yet doc tors dont want to miss one about 2 percent of patients having heart attacks are mistakenly sent home. People may feel re assured by being ad mitted to a hospital so doctors can keep an eye on them, but that raises the risk of pick ing up an infection and having expensive care theyll have to pay a share of, plus unneces sary tests. The study included nearly 15,000 people who went to the Karo linska University hos pital with chest pains over two years. About 8,900 had low scores on a faster, more sensitive blood test for tropo nin, a substance thats a sign of heart damage. The test has been avail able in Europe, Asia and Canada for about three years, but it is not yet available in the United States. The patients were 47 years old on aver age and 4 percent had a previous heart attack. About 21 percent of them wound up being admitted. Researchers later looked back to see how the blood test and elec trocardiogram would have predicted how they fared over the next month. They gured that in order to nd one heart attack in patients like this, 594 would have to be admitted a huge waste of resources. A test like this would be enormously use ful, and the studys re sults are almost too good to be true, said Dr. Judd Hollander, an emergency medicine specialist at the Univer sity of Pennsylvania. Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. TEST FROM PAGE C1 FDA approves easy-to-use heroin overdose antidote

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 TRACIE MAURIELLO Pittsburgh Post-Gazette WASHINGTON A wheelchair by age 12, maybe 15 if he were one of the lucky ones. A ven tilator would be next and then would come the casket, probably be fore he turned 30. That was what Ter ri and Bill Ellsworth ex pected for their son when doctors con rmed his diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a debilitating and fatal disease striking one in 3,500 boys. Instead, Billy has be come an active, hap py teenager who likes to dance to Beatles songs, walk around at classic car shows, hike on local trails and jog in his living room along with avatars of Michael Jackson and Elton John he created for his Wii video game. Hes like a lot of other 13-year-olds but for an awkward gait and the Wednesday afternoons he spends at Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC for an infu sion of an experimental drug thats keeping his disease at bay and without any side effects. Billy, of Coraopolis, Pa., is one of a dozen Duchenne patients who are receiving eteplirsen as part of a clinical tri al. The drug was expect ed only to slow the pro gression of the disease, but Billy and others in the trial are nding their symptoms are improv ing. Testing conrms that their lungs are get ting stronger and their bodies are producing dystrophin, an essential protein that wasnt pres ent in muscles biopsied two and a half years ago when the trial began. Results astounded re searchers. Ive done many, many clinical trials and never encountered one that was so clean, ef fective and very well tolerated, said princi pal investigator Dr. Jer ry Mandell, Ohio State University professor of medicine and direc tor of gene therapy at Nationwide Childrens Hospital in Columbus, where testing was ini tially conducted. For the 12 boys and their families, its a mir acle drug, but other Duchenne patients cant access it because the Food and Drug Admin istration hasnt yet ap proved it. Terri Ellsworth and other mothers are lobbying regulators to expedite approval under a 2012 law that encour ages faster reviews of breakthrough therapies that address unmet med ical needs for rare and life-threatening diseases. They spent the past month collecting signa tures on a petition they sent to the White House urging the administra tion to expedite approv als of drugs that treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The White House has promised to respond publicly in writ ing to petitions with at least 100,000 signatures. The Duchenne peti tion reached that thresh old Tuesday. Supporters can still sign by going to TheRaceToYes.org. Duchenne par ents believe eteplirsen meets all the require ments for expedited ap proval, and theyre urg ing action now because their children are run ning out of time. They were hope ful last July when the FDA expressed interest in eteplirsen, but were disappointed when the agency came back three months later and paused the process, saying government sci entists needed more data from drug devel oper Sarepta Thera peutics. The Massachu setts-based company is awaiting more direction from the agency. FDAs drug approv al process requires well-controlled clini cal trials that provide the necessary scientif ic data, agency spokes woman Sandy Walsh said in an email message, noting she could not dis cuss specic cases under review. If a drug prod uct is to be marketed, well-controlled clinical trials are needed to en sure that the drug is safe and effective when used as indicated. The issue seems to be the size of the sample, not the quality of the re search, Mandell said. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted Parents of boys with Duchenne urge drug OK REBECCA DROKE / MCT Billy Ellsworth works on social studies lessons at home in Coraopolis, Pa., March 27. He is part of a clinical trial for eteplirsen, a drug that has not only slowed the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, but also improved his symptoms.

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 DELTHIA RICKS Newsday Accidental exposure to nicotine in e-ciga rette rells has fueled a dramatic jump in calls to poison control cen ters, according to fed eral health authorities, who say the substance triggered eye, skin and inhalation injuries. Kids drank avored e-liquids, lured by de ceptively sweet odors. Adults got squirts of nicotine in their eyes and through the skin. Nicotine poisons peo ple when appreciable amounts of the sub stance are absorbed, in haled or swallowed. Calls to poison centers have largely involved e-cigarette vials used to rell the devices. Phone calls to poison centers rose from one per month in September 2010 to 215 monthly by February of this year, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. More than half the calls to poison centers were about children ex posed to toxic levels of nicotine, but 42 per cent involved people 20 and older, also suffering from nicotine exposure. By comparison, monthly calls involv ing conventional ciga rettes didnt show a sim ilar increase during the same time period. Haz ards linked to cigarettes ranged from 301 to 512 calls per month and were more frequent in sum mer, researchers found. When e-cigarettes rst came out, the nic otine was contained in a cartridge, said Dan Jacobsen of the North Shore-LIJ Center for To bacco Control in Great Neck, N.Y. Now, to make them cheaper and easier to use, they are rellable and because these re lls have avors, they entice children, he said. Flavors include chocolate, strawberry and bubble gum. Jacobsen said its time the U.S. Food and Drug Administration con sidered regulating the products, which have evolved from dispos able devices resembling cigarettes to trendy wands from which bil lowing clouds of vapor are emitted. He said there are no quality-control guide lines on their manu facture in the U.S. or abroad. Dr. Tim McAfee, direc tor of the CDCs Ofce on Smoking and Health, said the new report is de signed as a wake-up call to the public and health care professionals. People are reporting symptoms through inha lation, eye exposure and skin exposure, McAfee said. E-cigarettes have a reservoir of liquid that has a heavy concentra tion of nicotine. The devices are bat tery-powered and also contain an atomizer with propylene glycol that can produce a vapor. Among 9,839 poison control calls with infor mation about severity of injuries, those from e-cigarettes were more likely to report adverse health effects. Nicotine, a highly ad dictive substance that targets the brain, can cause serious cardiovas cular side effects, such as dramatic palpitations and racing heart rate. The devices, however, are marketed as safe. Dr. Shahriyour Andaz, director of thoracic on cology at South Nassau Communities Hospital in Oceanside, N.Y., said although his work largely involves patients whove developed lung cancer caused by conventional cigarettes, the culprit in their addiction, he add ed, was also nicotine. There is 1 milligram of nicotine in a con ventional cigarette, but an e-cigarette can have amounts several times as high, he said. In high concentra tions, nicotine can be deadly, say experts who warned Thursday that guidelines need to be set on the amount in e-cig arettes, which are high lighted as smoking-ces sation devices. Nicotine patches and gum are regulated by the FDA. The nicotine amount varies with the e-ciga rette maker. The low est concentrations are about 1.5 percent per volume but some sell e-liquids online with higher concentrations. Brandon Rockstad, manager of Vapor World in Midwest City, Okla., sells e-liquids and nico tine. He said the amount of nicotine in his prod ucts varies, depending on the purchaser. Vapor World can sell a gallon or more of e-liq uids to brick and mortar stores, Rockstad said. For personal use we do not sell products with a high nicotine concen tration, he said. The leader of an e-cigarette trade orga nization Smoke Free Alternatives Trade As sociation said in a statement she supports child-safety measures. We are aware of re ports of increased calls to poison control cen ters that involve e-liq uid and support federal age restrictions on the purchase of vapor prod ucts, childproof caps and proper labeling to safeguard against acci dental ingestion, said Cynthia Cabrera, exec utive director. Dave Dobbins, chief operating ofcer of the Legacy Foundation in Washington, an an ti-smoking research group, said unless the FDA enacts guidelines as it said it will do e-cigarette poisonings will only increase. When you buy these products you dont even know how much nic otine is in them its the wild, wild West out there, he said. GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark Complaints of e-cigarette poisonings on the rise

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTS Comics www.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 www.dailycommercial.com Diversions 352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puz zle will be in tomorrows paper. YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, April 7 the 97th day of 2014. There are 268 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in His tory : On April 7, 1922, the Tea pot Dome scandal had its beginnings as Interior Sec retary Albert B. Fall signed a secret deal to lease U.S. Navy petroleum reserves in Wyoming and California to his friends, oilmen Har ry F. Sinclair and Edward L. Doheny, in exchange for cash gifts. On this date : In 1788 an expedition led by Gen. Rufus Putnam es tablished a settlement at present-day Marietta, Ohio. In 1798 the Mississippi Territory was created by an act of Congress, with Nat chez as the capital. In 1862 Union forces led by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant de feated the Confederates at the Battle of Shiloh in Ten nessee. In 1927 the image and voice of Commerce Secre tary Herbert Hoover were transmitted live from Wash ington to New York in the rst successful long-dis tance demonstration of tele vision. In 1939 Italy invaded Al bania, which was annexed less than a week later. In 1949 the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacic opened on Broadway. In 1953 the U.N. General Assembly ratied Dag Ham marskjold (dahg HAWMahr-shoold) of Sweden as the new secretary-general, succeeding Trygve Lie (TRI HG-vuh lee) of Norway. In 1964 IBM introduced its System/360, the com panys rst line of compat ible mainframe computers that gave customers the op tion of upgrading from low er-cost models to more pow erful ones. In 1966 the U.S. Navy re covered a hydrogen bomb that the U.S. Air Force had lost in the Mediterranean Sea off Spain following a B-52 crash. In 1978 President Jimmy Carter announced he was deferring development of the neutron bomb, a high-radia tion weapon. In 1983 space shuttle astronauts Story Musgrave and Don Peterson went on the rst U.S. spacewalk in almost a decade as they worked in the open cargo bay of Challenger for nearly four hours. In 1984 the Census Bu reau reported Los Angeles had overtaken Chicago as the nations second city in terms of population. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, April 7, 2014: This year you will have plenty of opportunities to deal with your anger. You will learn to turn this un comfortable feeling into a positive one for you and those around you. Your will ingness to look within your self will be important. If you are single, you could be passionately drawn to a Li bra. The reworks will be incredible, but the ghting also could be intense. Ask yourself if you really want a relationship like this. If you are attached, you could be forging a new path where both you and your sweet ie express your deeper feel ings. Rather than judge your partner, learn to empathize and understand where he or she is coming from. CAN CER can drag you down. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You could nd others to be demanding. Know that you cant make everyone happy all the time. A loved one or associate will let you know this fact in no uncer tain terms. Explaining can only go so far with someone who does not want to listen. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Keep communication owing. You might want to consider what is said with out personalizing the com ment. You could feel as if you have no say with a vol atile person in your life. It might be good to go to the gym to work out some stress. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Be open to a different method of handling your nances. You might get some important tips that could help you in the future. Be more forthright in your deal ings with others. A loved one could cause some prob lems. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You could be facing a problem you dont want to deal with, but you will have little choice. You might not be sure what to say. Hon or a change with a friend or loved one. You could nd some of this persons views challenging at best. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You might be walking right into a hornets nest without even realizing it. You could have very little to do with the situation, yet you could be the one being blamed. Listen to your instincts. Use care with aring tempers. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Emphasize the pos itives, even if all you are hearing are the negatives. The more you detach from this situation, the better your choices will be. Hon or a need for a change, but know that you dont have to act just yet. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might want to try a new approach or nd a different way of handling a problem. Clearly you do not have all the answers. Still, you must take a bigger role in what is going on. Be sensitive to a boss who could be off-kilter. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Detach from any vola tile situation. You might be angrier than you realize. Ex press your side of a dis agreement by saying what you want. A friend could be very difcult to deal with. Dont be petty. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Your creativity will be pushed to the max when dealing with a changeable situation. The issue could involve a friend or loved one. You will need to rene gotiate what was previous ly thought to be written in stone. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You defer to oth ers easily and probably too quickly. Honor a change within yourself, and keep in mind that a situation could get better with time. You seem to be less attached to a personal matter than you realize. Let go and relax. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Try to stay away from controversy. Buckle down and get your work done. Others might share a lot of their feelings. Detach and gain a new perspective. It is important for you to stay neutral. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your imagination and creativity will take you to a new level. A partner sudden ly might be very short and irritable. Be smart and walk away from an argument. Un derstand that a money mat ter needs to be handled. Realize what you want here. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORY DEAR ABBY: My 1-yearold baby recent ly passed away. I have two other children, one with special needs. I nd it irritating and not at all comforting when people tell me that at least I have other chil dren and that I should concentrate on them. How can I politely tell them that I have never stopped taking care of my other children, and that nothing eases the pain of burying your child? MOURNING MY BABY IN PUERTO RICO DEAR MOURNING: Please accept my deep est sympathy for the loss of your child. My heart goes out to you. While I can imag ine that you might be tempted to lash out at these insensitive indi viduals, I hope you re alize their comments are made out of igno rance. Sometimes it isnt what you say as much as how you say it. In a case like this, ex actly what you have written to me would be an appropriate re sponse as long as it is said calmly and with out anger. DEAR ABBY: My daugh ter was married for eight years before di vorcing her cheating husband. They have two children. When my daughter found out about the affair, she was inconsolable. The girlfriend actual ly phoned her and said, Why are you so upset? Everyone cheats! Now, two years lat er, the girlfriend is pregnant. My daugh ter would like a pater nity test done before the kids are intro duced to this new child. She thinks it would be harmful if they are in troduced to a new half-sibling who may later prove to belong to another man. (Every one cheats?) What do you think about this? Is it wrong for my daughter to want proof that this is her exs baby? He feels certain hes the fa ther, but he also knows the other woman has kept in touch with her ex-boyfriend. JUST WONDERING IN CONNECTI CUT DEAR JUST WONDERING: If your daughters ex wants to claim pater nity without a paterni ty test, there is no legal basis I can think of to prevent him from being considered the father. While your daughter has reason to be angry at her ex and to dislike the woman with whom he cheated, she cant prevent her children from seeing the baby if he wants them to. (P.S. Youd think her ex would WANT to know for certain, but it takes all kinds ...) DEAR ABBY: What is the best way to answer your children when they ask if you have taken drugs? I smoked a little marijuana back in college, but stopped before graduation and I havent done it since. My children are about ready to go to high school. I have avoided answering their questions in the past, but I know Ill have to say something sometime. What? TONGUE-TIED IN ANYTOWN, USA DEAR TONGUE-TIED: I dont believe in lying to children. When you are asked, tell them you tried it in college, didnt like it and considered it a waste of time. Then tell them that as long as they are living under your roof, using ANY il legal substance will not be condoned. Dear Abby is written by Abi gail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was found ed by her mother, Pauline Phil lips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Mother who lost baby wants to find right words for grief JEANNE PHILLIPS DEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGAR BIGARS STARS

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TAYLOR RINEHART CROWNED MISS LAKE COUNTY FAIR, A3MANATEE ZONES: Authorities are keeping a close watch, A3 LIVING HEALTHY: Retirees help caregivers cope, C1 LEESBURG, FLORIDA Monday, April 7, 2014 www.dailycommercial.com Vol. 138 No. 97 4 sectionsINDEX CLASSIFIED D1 COMICS C8 CROSSWORDS D1 DIVERSIONS C8 LEGALS D2 LIVING HEALTHY C1 SCOREBOARD B2 OBITUARIES A4 SPORTS B1 VOICES A9 STATE/REGION A3 TODAYS WEATHER Detailed forecast on page A10.86 / 69Afternoon showers/T-storm. 50 MILLARD K. IVES | Staff Writermillardives@dailycommercial.comSumter County prosecutors say alleged drug dealer Leonard Antonio Massey Jr. liked to barter crack cocaine for use of a vehicle even if it was just long enough for the customer to gather the money they owed. During a pre-hearing last week for Masseys murder trial, which starts today, As sistant State Attorney Pete Magrino pointed to a 2010 case in the Royal community of Wildwood, where Massey and other suspects were accused of beating up a cus tomer and burning his vehi cle after a disagreement over money that was owed. However, after an encoun ter between the victim and the suspects in the Sumter County jail, the victim be came uncooperative with in vestigators and the case was never prosecuted, Magrino said. But Masseys business practice of swapping drugs for use of vehicles came to an end on Jan. 11, 2011 af ter he allegedly spotted Ger ald Devon Patterson, an acquaintance, driv ing the 1996 Toyota Camry of Richard Len, a customer who owed Massey $200 for drugs. According to prosecutors, Sumter County Sheriffs reports and ar guments during last weeks pre-trial hearing, Massey got in the car. Massey, Patterson and a third passenger drove to Lens job in Marion County, picked him up and drove back to Royal. An argument en sued between Massey and Len over the mon ey. During the ride, Len made a telephone call to his wife, WILDWOODMasseys first-degree murder trial begins today MASSEY THERESA CAMPBELL | Staff Writertheresacampbell@dailycommercial.comUnder bright oodlights with luminaries lighting the way, hundreds of cancer survivors, family members and friends walked around the track of Leesburg High School in the wee hours Sun day for the Relay for Life of Leesburg and Lady Lake, a 16-hour event to raise aware ness and funds for the Amer ican Cancer Society. The supporters wanted to show cancer doesnt sleep. They also wanted cancer vic tims to know theyre not alone. It was empowering to know that I am not the only one, said uterine cancer survivor Wanda Linger, 41, of Bushnell, who cherished meeting other survivors at her rst Relay for Life, an upbeat event lled with music, food, games and an Iron Man contest and prizes. Even though Linger was tired, she stayed for the en tire relay, which began at 2 / p.m. Saturday and ended with the 6 / a.m. closing cer e mony and nal lap. I am nine months cancer free, Linger said. The Re lay for Life was her chance to celebrate.LEESBURG Hundreds walk to raise cancer awareness THERESA CAMPBELL / DAILY COMMERCIAL Erin Mann, Jeanine Rubino and Molly Rowe walk in the Relay for Life fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. JIM KUHNHENNAssociated PressWASHINGTON Lacking congressional support to raise wag es or end gender pay disparities, President Barack Obama is again imposing his policies on federal contractors, in keeping with presi dents tradition of exerting their powers on a fraction of the economy they directly control. Obama will sign an executive order Tuesday barring federal contractors from retal iating against employ ees who discuss their pay with each other. The order is similar to language in a Senate bill aimed at closing a pay gap between men and women. That mea sure is scheduled for a vote this week, but is unlikely to pass. The president also will direct the Labor Department to adopt rules requiring federal contractors to provide compensation data based on sex and race. He plans to sign the two executive orders during an event at the White House where he will be joined by Lilly Ledbetter, whose name appears on a pay discrimination law Obama signed in 2009. The moves showcase Obamas efforts to seek action without con gressional approval and demonstrate that even without legisla tion, the president can drive economic policy. At the same time, they show the limits of his ambition when he doesnt have the sup port of Congress for his initiatives. Republicans say Obama is pushing his executive powers too far and should do more Obama uses executive actions to test workplace ideas ROXANNE BROWN | Staff Writerroxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comAsk Dr. Len Lucero about Chris P. Bacon, the cel ebrated pig born with non-working hind legs, and youd think he was talking about a child, especially when he says its like a brother to his own children. We (my family) have always been close to him, Lucero said of the pot-bellied porker, who will appear in a PBS documentary series Nature at 8 / p.m. on Wednesday in an episode entitled My Bionic Pet. I was very excited about being contacted for the show and cant wait to see it, Lucero said. If you go to PBS Nature and type in Chris P. Bacon, they have some really good teasers out there. Weve been anticipating this for a while now, and Im anxious to see what ends up on the segment, because the shoot took a long time a whole day actually.SUMTERVILLEChris P. Bacon is back on TV PHOTO COURTESY OF DR. LEN LUCERO Chris P. Bacon will appear in a PBS documentary series called Nature at 8 / p.m. on Wednesday in an episode entitled My Bionic Pet.SEE TRIAL | A2SEE BACON | A2SEE WALK | A2SEE OBAMA | A2

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A2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 HOW TO REACH US APRIL 6CASH 3 . ............................................... 6-9-1 Afternoon . .......................................... 0-5-8 PLAY 4 . ............................................. 3-3-7-8 Afternoon . ....................................... 1-5-7-6FLORIDALOTTERY APRIL 5FANTASY 5 . ........................... 8-10-11-24-33 FLORIDA LOTTO . ............... 9-23-24-38-40-47 POWERBALL .................. 11-21-26-33-3429 THE NEWSPAPER OF CHOICE FOR LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES SINCE 1875The Daily Commercial (ISSN 0896-1042) is published daily for $90.74 per year (plus Florida sales tax) by Halifax Media Group at 212 East Main Street, Leesburg, Florida. Periodicals postage is paid at the USPO, Leesburg, FL. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 34749-0007. All material contained in this edition is property of The Daily Commercial and is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Reproduction is forbidden without written consent from the publisher.Call 352-787-0600 in Lake County or 877-702-0600 in Sumter County 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday. Call 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Saturday and 7 to 10 a.m. on Sunday.Call the Circulation Department 48 hours ahead to stop service.365-8200In Sumter County: 877-702-0600 ADVERTISING Retail . ................... 365-8200 Classied . ............. 314-3278 CIRCULATION Lake Co. . ....... 352-787-0600 Sumter Co. . ... 877-702-0600 Circulation Billing . 787-0600 ACCOUNTING . ...... 365-8216 MISSED YOUR NEWSPAPER? REDELIVERY NOT AVAILABLE IN ALTOONA OR SUMTER GOING ON VACATIONSUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Call 352-787-0600 (Lake Co.) or 877-702-0600 (Sumter Co.) between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Prepayments for 3 months or more, mail to: Circulation Dept., The Daily Commercial, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Billed monthly at the rates shown. The Daily Commercial promptly corrects errors of fact appearing in its pages. If you believe we have made an error, call the news department at 352-365-8250. Home Delivery 3 Mos. T ax T otal 6 Mos. T ax T otal 1 Yr. T ax T otal Daily/Sunday 28.43 1.99 30.42 50.05 3.50 53.56 90.74 6.35 97.09 SUBSCRIPTION RATES OUR COMMITMENT TO ACCURACY STAFF INFORMATIONSTEVE SKAGGS, publisher352-365-8213 ........................... steve.skaggs@dailycommercial.comMARY MANNING-JACOBS, advertising director352-365-8287 ............... mary.manning-jacobs@dailycommercial.comNEWSROOM CONTACTSTOM MCNIFF, executive editor352-365-8250 ............................... tom.mcniff@dailycommercial.comWHITNEY WILLARD, copy desk chief352-365-8258 .......................... whitney.willard@dailycommercial.comPAUL RYAN, digital editor352-365-8270 .................................. paul.ryan@dailycommercial.comTO REPORT LOCAL NEWSSCOTT CALLAHAN, news editor352-365-8203 ........................... scott.callahan@dailycommercial.comREPORTERS LIVI STANFORD, county government, schools352-365-8257 .............................. livi.stanford@dailycommercial.comROXANNE BROWN, South Lake County352-394-2183 ......................... roxanne.brown@dailycommercial.comMILLARD IVES, police and courts 352-365-8262 ................... millard.ives@dailycommercial.com THERESA CAMPBELL, Leesburg and The Villages 352-365-8209 .................theresa.campbell@dailycommercial.comAUSTIN FULLER, business news, Mount Dora, Eustis, Tavares 352-365-8263 .........................austin.fuller@dailycommercial.comLETTERS TO THE EDITOR Email submissions to letters@dailycommercial.com SPORTS RESULTSSchools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Submissions also can be emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com.FRANK JOLLEY, sports editor352-365-8268 ................................ frank.jolley@dailycommercial.comGOOD FOR YOU AND CELEBRATIONS ANNOUNCEMENTSEmail news about your awards and personal or professional mile stones along with a photo, if you desire - to pam.fennimore@ dailycommercial.com.CALENDAREmail upcoming events to pam.fennimore@dailycommercial.com. saying he was being held against his will with a gun and needed $200 but the call abruptly ended on Lens end. The following day, Lens gold Camry was found burning off County Road 216A in Wildwood. A little more than a week later, Lens body was found off County Road 228 in Wildwood, with multiple gunshot wounds. Massey was already in the Sumter County jail on unrelated drug charges when he was charged with being the trigger man in the shooting. It seems (Massey) didnt have much patience, Magrino said in an interview outside the Sumter County courtroom last week. Jury selection in Masseys rst-degree murder trial for the Len shooting is expected to start today, and testimony could start as early as Tuesday. Patterson is one of the witnesses slated to take the stand. His trial on rst-degree murder charges in the case was re cently halted after he accepted a plea deal that downgraded his charge to second-degree murder that will likely send him to prison for 20 years in exchange for his truthful testimony against Massey. Another witness sched uled to take the stand against Massey will be his own sister, Latonia M. La timer. She is accused of allowing her vehicle to be used to take Lens body to the backyard of an abandoned home off of Coun ty Road 227 in Wildwood. She will likely get pro bation on the accessory charge, also in exchange for her truthful testimo ny. Magrino added the third passenger in the car during the 2011 incident got out before the shoot ing and was not charged. The 2010 and 2011 cas es occurred within just over a mile of each other in Royal. Last week, Sumter County Judge William Hallman III ruled, over the defenses objections, that the 2010 case could be used against Massey in this weeks trial, citing there were enough simi larities between the two. TRIAL FROM PAGE A1 For those who dont know Chris P. Bacons story, a lady came to the Eastside Veterinary Clinic in Cler mont, where Lucero used to work, about 15 months ago to inquire about putting down the animal. But one look at the piglet, who weighed less than 1 pound, stirred something in Lucero. I told her if she surrendered (the pig) to me, I would try to give it the best life possible, Lucero said. The doctor took the pig to his Summerville home and built a tiny rear-end wheelchair out of KNex blocks, a childrens building toy similar to Legos. A video posted on YouTube showing Chris P. Bacon scooting around in his wheeled contraption went viral, and the pig got national television exposure (the Today show, Anderson Cooper, TMX, Discovery network, etc.), his own Facebook page with 107,174 likes and even worldwide T-shirt sales. Hes healthy and happy and thats all you can ask for, Lucero said. I guess I did my job. Beyond that, he inspires me, and as I keep seeing over and over again, he inspires many others as well. Once called a cute little pig, Chris P. Bacon is not that little any more, having added 72 pounds to his frame since Lucero rst got him. The PBS episode is about animals given a second chance at life through human intervention and prosthetics, or in Chris P. Bacons case, the mobile device Lucero built for him. A lot of people probably dont realize what goes into a 15to 20-minute segment, Lucero said of the TV shoot at his home. I know I didnt. It was take after take after take, and Im pretty sure Chris did better than I did. These days, Chris P. Bacon remains a busy pig, making appear ances at schools and hospitals. I hope and really think Chris is inspiring a lot of people but, if nothing else, every person who meets him ends up with a huge smile on their face. Last weekend, Lucero and Chris P. Bacon made an appearance at the MDA Muscle Walk in Orlando and, last month, participated in the Boating and Beach Bash for people with disabilities in Boca Raton. Lucero has written a childrens book about acceptance, the rst of a three-part series featuring Chris P. Bacon, himself and his family. The doctor also hopes to drum up interest in a movie deal about the pig on wheels. BACON FROM PAGE A1 FILE PHOTO Chris P. Bacon has added 72 pounds to his 1-pound frame since Lucero rst got him.Mary Shaner of Lady Lake was joined by her infant granddaugh ter, Tinslee Price, 4 months old, one of the youngest relay participants. She stayed all night and slept for a little while. This is her rst relay, rst of many, said Shaner, who has been involved in Relay for Life for 15 years. We relay for many friends affect ed by cancer, Shaner said, recall ing she became more involved in Relay for Life in 2009 after her sons teenage girlfriend was diagnosed with bone cancer. Since then, we have been full blast into it, Shaner said of serving on committees and forming a fam ily-and-friends relay team. The Family and Friends of Cops Against Cancer team, headed by Leesburg Police Captain Rob Hicks, was out in force, too. Its so wonderful to support American Cancer Society, Cops Against Cancer and Relay for Life. This is just a wonderful cause in trying to help raise awareness, and I feel honored to be a part of it, said Jeanine Rubino. Rubino walked with Erin Mann and Molly Rowe as they made their nal lap around the track. I think everybody has been affected by cancer one way or the other, Mann said. This is some thing that the community can do to get involved to come out here and support people who are ght ing cancer. Chuck Kirk, event chair for Relay for Life of Leesburg and Lady Lake, hailed the relay a success, bring ing in an estimated $50,000 and up to 700 attendees at the peak of the event. This was awesome and a great day, Kirk said after the closing cer emony. We started out with a huge opening ceremony, better than we have had in a couple of years, and it went through the entire day. Even with the heat, people stayed out. This group of really passionate people really made a difference, and when you think of all the challenges, the economy, what they have done is just phenomenal. Leesburg Regional Medical Cen ter employees were among the re lays biggest supporters. Janice Collins of LRMC said she enjoys being able to cheer for the survivors at the event. Its showing them that we are here to help them and support them, she said, and thats what the relay is all about. WALK FROM PAGE A1 to work with Congress. His new executive or ders are sure to lead to criticism that he is plac ing an undue burden on companies and increas ing their costs. Federal contracting covers about one-quar ter of the U.S. workforce and includes companies ranging from Boe ing to small parts sup pliers and service providers. As a result, presidential directives can have a wide and di rect impact. Such ac tions also can be large ly symbolic, designed to spur action in the broader economy. This really is about giving people access to more information both to help them make deci sions at the policy level but also for individuals, said Heather Boushey, executive director and chief economist at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. She has been working with the administration to get compensation information about the nations workforce. This is denitely an encouraging rst step, she said. Federal contractors, however, worry that additional compensation data could be used to fuel wage related law suits, said James Plunkett, director of labor policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Whats more, he said, such orders create a two-tiered system where rules apply to federal contractors but not to other employers. Those contractors, knowing that their business re lies on the government, are less likely to put up a ght, he said. Federal contractors ultimately know that they have to play nicely to a certain extent with the federal government, he said. In a separate action Monday, Obama in tends to announce 24 schools that will share more than $100 mil lion in grants to rede sign themselves to better prepare high school students for college or for careers. The awards are part of an order Obama signed last year. Money for the program comes from fees that companies pay for visas to hire foreign workers for specialized jobs. The moves represent a return to economic is sues for the president after two weeks devot ed almost exclusively to diplomacy and the nal deadline for health in surance coverage. A trip to Asia in two weeks is sure to change the focus once again. Still, Obama has de clared this a year of ac tion, whether Congress supports him or not. In February, Obama signed an executive or der increasing the hour ly minimum wage for federal contractors from $7.25 per to $10.10. While White House of cials estimated such an increase would affect only a small percentage of federal contract work ers, they said the move could encourage states or individual businesses to act on their own to increase workers wages. Obama has also pushed his workplace initiatives beyond just federal contractors where possible. Last month he instructed the Labor De partment to come up with new workplace overtime rules for all employers, a power the administration has un der the Fair Labor Stan dards Act. But presidents have most direct power over the workforce that is paid with taxpayers money. Through executive ac tions, Obama also has drawn attention to areas where he has chosen not to act on his own. The White House has resisted pressure from gay rights advocates who want have Obama to sign an anti-discrim ination executive order that would protect gays and lesbians working for federal contractors. The White House wants the House to approve a Senate-passed bill extending those protections to all Americans. OBAMA FROM PAGE A1 AP FILE PHOTO President Barack Obama works at his desk in the Oval Ofce of the White House in Washington, on Jan. 27.

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A5

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A6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A7 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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A8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 LEESBURG/ FRUITLAND PARK352-314-0164EUSTIS2904 David Walker Dr. (In Publix Plaza)352-308-8318THE VILLAGES352-205-7804THE VILLAGES352-259-5855OCOEE407-351-9679

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL A9 YOUR EDITORIAL BOARDSTEVE SKAGGS . ....................................... PUBLISHERTOM MCNIFF . .................................. EXECUTIVE EDITORSCOTT CALLAHAN . ................................. NEWS EDITORWHITNEY WILLARD . .......................... COPY DESK CHIEFGENE PACKWOOD . ..................... EDITORIAL CARTOONISTVoiceswww.dailycommercial.com The newspaper of choice for Lake and Sumter counties since 1875EDITORIALSEditorials are the consensus opinion of the editorial board, not any individual. They are written by the editorial staff but are not signed. Local editorials are published Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.COLUMNSColumns are the opinion of the writer whose byline and picture appears with them. They do not necessarily reect the opinion of the newspaper, and are chosen to represent a diver sity of views. If you would like to submit a guest column on a local, state or national issue, email your submission to letters@dailycommercial. com, or mail it to Voices, P.O. Box 490007, Leesburg, FL 347490007. Guest columns should be limited to 550 words in length. The writer also must submit a recent photo to be published with the column, as well as a brief biographical sketch.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Daily Commercial invites you to write letters to the editor. Letters should be no longer than 350 words. They must be original, signed with the full name of the writer, and include the writers address and telephone number for verication. We reserve the right to edit for length. Letters also will be edited for grammar, clarity, taste and libel. We accept no more than two letters per month from the same writer. No open letters, form letters or copies of letters to third parties will be published. We do not publish unsigned letters. Submissions are not returned. We retain the right to archive and republish any material submitted for publication.You can submit your letters by:Email (preferred) to:letters@dailycommercial.comBy regular mail to:Voices P.O. Box 490007 Leesburg, FL 34749-0007By fax to: 325-365-1951 H ow do you spell conscious uncoupling? Where I came from, we always spelled it the way Tammy Wynette sang it, which is D-I-V-O-R-C-E. I had one of them myself, several decades ago. Thats when I discovered that even uncontested divorces still prove bad mar riages are like hell: Its a lot easier to get in than it is to get out. So when approximately 176 friends posted on their Facebook pages and Twitter accounts that movie star Gwyneth Paltrow and rock star husband Chris Mar tin announced their conscious uncoupling via her website Goop, I felt a moment of genuine sympathy. Then I laughed so hard my sternum started to hurt. Seriously? Conscious uncoupling? Posted on a website called Goop? From a woman who named her kid Apple? And who shills, at $425 a go (so to speak), a colon-cleanse regime also called Goop? Forget about the movies: This is a woman who needs a scriptwriter to prepare her lines in life. Paltrow needs to do what elementary school teachers call exhibiting mastery over her native language. She seems to be doing less well with using her own words than she did with singing in her own voice. (And dont you think the real reason they broke up is because she made that Country Strong movie? I do. She couldnt just let her spouse have his music career without making a lm where she played a character inspired by Im not making this up music, um, personality Britney Spears? My money is that Country Strong, where Paltrow hams it up as a substance-friendly singer named Kelly Canter, although decidedly not the kind of cantor found in a synagogue, was the beginning of the end of that mar riage.) In addition to needing a writer, she also needs an editor and maybe a therapist because some of her sayings seem to have become infamous enough to generate their own line of snarky T-shirts. I would rather die than let my kid eat Cup-aSoup, she announced on an episode of Conan. Heres another Paltrow gem: Were human beings and the sun is the sun how can it be bad for you? I dont think anything thats natural can be bad for you. Guess Gwyneth never heard of melanoma, which is natures own sunshiny gift. Actually, death is also natural (and organic!), but I hear thats very bad for you, too. But those declarations are violently sane compared to what Paltrow recently said during her interview with E! News. Without irony, mind you, the woman whose net worth is around $140 million was all wistful about the simple lives of women with children who dont have to deal with the hassle of being movie stars but instead work regular jobs: I think its different when you have an ofce job, because its routine and, you know, you can do all the stuff in the morning and then you come home in the evening I think to have a regular job and be a mom is not as of course there are challenges, but its not like being on set. And most working-stiff moms with regular jobs would, Im sure, agree: There are challenges, and its not like being on a set. Unless, of course, were talking about the set of Lockup: Extreme Dinnertime Tantrums. Making up words Goop and mangling phrases conscious uncoupling that render a signicant event meaningless by bankrupting its significance doesnt help anybody accept, understand or cope with lifes vicissitudes. Calling something by another name doesnt change what it is. Consider those buses you see at every airport with Elegant Limousine Transport italicized in aking gold paint on their side. They are not really limousines, are they? Theyre buses. Theres nothing whatsoever wrong with them because they no doubt provide adequate transportation. To refer to them by another name is, however, pretentious, misleading and disingenuous. Sure, their owners can do whatever they want and who really cares? Yet, if we contort and misalign words to t eccentric meanings, we obscure rather than explain what were trying to communicate. Life isnt easy for anybody, and divorce is always hard. But its still probably easier if youre brave enough to spell it out.Gina Barreca is an English professor at the University of Connecticut, a feminist scholar who has written eight books, and a columnist for the Hartford Courant. She can be reached through her website at http://www.ginabarreca.com.OTHERVOICES Gina BarrecaMCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Gwyneth needs to recouple with reality If you drive down Buckeye Road at the southern edge of Lima, Ohio, youll pass an industrial complex where General Dy namics makes armored vehicles for the U.S. military. But if you stop and take a photo graph, you just might nd yourself detained by military police, have your camera cons cated and your digital photos deleted. Which is exactly what happened to two staffers for the Toledo Blade newspaper on Friday, in an unacceptable violation of the First Amend ment and common sense. According to the Blade, staff writer Tyrel Linkhorn and photographer Jetta Fraser had just covered a news event at another Lima-ar ea factory and decided to take photos of oth er businesses for future use, a common media practice. Linkhorn, who was driving, pulled into a circular driveway at the Joint Systems Manufacturing Center also known as the Lima Army Tank Plant and stopped short of an unmanned security booth. Fraser took her photos, and as they were preparing to leave they were approached by military police. The staffers, who were wearing credentials from their newspaper, identied themselves as journalists. Fraser, who was in the passen ger seat, refused a request for her drivers li cense because she wasnt driving; she was sub sequently handcuffed and removed from the car. After more than an hour, the two were al lowed to leave but without Frasers camer as. When the equipment was nally retrieved seven hours later, the photos of the tank plant, and of another location, had been deleted. Several lines were crossed here. Law enforcement ofcials have the right, even the responsibility, to investigate suspicious activity. But its hard to imagine a scenario in which a person with a camera standing in broad daylight taking a photograph of something openly visible to the public indeed, which is visible to the world through Google Maps clears the hurdle of suspicious activi ty. And to delete the work of a photojournalist is indefensible. Unfortunately, this is not an isolated incident. In the years since 9/11, various police agencies have acted with occasional callous disregard for the First Amendment rights of journalists and photojournalists, as well as citizens documenting public occurrences particularly police activities. The Blade has led a complaint with the FBI, and we urge a quick and detailed investigation followed by a public accounting. But we also urge law enforcement ofcials at all levels to reacquaint themselves with the First Amendment rights of citizens and journalists, and to issue new policies and training directives as necessary.Distributed by MCT Information ServicesAVOICEIts law enforcement versus the First Amendment, and citizens are losing Classic DOONESBURY 1972Without irony, mind you, the woman whose net worth is around $140 million was all wistful about the simple lives of women with children who dont have to deal with the hassle of being movie stars but instead work regular jobs: I think its different when you have an office job, because its routine and, you know, you can do all the stuff in the morning and then you come home in the evening I think to have a regular job and be a mom is not as of course there are challenges, but its not like being on set.

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SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268Sportssports@dailycommercial.com B1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014www.dailycommercial.comNCAA: Kentucky, UConn face off for NCAA title / B4 DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP NCAA President Mark Emmert answers a question at a news conference on Sunday in Arlington, Texas. PATRIC SCHNEIDER / APFormer President George H. W. Bush congratulates Matt Jones after Jones won the Houston Open golf tournament on Sunday in Humble, Texas.Emmert: Unionization grossly inappropriate EDDIE PELLSAP National WriterARLINGTON, Texas The NCAA president called an effort to unionize players a grossly inappropriate way to solve prob lems in college sports while insisting the association has plans to change the school-athlete relationship. Mark Emmert said Sunday that the NCAA wants to allow the big conferences with mon eymaking teams to write their own rules, and those changes could solve many ath letes complaints more effectively than union ization. To be perfectly frank, the notion of using a union-employee model to address the chal lenges that exist in in tercollegiate athletics is something that strikes most people as a gross ly inappropriate solution to the problems, Emmert said at his annual news conference, held the day before col lege basketballs na tional championship. He said it would throw away the en tire collegiate model for athletics. The NCAA has spent the last three years writing up plans to change its governance structure to allow the ve biggest confer ences to have different rules from hundreds of smaller schools. Because smaller schools have fought against costly changes such as paying athletes stipends, the indepen dence of the big schools could break a logjam. Although the issues have been simmer ing for years, they have drawn attention in re cent weeks with a lawsuit led by former KURT VOIGTAP Sports WriterHUMBLE, Texas Matt Jones told his caddy he was about to make a 42-yard chip-in on the rst playoff hole at the Houston Open. The Australian did just that on Sunday, earning his rst PGA Tour win in spectacular fashion and changing his immediate travel plans in the process. Jones, who began the day six shots off the lead, shot a nal-round 66 and ended the tournament 15 under to earn his rst trip to the Masters with the dramatic win over Matt Kuchar. He earned nearly $1.2 million for the win, also making amends for a disastrous missed putt last September that appeared destined to keep him from playing at Augusta Nation al. Destiny, however, had other plans for the 33-yearold who played collegiately at Arizona State. Going to Augusta is amazing, Jones said. The win means everything to me right now because thats what we play for is to win. To have Augusta as a reward for that win is amazing. In September, Jones lipped out an 8-foot birdie putt on the last hole of the BMW Championship a putt that would have earned him a trip to next weeks Masters by sending him to the Tour Championship.Jones playoff chip-in tops Kuchar in Houston Open MARK DIDTLERAssociated PressST. PETERSBURG Yu Darvish allowed sev en hits over seven innings in his season debut, Elvis Andrus hit a two-run homer, and the Texas Rangers avoided a three-game sweep by beating the Tampa Bay Rays 3-0 on Sunday Darvish (1-0) struck out six and walked one. Sidelined by neck stiffness, it was his rst outing since a spring training game on March 16. Darvish got his 500th career strikeout, com ing in 401 2-3 innings, by fanning David DeJe sus and Wil Myers in the rst. According to the Rangers, it is the fewest innings for a starter to reach 500 strikeouts in major league history. TIM REYNOLDSAssociated PressMIAMI LeBron James scored 38 points, Mario Chalmers added 15 and the Miami Heat survived a 3-point barrage from New Yorks J.R. Smith on the way to dealing the Knicks playoff hopes a big blow with a 102-91 victory on Sun day. Chris Bosh added 14 points and Ray Allen had 12 for the Heat, who remained atop the Eastern Conference standings. Smith made a Knicks-record 10 3-pointers, on an NBA-record 22 attempts, and nished with 32 points. Raymond Felton scored 14 for New York WILFREDO LEE / AP Miami Heat guard Norris Cole comes up with a loose ball against New York Knicks guard Raymond Felton (2) on Sunday in Miami. The Heat won 102-91. CHARLIE NEIBERGALL / AP Florida center Patric Young (4) goes after a loose ball against Connecticut during the second half of the NCAA seminal game on Saturday in Arlington, Texas. Gators: Successful season despite Final Four flop MARK LONGAP Sports WriterARLINGTON, Texas Scottie Wilbekin sat hunched in his locker, his eyes red, his voice hush and his legs still cramping. Teammates Casey Prather, Will Yeguete and Patric Young were a few feet away, also ght ing back tears while try ing to nd words to ex plain how they played so poorly on college basketballs biggest stage. It was a painful end ing for Floridas four se niors, the mainstays of coach Billy Donovans team. But when the disap pointment ees, when the vivid details of how Floridas national seminal unfolded Saturday night at AT&T Stadium fade, the Gators will be able to smile about what will go down as one of the most suc cessful seasons in school history. This team was so special, something Im never going to forget for all my life, Young said after a 63-53 loss to Connecticut. We ac complished a lot just by loving each other and being really committed and loving playing with one another. So Im just really going to cher ish everything that we had this year and its go ing to be something Ill never forget. Florida won a school-record 30 consecutive games, set an other mark with 32 con secutive home wins, became the rst team to go 18-0 in the South eastern Conferences regular season, swept the league tourna ment and earned the top overall seed in the NCAA tournament for the second time. And after losing in a regional nal the last three years, the Gators nally made it to the Fi nal Four. They talked all week about not being satis ed with just getting here and nishing the journey. They recited Donovans recent an ecdote about getting to a potential stopping point while climbing Mount Everest, and instead of settling for the small accomplishment, nding the fortitude to make it the rest of the way despite potential pitfalls and adversity. Florida tried. The Huskies got in the way again. The Gators (36-3) lost to UConn in early De cember on Shabazz Napiers buzzer-beater, which many called lucky. The rematch was ERIC GAY / AP Florida guard Lexx Edwards sits dejected in the locker room after his team lost to Connecticut 63-53.LeBrons 38 points lead Heat to win over KnicksSEE HEAT | B2SEE GATORS | B2Darvish returns as Rangers beat RaysSEE RAYS | B2SEE NCAA | B2SEE GOLF | B2

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B2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 American League At A Glance East W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 4 3 .571 New York 3 3 .500 Toronto 3 4 .429 1 Baltimore 2 4 .333 1 Boston 2 4 .333 1 Central W L Pct GB Detroit 4 1 .800 Chicago 3 3 .500 1 Cleveland 3 3 .500 1 Minnesota 3 3 .500 1 Kansas City 2 3 .400 2 West W L Pct GB Seattle 4 1 .800 Houston 3 3 .500 1 Texas 3 3 .500 1 Oakland 2 3 .400 2 Los Angeles 2 4 .333 2 Saturdays Games Minnesota 7, Cleveland 3 Toronto 4, N.Y. Yankees 0 Detroit 7, Baltimore 6 Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Seattle 3, Oakland 1 L.A. Angels 5, Houston 1 Milwaukee 7, Boston 6, 11 innings Tampa Bay 5, Texas 4 Sundays Games Minnesota 10, Cleveland 7 N.Y. Yankees 6, Toronto 4 Baltimore 3, Detroit 1 Milwaukee 4, Boston 0 Texas 3, Tampa Bay 0 Chicago White Sox 5, Kansas City 1 Houston 7, L.A. Angels 4 Seattle at Oakland, late Todays Games Baltimore (Jimenez 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 0-1), 1:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 0-1) at Houston (Cosart 1-0), 2:10 p.m. Oakland (Kazmir 1-0) at Minnesota (Correia 0-0), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Erlin 0-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Texas (Scheppers 0-0) at Boston (Lackey 1-0), 7:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Moore 0-1) at Kansas City (Vargas 0-0), 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Paulino 0-0) at Colorado (Lyles 1-0), 8:40 p.m. Tuesdays Games Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m. Texas at Boston, 6:10 p.m. San Diego at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. National League All Times EDT East W L Pct GB Miami 5 2 .714 Atlanta 4 2 .667 Washington 4 2 .667 Philadelphia 3 3 .500 1 New York 2 4 .333 2 Central W L Pct GB Milwaukee 4 2 .667 Pittsburgh 4 2 .667 St. Louis 3 3 .500 1 Chicago 2 4 .333 2 Cincinnati 2 4 .333 2 West W L Pct GB San Francisco 5 1 .833 Los Angeles 4 3 .571 1 Colorado 3 3 .500 2 San Diego 2 4 .333 3 Arizona 1 7 .125 5 Saturdays Games N.Y. Mets 6, Cincinnati 3 Philadelphia 2, Chicago Cubs 0 San Francisco 7, L.A. Dodgers 2 Atlanta 6, Washington 2 St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 1 Milwaukee 7, Boston 6, 11 innings Miami 5, San Diego 0 Colorado 9, Arizona 4 Sundays Games Cincinnati 2, N.Y. Mets 1 San Diego 4, Miami 2 Washington 2, Atlanta 1 Milwaukee 4, Boston 0 Pittsburgh 2, St. Louis 1 Chicago Cubs 8, Philadelphia 3 Arizona at Colorado, late San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, late Tondays Games Milwaukee at Philadelphia, ppd., rain Cincinnati (Cingrani 0-0) at St. Louis (Wacha 0-0), 4:15 p.m. San Diego (Erlin 0-0) at Cleveland (Kluber 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Paulino 0-0) at Colorado (Lyles 1-0), 8:40 p.m. Tuesdays Games Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 4:35 p.m. Miami at Washington, 7:05 p.m. San Diego at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m. National Basketball Association All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L Pct GB x-Toronto 45 32 .584 x-Brooklyn 42 34 .553 2 New York 33 45 .423 12 Boston 23 54 .299 22 Philadelphia 17 60 .221 28 Southeast W L Pct GB y-Miami 53 23 .697 x-Washington 40 37 .519 13 x-Charlotte 39 38 .506 14 Atlanta 33 42 .440 19 Orlando 22 55 .286 31 Central W L Pct GB y-Indiana 53 24 .688 x-Chicago 45 32 .584 8 Cleveland 31 47 .397 22 Detroit 28 49 .364 25 Milwaukee 14 63 .182 39 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 59 17 .776 x-Houston 50 25 .667 8 Dallas 46 31 .597 13 Memphis 45 31 .592 14 New Orleans 32 44 .421 27 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City 55 20 .733 Portland 49 28 .636 7 Minnesota 38 38 .500 17 Denver 33 43 .434 22 Utah 24 52 .316 31 Pacic W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers 54 23 .701 Golden State 47 29 .618 6 Phoenix 45 31 .592 8 Sacramento 27 49 .355 26 L.A. Lakers 25 51 .329 28 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Saturdays Games Orlando 100, Minnesota 92 Chicago 96, Washington 78 Brooklyn 105, Philadelphia 101 Charlotte 96, Cleveland 94, OT Detroit 115, Boston 111 Toronto 102, Milwaukee 98 Sundays Games Miami 102, New York 91 L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m. Dallas at Sacramento, late Atlanta at Indiana, late Denver at Houston, late Memphis at San Antonio, late Oklahoma City at Phoenix, late Utah at Golden State, late New Orleans at Portland, late Todays Games No games scheduled Tuesdays Games Detroit at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Brooklyn at Miami, 8 p.m. Dallas at Utah, 9 p.m. Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Houston at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. WTA Family Circle Cup Results Sunday At The Family Circle Tennis Center Charleston, S.C. Purse: $710,000 (Premier) Surface: Green Clay-Outdoor Singles Championship Andrea Petkovic (14), Germany, def. Jana Cepelova, Slovakia, 7-5, 6-2.TV2DAYSCOREBOARD CONTACTUS SPORTS EDITOR FRANK JOLLEY 352-365-8268 FAX 352-365-1951 EMAIL sports@dailycommercial.com Schools or coaches can report game results after 6 p.m. by calling 352-365-8268, or 352-365-8279. Amateur Listings (college scholarships, meeting announcements, schedule changes, outdoors notices) can be faxed to 352-365-1951, or emailed to sports@dailycommercial.com When sports are being played in Lake County, we want to report it and we need your help. Directors and coaches of recreational and youth leagues can send game results, statistics, team and action photos, and well publish them in the newspaper and on our website. Proud parents can send us individual photos and accomplishments. Just email them to sports@dailycommercial.com IF YOURE PLAYING, WERE INTERESTED COLLEGE BASEBALL 7 p.m.ESPNU NC State at ClemsonMAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m.MLB Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees4 p.m.MLB Regional coverage, Cincinnati at St. Louis or Oakland at Minnesota7 p.m.ESPN Texas at Boston8:10 p.m.SUN Tampa Bay at Kansas CityMENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL 9 p.m.CBS NCAA Division I tournament, championship, UConn vs. Kentucky, at Arlington, TexasSOCCER 2:55 p.m.NBCSN Premier League, Sunderland at Tottenham and Carmelo Anthony managed only 13, on 4 for 17 shooting. Anthony had two points after halftime, while James had 22. The Heat (53-23) en sured they would n ish the day still ahead of Indiana atop the East standings. New York (33-45) has only four games left and will be either two or three losses behind Atlan ta when Sunday ends, depending on the outcome of the later game between the Hawks and Pacers. Miamis lead was 15 with just under 9 minutes to go after a 3-pointer by Allen, before the Knicks came up with one last rally and made it more than a little interesting. Iman Shumpert missed a wide-open 3 with 3:30 left that would have gotten New York within four. Instead, James had a layup at the other end and after Smith made his ninth 3 of the game, Chalm ers answered with one of his own, making Mi amis lead 97-88. So Smith made an other, giving the Knicks life. And Miami again answered, this time Bosh doing the longrange honors and re storing the nine-point edge with 1:32 remaining. Smith missed two more 3s from there his 20th and 21st at tempts of the day and that just about sealed things for the Knicks. HEAT FROM PAGE B1 far from a uke, with the Huskies dominating the nal 30 minutes of the game. During the last break, with just a few seconds left on the clock, Floridas seniors huddled on the court with tears in their eyes. It was over, and every one knew it. Obviously the four seniors, we came to gether and we have been through a lot, Yeguete said. Just n ishing up doing all the things we done this year, I think its really special. Going to a Final Four is something special as well. I think were going to continue to just cherish our friend ship and were going to stay close after this. This game is not changing anything, regardless of how I feel, about my relationship with them. Theyre great guys. I love them, love to be around them. I just wish them the best and I know theyre going to be successful in life. The seniors nished with a program-record 120 victories, including 13 in the NCAA tour nament. They also won three SEC titles. They provided Donovan with a unique com bination of players who stayed in school, committed to the process, got better every year and ended up with sig nicant roles for the one of the nations top teams. It wasnt enough to beat UConn. But it surely will cement this group as one of Dono vans best, right behind that star-studded team that won back-to-back national titles in 2006 and 2007. Everybody will remember this season for the team that we were able to become, Wil bekin said. At the beginning of the year, it didnt look like we would be much of a team. Then throughout the year, we just really came together and did a lot of special things, broke a number of re cords at the school and won some really tough games. Unfortunately, we didnt go out the way we would like to, but only one team is going to do that. So we just have to try and remember all the good things that we did before this point. Even though its hard right now, Im sure that Ill look back on this year and be really proud of the guys that were standing next to me. The guys behind them should be worth watch ing, too. Sharp-shooter Michael Frazier II, dynam ic guard Kasey Hill, ver satile forward Dorian Finney-Smith and big man Chris Walker are a solid nucleus to build around next season. Throw in transfers Eli Carter, Alex Murphy and Damontre Har ris, as well as incoming freshmen Chris Chioz za, Brandone Francis and Devin Robinson, and the Gators could be a contender again in 2015. They have a tough act to follow, though. The No. 1 question I ask myself every year is: Did our team play as close as possible to their potential? Donovan said. Maybe more so than any team that Ive coached based on the talent level, we played way beyond our potential as a team. GATORS FROM PAGE B1 Andrus put the Rangers up 2-0 with his ho mer off Joel Peralta (01) in the eighth. Donnie Murphy made it 3-0 on an RBI ineld during the ninth. Neal Cotts replaced Alexi Ogando for the Rangers with two on and two outs in the eighth, and struck out Matt Joyce on a 3-2 pitch. Joakim Soria pitched the ninth for his rst save. Alex Cobb scattered three hits, walked one and struck out six in seven shutout innings for the Rays. Only one runner reached second against the Tampa Bay right-hander. Tampa Bay had runners on second and third with one out in the fth, but failed to score when Myers hit an in eld pop y and Ben Zobrist ew out. Darvish got three consecutive outs after allowing Evan Longorias double to lead off the sixth. He also worked out of a jam during the seventh after Ryan Hanigan hit a leadoff double. The Rays were 0 for 11 with runners in scoring position. Notes: Darvish was activated from the 15day disabled list and RHP Nick Martinez was optioned to Dou ble-A Frisco. ... Rangers RHP Colby Lewis (hip surgery) gave up four runs and four hits over ve innings in a rehab start for Triple-A Round Rock. ... Texas LHP Joe Saunders (bruised left ankle) is not expected to be ready for his regular bullpen session Mon day and could miss his next start. ... Texas RHP Tanner Scheppers (00) will face Boston RHP John Lackey (1-0) Mon day night in the opener of a three-games series at Fenway Park. ... Tampa Bay LHP Matt Moore (0-1) and Royals LHP Jason Vargas (0-0) are the scheduled starters for Monday nights game in Kansas City. RAYS FROM PAGE B1 athletes about to go to trial and a National Labor Relations Board directors ruling that Northwestern football players should be able to form a union. If the NCAA loses the unionization ght or the lawsuit, led by former UCLA basketball play er Ed OBannon, it could drastically alter the rela tionship between NCAA schools and 460,000 col lege athletes. But, Emmert said, nothing the NCAA might do in coming months will be a di rect response to either of those legal cases: Those are conversations that have been going on for several years now, he said. Neither Emmert nor the administrators who joined him for the news conference sounded overly concerned about drawing up contingency plans in case unions start sprouting up in the aftermath of the Northwestern case. Theres 50 differ ent sets of rules for 50 different states, Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby said. So, were a long way from having unions. I think about it a lot. Havent spent any time talking about it. Im not going to specu late on it. Its a long way down the road. Bowlsby and a panel that included pres idents at Wake Forest, Kansas State and the fu ture president at Ohio State agreed that many of the NCAAs thorniest issues, including pay ing athletes and improving their long-term health care, could be more easily resolved if the ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and SEC were given autonomy to draw up their own regulations. I think most of Di vision I memberships see that were standing at a fork in the road, Kansas State president Kirk Schulz said. What were going to put out there again is not per fect, but I believe that the vast majority of members recog nize that some of these things must change and that we need to do it rapidly. NCAA FROM PAGE B1 Shell Houston Open Leading ScoresSunday At The Golf Club of Houston Humble, Texas Purse: $6.4 million Yardage: 7,441; Par: 72 Final FedEx Cup points in parentheses Jones won on rst playoff hole Matt Jones (500), $1,152,000 68-68-71-66 Matt Kuchar (300), $691,200 66-67-68-72 Sergio Garcia (190), $435,200 67-65-73-70 Cameron Tringale (135), $307,200 68-68-69-71 Shawn Stefani (110), $256,000 67-69-73-69 Rickie Fowler (100), $230,400 70-70-68-71 Brice Garnett (80), $186,240 68-71-72-69 Retief Goosen (80), $186,240 68-71-71-70 Russell Henley (80), $186,240 73-69-72-66 Rory McIlroy (80), $186,240 70-71-74-65 Ryan Palmer (80), $186,240 70-68-73-69 Erik Compton (59), $125,440 66-73-73-69 Ben Curtis (59), $125,440 67-70-71-73 J.B. Holmes (59), $125,440 66-73-71-71 Phil Mickelson (59), $125,440 68-70-72-71 Chris Stroud (59), $125,440 68-72-71-70 Martin Flores (54), $99,200 68-72-72-70 Lee Westwood (54), $99,200 70-72-71-69 Jonathan Byrd (50), $77,568 68-74-73-68 Graham DeLaet (50), $77,568 70-71-72-70 Jason Gore (50), $77,568 67-71-74-71 Freddie Jacobson (50), $77,568 68-72-74-69 Charl Schwartzel (50), $77,568 67-75-70-71 Luke Donald (44), $50,651 71-71-71-71 Michael Putnam (44), $50,651 68-72-73-71 Jim Renner (44), $50,651 66-72-74-72 Steve Stricker (44), $50,651 68-69-76-71 Nicholas Thompson (44), $50,651 71-69-74-70 Jimmy Walker (44), $50,651 71-65-77-71 Andres Romero (44), $50,651 72-69-70-73 Kevin Chappell (38), $37,952 71-72-76-66 Jon Curran, $37,952 69-72-69-75 Ryo Ishikawa (38), $37,952 69-74-71-71 Hunter Mahan (38), $37,952 69-72-71-73 Carl Pettersson (38), $37,952 69-74-72-70 After briey tying Kuchar in the middle of the round on Sunday, Jones chances at redemption for last year appeared n ished after he bogeyed the next-to-last hole in regulation. The set back left Jones at 14 under, two shots back of Kuchar. However, Jones in the rst of his two memorable moments on the 18th rolled in a 46-foot putt for birdie. That pulled the Aus tralian within one shot of Kuchar, who was watching his closest challenger from the tee. I was going to threeputt before I left it short, Jones said. I didnt care about nishing second or third or fourth; it didnt mat ter. I was only trying to get the win. Kuchar went on to bogey the nal hole of regulation after sending his second shot into the water. That set the stage for the playoff in the soggy conditions at the Golf Club of Houston. Jones sent his tee shot on the rst hole of the playoff into the right fairway bunker. He then landed just short of the greenside bunker with his second shot, while Kuchar found the bunker from the fairway. It was the second straight miss of the 18th green from the fairway for Kuchar, who sent his fairway metal on the 72nd hole into the water before recovering to make bogey and reach the play off. Jones didnt leave Kuchar any room for error in the playoff, sending his chip over the greenside bun ker and watching as it rolled in causing a roar from the gal lery and leaving Jones standing with his arm raised in celebration. I walked up there and told my caddy I was going to chip it in, Jones said. ... You dont know if its going to lip out, low or high, but when I saw it dis appear its probably the happiest Ive been on the golf course. Jones is the second straight Australian to win on the PGA Tour, following Steven Bowditchs win at the Texas Open last week. GOLF FROM PAGE B1

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL B3 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLOrioles best Tigers 3-1, handing them first loss LARRY LAGEAP Sports WriterDETROIT Chris Tillman outpitched Justin Verlander, allowing one run while work ing into the ninth and the Baltimore Orioles beat the Detroit Tigers 3-1 Sunday to avoid getting swept. Tillman (1-0) gave up ve hits, including Torii Hunters solo homer in the fourth, in 8 1/3 innings. Tommy Hunt er entered with one out in the ninth and Victor Martinez on second base and retired the last two batters for his sec ond save. Verlander (0-1) gave up two runs on ve hits and two walks over eight innings.YANKEES 6, BLUE JAYS 4TORONTO CC Sabathia pitched six innings for his rst victory of the season, Brett Gardner hit a two-run home run and the New York Yankees beat the Toronto Blue Jays 6-4 on Sunday afternoon. Sabathia (1-1) allowed four runs and seven hits, walked none and struck out six. Sabathia was hit hard in Tuesdays opening day loss at Houston, allowing six runs and eight hits, including two home runs, in six innings.TWINS 10, INDIANS 7CLEVELAND Chris Co labello drove in four runs, Brian Dozier scored three times and the Minnesota Twins outslugged the Cleve land Indians 10-7 on Sunday. Colabello, who played seven seasons of independent ball in Canada before sign ing with the Twins in 2012, broke a 6-6 tie with a threerun double in the sixth inning off Blake Wood (0-1). The 30-year-old Colabello leads the AL with 11 RBIs after six games. Joe Mauer had three hits and scored twice for the Twins, who took two of three in the series and will play their home opener Monday against Oakland.ANGELS 7, ASTROS 4HOUSTON Scott Feldman threw seven strong in nings, ve Astros homered, and Houston snapped a three-game losing streak with a 7-4 victory over the Los Angeles Angels on Sun day. Feldman (2-0) did not al low a hit until two outs in the fourth, when Josh Hamilton managed an ineld hit.WHITE SOX 5, ROYALS 1 KANSAS CITY, Mo. Chris Sale gave up four singles in eight scoreless innings as the Chicago White Sox de feated the Kansas City Royals 5-1 on Sunday. Alexei Ramirez and Tyler Flowers each drove in a pair of runs as the White Sox won the series nale after drop ping the rst two games. Sale (2-0) struck out six and walked one. In his previous four starts against the Roy als, the White Sox had backed him with one run, enough to beat James Shields 1-0 in the 2012 opener.BREWERS 4, RED SOX 0BOSTON Yovani Gallar do made his second straight scoreless start and the Mil waukee Brewers completed a three-game sweep of the Boston Red Sox with a 4-0 victory Sunday. The World Series champion Red Sox, who never had a losing record last year, fell to 2-4 and matched their lon gest skid of 2013. They were swept just once last season, in a three-game series against the Texas Rangers from May 3-5.NATIONAL LEAGUE REDS 2, METS 1 NEW YORK Alfredo Si mon pitched seven impres sive innings in his rst start in more than two years and be gan the go-ahead rally with his second career hit, helping the Cincinnati Reds beat the New York Mets 2-1 Sunday to salvage a win in the threegame series. Joey Votto had a sacrice y and Ryan Ludwick a tiebreak ing single off Jonathon Niese (0-1), who was making his rst start of the season after a being slowed by shoulder and elbow injuries this spring.PADRES 4, MARLINS 2 MIAMI Pinch-hitter Alexi Amarista celebrated his 25th birthday by delivering a go-ahead, three-run homer in the seventh inning to lift the San Diego Padres to a 4-2 victory over the Miami Mar lins on Sunday. Ian Kennedy (1-1) allowed one run and three hits in six innings for the Padres. He struck out ve. Four relievers then helped the Padres end a four-game losing streak, including two against the Marlins to be gin the series. Huston Street pitched the ninth for his second save.NATIONALS 2, BRAVES 1WASHINGTON Ian Des mond led off the seventh inning with a home run the only run of the game scored on a hit and the Wash ington Nationals and their makeshift lineup avoided a sweep Sunday with a 2-1 win over the Atlanta Braves. Desmond ripped a downthe-middle fastball from Alex Wood (1-1) well into the left eld bleachers, the Nationals rst hit since the rst inning. But it was enough to win on a day when four Washington pitchers combined to allow eight hits.PIRATES 2, CARDINALS 1 PITTSBURGH Tony Sanchez hit a tiebreaking RBI double in the seventh inning and the Pittsburgh Pirates edged the St. Louis Cardinals 2-1 on Sunday. Sanchezs double to deep center eld with two outs came off Cardinals ace Adam Wainwright (1-1) and snapped a 1-1 tie. The hit by the rookie re serve catcher scored Pedro Alvarez, who led off the in ning with a walk, and was Sanchezs second game-win ning hit of the week. CARLOS OSORIO / APBaltimore Orioles Matt Wieters, right, is congratulated after his solo home run by teammate J.J. Hardy during the ninth inning against the Detroit Tigers on Sunday in Detroit. NBA GOLF MICHAEL MAROTAP Sports WriterINDIANAPOLIS Jeff Teague scored 25 points in the Atlan ta Hawks 107-88 rout Sunday of the reeling Indiana Pacers, who were held to a franchise-low 23 points in the rst half of an em barrassing performance on their home oor. The Hawks (34-42) have won three of four and extended their lead over the Knicks for the nal playoff spot in the Eastern Confer ence to two full games. The Pacers (53-25) have lost four of ve and fell a full game be hind Miami in their quest for the No. 1 seed in the East. Paul George scored 18 points and David West had 17 on a night AllStar center Roy Hibbert did not play the nal 30 minutes. Atlanta jumped to a 9-0 lead, extended the margin to 33-11 after one and 55-23 at the half.CLIPPERS 120, LAKERS 97LOS ANGELES Blake Grifn and Chris Paul scored 23 points apiece, and the Los Angeles Clippers hung another rout on the Lakers, winning 12097 Sunday to take three of four games this season from their belea guered Staples Center co-tenants. It wasnt quite the blowout of the Clip pers previous two wins 48 points on March 6 and 36 points on Jan. 10 but they were easily in com mand as the designat ed home team. J.J. Redick added 15 points and DeAndre Jor dan had 11 points and 12 rebounds for the Pa cic Division-winning Clippers, who improved to 32-6 at home. DOUG FERGUSONAP Golf WriterAUGUSTA, Ga. The biggest thrill of his life was making a 20-foot putt across the 18th green at Augusta Na tional, and moments later he was wearing a green jacket. It could have been a replay from last year at the Masters, except the big moment wasnt for Adam Scott. On this Sunday at Au gusta National, the end less smile belonged to 11-year-old Leo Cheng of Northridge, Calif. He was among eight winners from different age groups at the inaugural Drive, Chip and Putt contest. I just had a vision of Adam Scott making that putt, said Cheng, who won the boys 10-11 di vision. The nal shot in the skills challenge was a putt from the same spot where Scott made birdie last year in the Mas ters, which he won in a playoff. Cheng and other sev en kids didnt win a green jacket. Chengs parents bought him a dark green sports coat to wear, win or lose, for making it to the nals of the skills challenge sponsored by Augusta National, the USGA and the PGA of America. To make Chengs day even more memorable, Scott showed up at the trophy presentation wearing the real green jacket. Its amazing to see so many people out there and the kids having a fun time, Scott said. This was a Sunday unlike any other at Au gusta National. Natalie Pietromonaco of Auburn, Calif., was on one side of the prac tice green standing over a 6-foot putt as Fred Couples watched from the other side. RAINIER EHRHARDT / AP Back row, from left, Ted Bishop, president of The PGA of America; Tom OToole, president of the U.S. Golf Association; and Billy Payne, chairman of Augusta National Golf Club, stand with winners of the Drive, Chip and Putt contest on Sunday at Augusta National. TENNIS PETE IACOBELLIAP Sports WriterCHARLESTON, S.C. An drea Petkovic ended a sur prising week at the Fam ily Circle Cup by winning her rst WTA tournament in three years, outlasting Jana Cepelova for a 7-5, 6-2 victo ry Sunday. Petkovic was once ranked ninth in the world before several injuries slowed her progress and cost her much of the 2012 season. Petkovics powerful fore hand and grind-it-out mindset helped her oust three straight top 10 seeds in No. 4 Sabine Lisicki, No. 9 Lucie Safarova and No. 6 Eugenie Bouchard on the way to the nals. The 26-year-old German used that same formula against Cepelova, a rising 20-year-old from Slovakia competing in her rst WTA nal. I still have a long way to go for me and I have a lot of po tential, Petkovic said. But I feel Im on the right track. Cepelova led 5-4 and was a point away from capturing the rst set. But Petkovic ral lied to win that game and be gin a run of eight in a row to take control of the match.A Sunday for the ages at Augusta National MIC SMITH / AP Andrea Petkovic celebrates after defeating Jana Cepelova for the Family Circle Cup on Sunday in Charleston, S.C. Germanys Petkovic wins Family Circle CupR. BRENT SMITH / APIndiana Pacers forward Paul George (24) tips the ball away from Atlanta Hawks guard Jeff Teague on Sunday in Indianapolis. Hawks race away from Pacers 107-88

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B4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 CHRIS LINESAP Auto Racing WriterSAKHIR, Bahrain Lewis Hamilton edged Mercedes teammate Nico Rosberg after an intense race-long duel to take victory by just one second at the Bahrain Grand Prix on Sunday. The two Mercedes were predictably in a different league to their rivals and recorded their second one-two nish in eight days after Hamiltons victory last weekend in Malaysia. With no team orders, the two were allowed to race for the lead and there were several close calls when the pair came inches away from col liding, providing a thrill ing spectacle under the lights at the Bahrain International Circuit. It was very, very fair and it was very hard to keep him behind, Hamilton said. He was very fast on the option tires and I was on the knife-edge the whole time. ... Me and Nico havent had a race like that since back in our karting days. In our rst (karting) race, he led all day and I over took him on the last lap and won, and I thought for sure he is going to do that to me today. Force Indias Ser gio Perez was third in his rst podium nish since 2012 and Nico Hulkenberg fth.AUTO RACING COLLEGE BASKETBALL GOLF JOHN NICHOLSONAP Sports WriterRANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. Lexi Thomp son left Michelle Wie behind Sunday off the tee and on the leaderboard in the Kraft Na bisco Championship. The 19-year-old Thompson closed with a bogey-free 4-under 68 at Mission Hills for a three-stroke victo ry over Wie. Thompson birdied four of the rst nine holes to open a ve-stroke lead and parred the nal nine. Wie birdied the nal hole for a 71. She used her driver only four times, choosing to hit fairway-metal stingers on the other 10 driv ing holes leaving her as much as 60 yards be hind Thompson. When both hit 3-woods, Thompson also had the advantage. Thompson became the second-youngest major winner in LPGA Tour history at 19 years, 1 month, 27 days. Mor gan Pressel set the re cord in her 2007 victory at Mission Hills at 18 years, 10 months, 9 days. Thompson nished at 14-under 274 for her fourth LPGA Tour vic tory. She opened with a 73, shot a tournament-best 64 on Fri day and had a 69 on Saturday to tie for the lead with Wie at 10 under. The 6-foot Florida player had only one bo gey when she missed a 3-footer on the par-5 18th Saturday in her last 55 holes. Thompson won the 2011 Navistar LPGA in Alabama at 16 to be come the youngest winner in tour history, a mark broken by Lydia Ko in the 2012 Canadi an Womens Open. Last year, Thompson won the LPGA Malaysia and Lorena Ochoa Invita tional. The 24-year-old Wie made her 12th start in the event. She was ninth in 2003 at age 13, fourth the following year and tied for third at 16 in 2006. She also was sixth in 2011. Wie has two tour vic tories, winning the 2009 Lorena Ochoa Invita tional and 2010 Cana dian Womens Open. Hamilton takes Bahrain Grand Prix HASAN JAMALI / AP Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton of Britain celebrates after winning the Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix on Sunday at Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir, Bahrain. JIM OCONNELLAP Basketball WriterARLINGTON, Texas Connecticut and Kentucky couldnt have met in last years champion ship game and few peo ple gave them a chance to be in this years. No. 7 seed Connecti cut and eighth-seeded Kentucky meet Monday night in one of the un likeliest NCAA championship games ever. Neither was around in last years postseason Connecticut because of a tournament ban over academic issues; Ken tucky because it didnt make the eld. And nei ther looked like nation al title contenders at times this season. Kentucky (29-10) and its outstanding freshmen went from presea son No. 1 to out of the rankings after some bad losses. And Connecticut (31-8) was not a popular postseason pick after nishing tied for third in the American Athletic Conference with multiple losses to Louisville and SMU. In the tournament, the Huskies have stopped some of the countrys top guards and put themselves in position for their fourth national championship, the previous three un der Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame coach Jim Calhoun. Hopefully we have an opportunity to fall back on our defense, second-year coach Kevin Ollie said. We have been doing that the whole year. If Kentucky has a chance to win in the nal minute, that de fense better pay atten tion to guard Aaron Harrison, one of ve freshmen starters. He has hit huge 3-pointers in the Wildcats last three games. Harrison rattled in a 26-footer with 5.7 seconds to go in the 7473 win over Wisconsin in the seminals. He made almost the exact same shot with 2.3 sec onds left against Michi gan for a 75-72 win that sent the Wildcats to the Final Four. Against Lou isville, he hit a 3 with 39 seconds left to give Ken tucky the lead for good in a 74-69. The biggest thing is hes not afraid to miss, Kentucky coach John Calipari said. Hes OK with it. Hes comfort able in his own skin. ... If youre going to make those kind of shots, you absolutely cannot be afraid to miss them. These two programs have combined to win six of the last 18 NCAA titles.UConn and Kentucky meet for national title DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP Connecticut guard Shabazz Napier, left, drives to the basket over Florida forward Dorian Finney-Smith on Saturday in Arlington, Texas. Lexi Thompson outduels Michelle Wie for Kraft title CHRIS CARLSON / AP Lexi Thompson watches her tee shot on the third hole during the nal round of the Kraft Nabisco Championship on Sunday in Rancho Mirage, Calif.

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LivingHealthySend your health news to features@dailycommercial.com 352-365-8203 C1DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014MEDICINE: Parents urge OK for Duchenne drug / C6 Health check www.dailycommercial.com LEESBURG Cleanup event planned for Venetian Gardens scenic shorelineThe City of Leesburg and the Lake County Water Authority have teamed up to provide a fun way to help clean up litter at Venetian Gardens as part of the annual Love Our Lakes program. Volunteers can bring a canoe or kayak, or reserve one with the Water Authority, for the event from 9 / a.m. to noon, April 17. Teams will paddle along the northwest shore of Lake Harris to collect litter around the 64-acre Venetian Gardens waterfront park and collection supplies will be provided. Participants should meet at the Leesburg Community Building parking lot on Dozier Circle. For directions and to reserve a spot, call the Water Authority at 352343-3777, ext. 0. Reservations must be made by April 11.LAKE COUNTY Immunization program begins in middle schoolsThe Department of Health in Lake County will offer immunizations at local Lake County schools through May for students who will enter the seventh grade during the 2014-15 school year. Upcoming dates for immunizations are: Tavares Middle School on Tuesday and Mount Dora Middle on Thursday. For information, call the Department of Health at 352-7715500 or go to www.lakechd.com. LAURAN NEERGAARDAssociated PressWASHINGTON Edwin Pacheco was in and out of the hospital for months. Hed survived one organ transplant and desperately needed another. But he wasnt the only one suffer ing. Few people asked how his wife was holding up as she kept vigil, cornered hard-to-understand doctors and held job and fam ily together. Everybody was like, Oh, youre a good caregiv er. But inside, Im dying, Minerva Pacheco of New York recalls of those tu multuous days. Then one day in the intensive care waiting room at Monteore Medical Center, a pair of strangers introduced themselves as volunteer coaches for caregivers and offered a shoulder. Its part of an unusual program that recruits re tirees and specially trains them to help overwhelmed family members cope with a scary hospital stay for their own health, and so they can better care for their loved one. The caregiver needs to be taken care of, too, said Monteore coach Dave Wolffe, a retired high school guidance counselor who spotted Pachecos distress. If theyre sick, or they break down, feel help less or hopeless, theyre not going to be too helpful to the patient. The coaches offer more than emotional support and a sympathetic ear. Theyre trained to help people navigate a com plex hospital system and to help them locate community resources that may ease the strain, too. They can track down a doctor to answer a caregivers questions. Or nd someone to translate all the medical jargon. Or alert a professional to signs of depression. Or gen tly probe about just how prepared the family real ly is for continuing care at home: Are they com fortable giving injections, or cleaning a wound or might they need some more planning with the discharge team? Todays caregivers are being asked to do a lot of things theyre really not equipped to do, said so cial worker Randi Kaplan, who directs the Monteo re Caregiver Support Cen ter. The program evolved as the hospital realized, were ignoring a very, very overstressed population. Millions of Americans regularly care for older or impaired adult relatives or friends, and a hospitalization only adds to the stress. Yet research shows that pa tients who have supportive care from family or friends during a hospitalization fare better. You dont eat right, you dont sleep right, said Pa checo, who hadnt known she could seek help for herself as her husband worsened between his rst transplant in December 2012 and the one that nal ly restored his health last summer. Youre scared to ask whats next. Families need an advo cate, said Dr. Paul Levin, Retirees help caregivers cope RICHARD DREW / AP In this photo, Caregiver Center Director Randi Kaplan, center, of Monteore Medical Center, talks with Janet Lipson, left, acting as a caregiver, and volunteer David Wolffe, during a training session at the hospital in the Bronx, New York. MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical WriterWASHINGTON A simple test appears very good at ruling out heart attacks in people who go to emergency rooms with chest pain, a big public health issue and a huge worry for patients. A large study in Sweden found that the blood test plus the usual electro cardiogram of the heartbeat were 99 percent accurate at showing which patients could safely be sent home rather than be admitted for obser vation and more diagnostics. Of nearly 9,000 patients judged low risk by the blood test and with normal electrocardiograms, only 15 went on to suffer a heart attack in the next month, and not a single one died. We believe that with this strategy, 20 to 25 percent of admissions to hospitals for chest pain may be avoided, said Dr. Nadia Bandstein of the Karolinska University Hospi tal in Stockholm. She helped lead the study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and presented Sunday at the cardiology colleges Test accurately rules out heart attacks in the ERSEE TEST | C5 MARILYNN MARCHIONE,AP Chief Medical WriterWASHINGTON New research is boosting hopes that weight-loss surgery can put some patients di abetes into remission for years and perhaps in some cases, for good. Doctors on Monday gave longer results from a landmark study showing that stomach-reducing operations are better than med ications for treating diabesity, the deadly duo of obesity and Type 2 diabe tes. Millions of Americans have this and cant make enough insulin or use what they do make to process food. Many experts were skeptical that the benets seen after a year would last. Now, three-year results show an even greater ad vantage for surgery. Blood-sugar levels were normal in 38 percent and 25 percent of two groups given surgery, but in only 5 percent of those treated with medications. The results are quite remarkable and could rev olutionize care, said one independent expert, Dr. Robert Siegel, a cardiolo gist at Cedars-Sinai Medi cal Center in Los Angeles. No one dreamed, at least I didnt, that obesity surgery could have such broad effects long before it caused patients to lose weight, he said. Some pa tients were able to stop us ing insulin a few days after surgery. At three years, more than 90 percent of the sur gical patients required no insulin, and nearly half had needed it at the start of the study, said its leader, Dr. Philip Schauer of the Cleveland Clinic. In con trast, insulin use rose in the medication group, from 52 percent at the start to 55 percent at three years. The results were report ed Monday at an Ameri can College of Cardiology conference in Washington. They also were published online by the New England Journal of Medicine. Doctors are reluctant to call surgery a possible cure because they cant guarantee diabetes wont come back. But some patients, like Heather Britton, have passed the ve-year mark Surgery gives long-term help for diabetics TONY DEJAK / AP Heather Britton talks about her weight-loss surgery at her home in Bay Village, Ohio.SEE COPE| C4SEE SURGERY | C4

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C2 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C3

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C4 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 when some experts consider cure or pro longed remission a pos sibility. Before the study, she was taking drugs for diabetes, high blood pressure and high cho lesterol; she takes none now. Its a miracle, said Britton, a 55-yeear-old computer programmer from suburban Cleveland. It saved my life. I have no doubt that I would have had serious complications from my diabetes because the disease killed her moth er and grandmothers at a young age, she said. About 26 million Americans have diabetes, and two-thirds of them are overweight or obese. Diabetes is a leading cause of heart disease, strokes, kidney failure, eye trouble and other problems. Its treated with var ious drugs and insulin, and doctors urge weight loss and exer cise, but few people can drop enough pounds to make a difference. Bar iatric surgery currently is mostly a last resort for very obese people who have failed less drastic ways to lose weight. It costs $15,000 to $25,000 and Medicare covers it for very obese people with diabetes. Gastric bypass is the most common type: Through keyhole sur gery, doctors reduce the stomach to a small pouch and reconnect it to the small intestine. Another type is sleeve gastrectomy, in which the size of the stomach is reduced less drastically. Schauers study test ed these two operations versus medication alone in 150 mildly obese people with severe diabetes. Their A1c levels a key blood-sugar measure were over 9 on average at the start. A healthy A1c is 6 or below and the study aimed for that, even though the American Diabetes Association sets an easier target of 7. After three years, re searchers had follow-up on 91 percent of the orig inal 150 patients. The medication groups A1c averaged 8.4; the surgery groups were at 6.7 and 7, with gastric bypass being a little better. The surgery groups also shed more pounds 25 percent and 21 per cent of their body weight versus 4 percent for the medication group. Some cholesterol and other heart risk factors also improved in the surgery groups and they required fewer medicines for these than at the start. Doctors dont know how surgery produces these benets, but food makes the gut produce hormones to spur insulin, and trimming away part of it affects many hormones and metab olism. Four patients needed a second surgery within a year but none did after that. Out-of-control diabetes has complications, too many pa tients lose limbs or wind up on dialysis when their kidneys fail, and some need transplants. An obesity surgery equipment company sponsored the study, and some of the re searchers are paid consultants; the federal government also gave grant support. Dr. Robert Ratner, chief scientic and medical ofcer for the American Diabetes Association, said he was very encouraged that so many stayed in the study, and said it will remain important to follow participants longer, because many people who have weight-loss surgery regain substantial weight down the road. Any way you lose weight is benecial for curbing diabetes, he said, but we need to be concerned about the cost and complications of treatments. Diets cost less and have fewer side effects, Ratner said. One other common type of obesity surgery, stomach banding, was not part of this study. Its use has declined in re cent years as other types of surgery have shown long-term benets for keeping weight off. Your Podiatrist treats... CENTRALFLORIDAFOOTCARE, P.A.Dr. Nick Przystawski, DPM www.Floridafoot.com CROWNS$399Each(3 or more per visit) D2751/Reg $599 ea. Porcelain on non Precious metal DENTURES$749EachD05110 or D05120DENTAL SAVINGSThe patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other services, examination which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the discounted fee or reduced fee service or treatment. Fees may vary due to complexity of case. This discount does not apply to those patients with dental plans. Fees are minimal. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. LEESBURG MT. DORASunrise DentalTri-DentalConsultation and Second Opinion No Charge! NEW PATIENT SPECIAL COMPLETE SET OF X-RAYS (D0210) CLEANING BY HYGIENIST (D110) EXAMINATION BY DOCTOR (D0150) SECOND OPINION$49Reg. $155(IN ABSENCE OF GUM DISEASE) COPEFROM PAGE C1Monteores vice chair man of orthopedic sur gery, who tells the vol unteer coaches, and medical students, how caregivers can get lost in the shufe. Years ago, Levins old est daughter had a roll er-blading accident and was run over by a bus, suffering life-threatening injuries while at col lege hundreds of miles from home. In a hospital where he knew no one, even Levin had a hard time cornering doctors, got conicting reports and once watched his daughter wheeled off to deal with a dangerous complication without any explanation. Im a trauma special ist who knows the system, knew the ques tions to ask, but I couldnt get a straight answer, Levin said. Many hospitals offer support groups for caregivers, or services from a social worker or other professional. The volunteer coach es are different: Retir ees with no background in health care under go training to support caregivers in hopes that families will let their guard down with a peer. They make dai ly rounds through Mon teores waiting rooms and nursing stations to offer the services of the support center, where families can talk with a coach or a social work er, research caregiver resources online, or just relax in a quiet room. There are no statistics on similar volunteer ini tiatives, but Monteore and a handful of com munity hospitals have modeled programs on one at Northern West chester Hospital in New York. This caregiver coach idea is very innovative, said Lynn Feinberg of AARP, who tracks ef forts to help caregivers and says too often whats missing is someone to call at a moments notice, rather than awaiting a month ly support group meeting. Utilizing retirees is really a win-win, to provide that basic emotional, practical sup port and advice. It takes strong su pervision to know the boundaries, cautioned Carol Levine of the nonprot United Hospital Fund, which provided a startup grant to Monteore and has created online caregiver guides. They are not there to be nurses or social workers, she said. In stead, the program re ally treats people with respect and dignity and understanding that theyre in a difcult sit uation. Monteore put its 21 volunteers through a training course that stresses those boundaries, teaches nonjudgmental listening and lets them role-play dif cult situations. The support services dont expire when the patient goes home, Kaplan said. Caregivers still can call or come in indenitely, but there are no home visits. Does the program make a clinical differ ence? The hospital has begun a pilot study comparing whether cancer patients stick with a grueling chemotherapy-and-radiation treatment better when their caregivers are coached in providing support. Like many of the coaches, Wolffe, 69, had been a caregiver. He sought out Monteores support center while his wife, Janet Lipson, was undergoing complex cancer treatment. When she recovered, the couple became vol unteer coaches to give back. Wolffe recalls a moth er of three with termi nal cancer whose own parents didnt under stand how badly chemo sapped her strength un til Lipson explained it. Later, Wolffe brought in professionals for advice on telling the young children about their mothers illness. Mostly, Wolffe says, caregivers need to vent: Sometimes I know I have to bite my tongue because I want to say something. But they just need me to listen. RICHARD DREW / AP Janet Lipson, left, is counseled by volunteer David Wolffe, and observed by Caregiver Center Director Randi Kaplan, of Monteore Medical Center. SURGERYFROM PAGE C1 TONY DEJAK / AP Heather Britton holds a photo of herself made before her weight-loss surgery, at her home in Bay Village, Ohio.

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C5 LAURAN NEERGAARD and MARY CLARE JALONICKAssociated PressWASHINGTON Friends and family will be able to take the rst step to save a loved one from an overdose of heroin or powerful painkillers called opioids. The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved an easy-to-use device that automatically in jects the right dose of an overdose antidote named naloxone before an ambulance arrives. Doctors could prescribe it for family members or caregivers to keep on hand, in a pocket or a medicine cabinet. Opioids include legal prescription painkillers, such as OxyContin and Vicodin, as well as illegal street drugs like her oin. Called Evzio, the de vice contains naloxone, a long-used antidote for overdoses that is usually administered by syringe in ambulances or emer gency rooms. But with the rise in drug over dose deaths, there has been a growing push to equip more people with the protection. The FDA said Evzios design makes it easy for anyone to adminis ter. Once Evzio is turned on, it provides verbal in structions, much like debrillators that laymen frequently use to help people who collapse with cardiac arrest. It is about the size of a credit card or small cellphone. The antidote is not a substitute for immediate medical care, the FDA said, as anyone who has overdosed will need additional treatment. Still uncertain is how much the antidote will cost. Executives of the drugs manufacturer, kalo, Inc., of Richmond, Va., said it is too soon to say, but they are working with health insurers to get broad coverage. Eric Edwards of kalo says the antidote is intended not just for her oin or prescription drug addicts, but also for peo ple who have accidental overdoses, unexpected drug interactions or are on very high doses of the drugs. People who over dose may suffer slower breathing or heart rates or loss of consciousness. FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said in a statement that 16,000 people die every year due to opioid-relat ed overdoses, and that drug overdose deaths are now the leading cause of injury death in the United States, surpassing motor vehicle crashes. She said the increase in over dose deaths has largely been driven by prescrip tion drug overdoses. While the larger goal is to reduce the need for products like these by preventing opioid ad diction and abuse, they are extremely important innovations that will help to save lives, Hamburg said. The announcement follows several state ef forts to widen access to the antidote. At least 17 states and the District of Columbia now allow naloxone common ly known by the brand name Narcan to be distributed to the public. Some of those states allow for third parties, such as a family member or friend of an intra venous drug user, to be prescribed it. On Thursday, the state of New York announced that every state and local law enforcement ofcer will now carry syringes and inhalers of naloxone. annual conference in Washington. Chest pain sends more than 15 million people to emergency rooms in the United States and Europe each year, and it usually turns out to be due to anxi ety, indigestion or other less-serious things than a heart attack. Yet doctors dont want to miss one about 2 percent of patients having heart attacks are mistakenly sent home. People may feel reassured by being ad mitted to a hospital so doctors can keep an eye on them, but that raises the risk of pick ing up an infection and having expensive care theyll have to pay a share of, plus unneces sary tests. The study included nearly 15,000 people who went to the Karo linska University hospital with chest pains over two years. About 8,900 had low scores on a faster, more sensitive blood test for troponin, a substance thats a sign of heart damage. The test has been avail able in Europe, Asia and Canada for about three years, but it is not yet available in the United States. The patients were 47 years old on aver age and 4 percent had a previous heart attack. About 21 percent of them wound up being admitted. Researchers later looked back to see how the blood test and elec trocardiogram would have predicted how they fared over the next month. They gured that in order to nd one heart attack in patients like this, 594 would have to be admitted a huge waste of resources. A test like this would be enormously useful, and the studys re sults are almost too good to be true, said Dr. Judd Hollander, an emergency medicine specialist at the Univer sity of Pennsylvania. Central Florida Express CareAllergies to Ankle Sprains, No Appointment Needed!Walk-Ins Welcome or Call aheadWhen the unexpected happens, were here with quality medical care. We offer on-site lab services and prescriptions for your convenience.Pharmacy Coming Soon!URGENT CARE (352) 431-3743 501 West North Blvd. | Leesburg, FL | 352.431.3743WE OFFER CASH DISCOUNTS FOR UNINSURED PATIENTS. APPOINTMENTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE. TESTFROM PAGE C1 FDA approves easy-to-use heroin overdose antidote

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C6 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 TRACIE MAURIELLOPittsburgh Post-GazetteWASHINGTON A wheelchair by age 12, maybe 15 if he were one of the lucky ones. A ventilator would be next and then would come the casket, probably be fore he turned 30. That was what Ter ri and Bill Ellsworth ex pected for their son when doctors conrmed his diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a debilitating and fatal disease striking one in 3,500 boys. Instead, Billy has become an active, hap py teenager who likes to dance to Beatles songs, walk around at classic car shows, hike on local trails and jog in his living room along with avatars of Michael Jackson and Elton John he created for his Wii video game. Hes like a lot of other 13-year-olds but for an awkward gait and the Wednesday afternoons he spends at Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC for an infusion of an experimental drug thats keeping his disease at bay and without any side effects. Billy, of Coraopolis, Pa., is one of a dozen Duchenne patients who are receiving eteplirsen as part of a clinical tri al. The drug was expected only to slow the pro gression of the disease, but Billy and others in the trial are nding their symptoms are improving. Testing conrms that their lungs are get ting stronger and their bodies are producing dystrophin, an essential protein that wasnt pres ent in muscles biopsied two and a half years ago when the trial began. Results astounded researchers. Ive done many, many clinical trials and never encountered one that was so clean, effective and very well tolerated, said princi pal investigator Dr. Jer ry Mandell, Ohio State University professor of medicine and direc tor of gene therapy at Nationwide Childrens Hospital in Columbus, where testing was initially conducted. For the 12 boys and their families, its a mir acle drug, but other Duchenne patients cant access it because the Food and Drug Admin istration hasnt yet ap proved it. Terri Ellsworth and other mothers are lobbying regulators to expedite approval under a 2012 law that encour ages faster reviews of breakthrough therapies that address unmet med ical needs for rare and life-threatening diseases. They spent the past month collecting signatures on a petition they sent to the White House urging the administration to expedite approvals of drugs that treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The White House has promised to respond publicly in writ ing to petitions with at least 100,000 signatures. The Duchenne peti tion reached that thresh old Tuesday. Supporters can still sign by going to TheRaceToYes.org. Duchenne par ents believe eteplirsen meets all the requirements for expedited ap proval, and theyre urg ing action now because their children are running out of time. They were hopeful last July when the FDA expressed interest in eteplirsen, but were disappointed when the agency came back three months later and paused the process, saying government sci entists needed more data from drug developer Sarepta Therapeutics. The Massachusetts-based company is awaiting more direction from the agency. FDAs drug approval process requires well-controlled clinical trials that provide the necessary scientific data, agency spokes woman Sandy Walsh said in an email message, noting she could not discuss specic cases under review. If a drug product is to be marketed, well-controlled clinical trials are needed to en sure that the drug is safe and effective when used as indicated. The issue seems to be the size of the sample, not the quality of the re search, Mandell said. CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES Save Up To... 80% OFFPharmacy Prices!Generic MedicinesCialis 20mg.24 count.....$89.95Viagra 100mg.20 count.....$65.95Actonel 35mg.12 count.....$69Flomax 4mg.90 count.....$68Nexium 40mg.90 count.....$74 CANADIAN DISCOUNT SERVICES10111 S.E. HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 (1/4 mi. North of K-Mart on Hwy. 441)(352) 347-0403/fx (352) 347-2034CDRX441@gmail.com Aching Feet? Step right into our office. We specialize in quality medical care for all types of foot problems.Walk-InsWelcome.Call now to schedule your appointment. 923 WestDixieAvenueSuiteB| Leesburg, FL34748352-435-7849 | NexttoDr. TatroDr. Erik ZimmermannPodiatristYour feet are in good hands with us! MostMajor Insurances Accepted Parents of boys with Duchenne urge drug OK REBECCA DROKE / MCT Billy Ellsworth works on social studies lessons at home in Coraopolis, Pa., March 27. He is part of a clinical trial for eteplirsen, a drug that has not only slowed the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, but also improved his symptoms.

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C7 DELTHIA RICKSNewsdayAccidental exposure to nicotine in e-ciga rette rells has fueled a dramatic jump in calls to poison control centers, according to federal health authorities, who say the substance triggered eye, skin and inhalation injuries. Kids drank avored e-liquids, lured by de ceptively sweet odors. Adults got squirts of nicotine in their eyes and through the skin. Nicotine poisons peo ple when appreciable amounts of the substance are absorbed, inhaled or swallowed. Calls to poison centers have largely involved e-cigarette vials used to rell the devices. Phone calls to poison centers rose from one per month in September 2010 to 215 monthly by February of this year, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. More than half the calls to poison centers were about children exposed to toxic levels of nicotine, but 42 per cent involved people 20 and older, also suffering from nicotine exposure. By comparison, monthly calls involving conventional cigarettes didnt show a similar increase during the same time period. Haz ards linked to cigarettes ranged from 301 to 512 calls per month and were more frequent in sum mer, researchers found. When e-cigarettes rst came out, the nic otine was contained in a cartridge, said Dan Jacobsen of the North Shore-LIJ Center for To bacco Control in Great Neck, N.Y. Now, to make them cheaper and easier to use, they are rellable and because these rells have avors, they entice children, he said. Flavors include chocolate, strawberry and bubble gum. Jacobsen said its time the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered regulating the products, which have evolved from disposable devices resembling cigarettes to trendy wands from which bil lowing clouds of vapor are emitted. He said there are no quality-control guidelines on their manufacture in the U.S. or abroad. Dr. Tim McAfee, director of the CDCs Ofce on Smoking and Health, said the new report is de signed as a wake-up call to the public and health care professionals. People are reporting symptoms through inhalation, eye exposure and skin exposure, McAfee said. E-cigarettes have a reservoir of liquid that has a heavy concentration of nicotine. The devices are bat tery-powered and also contain an atomizer with propylene glycol that can produce a vapor. Among 9,839 poison control calls with infor mation about severity of injuries, those from e-cigarettes were more likely to report adverse health effects. Nicotine, a highly ad dictive substance that targets the brain, can cause serious cardiovascular side effects, such as dramatic palpitations and racing heart rate. The devices, however, are marketed as safe. Dr. Shahriyour Andaz, director of thoracic on cology at South Nassau Communities Hospital in Oceanside, N.Y., said although his work largely involves patients whove developed lung cancer caused by conventional cigarettes, the culprit in their addiction, he added, was also nicotine. There is 1 milligram of nicotine in a con ventional cigarette, but an e-cigarette can have amounts several times as high, he said. In high concentrations, nicotine can be deadly, say experts who warned Thursday that guidelines need to be set on the amount in e-cig arettes, which are high lighted as smoking-ces sation devices. Nicotine patches and gum are regulated by the FDA. The nicotine amount varies with the e-cigarette maker. The low est concentrations are about 1.5 percent per volume but some sell e-liquids online with higher concentrations. Brandon Rockstad, manager of Vapor World in Midwest City, Okla., sells e-liquids and nico tine. He said the amount of nicotine in his products varies, depending on the purchaser. Vapor World can sell a gallon or more of e-liq uids to brick and mortar stores, Rockstad said. For personal use we do not sell products with a high nicotine concen tration, he said. The leader of an e-cigarette trade orga nization Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association said in a statement she supports child-safety measures. We are aware of reports of increased calls to poison control cen ters that involve e-liquid and support federal age restrictions on the purchase of vapor prod ucts, childproof caps and proper labeling to safeguard against acci dental ingestion, said Cynthia Cabrera, executive director. Dave Dobbins, chief operating ofcer of the Legacy Foundation in Washington, an an ti-smoking research group, said unless the FDA enacts guidelines as it said it will do e-cigarette poisonings will only increase. When you buy these products you dont even know how much nic otine is in them its the wild, wild West out there, he said. GOLF CART ACCESS Now, one doctor is helping local residents with back pain live more active, pain-free lives.Painless, convenient, fast-actingSoleveprocedure shown to be promising in a pilot study for 95% of patients now available exclusively at Etheredge Chiropractic.*Fruitland Park(352) 365-1191The Villages(352) 750-1200*Patients in a pilot study showed a 20-point reduction in VAS score in as few as four sessions. Gorenberg M, Schiff E, Schwartz K, Eizenberg E: A novel image-guided, automatic, high-intensity neurostimulation device for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain. Pain Res Treat; 2011;2011;152307. Nervomatrix Ltd. All rights reserved. Soleve is a registered trademark Complaints of e-cigarette poisonings on the rise

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C8 DAILY COMMERCIAL Monday, April 7, 2014 CLASSIC PEANUTSComicswww.dailycommercial.com HEATHCLIFF DENNIS THE MENACE FAMILY CIRCUS LUANN MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM BEETLE BAILEY ZITS GARFIELD FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE B.C. ROSE IS ROSE DILBERT SHOE PICKLES PHANTOM BLONDIE BABY BLUES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE SNUFFY SMITH

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Monday, April 7, 2014 DAILY COMMERCIAL C9 www.dailycommercial.comDiversions352-365-8208 features@dailycommercial.com BRIDGE How to play: Fill in the blank squares with the numbers 1 through 9 so that each horizontal row, vertical column and nine-square sub-grid contains no repeated numbers. Puzzles range in difculty from one to six stars. The solution to todays puzzle will be in tomorrows paper.YESTERDAYS SOLUTION Today is Monday, April 7, the 97th day of 2014. There are 268 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On April 7, 1922, the Teapot Dome scandal had its beginnings as Interior Secretary Albert B. Fall signed a secret deal to lease U.S. Navy petroleum reserves in Wyoming and California to his friends, oilmen Harry F. Sinclair and Edward L. Doheny, in exchange for cash gifts. On this date: In 1788, an expedition led by Gen. Rufus Putnam established a settlement at present-day Marietta, Ohio. In 1798, the Mississippi Territory was created by an act of Congress, with Natchez as the capital. In 1862, Union forces led by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant defeated the Confederates at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee. In 1927, the image and voice of Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover were transmitted live from Washington to New York in the rst successful long-distance demonstration of television. In 1939, Italy invaded Albania, which was annexed less than a week later. In 1949, the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacic opened on Broadway. In 1953, the U.N. General Assembly ratied Dag Hammarskjold (dahg HAWMahr-shoold) of Sweden as the new secretary-general, succeeding Trygve Lie (TRIHG-vuh lee) of Norway. In 1964, IBM introduced its System/360, the companys rst line of compatible mainframe computers that gave customers the option of upgrading from lower-cost models to more powerful ones. In 1966, the U.S. Navy recovered a hydrogen bomb that the U.S. Air Force had lost in the Mediterranean Sea off Spain following a B-52 crash. In 1978, President Jimmy Carter announced he was deferring development of the neutron bomb, a high-radiation weapon. In 1983, space shuttle astronauts Story Musgrave and Don Peterson went on the rst U.S. spacewalk in almost a decade as they worked in the open cargo bay of Challenger for nearly four hours. In 1984, the Census Bureau reported Los Angeles had overtaken Chicago as the nations second city in terms of population. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, April 7, 2014: This year you will have plenty of opportunities to deal with your anger. You will learn to turn this uncomfortable feeling into a positive one for you and those around you. Your willingness to look within yourself will be important. If you are single, you could be passionately drawn to a Libra. The reworks will be incredible, but the ghting also could be intense. Ask yourself if you really want a relationship like this. If you are attached, you could be forging a new path where both you and your sweetie express your deeper feelings. Rather than judge your partner, learn to empathize and understand where he or she is coming from. CANCER can drag you down. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You could nd others to be demanding. Know that you cant make everyone happy all the time. A loved one or associate will let you know this fact in no uncertain terms. Explaining can only go so far with someone who does not want to listen. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Keep communication owing. You might want to consider what is said without personalizing the comment. You could feel as if you have no say with a volatile person in your life. It might be good to go to the gym to work out some stress. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Be open to a different method of handling your nances. You might get some important tips that could help you in the future. Be more forthright in your dealings with others. A loved one could cause some problems. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You could be facing a problem you dont want to deal with, but you will have little choice. You might not be sure what to say. Honor a change with a friend or loved one. You could nd some of this persons views challenging at best. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You might be walking right into a hornets nest without even realizing it. You could have very little to do with the situation, yet you could be the one being blamed. Listen to your instincts. Use care with aring tempers. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Emphasize the positives, even if all you are hearing are the negatives. The more you detach from this situation, the better your choices will be. Honor a need for a change, but know that you dont have to act just yet. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You might want to try a new approach or nd a different way of handling a problem. Clearly you do not have all the answers. Still, you must take a bigger role in what is going on. Be sensitive to a boss who could be off-kilter. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Detach from any volatile situation. You might be angrier than you realize. Express your side of a disagreement by saying what you want. A friend could be very difcult to deal with. Dont be petty. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) Your creativity will be pushed to the max when dealing with a changeable situation. The issue could involve a friend or loved one. You will need to renegotiate what was previously thought to be written in stone. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) You defer to others easily and probably too quickly. Honor a change within yourself, and keep in mind that a situation could get better with time. You seem to be less attached to a personal matter than you realize. Let go and relax. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Try to stay away from controversy. Buckle down and get your work done. Others might share a lot of their feelings. Detach and gain a new perspective. It is important for you to stay neutral. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your imagination and creativity will take you to a new level. A partner suddenly might be very short and irritable. Be smart and walk away from an argument. Understand that a money matter needs to be handled. Realize what you want here. HOROSCOPES TODAY IN HISTORYDEAR ABBY: My 1-yearold baby recently passed away. I have two other children, one with special needs. I nd it irritating and not at all comforting when people tell me that at least I have other children and that I should concentrate on them. How can I politely tell them that I have never stopped taking care of my other children, and that nothing eases the pain of burying your child? MOURNING MY BABY IN PUERTO RICO DEAR MOURNING: Please accept my deepest sympathy for the loss of your child. My heart goes out to you. While I can imagine that you might be tempted to lash out at these insensitive individuals, I hope you realize their comments are made out of ignorance. Sometimes it isnt what you say as much as how you say it. In a case like this, exactly what you have written to me would be an appropriate response as long as it is said calmly and without anger. DEAR ABBY: My daughter was married for eight years before divorcing her cheating husband. They have two children. When my daughter found out about the affair, she was inconsolable. The girlfriend actually phoned her and said, Why are you so upset? Everyone cheats! Now, two years later, the girlfriend is pregnant. My daughter would like a pater nity test done before the kids are introduced to this new child. She thinks it would be harmful if they are introduced to a new half-sibling who may later prove to belong to another man. (Every one cheats?) What do you think about this? Is it wrong for my daughter to want proof that this is her exs baby? He feels certain hes the father, but he also knows the other woman has kept in touch with her ex-boyfriend. JUST WONDERING IN CONNECTICUT DEAR JUST WONDERING: If your daughters ex wants to claim pater nity without a paternity test, there is no legal basis I can think of to prevent him from being considered the father. While your daughter has reason to be angry at her ex and to dislike the woman with whom he cheated, she cant prevent her children from seeing the baby if he wants them to. (P.S. Youd think her ex would WANT to know for certain, but it takes all kinds ...) DEAR ABBY: What is the best way to answer your children when they ask if you have taken drugs? I smoked a little marijuana back in college, but stopped before graduation and I havent done it since. My children are about ready to go to high school. I have avoided answering their questions in the past, but I know Ill have to say something sometime. What? TONGUE-TIED IN ANYTOWN, USA DEAR TONGUE-TIED: I dont believe in lying to children. When you are asked, tell them you tried it in college, didnt like it and considered it a waste of time. Then tell them that as long as they are living under your roof, using ANY illegal substance will not be condoned.Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.Mother who lost baby wants to find right words for grief JEANNE PHILLIPSDEAR ABBY JACQUELINE BIGARBIGARS STARS

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