Amendment 7 to B.A.I. Order 142, regulations for the inspection and quarantine of horses, cattle, sheep, and other rumin...

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Amendment 7 to B.A.I. Order 142, regulations for the inspection and quarantine of horses, cattle, sheep, and other ruminants, and swine imported into the United States amendment to regulation 41, providing for the dipping or the quarantine of sheep imported from Canada for breeding, grazing, or feeding
Physical Description:
2 p. : ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Animal Industry
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Quarantine, Veterinary -- Law and legislation -- United States   ( lcsh )
Animal industry -- Law and legislation -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Title from caption

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 029969163
oclc - 85229050
System ID:
AA00019113:00001

Full Text
C. V ?NT.

United States Department of Acvie,
BUREAU OF ANIM L I DUSTRY.
____ __ U.S. DEPOSITORY

Amendment 7 to B. A. I. Order 142 (Regulations for the Inspection and Quar-
antine of Horses, Cattle, Sheep, and Other Ruminants, and Swine Imported
into the United States).

AMENDMENT TO REGULATION 41, PROVIDING FOR THE DIPPING OR
THE QUARANTINE OF SHEEP IMPORTED FROM CANADA FOR BREED-
ING, GRAZING, OR FEEDING.


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
nrashington, D. C., October 18, 1909.
Regulation 41 of the Regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture for
the inspection and quarantine of horses, cattle, sheep, and other rumi-
nants, and swine imported into the United States, B. A. I. Order 142,
is hereby amended to read as follows:
REGULATION 41. All sheep imported into the United States from
Canada for breeding, grazing, or feeding must be inspected at the port
of entry by an inspector of the Bureau of Animal Industry. They must
also have been inspected by a veterinarian in the employ of and receiv-
ing a salary from the Canadian government, and be accompanied by a
certificate signed by him stating that he has inspected the sheep and
found them free from disease, and that no contagious disease affecting
sheep has existed in the district in which the animals have been kept
for six months preceding the date of importation; stating also that
They have been twice carefully dipped under his personal supervision,
or under the personal supervision of another veterinarian in the employ
of and receiving a salary from the Canadian government, in one of the
dips approved by the Secretary of Agriculture, as described in Regula-
tion 33 of B. A. I. Order 143. The owner or importer shall present an
affidavit that said certificate refers to the sheep in question: It ispro-
vided further, That any such sheep which are unaccompanied by the
aforesaid certificate showing that they have been twice dipped, as herein
prescribed, shall be subjected to a quarantine of thirty days.
This amendment shall become and be effective on and after October
20, 1909.
JAMES WILSON,
Secretary of Agriculture.


Regulation 33 of B. A. I. Order 143, as amended, which is referred to
in the foregoing amendment, reads as follows:
Regulation 33. The dips now approved are:
(a) The tobacco-and-sulphnr dip, made with sufficient extract of tobacco or
nicotine solution to give a mixture containing not less than five one-hundredths




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA "-

Nili Mi I 1111 11 1111111 iii 111111
2 3 1262 08585 4148


of 1 per cent of nicotine and 2 per cent flowers of sulphur: Provided, That for
the first dipping of infected sheep, in lieu of the sulphur herein prescribed, a
sufficient additional amount of extract of tobacco or nicotine solution shall be
used to give a mixture containing not less than seven one-hundredths of 1 per
cent of nicotine.
(b) The lime-and-sulphur dip, made by mixing 8 pounds of unslaked lime and
24 pounds of flowers of sulphur and boiling with 30 gallons of water f9r not lees
than two hours. All sediment should be allowed to subside before the liquid is
placed in the dipping vat. This liquid should be diluted sufficiently to make
100 gallons before use.
And pending further investigation, the following-described dips:
(c) The cresol dip, which consists of a mixture of cresylic acid' with soap.
When diluted ready for use this dip should contain one-half of 1 per cent of
cresylic acid.
(d) The coal-tar creosote dip, which is made by mixing coal-tar creosote or
coal-tar oils and cresylic acid separately with resin soap in varying proportions.
This dip should contain when diluted ready for use not less than 1 per cent by
weight of coal-tar oils and cresylic acid. In no case should the diluted dip con-
tain more than four-tenths of 1 per cent nor less than one'tenth of 1 per cent of
cresylic acid; but when the proportion of cresylic acid fall% below two-tenths of
1 per cent the coal-tar oils should be increased sufficientlyito bring the total of
the tar oils and the cresylic acid in the diluted dip up to 1. per cent by weight.
The cresol dip and the coal-tar creosote dip should always be tested on a small
scale with the water and under the conditions to be employed in dipping in order
to avoid possible injury to stock. The diluted sample should be allowed to stand
for at least an hour. If after this length of time there is a separation of an oily
layer the dip should not be used with that kind of water. Especial care in this
connection is necessary where hard water is to be used.
In the undiluted coal-tar creosote dips there may be, in cold weather especially,
a separation of naphthalene and other constituents of the dip. Care should
therefore be taken to gee that the concentrated dip is homogeneous in character
before using any portion of it.
Manufacturers who desire the Department to approve their dips for official
dipping should submit a sample of their product to the Bureau of Animal
Industry in Washington and accompany this with the formula used in prepar-
ing the dip.
Before a proprietary substance is approved for use in official dipping the man-
ufacturer must agree as follows:
(1) To recommend for sheep scab a dilution of the product, so as to conform
to the requirements of the Department of Agriculture.
(2) To maintain said product at a uniform composition.
(3) To place on packages of dips which have been examined and found to
conform to the requirements of the Department the following statement:
A sample of this product has been submitted to the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture for examination. We guarantee the contents of this pack-
age to be of the same composition as the sample submitted to the Department,
and that when diluted according to the directions printed thereon for the treat-
ment of sheep scab, it will give a dipping fluid of the composition required of a
--- ------2 dip by the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture governing
sheep scab."
(4) To have on containers or advertising matter no reference to the United
States Government or any of its Departments except as provided in the preced-
ing paragraph, unless such reference has been submitted to and approved by
the Department of Agriculture, and to have on containers or advertising matter
no false or misleading statement.


1 By the term cresylic acid as used in these regulations is meant cresols and other phenols
derived from coal tar, none of which boils below 185 C. nor above 250 C.
2There should be inserted here the name of the claes of dips to which the product beloigs.,
such as cresoll" or "lime and sulphur," etc.

0

* r


i*i1
Vt
"141