Citation
Regulations governing the inspection of live poultry and the inspection, humane treatment, and safe transport of animals for exportation from the United States

Material Information

Title:
Regulations governing the inspection of live poultry and the inspection, humane treatment, and safe transport of animals for exportation from the United States
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Animal Industry
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
12 p. : ; 23 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Poultry industry ( lcsh )
Export controls ( lcsh )
Animal industry -- Law and legislation -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
legislation ( marcgt )
federal government publication ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
B.A.I. order 322
Statement of Responsibility:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
029799885 ( ALEPH )
85229969 ( OCLC )

Full Text
/ItI ;5X/


DE01'Q '____._._- Issued May, 1930
(B. A. I. Order 322 "" S DEPOS U Issued May, 1930
United V a-es.Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY


REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE INSPECTION OF LIVE
POULTRY AND THE INSPECTION, HUMANE TREAT-
MENT, AND SAFE TRANSPORT OF ANIMALS FOR EX-
PORTATION FROM THE UNITED STATES

Effective on and after September 1, 1930


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
Washington, D. C., April 24, 1930.
Under authority of the act of Congress approved May 29, 1884 (U. S. C., title
21, sees. 112-115 and 117-119), as amended February 7, 192S (U. S. C., Supp.
III, title 21, sees. 112-115 and 117-119) ; of the act of Congress approved August
30, 1890 (U. S. C., title 21, sees. 101-105); of the act of Congress approved
March 3, 1891 (U. S. C., title 45, secs. 75-76), as amended May 28, 1928 (U. S.
C.. Supp. III, title 45, sees. 75-76) ; of the act of Congress approved February 2,
1903 (U. S. C., title 21, sees. 111-122), as amended by the act of Congress ap-
proved February 7, 1928, supra; and of the act of Congress approved March 4,
1907 (U. S. C., title 21, sees. 80-82), as amended July 24, 1919 (U. S. C., title
21, sec. 96), the following regulations are hereby prescribed for the inspection
of live poultry and the inspection, humane treatment, and care of livestock, and
for fitting vessels engaged in the transportation of animals from the United
States to foreign countries.
These regulations, which for the purpose of identification are designated as
B. A. I. Order No. 322, supersede all previous regulations on the same subject,
and shall become and be effective on and after September 1, 1930.
[SEAL.] C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


GENERAL PROVISIONS
DEFINITIONS
REGULATION 1. Whenever in these regulations the following words, names, or
terms are used they shall be construed as follows:
Department.-The United States Department of Agriculture.
Bureau.-The Bureau of Animal Industry of the department.
Inspector.-An inspector of the bureau.
Accredited veterinarian%--A veterinarian accredited by the bureau for testing
accredited herds.
Animals.-Horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and goats.
Horses.-Horses, mules, and asses.
Poultry.-Domestic fowls.
Lumber.-Sound hard pine, spruce, oak, or other hardwood.
INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION
REGULATION 2. Sectiont 1. No animals or live poultry shall be exported from
the United States to a foreign country until they have been inspected in the
manner prescribed by the chief of bureau and found to be free from evidence
of communicable disease or exposure thereto, and until they have been tested
in the manner provided by these regulations if they are of a class required by
regulation 3 hereof to be tested. If, upon inspection, they are found to be
1113380-30









free from evidence of communicable disease or exposure thereto, they shall be
accompanied by a certificate to that effect signed or indorsed by a bureau in-
spector, unless they are destined to a country with reference to which the
Secretary of Agriculture shall have waived the requirement of such a certificate.
SEC. 2. Owners or masters of vessels carrying animals from the United States
to a foreign country shall provide such animals with space, ventilation, fittings,
food and water supply, and other facilities as hereinafter set forth: Provided,
however, That shipments of animals to Canada, Mexico, Central America, and
countries of the West Indies shall be subject to such requirements only as the
chief of bureau shall prescribe as to space, ventilation, fittings, food, and water
supply. Such owners or masters shall not accept for transportation any animals
found by a bureau inspector to be in an unfit condition for such transportation.
TUBERCULIN TEST FOR DAIRY AND BREEDING CATTLE
REGULATION 3. No dairy or breeding cattle shall be exported from the United
States to a foreign country unless they shall have passed a tuberculin test
applied either by a bureau inspector, a duly authorized representative of the
country to which the animals are to be exported, or an accredited veterinarian,
in which case the test chart shall be indorsed by a bureau inspector in charge of
tuberculosis-eradication work in the State of origin: Provided, however, That
the requirement of a tuberculin test may be waived upon presentation to the
inspector by the exporter of a written permit of an authorized representative of
a foreign government to ship a specified lot of cattle to that particular country
without said test.
PORTS OF EXPORT
RIEULATION 4. Inspection will be maintained at the following ports: Portland,
Me.; Boston, Mass.; New York, N. Y.; Philadelphia, Pa.; Baltimore, Md.; Nor-
folk, Va.; Jacksonville, Fla.; New Orleans, La.; Galveston and Hiouston, Tex.;
San Diego, Los Angeles, and San Francisco, Calif.; Portland, Oreg.; and Tacoma
and Seattle, Wash. Other ports may be designated in special cases by the chief
of the bureau.
DISINFECTION OF CARS AND OTHER CONVEYANCES
REGULATiON 5. Animals destined to a foreign country shall be transported
from the point of inspection to the ocean vessel in cars or other conveyances
which have been cleaned and disinfected to the satisfaction of an inspector after
the animals have been inspected in accordance with the requirements of regula-
tion 2: Provided, however, That express cars and other conveyances not reg-
ularly used for the transportation of livestock need not be so disinfected. If
such animals are so transported in crates, the crates shall either be new and
previously unused, or shall be cleaned and disinfected (to the satisfaction of an
inspector) prior to receiving such export animals.
REST AND INSPECTION BEFORE EMBARKATION, LOADING, ETC.
REGULATION 6. No animals shall be loaded upon a vessel for exportation until
they have been allowed at least five hours' actual rest in suitable quarters at the
port of embarkation: Provided, however, That a period of rest will not be re-
quired at the port of embarkation if the animals were transported thereto in
cars in which there was opportunity to rest and proper feed and water were
provided in compliance with the requirements of the 28-hour law (U. S. Code,
title 45, secs. 71-74), or when the time of transportation between the point of
origin or place where last fed, watered, and rested in transit and the port of
embarkation does not exceed 12 hours.
All animals specified in this regulation shall remain a sufficient length of time
and under conditions at the port of export to afford proper inspection during
daylight. The place of detention for rest and inspection shall be subject to
approval of the inspector. Movement of animals from the holding yards, pens,
or stables to the transporting vessel and their loading, storing, and tying shall
be performed under such careful supervision and restrictions as the inspector
may direct.
HEADROPES AND HALTERS

RmULATION 7. Horses shall be provided with proper halters and ropes for
handling and tying. Halters, ropes, or other suitable equipment satisfactory to
the inspector shall be provided for the handling and tying of cattle.







L
SPACE ON VESSELS

REGULATION 8. Except as specified in regulation 9 of this order, space on ves-
sels for the various animals covered by these regulations shall be as follows:
Horses.-Horses shall have not less than 6 feet 3 inches clear vertical space
from beams of deck or roof overhead to flooring underfoot. Each horse shall
be allowed an individual space of not less than 2 feet 6 inches in width by not
less than 8 feet in depth, provided-
(1) That additional space shall be furnished for very large horses and for
mares in foal.
(2) That upon application, to the inspector, of the owner of the horses or his
agent four horses may be placed in regulation pens not less than 10 feet in
width by 8 feet in depth. Stallions and mares in foal, however, shall be
shipped only in separate stalls.
(3) That, subject to the approval of the inspector, from five to seven horses
or mules not exceeding 500 pounds each in weight may be shipped untied in
pens having a width of not less than 10 feet and a depth of not less than 8 feet.
(4) That upon approval of the inspector the 8-foot depth of stalls for horses
may be reduced to 7 feet for medium-sized horses in order to avoid losing a
row of stalls in the forward and aft ends of the ship, abreast of hatches, along-
side of engine and boiler casings, etc.
Additional stalls distributed in the different compartments or decks in which
horses are carried shall be provided for use as hospital stalls for sick or disabled
horses, as follows:
One stall not less than 2 feet 6 inches in width by 8 feet in depth for the first
4 to 10 horses shipped; 1 additional like stall for any number of horses in excess
of 10 up to and including 25; and an additional like stall for each additional 25
horses or fraction of that number.
Cattle.-Cattle shall have at least 6 feet vertical space by not less than 8 feet
in depth on all decks free of all obstructions except that, subject to approval of
the inspector, cattle may be placed on raised floors over pipes and over similar
obstructions where the vertical space is not less than 5 feet 6" inches from under-
edge of beam overhead to flooring underfoot. Cattle over 850 pounds in weight
shall each be allowed a space of 2 feet 6 inches in width by 8 feet in depth, and
no more than 4 head of such cattle shall be allowed in each pen, except at the
end of rows, where 5 may be allowed together. Cattle of 850 pounds' weight or
less shall each be allowed a space of at least 2 feet in width by 8 feet in depth,
and 5 may be allowed in each pen. Calves and young stock or yearlings may be
stowed at the discretion of the inspector. Cattle standing between stanchions,
sounding tubes, ventilators, and other obstructions, though in continuous pens,
shall each be allowed a space of 3 feet in width by 8 feet in depth. Cattle car-
ried in single stalls shall each be allowed not less than 3 feet in width by 8 feet
in depth. Additional space and separate stalls shall be provided when required
by the inspector for large dairy and breeding cattle and for cows in advanced
pregnancy. Large cows, in the discretion of the inspector, may be placed 3 in a
pen of 10 feet in width by 8 feet in depth.
Sheep and goats.-The space for each sheep or goat shall be 4 feet long by
14 inches wide: Provided, however, That for lambs or goats under 100 pounds
in weight the space need not exceed 4 feet by 12 to 13 inches. Space for sheep
and goats for breeding purposes shall be not less than 5 feet in length by
20 inches in width.
Sheep pens shall have a clear vertical space of not less than 3 feet. One
single deck of sheep may be carried upon the roof over cattle when said roofs
meet the requirements of regulation 16. Sheep pens shall not exceed 20 feet
by 8 feet where two tiers are carried.
Swine.-The space for swine not exceeding 150 pounds in weight shall be the
same as that specified for breeding sheep and goats, and for those under 100
pounds in weight the same as for lambs and for goats of less than 100 pounds
in weight. Additional space and suitable pens shall be provided when re-
quired by the inspector for unusually large hogs or for swine for breeding
purposes.
CRATES AND PORTABLE STALLS
REGULATION 9. Small numbers of cattle, sheep, goats, and swine mty be car-
ried in crates or portable stalls which meet the space requirements of regula-
tion 8 of these regulations and are so constructed as to afford comfort and
security. Small numbers of horses may be shipped in crates or portable









stalls of sufficient size and strength to carry them safely. All crates and port-
able stalls shall be properly equipped for feeding the animals carried therein
and shall be subject to the approval of the inspector.
Where animals are carried in crates or portable stalls on upper or exposed
decks, provision shall be made for a suitable roof for each crate or stall to
afford protection against seas and weather conditions.
HATCHES

REGULATION 10. No animals shall be loaded upon hatches on decks above ani-
mals, nor shall any merchandise, freight, or feed for animals be loaded upon said
hatches, but said hatches shall at all times be kept clear.
In loading animals upon exposed decks, such as bridge, spar, well decks, etc.,
where hatch coamings do not exceed 2 feet in height at center of hatch, animals
may be placed on hatches, provided that on all hatches on upper decks sufficient
space be left clear so that entrance to deck beneath may be possible at all times.
There shall also be left clear on all hatches, under which hay and feed are
stowed, space for the proper removal and handling of same.
When carried in the 'tween-decks, animals may be placed on hatches. In no
case shall horses be allowed on hatches when the vertical space between beams
or coamings overhead and flooring underfoot is less than 6 feet 3 inches.
In no case shall cattle be placed on hatches when the vertical space between
beams or coamings overhead and flooring underfoot is less than 5 feet 6 inches.
When animals are carried on third or steerage deck, they may be carried on
third-deck hatches.
In carrying animals on underdeck hatches, sufficient space shall be left clear
on hatches for passageway across ship, for proper removal and handling of
hay and feed, and also for brow.
UPPER-DECK FITTINGS

REGULATION 11. No animals shall be carried upon the upper decks where the
outside rails or bulwarks are not of sufficient strength to hold fittings securely
and measure less than 3 feet in height from the deck. When animals are car-
ried upon the upper decks bulkheads shall be erected at all unprotected ends
of stalls.
PROTECTION FROM HEAT OF BOILERS AND ENGINES

REGULATION 12. No animals shall be stowed along the alleyways by engine
and boiler rooms, unless the sides of said engine and boiler rooms are covered
by a tongue-and-groove tight sheathing, making a 3-inch air space.
ALLEYWAYS

REGULATION 13. Alleyways in front of and between pens used for feeding
and watering cattle shall have a width of 3 feet; however, for a distance not to
exceed 12 feet at end of alleyways in bow and stern of ship, and where obstruc-
tions less than 3 feet in length occur, the width may be reduced to a minimum of
18 inches. Alleyways in front of and between pens used for feeding and water-
ing horses shall have a minimum width of 4 feet except in bow and stern of
ship, where the alleyways may be reduced to a width of not less than 3 feet.
Two or more athwartship alleyways at least 18 inches wide in the clear shall
be left on each side of upper deck, so that the scuppers can be readily reached
and kept clear of obstructions. Three or more alleyways at least 18 inches
wide shall be left open on each side in 'tween or other under decks, where deck
is not divided into compartments. Where 'tween or other under decks are
divided into compartments, one or more athwartship alleyways, 18 inches wide
on both sides of ship and in every compartment shall be left clear and open so
that the scuppers can be readily reached and cleared of all obstructions. In
forward compartments the alleyways to scuppers shall be placed at after end of
compartments. In after compartments the alleyways to scuppers shall be in
forward ends of compartments. Athwartship alleyways not less than 2 feet
in width shall be provided where necessary so that the attendants may cross
ship's deck with feed and water for animals and for other purposes. When
animals are not carried in the decks beneath, passage from side to side of ship
can be made by crossing over hatches where the coamings do not exceed 18
inches in height. Sufficient space shall be left at the sides of hatches to permit







5

of the feed in decks beneath being readily removed and handled. Where animals
are carried in underdecks, proper brows, or runs, shall be placed in hatches, on
which animals may be walked in loading or discharging. Where horses are
carried on upper deck and in under deck, said brows shall remain shipped, in
hatches, so that horses may be led from deck to deck during voyage.
Fore-and-aft alleyways of the same character as those specified in this regu-
lation for cattle shall be provided in front of and between all pens used for
feeding sheep, goats, and swine, and athwartship alleyways not less than 18
inches in the clear shall be provided at ends of 20-foot pens for all double tiers.
STANCHIONS

REGULATION 14. Stanchions as follows shall be provided for all stalls and pens
for horses, cattle, sheep, goats, and swine:
Horses and cattle.-Iron stanchions shall not be less than 2 inches in diam-
eter, set in iron sockets above and below, and fastened with 5/%-inch bolts.
Except as hereinafter provided, wooden stanchions shall be of 4 by 6 inch
lumber set at 5 feet from centers against the ship's rail or at points midway
between two animals, and inside stanchions in their proper place shall be in
line with outboard stanchions and set up so that the 6-inch way of the stan-
chions shall set fore-and-aft. Each outboard stanchion shall be fastened to the
rail or bulwark by means of a %s-inch iron hook bolt with hook on outboard end
to pass over and under rail or bulwark and through outboard stanchion and
set up on inside of same with a washer and nut. Stanchions shall be of not less
than same height as the required vertical space for horses and cattle, respec-
tively, and butt up square to beams with 2 by 4 by 8 inch cleat butted against
both sides of stanchions and well nailed to beams and 1 by 6 by 24 inch angle
braces properly placed and nailed to secure each stanchion to its beam. Inboard
stanchions supporting roof fittings shall be 2 inches higher than outboard or
rail stanchions.
A piece 2 by 3 inches, or 2-inch plank, shall be fastened to the outside of the
outboard stanchion and run up to underneath the rail to chock down the
stanchion and prevent lifting when the beam is sprung to the crown of the
deck. Open-rail ships shall be blocked out on backs of stanchions fair with
the outside of rails to receive the outside planking. Where upper-deck fittings
are not permanent, the heels of outside stanchions shall be secured by a
bracing of 2 by 3 inch lumber from the back of each stanchion to sheer streak
of waterway, the heels of inside stanchions being properly braced from end to
each other. In amidship fittings and where fittings are brought forward to
clear rigging bitts, etc., the rump-board stanchions may be 3 by 4 inch, braced
or cleated to beam or roof or deck as required.
Stanchions on under decks may be set 7 feet 6 inches from centers, for three
animals, provided the space for animals is 2 feet 6 inches per head. If space
for animals is more than 2 feet 6 inches per head, the distance between
stanchions may be changed accordingly. Thus, if two cattle or horses are
given 4 feet each, stanchions may be set at 8-foot centers and driven tight be-
tween the decks, securely braced with 2 by 3 inch raking shores from stanchion
to stanchion and sides of ship. If one or both decks are of wood, then the
stanchions may be secured by cleating well to one or both decks, at heads and
heels of same. When 3 by 10 inch breast boards are used, 4 by 6 inch stanchions
may be set at 10-foot centers.
Sheep, goats, and swine.-Except as hereinafter provided, pens shall be
equipped with stanchions of not less than 3 by 4 inch lumber, set at 5-foot
centers, the 4-inch way of stanchions fore-and-aft, with 1-inch shoulder
gained on stanchions to receive beams.
On well decks and other exposed decks outboard stanchions shall be cut not
less than 4 inches higher than bulwark and be hook bolted to the rail with
%-inch hook bolts in the same manner as provided in this regulation for horse
and cattle stanchions. When bulwark on well decks is of sufficient height to
permit of beams running underneath the head of rail, this shall be done by
cutting out 1 by 4 inches of side of stanchion at that point, allowing beam to
run through to underneath the head, thus forming chock to prevent fittings
lifting. For single-tier pens on exposed decks braces of 2 by 3 inch lumber
shall run from heels of front stanchion to hatch coamings, winch beds, etc.
On open-rail ships the backs of rail stanchions shall be filled out to flush with
outside of rail t6 receive the outside planking.








Where two tiers of sheep, pigs, or goats are carried on upper or exposed decks,
the stanchion beams and their attachments shall be as required for horses and
cattle.
Where sheep pens are placed over cattle fittings, outboard stanchions not less
than 4 by 4 inch lumber shall run up through the cattle fittings roof and be
secured by bolting through outboard cattle stanchions with not less than 3%-inch
bolts. Similar inboard stanchions shall be securely nailed and cleated to the
roof of cattle pens.
BEAMS
REGULATION 15. Horses and cattle.-Except where stanchions are driven
tightly between the decks or otherwise secured by cleating to wooden decks as
specified in regulation 14, a beam shall be provided for each athwartship line
of stanchion. Beams shall be 3 by 6 inch lumber. Those at the ends of fittings
and each alternate one shall extend clear across the ships beam or abut against
house or other permanent deck fittings. Intermediate short beams are not to
extend beyond the inner edge of the roof.
Sheep, goats, and swine.-Where two tiers of pens are constructed on upper
or exposed decks, beams shall be provided as specified in this regulation for
horses and cattle. Beams of 3 by 4 inch lumber set on 3-inch side and bolted
to stanchions with %-inch bolts shall be provided to support the roof of single-
tier pens on exposed decks and the floor of upper double-tier pens on all decks.
Beams under upper-tier pens shall be supported in centers by 2 by 3 inch pieces
run from deck to underside of beams.
ROOFS

REULATION 16. All pens for carrying horses and cattle on exposed decks
shall be roofed with 11/'-inch lumber, tongued and grooved and laid fore-and-
aft from the outside planking to 2 feet beyond the line of breast boards, driven
tightly together and nailed to the athwartship beams.
FLOORING

REULATION 17. Horses and cattle.-On temporarily fitted ships dairy and
breeding cattle shall be placed on raised flooring, as hereinafter described.
Ships with iron decks shall be sheathed with 1 or 2 inch lumber. Sheathing
will not be required on ships with wooden decks, provided proper footlocks are
secured to the deck. Cement diagonally scored one-half inch deep may be used
on iron decks instead of wooden sheathing if the footlocks are molded in the
same and bolted to the deck. Except as otherwise provided in this regulation,
no raised flooring less than 2 inches in thickness shall be used, and it shall be
nailed to scantling 2 by 3 inches laid athwartship on the deck not more than
2 feet 6 inches apart. Such flooring may be in two or three sections in the
depth of the stalls, so as to provide for its removal and relaying after cleaning
and disinfecting of decks and fittings; for dairy and breeding cattle 1/4 by not
less than 8 inch lumber may be used, nailed to 2 by 3 inch scantling placed
underneath not more than 2 feet 6 inches apart. This flooring may be laid in
portable sections, as hereinbefore described for 2-inch materials.
Sheep. goats, and swinhe.-On all temporarily fitted ships sheep, goats, and
swine shall be carried only on wooden decks or wooden flooring, as hereinafter
provided. Where wooden decks are used, footlocks as specified in regulation 18
shall be secured to the deck. On other than wooden decks flooring for lower
tiers shall be of not less than 1-Inch lumber raised 2 inches by nailing to 2 by 3
inch lumber laid athwartship on the d(leck not more than 2 feet 6 inches apart.
Where a single tier is built on top of cattle pens the roof of the cattle pens shall
serve as a floor for the animals. Where two tiers of pens are to be used, the
flooring of the upper tier shall be made of l/8-inch lumber, tongued and grooved,
driven closely together and nailed to the beams beneath.
Raised flooring.-Raised flooring of 2-inch plank shall be laid over steering
gear for all animals when found necessary by the inspector.
FOOTLOCKS

REGULATIoN 18. Footlocks shall be provided for all pens in which animals are
carried.
Horses and cattle.-Except as hereinafter provided, footlocks for horses and
cattle shall be of 2 by 4 inch lumber laid flat side down and fore-and-aft and








placed 12 inches, 14 inches, 2 feet 2 inches, and 14 inches apart, the first one
distant 12 inches from the inside of footboard. Where temporary fore-and-aft
footlocks are used, they shall be filled in athwartship opposite each stanchion,
properly secured to sheathing or deck, and secured by a batten of 2 by 3 inch
lumber, to go over all from stanchion to stanchion. This batten must be in one
piece. Pieces 2 by 3 inches must be nailed on stanchions or backing over batten
to prevent floor raising. These pieces over battens over all will not be required
in underdecks. When permanent footlocks, securely bolted to decks, are used, the
athwartship braces between footlocks from stanchion to stanchion and batten
may be omitted when the stanchion is securely fitted in iron socket bolted to
the deck. A space of 2 inches shall be left between the ends of athwartship
footlocks and fore-and-aft footlocks when the former are securely bolted to the
d(leck. When the fore-and-aft footlocks are permanent, a 3-inch space shall be
left between the ends at end of each section.
Where dairy and breeding cattle are carried between decks, footlocks as here-
inbefore specified may be of 1 by 4 inch lumber.
Sheep, goats, and swine.-Pens for sheep, goats, and swine shall be provided
with footlocks of 1 by 2 inch lumber laid flat side down fore-and-aft with four
strips at equal distances apart through depth of pen, provided that the lower
pens of double tiers shall be equipped with footlocks of 2 by 4 inch lumber
placed as provided in this regulation for cattle.
OUTSIDE PLANKING

REGULATION 19. All pens for carrying animals on exposed decks shall be pro-
vided with outside planking of not less than l1-inch tongue-and-groove lumber
laid fore-and-aft of ship driven tightly together and securely nailed to backs
of stanchions in a manner to cover all open spaces properly: Provided, That
during warm weather the top-course planking may be left off fore-and-aft of
ship in order to allow a free circulation of air. Outside planking may be laid
in mill-run lengths, butts to be broken, and reinforced with l1-inch lumber,
forming butt straps, these to be well nailed and nails clinched.
BREAST, FRONT, AND FOOT BOARDS

REGULATION 20. Horses and cattle.-Breast boards shall be of not less than
2% by 9% inch dressed, or 3 by 10 inch lumber in the rough, provided that
breast boards may be of not less than 1% by 9% inch lumber dressed, or of 2
by 10 inch in the rough when the distances between centers of breast-board
stanchions are not more than 8 feet. All breast boards shall butt on the stan-
chions and an iron plate one-fourth of an inch in thickness and 3 inches square
be placed over the boards like a butt strap, %-inch bolt passing through same.
All breast boards shall have 1-inch holes bored through them at proper dis-
tances for tying animals. Proper gates or openings in breast boards shall be
provided at convenient distances in order to allow animals to be loaded and
moved from pens when necessary. These shall be formed of breast boards and
be properly cleated with wood or iron cleats, with stop or chock over top of
breast board to prevent raising. All pens shall be provided with footboards of
not less than 2 by 9 inch lumber and shall be properly nailed or bolted to
stanchions.
Sheep, goats, and sicwne.-Front boards shall be of 1 by 6 inch lumber and
sufficient in number to secure the animals properly in the pens. Provisions shall
be made for removing a section of front boards at each pen to allow loading and
unloading of the animals.
RUMP BOARDS

REGULATION 21. Horses and cattle.-Rump boards shall be provided for horses
and cattle, and when covering bitts, rigging, braces, or other obstructions
located at a distance from ship's sides they shall be brought forward to cover
same, with a solid partition behind the animals; and when necessary to extend
fittings opposite bitts, rigging, braces, etc., fittings for two or more animals
shall be brought forward. Rump boards in such cases shall be not less than
1/8 inches in thickness, tongued and grooved and built to a height of 4 feet
6 inches from the deck. Where deck is clear and without obstructions, such
as braces, etc., rump boards may be set on the inside of rail stanchions. In
such case and where beef cattle stand, rump to rump in amidship stalls 18
inches (or two boards of 11 by 9 inches) of tongue-and-groove lumber shall be






8

used. In 'tween-decks, when ship's ribs are of the bulb-edge type, or of channel-
Iron type, the above-mentioned rump board may be used. When ribs are of the
thin-edge type close backing shall be run down, same as in offsets on upper
deck, or ribs may be covered with wood. Where ship's cargo battens are in
good order same may be used as backing or rump boards by filling in spaces
between when necessary.
In case stalls or pens are built alongside of hatches, rump boards shall be
carried down to line of coaming.
Sheep, goats, and szoine.-Pens for these animals on all exposed decks shall
be provided with an inner backing, as required in this regulation for horses
and cattle, extending from the floor to a height of not less than 2 feet 6 inches:
Provided, however, That not less than 1-inch lumber may be used for this
purpose.
DIVISION BOARDS

REGULATION 22. Horses.-There shall be from 1 to 4 or more division boards
for horses. They shall be portable and be not less than 2 by 9 inches of lumber,
dressed on both sides, with top edges rounded, and placed horizontally between
the horses with 3-inch openings between. They shall be four in number at ends
of hatches, passageways across ship, and at alleyways to scuppers.
Cattle.-Division boards for cattle shall be of lumber not less than 2 by 8
inches and so arranged as to divide the animals into lots of four, except at the
ends of rows as provided in regulation 8, thus making compartments for that
number all over the vessel. Division boards shall be four in number at ends of
hatches, passageways across ship, at alleyways to scuppers, and for dairy and
feeding cattle, whether divided into lots of four or placed in single stalls. All
division boards shall be portable and, for dairy and breeding cattle, placed hori-
zontally with 3-inch openings between. For other than dairy and breeding
cattle, division boards may be two in number, placed perpendicularly.
Sheep, goats, and swine.-Division boards and those forming ends of pens
shall be as provided for front boards for sheep, goats, and swine in regulation 20
of these regulations.
TROUGHS AND HAYRACKS

REGULATION 23. All pens shall be equipped with proper troughs and hayracks,
as hereinafter provided.
Horses.-Removable separate troughs shall be provided for horses. They may
be of wood or metal and shall be provided with hooks for hanging on breast
board.
Cattle.-When flooring is raised to form bottom of trough, troughs may be
provided for cattle by placing footboard on outside of front stanchion and a
2 by 3 inch scantling on 2-inch edge on first footlock, provided that in 'tween-
decks when footlocks are of 1 by 4 inch lumber the said scantling shall be of
2 by 4 inch dimensions. When flooring is not raised in stalls the section between
footboards and first footlock shall be raised 2 inches, thus forming the bottom of
troughs, the footlock to be built up properly to form inner side of trough.
Metal troughs meeting approval of the inspector may be used in lieu of the
aforementioned wooden troughs.
Sheep, goats, and swine.-Troughs for sheep, goats, and swine shall be con-
structed with sides and ends of 1 by 6 inch lumber nailed to pieces of 1 by 8
inch lumber for bottom board and be fastened between stanchions on fronts and
ends of stalls. Suitable hayracks shall be provided for sheep and goats. They
shall be made of 1 by 2 inch strips of lumber placed fore-and-aft and along the
athwartship partitions by nailing to angle braces of 2 by 3 inch lumber nailed
to stanchion and beam. Each pen for sheep and goats shall be equipped with a
suitable water-tight vessel for watering the animals.
DEFECTIVE FITTINGS
REGULATION 24. In the case of previously used fittings the inspector may, in
case he finds that any of the fittings are worn, decayed, defective in construction,
or apparently unsound, require replacement of the same before permitting
their use.
CLEANSING OF FALSE DECKS AND TEMPORARY TROUGHS
REGULATION 25. False decks upon which animals are loaded and temporary
feed troughs shall be removed, and all the manure and dirt shall be removed







from underneath, and the decks and troughs shall be disinfected before they
are used to receive another load of animals.
VENTILATION
REGULATION 26. Each underdeck compartment not exceeding 50 feet in length
shall have at least four bell-mounted ventilators of not less than 18 inches in
diameter and with tops exceeding 7 feet in height above shelter deck, two situ-
ated at each end of the compartment. Compartments over 50 feet long shall
have additional ventilators of the same dimensions or efficient fans. Animals
shall not be placed at greater distance than 10 feet beyond ventilators. When
the fittings on upper decks are permanent and hatches overhead are provided, the
same regulations for ventilation shall apply as provided for underdecks.
LIGHTING
REGULATION 27. All vessels carrying animals shall have electric lights avail-
able at all times for the proper attending of all animals.
FEED AND WATER
REGULATION 28. Feed.-Owners of animals or their agents shall provide a suf-
ficient amount of suitable feed. Owners of vessels carrying animals shall have
all feed placed under hatches and, so far as possible, in holds contiguous to the
animals on board, provided that not more than two days' feed may be allowed
on the shelter deck when it does not interfere with the proper care of the
animals and it is properly covered. It shall be the first used. No feed shall
be stored on top or inside of sheep pens.
Water.-Owners of vessels carrying animals shall have each vessel equipped
with water condensers in good working order and of sufficient capacity to pro-
vide 8 gallons of fresh, cold water each 24 hours for each head of horses and
cattle in addition to any amount required by other animals on board and for
other purposes. Where vessels are not equipped with pipes for watering
animals, casks or hogsheads shall be provided of not less than 400 gallons' total
capacity for each 100 head of cattle and horses, and an additional amount in
equal proportion shall also be carried for sheep, goats, and swine. These con-
tainers shall be filled with fresh water before sailing and refilled as emptied.
All water tanks for use of animals shall be filled with good, fresh water before
sailing.
ATTENDANTS
REGULATION 29. Sufficient attendants, as herein specified, shall be provided
by the shipper or by the owner of the vessel. The employment of attendants
shall be subject to the approval of the inspector, and after such approval they
shall be signed as members of the ship's crew. They shall be furnished with
heated, well-lighted, and well-ventilated quarters and with bedding and table
utensils. Experienced foremen shall be in charge of the animals. The attend-
ants shall be assembled a sufficient time before the sailing of the steamer for
the inspector to examine them. The examination shall be made before the
signing of the ship's articles by the attendants, who shall give evidence-
(1) That they know for what purpose they are employed and the duties that
will be required of them.
(2) That they are able-bodied and physically competent to perform the duties
required.
(3) That they have sufficient knowledge of English to make themselves under-
stood or to understand orders given them.
The number of attendants shall be as follows:
For horses.-One attendant to each 22 head.
Cattle.-One attendant for each 35 head where steanyer has water pipes ex-
tending entire length of both sides of compartments.
One attendant for each 25 head if steamer does not have water pipes extend-
ing the entire length of both sides of compartments.
One attendant for each 50 head when steamer has water pipes extending
entire length of both sides of compartments, with not less than 3 feet in width
of alleyways, and when a competent watchman in addition to attendants is on
duty at night.
One attendant to each 35 head upon steamers not equipped with water pipes
extending the entire length of both sides of compartments, with a watchman on
duty at night.







10

One additional attendant who is a capable mnilker to each 15 head of fresh
cows and forward springers.
Sheep and goats.-One attendant for each 150 head during the winter season
(October 1 to March 31).
One attendant to each 200 head during the summer season (April 1 to Sep-
tember 30).
Sw'ne.-One attendant for each 50 head.

LAWS UNDER WHICH THE FOREGOING REGULATIONS ARE MADE

AN ACT For the establishment of a Bureau of Animal Industry, to prevent the exporta-
tion of diseased cattle, and to provide means for the suppression and extirpation of
pleuropneumonia and other contagious diseases among domestic animals. (U. S. C.,
Title 21, Sees. 112-115 and 117-119)
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of
America in Congress assembled, That the Commissioner of Agriculture shall organize in
his department a Bureau of Animal Industry, and shall appoint a chief thereof, who
shall be a competent veterinary surgeon, and whose duty it shall be to investigate and
report upon the condition of the domestic animals of the United States, their protection
and use, and also inquire into and report the causes of contagious, infectious, and com-
mniunicable diseases among them, and the means for the prevention and cure of the same,
and to collect such information on these subjects as shall be valuable to the agricultural
and commercial interests of the country; and the Commissioner of Agriculture is hereby
authorized to employ a force sufficient for this purpose, not to exceed twenty persons at
any one time. The salary of the chief of said bureau shall be three thousand dollars per
annum; and the commissioner shall appoint a clerk for said bureau, with a salary of one
thousand five hundred dollars per annum.
SEC. 2. That the Commissioner of Agriculture is authorized to appoint two competent
agents, who shall be practical stock raisers or experienced business men familiar with
questions pertaining to commercial transactions in livestock, whose duty it shall be,
under the instructions of the Commissioner of Agriculture, to examine and report upon
the best methods of treating, transporting, and caring for animals, and the means to be
adopted for the suppression and extirpation of contagious pleuropneumonia, and to pro-
vide against the spread of other dangerous contagious, infectious, and communicable dis-
eases. The compensation of said agents shall be at the rate of ten dollars per diem, with
all necessary expenses, while engaged in the actual performance of their duties under
this act, when absent from their usual place of business or residence as such agent.
SEC. 3. That it shall be the duty of the Commissioner of Agriculture to prepare such
rules and regulations as hlie may deem necessary for the speedy and effectual suppression
and extirpation of said diseases, and to certify such rules and regulations to the execu-
tive authority of each State and Territory, and invite said authorities to cooperate in the
execution and enforcement of this act. Whenever the plans and methods of the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture shall be accepted by any State or Territory in which pleuropneu-
monia or other contagious, infectious, or communicable disease is declared to exist, or
such State or Territory shall have adopted plans and methods for the suppression and
extirpation of said diseases, and such plans and methods shall be accepted by the Com-
missioner of Agriculture, and whenever the governor of a State or other properly consti-
tuted authorities signify their readiness to cooperate for the extinction of any contagious,
infectious, or communicable disease in conformity with the provisions of this act, the
Commissioner of Agriculture is hereby authorized to expend so much of the money
appropriated by this act as may be necessary in such investigations, and in such disin-
fection and quarantine measures as may be necessary to prevent the spread of the disease
from one State or Territory into another.
SEC. 4. That in order to promote the exportation of livestock from the United States the
Commissioner of Agriculture shall make special investigation as to the existence of
pleuropneumonia, or any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, along the divid-
ing lines between the United States and foreign countries, and along the lines of trans-
portation from all parts of the United States to ports from which livestock are exported,
and make report of the results of such investigation to the Secretary of the Treasury.
who shall, from time to time, establish such regulations concerning the exportation and
transportation of livestock as the results of said investigations may require.
SEC. 5. That to prevent the exportation from any part of the United States to any
port in a foreign country of livestock affected with any contagious, infectious, or com-
municable disease, and especially pleuropneumonia, the Secretary of the Treasury, be
and he is hereby, authorized to take such steps and adopt such measures, not inconsistent
with the provisions of this act, as he may deem necessary.
SEC. 6. That no railroad company within the United States, or the owners or masters
of any steam or sailing or other vessel or boat, shall receive for transportation or trans-
port, from one State or Territory to another, or from any State into the District of Co-
lumbia, or from the District into any State, any livestock affected with any contagious,
infectious, or communicable disease, and especially the disease known as pleuropneumonia;
nor shall any person, company, or corporation, deliver for such transportation to any
railroad company or master or owner of any boat or vessel, any livestock, knowing them
to be affected worth any cQntagious, infectious, or communicable disease; nor shall any
person, company, or corporation drive on foot or transport in private conveyance from
one State or Territory to another, or from any State into the District of Columbia, or from
the District into any State, any livestock, knowing them to be affected with any contagious,
infectious, or communicable disease, and especially the disease known as pleuropnieu-
monia,
SEC. 7. That it shall be the duty of the Commissioner of Agriculture to notify, in
writing, the proper officials or agents of any railroad, steamboat, or other transportation
company doing business in or through any infected locality, and by publication in such
newspapers as he may select, of the existence of said contagion; and any person or per-
sons operating any such railroad, or master Or owner of any boat or vessel, or owner or






11

custodian of or person having control over such cattle or other livestock within such
infected district, who shall knowingly violate the provisions of section six of this act,
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not
less than one hundred nor more than five thousand dollars, or by imprisonment for not
more than one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment.
SEc. 8. That whenever any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease affecting
domestic animals, and especially the disease known as plenropneumonia, shall be
brought into or shall break out in the District of Columbia, it shall be the duty of the
commissioners of said District to take measures to suppress the same promptly and to
prevent the same from spreading; and for this purpose the said commissioners are hereby
empowered to order and require that any premises, farm, or farms, where such disease
exists, or has existed, be put in quarantine; to order all or any animals coming into the
District to be detained at any place or places for the purpose of inspection and examina-
tit)n ; to prescribe regulations for and require the destruction of animals affected with
contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, and for the proper disposition of their
hides and carcasses; to prescribe regulations for disinfection, and such other regulations
as they may deem necessary to prevent infection or contagion being communicated, and
shall report to the Commissioner of Agriculture whatever they may do in pursuance of the
provisions of this section.
SEc. 9. That it shall be the duty of the several United States district attorneys to
prosecute all violations of this act which shall be brought to their notice or knowledge
by any person making the complaint under oath; and the same shall be heard before any
district or circuit court of the United States or Territorial court holden within the district
in which the violation of this act has been committed.
Approved May 29, 1884.
AN ACT To enable the Secretary of Agriculture to more effectually suppress and prevent
the spread of contagious and infectious diseases of livestock, and for other purposes.
(U. S. C., title 21, sees. 111-122)
Re it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of
America in Congress assembled, That in order to enable the Secretary of Agriculture to
effectually suppress and extirpate contagious pleuropneumonia, foot-and-mouth disease,
and other dangerous contagious, infectious, and communicable diseases in cattle and other
livestock, and to prevent the spread of such diseases the powers conferred on the Secre-
tary of the Treasury by sections four and five of an act entitled "An Act for the estab-
lishment of a Bureau of Animal Industry, to prevent the exportation of diseased cattle,
and to provide means for the suppression and extirpation of pleuropneumonia and other
contagious diseases among domestic animals," approved May twenty-ninth, eighteen hun-
dred and eighty-four (twenty-third United States Statutes, thirty-one), are hereby con-
ferred on the Secretary of Agriculture, to be exercised exclusively by him. He is hereby
authorized and directed, from time to time, to establish such rules and regulations con-
cerning the exportation and transportation of livestock from any place within the United
States where he may have reason to believe such diseases may exist into and through any
State or Territory, including the Indian Territory and into and through the District of
Columbia, and to foreign countries, as he may deem necessary, and all such rules and
regulations shall have the force of law. Whenever any inspector or assistant inspector
of the Bureau of Animal Industry shall issue a certificate showing that such officer had
inspected any cattle or other livestock which were about to be shipped, driven, or trans-
ported from such locality to another, as above stated, and had found them free from Texas
or splenetic fever infection, pleuropneumonia, foot-and-mouth disease or any other Infec-
tlous, contagious, or communicable disease, such animals, so inspected and certified, may
be shipped, driven, or transported from such place into and through any State or Terri-
tory, including the Indian Territory, and into and through the District of Columbia, or
they may be exported from the United States without further inspection or the exaction
of fees of any kind, except such as may at any time be ordered or exacted by the Secre-
tary of Agriculture; and all such animals shall at all times be under the control and
supervision of the Bureau of Animal Industry of the Agricultural Department for the
purposes of such inspection.
SEc. 2. That the Secretary of Agriculture shall have authority to make such regulations
and take such measures as he may deem proper to prevent the introduction or dissemina-
tion of the contagion of any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease of animals
from a foreign country into the United States or from one State or Territory of the
United States or the District of Columbia to another, and to seize, quarantine, and dis-
pose of any hay, straw, forage, or similar material, or any meats, hides, or other animal
products coming from an infected foreign country to the United States, or from one State
or Territory or the District of Columbia in transit to another State or Territory or the
District of Columbia whenever in his judgment such action is advisable in order to guard
against the introduction or spread of such contagion.
SEc. 3. That any person, company, or corporation knowingly violating the provisions of
this act or the orders or regulations made in pursuance thereof shall be guilty of a mis-
demeanor, and on conviction shall be punished by a fine of not less than one hundred
dollars nor more than one thousand dollars, or by imprisonment not more than one year,
or by both such fine and imprisonment.
Approved February 2, 1903.

JOINT RESOLUTION To amend the act of May 29, 1884, as amended, the act of February
2, 1903, and the act of March 3, 1905, as amended, to include poultry within their pro-
visions. (U. S. C., Supp. III, title 21, sees. 112-115 and secs. 117-119)

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in
Congress assembled, That the act entitled "An Act for the establishment of a Bureau of
Animal Industry, to prevent the exportation of diseased cattle, and to provide means for
the suppression and extirpation of pleuropneumonia and other contagious diseases among
domestic animals," approved May 29, 1884, as amended, the act entitled "An Act to enable
the Secretary of Agriculture to more effectually suppress and prevent the spread of con-
tagious and infectious diseases of livestock and for other purposes," approved February 2,.
1903, and the act entitled "An Act to enable fthe Secretary of Agriculture to establish and




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

111111111111111111111111111111il11111111111111 111
12 3 1262 08925 9195

maintain quarantine districts, to permit and regulate the movementt of cattle and other
livestock therefrom, and for other purposes," approved March 8, 1905, as amended, ,ar
hereby further amended to include within their provisions live poultry, and whereer n
the said act the term "livestock" is used it shall be followed by the words "and/or tive
poultry ; and all the penalties, terms, and provisions in said acts, as amended, are hereby
made applicable to live poultry.
Approved February 7. 1928.

Extracts from an act of Congress entitled "An Act providing for an inspection of meats
for exportation, prohibiting the importation of adulterated articles of food or drink, and
authorizing the President to make proclamation in certain cases, and for other purposes."
(U. S. C., title 21, sees. 101-105.)
SEC. 6. That the importation of cattle, sheep, and other ruminants, and swine, which
are diseased or infected with any disease, or which shall have been exposed to such infec-
tion within 60 days next before their exportation is hereby prohibited:
S S S S
SEC. 10. That the Secretary of Agriculture shall cause careful inspection to be made
by a suitable officer of all imported animals described in this act, to ascertain whether
such animals are infected with contagious diseases or have been exposed to infection so
as to be dangerous to other animals, which shall then either be placed in quarantine or
dealt with according to the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture; and all food,
litter, manure, clothing, utensils, and other appliances that have been so related to suih
animals on board ship as to be judged liable to convey infection shall be dealt with ac-
cording to the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture; and the Secretary of Agricul-
ture may cause inspection to be made of all animals described in this act intended for
exportation, and provide for the disinfection of all vessels engaged in the transportation
thereof, and of all barges or other vessels used in the conveyance of such animals intended
for export to the ocean steamer or other vessels, and of all headropes and other appliabences
used in exportation, by such orders and regulations as he may prescribe; and if, upon such
inspection, any such animals shall be adjudged, tinder the regulations of the Secretary of
Agriculture, to be infected or to have been exposed to infection so as to be dangerous to
other animals, they shall not be allowed to be placed upon any vessel for exportation;
the expense of all the inspection and disinfection provided for in this section to be borne
by the owners of the vessels on which such animals are exported.
Approved August 30, 1890.

An act to provide for the safe transport and humane treatment of export cattle from
the United States to foreign countries, and for other purposes. (U. S. C. and Supp.
III, title 45, sees. 75-76)
That the Secretary of Agriculture is hereby authorized to examine all vessels which
are to carry export cattle, horses, mules, asses, sheep, goats, or swine from the ports
of the United States to foreign countries, and to prescribe by rules and regulations or
orders the accommodations which said vessels shall provide for export cattle, horses,
mules, asses, sheep, goats, or swine as to space, ventilation, fittings, food and water supply,
and such other requirements as he may decide to be necessary for the safe and proper
transportation and humane treatment of such animals.
SEc. 2. That whenever the owner, owners, or master of any vessel carrying port
cattle, horses, mules, asses, sheep, goats, or swine shall willfully violate or cause or
permit to be violated any rule, regulation, or order made pursuant to the foregoing
section the vessel in respect of which such violation shall occur may be prohibited from
again carrying cattle, horses, mules, asses, sheep, goats, or swine from any port of the
United States for such length of time, not exceeding one year, as the Secretary of Agri-
culture may direct, and such vessel shall be refused clearance from any port of the
United States accordingly.
Approved March 3, 1891; amended May 28, 1928.
Extract from an act of Congress entitled "An act making appropriations for the
Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, nineteen hundred
and eight," approved March 4, 1907 (U. S. C., title 21, sees. 80-82).
S S S
That the Secretary of Agriculture shall cause to be made a careful inspection of all
cattle, sheep, swine, and goats intended and offered for export to foreign countries at
such times and places, and in such manner as he may deem proper, to ascertain whether
such cattle, sheep, swine, and goats are free from disease.
And for this purpose he may appoint inspectors who shall be authorized to give an
official certificate clearly stating the condition in which such cattle, sheep, swine, and
goats are found.
And no clearance shall be given to any vessel having on board cattle, sheep, swine, or
goats for export to a foreign country until the owner or shipper of such cattle, sheep,
swine, or goats has a certificate from the inspector herein authorized to be appointed,
stating that the said cattle, sheep, swine, or goats are sound and healthy, or unless the
Secretary of Agriculture shall have waived the requirement of such certificate for export
to the particular country to which such cattle, sheep, swine, or goats are to be exported.
C *
Extract from an act of Congress entitled "An act making appropriations for the
Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920," approved July 24,
1919 (U. S. C., title 21, sec. 96).
*
All the penalties, terms, and provisions in said act, as amended, except the exemption.
therein applying to animals slaughtered by any farmer on a farm, to retail butcher and.
retail dealers in meat food products supplying their customers, are hereby: mad
applicable to horses. * *
.. GOVEREET PRITI .. .
U. S. SOVERNSMENT PRmINTI WW^,W^




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