Potato leafhopper

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Title:
Potato leafhopper
Physical Description:
Mixed Material
Creator:
Benson, Mary F
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture ( Washington, D.C. )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030256268
oclc - 86173745
System ID:
AA00017516:00001


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POTATO LEAFHOPPER


a, Adult leafhopper; b, nymphs (or young leafhoppers); c, part of a
potato plant showing hopperburn injury caused by the feeding of
leafhoppers, the upper surface of the leaves showing the typical
upcurled brown tips and margins. (a and b about 14 times natural
size; c about three-fourths natural size.)

(See other side for life history :ad control)





Bureau of Entomn', ;" an! PLIa: QuaT.nilne P
L'nitej stst Derm.. f Azi '(e Picture Sheet No. 8


I





POTATO LEAFHOPPER


(Empoasca fabae (Harr.))

Injury and Life IIistory
Tihe potato leafhopper is oine of the most important insect enemies
of tlet potato in ll t Easterii Stlates. In addition to potato, however,
many other kin(Is of plants are attacked( by it. The young forms,
kio\,il as nvily)lphs, as well as the adults, feed by sicking the plant juices.
On potato plaits their feeding causes a (lisensed condition called hopper-
tburn, which r(,sults in steriolus losses.
Adults of the potato lea Chnopper appear each year in the North in
April or May, and, since they have never been found during the w'intel
in the North, it is supposed that they migrate from the South. During
tlie early part of June they move in large numimbers to potato fields.
Eggs are deposited in the tissue of the potato plant. In about a week
these( eggs hatch into wingless nymphs, wli( feed upon the under
surface of the leaves. The nymphs pass through five stages and
become winged adults in from 10 to 14 days. Under normal condi-
tions these adults begin egg laying in 5 or 6 days after maturing. The
period from egg to egg is approximately 1 month.

Control
To control the leafhopper and prevent hopperburn, spray with
bordeaux mixture (4-6-50 formula). This is prepared with 4 pounds
of copper sulfate (bluestone), 6 pounds of high-grade hydrated lime,
and 50 gallons of water. Dissolve the copper sulfate in a wooden or
earthenwaree vessel by suspending the crystals just below the surface
of thle -water. Dilute with one-half the water in the spray tank (25
gallons in this case). Mix the lime with a small quantity of water,
and then add the othlier half of the water (25 gallons). Pour this into
the copper sulfate solution and mix thoroughly. For more detailed
instructions, refer to your county agent, State experiment station, or
the United States Department of Agriculture. Dry bordeaux mix-
tilre, which requires only the addition of water, may be purchased in
convenient packages, but the freslh-mixed spray described is more
satisfactory.
Copper-lime dust may be used, but it is not so effective as the spray.
To prepare the dust, place 1 pound of monohydrated copper sulfate
ai(nd 4 pounds of hydra ted lime in a drum that can be tightly closed,
then roll tlie drum on the ground for at least 5 minutes, tilting it on
end at frequent intervals. Rea(ly-mixed copper-lime (dusts can be
obtaiiied from insecticide dealers.
16-20763:



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Ml iI[ IIII I I 1111 W I II NI U II WII
3 1262 09082 4664


April 1941 U. S. Govern,,enti Printing Office
l",r .sLle by thlie SluprititviIelIent of Dociuiniit.s, Washinigtoin, D. C.-Price 5 cents




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