A Report on the work and expenditures of the agricultural experiment stations for the year ended ...

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A Report on the work and expenditures of the agricultural experiment stations for the year ended ...
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WORK AND EXPENDITURES


AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS

FOR


THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30,


1897.


A. C. TRUE,
Dicrour OF r OFICc or EXPERIzNlxrr STATIONs.


WASHINGTON:
OTVRRHNXBNT PRINTING OPIOI.
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-LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.
:::::E" .": "
||;iiiE:. ..:::.

K. US. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
SOFFIcOr OF EXPERIMENT STATIONS,
f Washington, D. 0., January 17, 1898.
SIn: I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a report on the
work and expenditures of the agricultural experiment stations for the
tsam year ended June 30, 1897, prepared under your instructions in
empliace with the following provision of the act of Congress making
appropriations for this Department for the said fiscal year:
I- Ti Secretary of Agriculture shall prescribe the form of the annual financial
bWkhmamt required by section three of the said seact of March second, eighteen hun-
*I and eighty-seven; shall ascertain whether the expenditures under the appro-
pdatih hereby made are in accordance with the provisions of the said act, and
dal! make report thereon to Congress.
This report has been transmitted to Congress and has been printed
a document of the House of Representatives. A special edition has
been ordered by Congress for the use of this Department, and I respect-
Miy suggest that this be utilized as Bulletin No. 50 of this Office.
Respectfully,
A. C. Tiue,
Director.
JAMe WILSXON,
8eoretary of Agriculture.




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Softhe Seetary of Agriculture....................................... I
$ e twd leDhxctnr ofthe Officeo f Experimet Sttion .. 2
k a expenditures of the agricultural experiment station........... 3
2%effneial business of the stations.................................... 3
'The abMtl~ona ........................: ........... ........ *e.......-. 4
andt a dairy operations ......----....... .......---- --...... 4
hRlshlons of colleges and stations ....................................... 5
D" adeffebof frequent changes of officers................................ 6
Uvidea mof the snucei of the 7t.................. 7
Cordial rIeatioms between the Department and the station .............. 9
2% Am-clatoun of Colleges and Stations................................ 10
TheOflleeof Experiment Stations.-------ee--------Sm------------------- 10
Stbtestofthestations.------------- ----------..- ----- ------... 10
AlabmaCollege Station........................................emmm 11
Alabama Canebrake Station-------------.................. 13
Ara Station ......................................................... 13
ArlhmaStation ..--------------------------------------------- 5 1
s C o Station .. ..--------------------------------------------- 15
Colao station ........................................................ 18
CaBnec tcState Station............................................... 19
Co.neeticnt Stor Station .............................................. 20
elawresttion m....................................................... 21
lridt Station......................................................... 23
Geogia Station......................................................... 25
Idam Station........................................................... 25
Iflises Station ........................................................ 26
ldaNaSstation.m.....m..e....em ..e----- ............... .... 27
Iaws Station ........................................................!.. 29
Kinsas Station .......................................... ... mm.m.. 30
Keutfekystation....................................................... 33
IoWAIuSa io-UM-...................................................... 34
Maine Station .......................................................... 35
MaryaidStation.................. ee.. me............ ...in................. 37
Maiahusett Station ........................................m e Sins......... 38
Michigan Station ...................................................... 40
Min lefota Station .......................................s ........... ... 41
M.i...ppi.station-..................S ..............m............... m J 43
i souistati m.....em.................................................. 44
Montana Seite..... S e ..............e..................................... 45
Nebm ka Station me i.............n .............................. ........... 416
N..d"Stotionei......a ................................................... 48
Nw ihspahir Station......... ee..m.....................................m 49
Sw J StSation s......................m............................... 50











.. .....

".-Work and expenditures of the agricultural experiment stations-Continued.
l) New Mexico Station ------------.. .......-...-- --......-.... ------------------.................- .
New York State Station. ........................................
?% i|' ewY r on l St in................................................ *
v.New York Cornell Station ------------------------------------------
:?? Not Caoln Staio .. ...............................................' ^ :

c. .. North Carolina Station ----------------------------------------------
SNorth Dakota Station.-----...------...--...----------------------------------.................................. 61-
SOhio Statiou--- ---------------------------------------------...................... ... 62 !
Oklahoma Station --------------------------------------------------- 6
!!ii i ,

.. Oregon Station......................................................... 6---------------------------------------------

SPennsylvania Station ----...-----------.------------------------------.................. 67
SRhode Island Station -----------------------------------------------
South Carolina Station -------------------------------------------- .......... .i
"i"South Dakota Station-------.. -------------.---..--------------------71
:: .. ;: ^ '.*



STennessee Station ..---...--..----..----...-------------.----...------------- 7.3
STexas Station .-....---------------------------------------------------.............. 74
Utah Station ...............................................---------------------------------------------------- 75
* '', .. *\ ..:_
-. Vermont Station .-- ..----..---.--.--------.------..--------------------............ 77
TVirginia Station ----....-------- ---....-..--.------......------------------------- 78
SWashington Station --------- ------------------------------------ 70
.,, West Virginia Station -------.--------...-...---..-----.--....-----------------................. 81
Wisconsin Station ----------------------------------------------- 82
SWyoming Station......................................................------------------------------------------------. 86
* The Association of American Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations.. 86
"Table 1.-General statistics of the stations, 1897------.----------......--..----------.. 88
Table 2.-Revenue of the stations, 1897---.----------------------...--------. 94
Table 3.-Expenditures of the stations, 1897 .......................-.-....- 96








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HOUSBOi REPESNTTIES iiiiiiii
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WOKADEPNIUEnFTEARCLUA

]EPRMN TTOS


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PRSDN F-TEUIE TTS

A!F SSRT&YO GIUT NTEWR


AIM~~~ ~ ~ ~ z@@mrO8O T3 GIUTRA 'PRM
STTIN FRTE ICA EA NDE JUN 30,897
Im~ y 7 8 8 R f r e o t e C m i t e o g iiiiiiiiiuiiiltureiiii ................... iiiiiiiiiiiiidiiiiioiiiiii
printed
ToiitheiSenate andiHouseiofiRepresentatives:











hundred and eighty-seven; shall ascertain whether the expenditures us
appropriation hereby made are in accordance with the provisions of thee
.and-shall make report thereon to Congress.


I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, i
JAMES WILSON, Secretary, ::
'The PRESIDENT. ":.


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A. C. TRUE, Director.


Hon. JAMES WILSON,
Secretary of Agriculture.


OFFICE OF EXPERIMENT STATIONS,
Washington, D. C., December 20, 1897.
'SIR.: I have the honor to present herewith a report on the work and
expenditures of the agricultural experiment stations for the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1897.
Very respectfully,


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101 AND EXPENDITURES OF THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERI-
FKENT STATIONS FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1897.



This is the third annual report on the work and expenditures of
the agricultural experiment stations in the United States, made by the
Director of the Office of Experiment Stations, under instructions from
the Secretary of Agriculture. As heretofore, the report is based on
three sources of information, viz: The annual financial statements of
the stations, rendered on the schedules prescribed by the Secretary
of Agriculture, in accordance with the act of Congress; the printed
reports and bulletins of the stations; and the reports of personal
examinations of the work and expenditures of the stations made
during the past year by the Director and Assistant Director of. the
Oieo of Experiment Stations. All the stations, except those in Ala-
bama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, were visited since the
previous report was transmitted to Congress.
While the act of Congress of March 2, 1887, commonly known as
the Hatch Act, does not require that the financial statements of the
stations for the past fiscal year shall be made until February 1, 1898,
the officers of the stations have readily acceded to the request of this
Department for the prompt return of these statements after the close
of the fiscamml year, and in this way have made it possible to complete
this report earlier than last year. State legislation regarding the
reports of the operations of the stations, together with other causes
affecting their business, have thus far made it impracticable for all
the stations to follow the suggestions of this Department that these
reports, as well as the financial statements, be made for the fiscal
*rather than the calendar year. A number of the stations have, how-
ever, made this change in the period covered by their reports, and it
is hoped that ultimately this may become the general practice. In
this way a more satisfactory report of the work of the stations during
any one fiscal year may be made by this Department in time for trans-
mission to Congress at or near the opening of its session in December.
THE FINANCIAL BUSINESS OF THE STATIONS.
From the point of view of this Department, representing the inter-
ests of the United States, the financial business of the stations is in
better condition than ever before. The account of the Hatch fund is
now, as a rule, kept distinct from that of other funds controlled by
thestation or the college of which the station is a department. The pur-
poses for which the Hatch fund may be properly expended are more
clearly defined, and the adjustment of expenditures as between the
station and the other departments of the college have been more
exactly made. Experience has clearly demonstrated that it is essen-
tial that a current account of the Hatch fund, which shall be distinct
S and separate from all other accounts, shall be kept, preferably in













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Executive officer of the station who is made responsible by th ....gf).-
erning board for the expenditure of the fund for the purposes .d.n'r ...
inated in the Hatch Act. Owing to the complicated financial'but*iHa
of many of the institutions receiving the benefits of this act :,-.i t!.'
been a matter of considerable difficulty to arrange the details Of.iU
0 ~ accounting in a manner thoroughly satisfactory to all concerned. t ."':..
-Ir is believed, however, that the expenditures on account of the Thh&..
j. fund are now recorded with substantial accuracy. The probleiii^^
.! respecting the proper expenditure of this fund now relate alim.o :7t
-... entirely to questions of general policy, some of which will be brinefly
^'* ~ considered in this report. '
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X; THE SUBSTATIONS.
- :" Considerable progress has been made during the past .year in seour
"5 :ing the reduction of expenditures from the Hatch fund on substations. ,
^ ~ In Idaho, Washington, Kansas, and Florida the substations have been
: "- entirely discontinued; in Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, :i
and Arkansas, the number of substations has been diminished, expend- :
'"itures for permanent improvements have ceased, and other expenidi- "
U.. "..; tures have been reduced. In this way a considerable portion of the
Hatch fund hitherto largely thrown away or extravagantly expended
| on trivial experiments will hereafter be available for more thorough
^investigations under the immediate direction of the expert officers of
g / the stations. Substations are maintained, as formerly, in California,
.y, Minnesota, and Texas, but in these States the experiment stations
have at their command resources derived from the State to supple-
Sment the Hatch fund. In Connecticut, New York, and Alabama two
Separate stations are maintained with the aid of State funds, and in a
Similar way three stations are maintained in Louisiana.
: : .
.-, FARM AND DAIRY OPERATIONS.
I- At a number of the stations farm and dairy operations are still con-
i" .."2 ducted on too extensive a scale and with too little appreciation of the
Real requirements of experimental inquiries in agriculture. In this
Sway a large amount of money is rapidly expended, the time and ener-
., gies of the station officers are largely employed in routine duties,
numerous petty and superficial experiments are made, and the truly
S- useful results of experiment station work are materially reduced in
Number and importance. In saying this we do not wish to be under-
S- stood as being in favor of confining the farm operations of the stations
.',in all cases to small plats and a few animals. The size of the experi-
mental field and the number of animals should depend on the nature
S' and importance of the experiment as related to the funds available
Sfor this purpose. But it is clear that oftentimes stations attempt too
S.many and too big field experiments and keep too large herds of ani-
mals. In these departments of the station business there is the great-
est need for trained experts, careful planning, thorough execution,
.* ^and economical management.
^. ,.; The causes tor the unsatisfactory condition of the farm and dairy
F1".-'. work of the stations are many, but two need particular attention at




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RELATIONS OF COLLEGES AND STATIONS.
Another cause of too extensive farm and dairy operations by the
stations grows out of their intimate connection with the land-rant
allegesM. These institutions are rapidly growing and expanding their
work up to the full measure of their incomes, however liberal these
my be. All our higher educational institutions perpetuaUy need
Mrgsr revenues than they actually receive. The agricultural college
IM r department in many of the land-grant colleges is relatively small
a regards numbers of students and at the same time is quite expen-
silre to maintain. The small number of students in agriculture is not
as A rule the fault of the governing board or faculty of the college.
In many cases extraordinary inducements are made to attract students
in agriculture. Causes inherent in the conditions of our agriculture
have hitherto combined to make the number of students who desire
or can avail themselves of a college course in agriculture relatively
MmalL But the pressure for funds to maintain college courses and
the small numbers of agricultural students have led directly and indi-
rectly to encroachment on the station funds for the maintenance of
the college farm and for other educational purposes. An easy way is
to have the station run the college farm and keep all sorts of domestic
animals. Some slight experimental feature can be readily attached
to a great variety of farm operations; records of rations, milk yield,
etc., can be easily kept with more or less regularity, and in this and
other ways the governing board may really think it is advancing the
interests of agriculture by experiments and carrying out the provi-
iMons of the Hatch Act. This of course is a sham, and the farmers
will get little good out of the station farms until they are run on a
S strictly experimental basis.
There is still some difficulty in securing a proper adjustment of the
salaries and work of officers employed in both college and station.
Teaching involves the regular performance of routine duties, which
constitute a drain upon the energies of the teacher that can not easily
be measured by the time spent in the class room. The value of the
best performance of either teaching or experimenting can not be esti-
mated in terms of the hours actually spent at the task. The essential
thing is that the worker, whether teaching or experimenting, shall
have such full command of his time and energies as to secure the best

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BAD EFFECTS OF FREQUENT CHANGES OF OFFICERS.

In one respect the past year has been a period of unusual discour-
agement to those who have the best interests of the experiment sta-
tions at heart. From changes in the constitution of the governing
boards, due to legislative action, changes in the governors having
power of appointment or removal of members of these boards, and
other causes, the directors of the stations in ten States and Territories
have been changed since the last report was prepared. In several
cases the directors removed had had long and successful experience
in the management of the stations and had made their work increas-
ingly useful. In these and other cases removal of the director was
accompanied by a further reorganization of the station staff. When
we consider the comparative scarcity of well-trained men who are
thoroughly competent tb conduct experimental inquiries, the numerous
changes in the personnel of the station staffs during the past year is
quite disheartening. Thorough agricultural investigations require
long and persistent effort, in accordance with a careful plan consist-
ently followed, it may be, for years before a final and satisfactory
result is reached. Nothing could have a more powerful tendency to
keep good investigators away from our stations and to produce a
structural weakness in their operations than a vacillating policy of
management. Station officers should be chosen for their fitness and
ability as determined by the standards of their profession, and they



*,


give satisfactory results to either college or station. There is ne
more careful attention to this subject on the part of governing b,19"
In a few instances the governing 'board has shown a disposaition to'A-
impose teaching duties on station officers without paying any p taei:^^i
of their salaries from college funds. This is plainly a violation .ofiS: e.if::i:,:
Hatch Act and should be resisted. *
To define more exactly the policy of the Department on this matte,
the following official opinion has been recently formulated and f ae
to the directors and other executive officers of all the stations: : .
This Department holds that no portion of the funds appropriated by Congrs, ::i'
in accordance with the act of March 2, 1887, can legally be used either directly 9r :
indirectly for paying the salaries or wages of professors, teachers, or other .per .
sons whose duties are confined to teaching, administration, or other work in con-
nection with the courses of instruction given in the colleges with which the st-
tions are connected or in any other educational institution; nor should any other
expenses connected with the work or facilities for instruction in school or college
courses be paid from said fund. In case the same persons are employed in both
the experiment station and the other departments of the college with which tie
station is connected, a fair and equitable division of salaries or wages should be .
made, and in case of any other expenditures for the joint benefit of the exper-
ment station and the other departments of the college, the aforesaid funds should
be charged with only a fair share of such expenditures.
While a thoroughly satisfactory state of things as regards the rela-
tions of the stations to the colleges has not yet been reached, much
progress has been made in this direction. The officers of the stations
are, as a rule, in harmony with the Department on this question, and
the views of the members of the governing boards who have had any
experience in dealing with this matter are becoming more definitely
settled in right lines.


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. S... ed to shake faith in the wisdom of committing the stations so.
hWy to the control of the local boards. Violent and unreasonable
I: changes in one or two stations tend to produce an unsettled feeling
suong the whole body of station workers throughout the country.
Already there is considerable sentiment in favor of extending the
functions of the National Government in the supervision of the sta-
Momns so far as to secure more permanent tenure of office for the inves-
tigKtors. It will be far better if the local appointing officers and
eards will recognize their plain duty in this matter and take such
-ello themselves as will defend the funds committed to their care by
he nation from being wasted in the frequent shifting of the charge
x the stations from one set of men to another, so that the carrying
t aof thorough investigations is practically impossible. It should be
leafrly understood that under existing conditions this Department
an do comparatively little to help the stations where frequent changes
we occurring in the personnel of the governing boards and station
staff. The chief benefit which the stations may derive from the
advisory relations of this Department to them will grow out of such
personal intercourse between the officers of the Department and of the
stations as will admit of intelligent discussion of local problems of
station business as related to the teaching of experience regarding the
management of agricultural investigations, viewed from the impartial
standpoint of the central office. There must also be opportunity for
the Department to explain its policy regarding the stations and to
answer objections arising from the seeming necessities imposed by the
loeal environment. When the membership of governing boards and
station staffs changes rapidly inexperience often leads to precipitate
action before the Department can be heard in the matter and its pre-
vious efforts to advance the interests of the station are rendered
entirely nugatory. Until the affairs of some stations become more
settled there is little prospect that any remedy can be found for the
weaknesses from which they are evidently suffering.

EVIDENCES OF THE SUCCESS OF THE STATIONS.
The past year has brought out many encouraging evidences of the
strength of the stations in the confidence and support of the farmers,
based on the aid which they are actually giving to agricultural enter-
prises through their experiments and their publications. The States
have, in many instances, continued or enlarged the appropriations



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1"Lil m .Lti y U.j UI. i S.LOij u D j ujliV p5). JPiyL U10 in.U;; wlnav pi
..l. everywhere a growing item of station expense. Others have.
Considerable funds for the erection or enlargement of stations
. ings. The equipment of the stations is everywhere steadily ... ........
A ing. As a rule the expert officers of the stations working'..Aloi:-3
.i.| scientific lines are receiving a larger measure of encouragemeut1tht .K2^
Sever before. The importance and authority of the station offiearsni ::
experts whose knowledge and judgment may be safely relied upo. to
Said in the enforcement of laws to protect the farmer from fraud or"
Injury have been increasingly recognized. The stations have.'f ior
JIs
Years performed very important and valuable services in connection.
with the control of the sale of commercial fertilizers. Laws recently "..
Passed in a number of States impose upon them similar duties regard- OiF
Sing feeding stuffs, dairy products, nursery stock, or injurious insects. '.
SIndeed, the danger is that our stations will be overloaded with routine .
.,. and police duties and the demands upon them to act as bureaus of
,.': information. There has been no more notable indication of the rapid
-- .i increase of original investigation in this country than is shown in the
.,, remarkable development of scientific effort in agricultural investige-
'". tions at some of our best experiment stations. Success has brought .
confidence, and the people are most heartily supporting those stations -.,
S; which are doing the most thorough work. There is every reason to
: believe that in agricultural research, as in other lines of scientific -
: inquiry, the useful results will accumulate in increasing ratio, and
'..: that the foundations are being laid for far wider success in the not
". far distant future. It is impracticable in a report of this character
to give an adequate resume of the progress of agricultural research
in this country during the past year. Some idea of the variety and
Relative importance of the information published by the several sta-
"tions may be gained from a perusal of the statements regarding their
S.publications made further on in the report. An examination of the
last volume of the Experiment Station Record issued by the Depart-
N ment would reveal much of interest in their recent work. A few of
.the most striking results may, however, serve as illustrations of the
) outcome of the work of the stations in some lines.
..'. The ripening of cheese has long been thought to be due to the action
..- of bacteria. A preliminary report of researches at the Wisconsin sta-
tion, recently published, announces that it has been definitely shown
,- that this process is chemical rather than bacteriological, being caused
S/ by chemical ferments present in milk as drawn from the cow. This
.; fundamental discovery may ultimately have most important practical
,.. results affecting the industry of cheese making. Another discovery
of considerable importance to the dairy industry as conducted under
Modern conditions is that the consistency of cream raised by the sep-
arator may readily and safely be restored by the addition of a small
quantity of sucrate of lime. The Iowa station has shown by carefully
conducted slaughter and block tests that there is no material differ-
Sence in the character, composition, and quality of meat from steers
and heifers grown under like conditions, and that therefore the dis-
crimination against heifer meat on the part of butchers is not well
founded. Several stations have reported valuable experiments in the
feeding of sheep, especially for meat, a matter of much importance in
view of the wide extension of the market for lamb and mutton in
recent years.
." i

















VlWSOl W MWlU IUL.-lMUl5.1 wl VBAZiL tmaaIlng IlniU U11L1i111 juVilCiClO.
Such things as the use of formalin, instead of the very poisonous
coosive sublimate, to prevent potato scab; the spraying of peach
tee with whitewash to protect them against injury by freezing; a
aw method for keeping grapes fresh for the market for a much longer
time than has hitherto been practicable, may need further experience
"to demonstrate fully their usefulness, but will at least indicate the
dilect and wide practical application which may be made of station
work successfully done.

CORDIAL RELATIONS BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT AND THE STATIONS.
The development of cordial relations between the stations and this
Department has presented many encouraging and gratifying features.
It has been the aim of the Department to bring to the stations the
results of a wide and impartial view of the general principles of sta-
Uio management as wrought out by experience in such affairs at home
aad abroad, and to aid in adapting these principles to the conditions
of local environment through personal conferences with station offi-
es. Study and discussion of the many perplexing problems of sta-
ticm business have been profitable in many ways. Without in the
least interfering with the free choice and execution of enterprises
suited to the agriculture of their several localities, it has been found
possible to do much toward making the individual stations feel that
they are truly parts of a great national system of institutions working
for the benefit of the agriculture of the whole country. The stronger
stations have shown a kindly disposition to aid the weaker ones in
developing their work, and by a certain spirit of self-restraint have
nerted a powerful influence toward keeping the station enterprise
within right lines. On the other hand, the stations handicapped by
limited resources and other unfortunate conditions, have, in many
instances, made gallant efforts to raise the grade and strength of their
enterprises. And in general there has been a growing appreciation
of the fact that "if one member suffer, all the members suffer with it."
Much progress has also been made in the organization of cooperative
enterprises between the stations and different branches of this Depart-
ment along some lines. In such arrangements the Department con-
tributes funds for special investigations to be carried on in different
parts of the country, furnishes materials collected in this and other
countries, or gives the stations the benefit of expert advice or general
supervision in particular directions. The stations, on their part, give
Laboratory facilities, expert services, or organization and supervision
'E of details of investigations and, what is often most essential and val-
uable, secure the intelligent cooperation of practical agriculturists in
Stheir several communities. In this way the funds of both the Depart-
ment and the stations are most economically and efficiently employed

LiIi. ..








h. l ..4 H
i^ for the general benefit of our agriculture. Cooperative exp
i, ""::yE~
of this character have been conducted the past year with sug
Storage plants and grasses, on soils, in forestry, and on problems
ing to the food and nutrition of man.

THE ASSOCIATION OF'COLLEGES AND STATIONS. :
0i M....
C:' The Association of American Agricultural Colleges and Experimet.. *" 1
Stations is doing much to strengthen the bonds of friendship aid.: 'i.....
e I cooperative efforts between the stations and to promote their mutual '
-||interests. Its work is also serving to bring more clearly to viewO e t :
j 1 interdependence and at the same time the individuality of the stations '*
Sand the other departments of the land-grant colleges. A brief account.',
v! |of the successful meeting of this association at Minneapolis last siim: !i|
mer is given farther on in this report.

THE OFFICE OF EXPERIMENT STATIONS.
:,,.."=:' ". *- *'*11" ;;i


*1 i Besides the work done in supervision of the expenditures of the
'..- ,i stations and in conferences and correspondence with station officers,
a- ..., this office has been engaged more busily the past year than ever before
^ in the collection and dissemination of information regarding the prog- -
: '. ress of agricultural investigations throughout the world.
,During the year the office issued 39 documents, aggregating 2,607
,,.. '"! pages, principally based on the work of the experiment stations.
-. These documents include 12 numbers of the Experiment Station Rec-
;: ord, with detailed index, 12 bulletins, 6 farmers' bulletins, 6 circulars,
1 the annual report of the director, a report to Congress on the work
and expenditures of the experiment stations, and an article for the
Yearbook of the Department. About 3,000 cards of the Index of
^ Experiment Station Literature were published and distributed to the
: stations last year. The total number of these cards has now reached
15,000.
The wide extent and variety of agricultural investigations at the
Present time is indicated in the following brief statement regarding
--the Experiment Station Record: The eighth volume of the Experi-
., ment Station Record comprises 1,210 pages, and contains abstracts
......* of 340 bulletins and 62 annual reports of 53 experiment stations
in the United States, 92 publications of the Department of Agri-
culture, and 702 reports of foreign investigations. The total num-
ber of pages in these publications is 38,552. The total number of
Articles abstracted is 1,565, classified as follows: Chemistry, 157; bot-
: any, 69; fermentation and bacteriology, 5; zoology, 10; meteorology,
S54; air, water, and soils, 55; fertilizers, 103; field crops, 228; horti-
., culture, 154; forestry, 11; seeds and weeds, 29; diseases of plants, 79;
entomology, 126; foods and animal production, 177; veterinary science,
; 51; dairying, 139; technology, 4; agricultural engineering, 22; statis-
i- tics, 92. Classified lists of articles, in some cases with brief abstracts,
are also given in each number. The aggregate number of titles thus
reported is 2,200.
STATISTICS OF THE STATIONS.
Agricultural experiment stations are now in operation under the
S. act of Congress of March 2, 1887, in all the States and Territories.
S' Alaska is the only section of the United States which has no experi-
ment station. A preliminary investigation regarding the feasibility i


















W overmeni, w=e remamuer, ,uyu.oozto, coming trom me zoiowing
stress: State governments, $287,176.35; individuals and communi-
tie, 5,653.88; fees for analyses of fertilizers, $37,265.26; sales of
fan r products, $64,437.83; miscellaneous, $16,906.20. In addition to
ti thie Office of Experiment Stations had an appropriation of $35,000
fr the past fiscal year, including $5,000 for the Alaskan investiga-
tlion. The value of additions to equipment of the stations in 1897 is
efftbated as follows: Buildings, $74,830.99; libraries, $12,993.25;
apparatus, $21,149.73; farm implements, $13,178.25; live stock,
14,733.07; miscellaneous, $7,714.08; total, $143,599.38.
The stations employ 628 persons in the work of administration and
SInquiry. The number of officers engaged in the different lines of work
ifaB follows: Directors, 67; chemists, 134; agriculturists, 66; horticul-
turista, 71; farm foremen, 38; dairymen, 19; botanists, 47; entomolo-
glts, 48; veterinarians, 30; meteorologists, 18; biologists, 8; physicists,
; geologists, 6; mycologists and bacteriologists, 21; irrigation engi-
m ees, 6; in charge of substations, 11; secretaries and treasurers, 70;
librarians, 9, and clerks, 38. There are also 30 persons classified
under the head of "miscellaneous," including superintendents of gar-
deanms, grounds, and buildings, apiarists, herdsmen, etc. Two hundred
and eighty-three station officers do more or less teaching in the col-
lege with which the stations are connected.
During 1897 the stations published 54 annual reports and 324 bul-
letins. Besides regular reports and bulletins, a number of the stations
issued press bulletins, which were widely reproduced in the agricul-
tural and county papers. The mailing lists of the stations now aggre-
P gate 506,100 names. Correspondence with farmers steadily increases
and calls upon station officers for public addresses at institutes and
other meetings of farmers are more numerous than ever. The sta-
tion officers continue to contribute many articles on special topics to
agricultural and scientific journals.

ALABAMLA.
Aploultural Experiment Station of the Agricultural and Mechanical College
of Alabmma, Auburn
DEPARTMLKNT OF THf AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF ALABAMA.
The work of the Alabama Station during the past year has been
S mainly along the same lines, as heretofore, including investigations on
cotton, especially the crossing of varieties, pot and field experiments
with fertilizers, culture and seeding experiments, and studies of dis-
i eames; field experiments with leguminous plants, tobacco, sweet pota-
* 'Apot n the investigation on apgriculture in Alaska has been published as
S HomMe Doe. No. 100, 5th aogre, 2d emwsion.







1 auLau urUJ. u-na .Jn, .PArnimI.N BJAIO'UNo..
.....1 toes, sorghum, etc.; pig feeding experiments; botanical inves
chemical studies on soils, fertilizers, etc.; biological and horti..i..
investigations, including studies of diseases of plants; investilg
on animal diseases; and entomological investigations. The st......i
has continued the analysis and inspection of fertilizers under St9!%:
laws. An entomologist was added to the staff of the station in the fWa:.l.
of 1896. :"l
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as foiowla .
United States appropriation ---------- --... ---.--------------.. ..... $15,000.00 ::
State fertilizer tax (including balance from previous year) -----.----.. 12,238.37 ::
SFarm products ------------------------- ---------- 607.61 ::
: Total------------------------------------------------. 7 90.1%
10 A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States
t P fund has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed. :
": ,* by this Department, and has been approved.
SThe publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
4, were Bulletins 72-79 and Index Volumes 2 and 3.
t Bulletin 72, pp. 24, figs. 12.-A Study of Skin Tuwmors of Horses and
M"' Mules in Alabama.-This is a thesis prepared by S. L. Coleman, of
S. the college, for a post-graduate degree. It gives general observations
:, upon causes, macroscopical and microscopical characteristics, and-:!
S. surgical and medical treatment of affections of this kind, based upon
-; ., studies of cases brought to the free clinics of the college.
S' Bulletin 73, pp. 10, figs. 3.-Edible Fungi: A Wasted Food Prod-
uct. -Popular notes on mushrooms, their uses, and descriptions of
; two of the most common edible mushrooms growing in Alabama.
Brief notes are also given on puffballs, and some of the more impor-
tant American bibliography relating to mushrooms is mentioned.
1 ,Bulletin 74, pp. 10.-Flour, Considered from the Standpoint of
SNutrition.-The relative value of bread made from whole wheat and
S;i fine wheat flour is discussed, and a receipt given for making bread
from whole-wheat flour. Analyses are given of flour of entire wheat
.and fine wheat flour, and the amounts of nutrients in a barrel of each
are calculated.
,Bulletin 75, pp. 22.-Experiments with Corn.-Results of a test of
S14 varieties, with tabular data on the relative yield of varieties of corn
Sin a number of Southern States; investigations on the relative value
of seed corn from different latitudes; butt, middle, and tip kernels
S' for seed; distances for upland corn; fertilizer experiments; methods
Sof harvesting corn; and on burning weeds versus plowing them under.
: Bulletin 76, pp. 23.-Experiments wiith Cotton.--This bulletin
embraces results of tests with 17 varieties of cotton; investigations
on the value of seed from different latitudes; the use of the roller in
cotton planting; distance experiments; barring off; subsoiling and
liming; and various fertilizer experiments.
2 Bulletin 77, pp. 8.-The San Jos' Scale; Some Other Insect Pests.-
A popular bulletin warning the fruit growers against the San Jos4
Scale, with brief notes on the tomato worm, grape-leaf hoppers, and
cabbage worms.
Bulletin 78, pp. 45.-Cooperative Fertilizer Experiments with Cotton
in 1896.-A report is given on the results secured in 27 fertilizer
experiments carried on in as many localities under the same instruc-
+ tions, in addition to experiments on the station farm.
SBulletin. 79,pp. 26.-Some Horticultural Suggestions.-Popular notes
on the subject of fruit culture, shipping, etc.















.: e Alabama Canebrake Station has continued to confine its opera-
..Irm to field experiments with various crops and investigations on the
dOesnes. of animals.
The income of the station during the past year was as follows:
m i 'ow rtatin.................................................... $2,5oo
Tatalt........- ------..........---------.. -.... --- ----..------...-. 210
Nhvprdub~------------------ W-------------------82
Tot-l---------------------------------------. 2,82S
The only publication issued during the year was a brief annual
rort for the calendar year 1896.
ARIZONA.
Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of Arizona, Tucson.
DEPARTMENT OF THE UNvERSITY OF ARIZONA.
The Arizona Station has continued its work during the past year
mainly along the same lines as heretofore. Experiments have been
made with a considerable number of varieties of semitropical and
other fruits, canaigre, tobacco, ramie, sugar beets, grasses and forage
plants, and problems connected with the growing of various crops
under irrigation have been studied. Chemical investigations of
maigre, soils, water, and milk; botanical studies of weeds and dis-
eases of plants, especially crown root knot; and entomological investi-
gations have also been pursued. The substation at Phoenix has been
continued and the work there, consisting largely of experiments with
fruits, has been intelligently and carefully conducted. Expenditures
from United States funds for permanent improvements at the sub-
station have ceased. Most of the experimental work on the poor land
near the university buildings has been given up, and 10 acres of irri-
gated land near Tucson have been leased for five years, the rent being
paid from Territorial funds. A forcing house, erected on the univer-
sity campus, has been made available for station purposes. The Ter-
ritorial funds for the support of the university have been materially
increased by recent legislative enactment, and this will incidentally
be of considerable advantage to the station. Cooperative experiments
with sugar beets and tobacco are in progress in a number of localities,
and successful efforts have been made to aid the farmers in the
repression of animal diseases.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
United States appropriation-----------............................................. 15,000
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
The publications of the station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins Nos. 19-23.
Butldin 19, pp. 8.-Sixth Annual Report.-A brief report by the
director on the work of the year, with list of bulletins published,















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ARKANSAS.

Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Fayetteville.

DEPARTMENT OF ARKANSAS INDUSTRIAL UNIVERSITY.
The Arkansas Station has continued work in the same lines as here-
tofore. Field experiments with cotton, potatoes, and forage crops;
feeding experiments with pigs; chemical investigations of wheat and
its mill products; horticultural studies of orchard and small fruits
and vegetables; bacteriological and other investigations of animal dis-
eases have constituted the main work of the station. The substations
at Camden and Newport were continued during the past year, but the
expenditures from the United States funds for this purpose were re-
duced. The substation at Camden will be discontinued at the conclu-
sion of the season's operations; that at Newport will be continued
for the present, especially for experiments with a view to improving
methods of production of animals, particularly sheep and cattle.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
United States appropriation .-----..-------..-.......-----..----.-------------. $15,000.00
Farm products ----- ----------------.-... ------------. -------------- 42.65
Total...--.....--------------------------------------------------.............. 15,042.65


1i



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acknowledgments and exchanges, and a financial statement w:
fiscal year ending June 30, 1895. .
Bulletin 20, pp. 38.-Arizona Weather.-Summaries of observe
on temperature, pressure, precipitation, humidity, evaporation1::
shine, and wind movement in the vicinity of Tucsonri and at ...
points in the Territory during about four years ending Jimnei A
with comparisons with similar data obtained at important itieS "
other parts of the United States.
Bulletin 21, pp. 35, figs. 6.-Canaigre.-Includes notes on the Oc"al"-II
gre plant-habitat, description, conditions of growth, insect enpR "!4 .6
and diseases-and the results of extended investigations on the to:,, ..
mation and distribution in the plant of tanning materials; chiew l ."I
life history of the plant; the effect of sprouting, irrigation, and aor+ ,i
mant state on tanning materials; conditions causing destruction an.di: i
loss of tanning materials, coloring matter, and nonsoluble tannins...'
found in the plant; food and fuel value of canaigre bagasse; relation
of canaigre to the soil; and notes on the canaigre industry.
Bulletin 22,pp. 32, figs. 12.-Something about Weeds. -Popular notes
on weeds in general, with descriptive notes on a number of domestic
and introduced weeds, and a table of 50 Arizona weeds, showing
methods of propagation and other characteristics.
Bulletin 23, pp. 44, figs. 4.-Sugar Beets.-A popular bulletin. Qn 1.3
the sugar-beet industry in this and foreign countries, with notes on the
climatology of the sugar beet and brief directions for its culture.
The Arizona station has made encouraging progress in strengthen-
ing its work and economizing its resources during the past year. The
conditions under which the work at Tucson is carried on are greatly
improved, the concentration of the substation work at Phoenix has been
beneficial, and the undertaking of cooperative enterprises has brought
the station into closer touch with the people of different parts of the
Territory. Recently, however, the president of the university has
resigned and the director of the station and superintendent of the sub-
station have been removed. The outlook of the station is therefore
much more uncertain than at the close of the past fiscal year.


All


w.
























rPWew pl& WA S LA TA1AJULISUIULL UUMfLAUttVJ UJL JUFY..
Jh hn p4, pp. 4 .-Coneerning Wheat and its Mill Products.-
This bulletin gives the result of extended investigations on the prod-
nat of small mills and their chemical composition; classification of
aouls; the fertilizing elements contained in wheat; loss in wheat dur-
big sprouting; composition of the ash of a wheat and its mill prod-
iabt; and studies concerning the proteids of wheat and a method for
th! quantitative separation.
Bu n 48, pp. 46, figs. 8.-Report of the Horticulturist.-Descrip-
tihe notes and tabulated data on 59 varieties of strawberries, with
replies to circular inquiries by leading horticulturists of the State as
to culture and best varieties; notes on the culture of various small
taits, including grapes, and on the station peach and apple orchard;
and short descriptions of some of the more injurious insects of the
year, with remedies, and brief notes on pear blight and its treatment.
Budetin 4 pp. 48.-Vegetable Gardening.-A popular bulletin de-
signed to furnish information relative to the culture of garden vegeta-
bles in Arkansas. It is largely based on results obtained in experi-
ments ifade at the Camden substation during the past three years.
Annual Report for 1896, pp. 120.-Includes a financial statement for
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896; brief report by the director on
the work of the year, and reprints of Bulletins 38-43.
The Arkansas Station continues to be managed on a conservative
and economical policy. The interest of the farmers and fruit grow-
era of the State in the operations and reports of the station is evi-
dently growing. The publications of the station issued during the
pst year show a decided increase in the amount of original work
completed, a considerable part of which is of interest and value out-
side of the State for which it was primarily intended. The station
needs better land for its field work at Fayetteville, and it is hoped
that the effort now being made to secure State aid in this direction
will be successful.
CALIFORWIA.


Aplotltsur1


RzpOutm t tatlac of the Unierslty of Calitforia. Berkeley.


DUPAfRTMXT OF Tax uImVmSITY Or CALITroNA.
The work of the California Station during the past year has included
chemical and physical investigations of soils, especially of alkali lands
with reference to reclamation; analyses of waters, foods, feeding








S' stuffs, sugar-beets, sugar cane, fruits, nuts, canaigre, etc.;
tions in the fertilization of citrus trees, the culture of olives11%
Making of olive oil, and in viticulture and vinification; entom
investigations;- studies in botany, horticulture, and forestry, an
ture experiments with a great variety of forage plants, cereals,.V5f
Stables, fruits, and forest trees at the central station and at six outlyxu
Substations, with special reference to the varied climatic and soil 6eoa :
Editions of the State. A special study of native plants growing upon.
alkali soils of different strength and character, as well as ofthe to'ei r
"i tance of culture plants and crops for alkali, has been made.' Food ::t i
S. 't investigations in cooperation with this Department undertaken last ''
year have been continued. The carefully guarded plan of diatrib ..:;
Si:tion of new varieties of seeds and plants to persons in the State who.: :
Share willing to pay expenses of the distribution is still continued.
Experiments were successfully made with an apparatus devised by
..:. ...the station for the purposes of cooling fermenting wine musts when
.. ./ the heat rises too high. It is based on the principle of evaporation of
.1. fine spray acting on a cooling coil, thus preventing the "sticking" of
.. partly fermented wines, which causes such heavy loss every year. The
-. same experiments will be continued during the coming year with an
,.. improved form of the apparatus. .
.',. On April 16, 1897, the building of the College of Agriculture and -
SExperiment Station was burned, involving a loss to the university of '
about $9,000 on the building itself, $6,000 in apparatus and supplies,
besides collections of soils and other material, valuable manuscripts,
Sand nearly all of the former annual reports and bulletins of this sta-
S.: tion, which can not easily be replaced, and whose value can hardly
be fairly estimated. The work in the laboratories of the station was
thus interrupted for several months, until a larger, better, and more
':"* commodious building could be built upon the site of the old one and
-" again equipped.
The manuscript of the annual reports for 1896 and 1897 has been in
readiness for the printer for some time, but owing to the veto of the
SState printing appropriation bill by the governor it could not be put
into type. The board of regents of the university have recently
'- determined to enlarge the printing facilities of the university printing
... office, and it is hoped that before very long the report of the station
S.- for the past two years will be ready for distribution.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
SUnited States appropriation ------------------------------- $15,000.00
State appropriation ---------..------------. ---------------- --------- 16,137.00
Farm products .-..----------------- --.. --------------- ------. --------- 89.25
Total------------ .------ --.----------. ---------. -----.--------- 31,226.25
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States
fund has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed
.". by this Department, and has been approved.
.The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year.
S. were Bulletins 111-115, aud a report of the Viticultural Division and
Appendix.
Bulletin 111, pp. 17.-The Work of the College of Agriculture and
Experiment Stations.-A popular article treating of the work of
instruction and research of the College of Agriculture and Experi-
ment Stations of the University of California.
Bulletin 112, pp. 8.-Distribution of Seeds and Plants.-A descrip-
Hi
t .


-I



















Ma" engaged in drying prunes.
Bvltmn 15, pp. 15.-Remedies for Insects and Fungi.-Popular
stem on the classes of insects and fungi, with remarks on remedies,
treatment, sprays, washes, etc.
ReP"wrt of the Viticidtural Work during the Seasons 1887-1893, with
dt regarding the Vintages of 1894-95, pp. 466.-This embraces a
flport of a series of systematic investigations on the composition and
elasification of grapes, musts, and wines; investigations of various
types of grapes, their adaptability to different localities, value for
wine making and other purposes, descriptions of red and white wine,
Sraisin, table, and other grapes; records of work in the viticultural
laboratory and of wines received for examination; notes on recently
I tuported grapes, the phylloxera, and general principles of fermenta-
Usa; experiments with pure and selected yeasts; fermentation experi-
iments at high temperatures and with various substances; experiments
With color grapes and with asaprol; investigations on the nitrogen in
Ianmta and wines by varieties, regions, types, etc., and miscellaneous
notes on methods of preservation of fresh grapes, sunstroke of the
vine, and the mold Botrytis cinerea ; together with a list of the viticul-
tural publications of the college and of the viticultural commission.
Appendixr to Viticultural Report, pp. 53, figs. 13.-Resistant Vines;
thetr Selection, Adaptation,, and Grafting.-A popular bulletin,
designed to give information with regard to replanting vineyards
destroyed by phylloxera and "to correct misconceptions of some
fundamental principles."
In spite of. the losses sustained in the burning of its laboratories, the
California Station has accomplished much useful work during the past
year. Its work is increasing in value and importance to the State,
and the permanent policy of its management gives assurance of con-
tinued success in its operations. The university with which it is
connected is steadily gaining in resources, number of students, and
influence in its relations to the work of education and research carried
on by the State. Recent legislation giving the university the proceeds
of a permanent tax will incidentally inure to the benefit of the station.
The governor of the State recently vetoed a bill providing for the main-
tenance of forestry substations on the ground that the university has
funds which should be used forany experimental work which is needed
in the State. The effect of this may ultimately be to bring the work
connected with investigations in belialf of agriculture, horticulture,
Sand forestry more completely under the control of the university. It is
believed that such concentration will be likely to secure more efficient
and economical service along lines of scientific effort in behalf of these
Important industries than has hitherto been found practicable to
Obtain.
I H. Doe. 20--2



;',',! .,... .............. ... .










4COLORADO.
Agricultural Experiment Station, Fort Collins.
DEPARTMENT OF THE STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE OF COLORADO
|-r< y | i .:3 iliiii fi ^
K; lt 2 The Colorado Station has continued its work on irrigation probleuiA,
v*; meteorology, field crops, feeding of animals, large and small fits, ll=
i




..entomology, botany, and chemistry. Among the more impart...i
Investigations are those relating to the duty of water, losses by see:-
age and evaporation, return waters, the chemistry of irrigation watOes,.;.
;4 the digestibility of the albuminoids of alfalfa hay, the effects of grow- .}. .
: ".ing beets on alkali lands, and feeding of milch cows, sheep, and hogs.P .'
SStudies regarding alfalfa have engaged the attention of different dri*- ..
"" i sions of the station, and a valuable bulletin on this subject was issued ,
.; :,during the past year. Cooperative work with this Department in for- ..:
Si estry and with sugar beets has been undertaken. The substations at
C" "Cheyenne Wells and Rocky Ford have been continued, but under
unsatisfactory conditions. The work at Cheyenne Wells, considered
l- as a temporary enterprise to determine the agricultural possibilities
ion of the locality, may prove of some value, but no good reason has been
.4.. assigned for a permanent substation there. The substation at Rocky -"
S.Ford has suffered the usual vicissitudes attending the prosecution u f
; station work under ill-trained superintendents, and is clearly an
expensive venture without important results. The State is building
+a new chemical laboratory at the college, in which the station will
S: have greatly improved facilities for chemical investigations..JM
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows: .
..United States appropriation ----u------------ -------------------- $15,000.00
Farm products -------------- -------- ---------------- 581.87
SMiscellaneous -----w------------------------------- ---------------- 1,77 7.89
Total---------- ---------------------------- 17,858.76
SA report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund 4
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules pes scribed by this
-Department, and has been approved.
S,. The publicationsof the stationreceived during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins Nos. 35-38 and the Annual Report for 1896.
Bulletin 85, pp. 95, pis. 18.-Alfalfa.-A comprehensive bulletin on
the alfalfa plant, its history, description, composition, structure, cul-
ture, fertilizing value, vitality of seed, varietal differences, etc.,
.largely based upon results of station investigations.
Bulletin 36, pp. 23.-Sugar Beets.-A popular bulletin on sugar-
Sbeet culture, based largely on the results reported in former publica-
tions of the station, with tables of analyses of sugar beets grown in
the State.
Bulletin S7, pp. 143. -The Birds of Colorado.-This bulletin sets
forth the present knowledge of the distribution and migration of Colo-
rado birds, and includes a bibliography of the subject and an histor-
ical review of the progress of ornithological investigations in the State.a
Bulletin 38, pp. 40, figs. 4.-Sheep Scab.-A Few Insect Enemies of
the Orchard.-Popular remarks on this disease, giving the results of
Experiments for the destruction of scab mites and their eggs, with .
.'notes on the various dips used. Brief popular notes with recommen-
S.dations as to remedies are also given on a number of insect enemies of
the orchard.
L EAM9111hi,
























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.:: ..e Connecticut Agricultural Uxperiment Station, New Haven.
The Connecticut State Station continues to make chemical and
eperlmental studies of fertilizers a leading feature of its work, but
b i o carrying on important investigations of plant diseases and of
i constituents, especially the proteids, of feeding stuffs, and other
ghlltural products. Greenhouse experiments on the manuring of
Smato radishes, carnations, etc., have been conducted on quite an
sd pensive scale. The availability of different forms of organic nitro-
g':: has also been studied. Pot experiments have been made with
p ound bone of different degrees of fineness. The valuable investi-
gatons on the proteids of various grains and seeds have been contin-
Sne For several years the station has carried on tobacco experiments
In cooperation with the Tobacco Growers' Association. This year the
work was on curing tobacco by artificial heat, to study the effect on
the quality of the tobacco, the saving of time, and the avoidance of
danger from diseases. The station has cooperative experiments on
fertilizers for peach trees at three different places in the State. A
mrass garden is maintained at South Manchester with the aid of the
nds supplied by the station. Work in forestry is being conducted
in cooperation with this Department. Under State laws the station
is charged with the inspection of fertilizers and foods. The food
inspection has especially to do with articles of food, spices, condi-
ments, etc., used by man. Many remarkable cases of adulteration
have been discovered, and it has been shown that adulteration of some
kinds of food is practiced to a surprising extent.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
utttedta tpDriation- -----------------------------,$ 57,5.00
Us a m ............................................ 129,500.00
FaalyWW............ ......................... 5,9045.00
hrjrouducte---------. -.- ----.------------------------ 71.00
--in-u--eous------------------------------------. 860.84
SSa ...................................................... 5968
Total--------------------------------------, 97.84
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States
fund has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed
by this Department, and has been approved.
The publication of this station received during the past fiscal year
was the Annual Report for 1896.


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Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station, Storrs.

DEPARTMENT OF STORRS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.


The work of the Connecticut Storrs Station during the past year
has been along the same lines as heretofore, including investigations
on the food and nutrition of domestic animals and of men, dairy bac-
teriology, field experiments with fertilizers and forage plants, and
rotation experiments. Digestion experiments with sheep have been
carried on to determine the relative amounts of digestible material
obtained from different kinds of green forage. Tuberculous cows
are being kept under good sanitary conditions with a view to deter-
mining the possibility of effecting a cure, and the effects of feeding
their milk to calves are being tested. The investigations on the food
and nutrition of man have occupied a large share of the attention of
the station, and, as heretofore, have been aided by a special State
appropriation, and have been carried on in cooperation with this
Department. Much work has been done in perfecting a special appa-
ratus (respiration calorimeter) for use in investigations on nutrition;


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statement for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896; a report
terated food products, giving the text of the State law regi.
their manufacture and sale, and the results of analyses of 947 sem .
including sugars, lard, condiments, and beverages; a report Cottf
mercial fertilizers, giving the text and observance of the Statei-tl- .
lizer law, explanations concerning the analysis of fertilizers and & Z' T
valuation of their active ingredients, description, valuation, d. .i
analyses of 492 samples of fertilizers, and a paper on the propeV:r6 u Se
of tables of analyses of fertilizers; results of experiments on t .....:i
availability of fertilizer nitrogen in different substances for maize .'ann l *
oats; on the use of commercial fertilizers for forcing-house crops; ":
notes on the new forcing house at the station, on the blight, burn0;o i
scald of tomato plants, and On certain insects injurious during :the 'I
season; results of extensive experiments with various substances for
the prevention of potato scab; investigations on the susceptibility of
various root crops to potato scab and the possibilities of preventive !
treatment; papers on the leaf blight of melons, on the probable winter
conditions of the fungus of peach scab, on a fungous disease of tobaeo,'
"shelling" of grapes, and miscellaneous notes on fungus and inset
pests; results of fertilizer experiments with tobacco, being a final -I
report on the fermented crops of 1895, and of further experiments
during the season of 1896; summary of fertilizer experiments with
tobacco for the five years 1892-96; report on the effect of fertilizers
on the composition of wrapper leaf tobacco; analyses of peas and.-
beans; observations on the growth of maize continuously on thesame
land for nine years; report of investigations on the proteids of lupine
seeds; on the effect of minute quantities of acid on the solubility of
globulin in salt solutions; and on the proteids of sunflower seed, cow-
pea, white potted adzuki bean, and maize kernel.
The policy and work of the Connecticut State Station during the
past year have been the same as heretofore. The station is doing
thorough work in a few lines of great importance to the State, and is
successfully managing cooperative enterprises which keep it in close
touch with the farmers.


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SifH report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States
tsd has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed
fI this Department, and has been approved.
T.. h.e publiestion of this station received during the past fiscal year
Iii w the Annual Report for 1896.
;insuaR Xii report, 1896, pp. 292, dgms. 2.-This embraces the report
.I.. tiae director on the general lines of work pursued at the station dur-
9i ift -he year; results of experiments in cream ripening and of investi-
ions on the bacillus Acidi lactici and other acid organisms found in
American dairies; a report on a study of rations fed to milch cows in
onnecticut; reports of investigations on the metabolism in the human
oraism, being a preliminary account of experiments on the income
ae outgo of the body and on the effects of different diets; reports on
9ditary studies; results of experiments on the digestion of food by
um and on two similar experiments with an infant; papers on the
immugtibility of different classes of foods, the average composition of
i American food materials, and on the proportion of digestible nutri-
o:nti in food materials; results of field experiments with fertilizers;
I wpper on irrigation in Connecticut, reprinted from the Office of
EIxperiment Stations Bulletin 36; results of digestion experiments at
the station with sheep; analyses of fodders and food stuffsin 1895-96,
Meteorological observations; and a financial report for the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1896.
The Connecticut Storrs Station continues to pursue a fixed policy
and to confine itself to a few lines of work. Its investigations on food
and nutrition are being earnestly prosecuted and are largely con-
cerned with the fundamental principles on which rational methods
for the nutrition of domestic animals and of man must be based.
The work of the past year materially contributed to the advancement
of methods of investigation in this line.

DELAWARE.
The Delaware College Agricultural Experiment Station, Newark.
DEPARTMENT OF DELAWARE COLLEGE.
The work of the Delaware Station during the past year has been
along the same lines as heretofore, including investigations on animal
Diseases, especially anthrax; methods for improving dairy herds,
largely based on chemical studies of milk; horticulture; plant diseases;
entomology; soil, fertilizer, and culture experiments, with special ref-
.11 eH nee to the use of leguminous plants for maintaining soil fertility
I and promoting the dairy interests of the State. Special experiments
Sin the breeding of varieties of sorghum with reference to the produc-
. uon of sugar, which have been carried on several years, have given
S uasualUy favorable results the past season.


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Miscellaneous L ------------------------------- --- --- --
12 :i 1 Zo.... .... .i 'i,
-~~~~~~~ ~~ -. .. . . ." ... ... uii'::: ::::..
.R" ""
Total_ -" '14ii
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United SAUi
has been rendered in accordance with the schedulesprei
This Department, and has been approved. .......
i The publications of this station received' during the past f i a i
iI were Bulletins 31-34 and the Annual Reports for 1895 and 1896...,
X:' Bulletin 31, pp. 23, figs. 2.-Milk Sampling.-Brief notes on takt.j.
;|j composite samples at creameries, on the use of composite sam1ate. e
I% i1 herd improvement, and on methods investigated at the station 1ott-;iih
., ,. preservation of composite samples. A device used at the stati6n "ft
4.I,' : facilitate mixing sulphuric acid with milk in testing is described.
Bulletin 32, pp. 24.-Combating Anthrax in Delaware.-Gives 'aj,
;%;,, summary of the experience of the station along this line for the pit "
five years and the details upon which the summary is based.
^ Bulletin 33, pp. 1O.-The Increase of the San Jose Scale in Ded*6 .,.
during 1896.--Mention is made of the increase of the San Jos6B.S ,.
during the year and some of the causes are pointed out; its life!"f,-',,
tory and remedies for its repression are discussed and suggest.ons '
":'; given regarding needed legislation. i
Bulletin 34, pp. 22, figs. 4.-The Treatment of Plant Diseases, in
1896.-Results of experiments for the treatment of peach rot, apple
Sscab, potato scab, and black rot of the sweet potato.
Md Annual Report, 1895, pp. 246.-This includes the work of the station ,
A-: for the 18 months ending June 30, 1895. It gives the results of 1
: four years' investigations with the southern pea vine, including van-
Sety tests, fertilizer, feeding, soiling, and cultural experiments; results
', of station investigations on anthrax, history of the disease in DoeW
ware and its probable source, attempts to control it by vaccination,
and tests made to demonstrate the efficiency and safety of'vaccines
made at the station; notes on glanders, including temperature records
..for a number of tests with mallein; notes on lockjaw in horses and
S'. methods of treatment; notes on bovine tuberculosis, and on cerebro-
,. spinal meningitis in horses; the report of the mycologist on anthrax,
Sand tuberculosis bacteriological work, bacteriological studies in con-
,-tagious abortion in cows, experiments to test the germicidal power of
menthol vapor and its action on the development of anthrax, experi-
ments in spraying for fungus diseases, and notes on a leaf blight of
.. tomatoes; a report on horticultural work giving results of fertilizer
~and subirrigation vs. surface irrigation, experiments with cauliflower
in the greenhouse, comparative data and descriptive notes on 51 vari-
S,., eties of tomatoes, results of investigations on the effect of nitrate of
S- soda upon tomato plants, comparative data and notes on 53 varieties
..,of grapes, 93 of strawberries, and 10 of raspberries, notes on the effect
of overflow salt water on peach trees, effect of bisulphid of carbon on
the vitality of seeds and plants, results of experiments to destroy
i. sodom apples, results of preliminary work on a study of varieties of
apples for profitable culture in Delaware, and notes on a blight affect-
.. ing the body of pear and apple trees; report of the entomologist giv-T
ing results of work with the San Jos6 scale and other insects and on
'. the use of various insecticides; the report of the chemist, being in
".part a reprint of Bulletili 27 of the station and giving results of 14


/.o.. i



























oan su witn i1 varieties or strawoerries grown in ioo ana or01 oz vanre-
dtios grown in 1896, with descriptive notes on the same, twenty replies
y hrticultnrists of the State to a circular of inquiry regarding the
w estk desirable varieties of strawberries grown in their respective
Ialties, injury from leaf blight and strawberry weevil in 1894 and
I M166, investigations on the effect of sterilizing the soil on the growth
of root tubercles of cowpeas, results of investigations on the preserva-
tive power of alcoholic vapors for fresh fruits, and brief notes on early
M. latepruning of grapes; the report of the entomologist on the vari-
ous insects most destructive throughout the State during the season,
Including a reprint of Bulletin 30 of the station with further notes on
the treatment of the San Josd scale; report by the chemist, being in
part a reprint of Bulletin 31 of the station, with the results of further
work on nonsubmergent preservatives for milk, on the detection of
ulpho-eyanites, and results of 8 fodder analyses; and a report by the
meteorologist and agriculturist on soil and forage-crop tests at Dover,
and giving the results of meteorological observations during the year.
The Delaware Station continues to be managed on the same con-
servative policy which has hitherto characterized its operations. The
station's work, especially on animal diseases and insect pests, has been
recognized of importance to the State by the enactment of laws for
carrying out recommendations made by station officers as the result of
their investigations. Recent changes in the State constitution provide
for the appointment of officials whose duty it will be to aid the farmers
of the State in securing larger practical benefits from the experimental
inquiries made by the station.

FLORIDA.
Arnltural Bipemnt Station of Floia, Lake City.
DEPARTMNT o PWRIDA STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.
U Florida Station continued during the past year culture experi-
meat with forage and' root crops; variety, fertilizer, and culture
experiment with orchard fruits, pineapples, and vegetables; studies







rwu z. .!iii~i
..X of plant diseases and insect pests; and chemical investigations :%i::i
soils of the State.
SThe income of the station during the past fiscal year was as folo
.9, United States appropriation......----...........-.--- ...----.-........ $15, O&46SlI
State---------------------------------------~
State .. ..-------.-...--- ------------------------ ----.-----------..- a
Farm products ---------------. --.-------------------------------... ..... ', 60 ::

STotal.------..----.-- ----.. -- --......-....----.----..-------------... .

^ll A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fu nd
I A. has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by
S .this Department, and has been approved.
:1: !The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
; were Bulletins 36-38 and the Annual Reports for 1895 and 1896.
'"p Bulletin 36, pp. 48, figs. 16.-Insects Injurious to Stored Grain and
S' Cereal Products.-Short popular accounts and descriptions of some 17
:, insects, with recommendations as to remedies.
i^'^ Bulletin 37, pp. 14, pis. 2.-The Pineapple at Myers.-Results are
wc, given of fertilizer and culture experiments with pineapples at the
S, substation, together with a test of the keeping qualities of a number
; of varieties, and detailed directions for the construction of shelters
ir 'for pineapples and the cost of material and construction. The opin- -*
L;' ions of prominent growers on the culture of pineapples are also given. ,
,. Bulletin 38, pp. 49.-Tobacco in. Florida.-A revision of Bulletin
^.: 30 of the station, with additions.
-Annual Report, 1895, pp. 8.-Brief outlines by the director of work
Carried on at the station and substations, list of bulletins issued dur-
S. ing the year, and a financial report for the fiscal year ending June 30,
-. ', ,1895.
Annual Report, 1896, pp. 95.-This embraces a report by the
':-. director on the work of the year, giving results of field experiments
S" with various crops and a financial statement for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1896; results of variety tests with vegetables; notes on the
propagating house at the station, the station orchard, small fruits,
Sand ornamentals; descriptive and life history notes on a number of
plant diseases, with lists of plants affected and suggestions as to reme-
J dies; notes on the San Jos' scale parasites and other insects; brief
report by the assistant biologist on the more injurious insects of the
year; report by the chemist, giving results of a number of miscella-
neous analyses of fertilizers, foods, and waters; explanations of the
terms used in reporting the analyses of feeding stuffs; practical sug-
; gestions in locating wells, and reports by the superintendents of the
De Funiak and Myers substations on the work of the year, giving
lists of trees, shrubs, and plants growing at these stations.
Progress was made during the past year in increasing the efficiency
of the Florida Station. Additions were made to the equipment of
different divisions of the station. The expenditures for the substa-
S"tions at De Funiak Springs and Fort Myers continued during the year
to be a heavy drain on the resources of the station, but the recent
abandonment of both these substations will, it is believed, enable the
station to use its funds much more economically and with better
results hereafter. For reasons beyond the control of the governing
board, a change was made in the director of the station at the begin-
ning of the present fiscal year, and an agriculturist was appointed at
the same time.



















u&a uo w conuucang roresvry experiments in cooperatn& n wii tnmis
flu:rment.
nTe income of the station was as follows:
td .MaStes appropriationion$15,00........--..--..-.....---....--- $15,000.00
S..-- ------------....-.- ........... -.. -... ---.. -... -.-.-. .. --------00.00
& .al ...- ~- --------- .--- ._ .------ ---_ --.2.00
1,792.21
ac .. .............................. .... ...... .. 1,881.57

Total--------- --- --... .--------------------------------.. 19,225.78
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States
fund has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed
by this Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 32-35 and the Annual Report for 1896.
S Buefin S2, pp. 57, figs. 247, pis. 4.--Strawberries.-Popular direc-
Stions for, the general culture of strawberries, and also the local
Methods followed in various parts of Georgia and neighboring States.
Results are given of tests of 80 varieties, with descriptive notes on a
lam number of the varieties tested.
tBulldin 33, pp. 31,figs. 17, piS. 4.-The Cultivated Blackberries and
Dewberries.-Popular directions for the cultivation of blackberries
and dewberries, results of experiments with these berries in 1896,
including variety tests and a comparison of old with new plants, and
descriptions of varieties tested.
Bulletin 34., pp. 29.-Corn Cultu re. -Results of fertilizer, culture,
Sand variety experiments with corn for the year 1896.
Bulletdin 85, pp. 29.-Cotton Cidture.-Results of fertilizer, culture,
and variety experiments with cotton for 189(j.
Annual Report, 1896, pp. 8.-A brief report on the work of the year,
personnel of the station, publications issued, and a financial state-
ment for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896.
The policy and work of the Georgia Station continue to be the same
as in past years. The affairs of the station are conducted in an
orderly manner; it is giving the farmers of the State considerable
useful information, and is vigilant to protect their interests as far as
practicable.
IDAHO.
oul~tus Experimenttato of the Univernty of Idaho uMoscow.
'i DEPARTMENT OF THE UNTVwRSITY OF IDAHO.
The work of the Idaho Station during the past year included field
experiments with cereals, forage crops, and vegetables; chemical
Studies of soils, peas, potatoes, fruits, and crops grown with and with-

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DEPARTMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS.


The work of the Illinois Station during the past year has included
field experiments with corn, oats, and forage crops; variety, culture,
and other experiments with orchard and small fruits and vegetables;
studies of bacterial and fungus diseases of plants; entomological
investigations, especially on the San Jose scale and shade and forest
tree insects, and chemical studies, especially of the nitrogen content
of corn. The station continues to make investigations on Indian corn
a leading feature of its work. Special experiments in the inoculation
of leguminous plants with bacterial cultures (nitragin) have been
made in pots and in the field. The station has kept considerable live
stock and managed a dairy on a commercial basis, but the amount of
experimental work connected with this enterprise hardly justifies its
continuance. Soil investigations in southern Illinois have been con-
tinued. The station has cooperated with this Department in experi-
ments with sugar beets. The burning of the chemical laboratory
about a year ago caused considerable loss of apparatus and records.


cuauUa.tUnaJ.LLoJSJJSSUA cSinICU sU unv F 5antiaUn 131 UJ OIJUU oubuJaCvJ J -
discontinued. Some preliminary work has been done in pr
for experimental purposes a tract of about 85 acres of land in,3:
vicinity of the station offices, donated by citizens of Moscow.
director, irrigation engineer, and farm superintendent resigned du t
the year. The president of the university has been made director .].
the station, and a horticulturist and farm superintendent has :been,:t
appointed. Changes in the governing board of the station have... alsoi
occurred. -
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows': I
United States appropriation---------------------------------- $15,000.00 I
Individuals--..---.------....... ....-------.------..0.00......0.. 8,'00. :
Farm products----------------.--.---..- ---..--------------------..-- 1,109.74 :1

Total----------- --------------- -------------------- 19,109.74 :
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States I
fund has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed i
by this Department, and has been approved. 4
The publication of this station received during the past fiscal year i
was the Annual Report for 1895. t
Annual Report, 1895, pp. 5.-A report by the director on the progress '
of work at the station and a financial statement for the fiscal year end- -
ing June 30, 1895.
The Idaho Station has been mainly engaged dMring the past year in
reorganizing its affairs. It is hoped that by the abandonment of the
substations and by the changes made in the management of the sta-;
tion its efficiency will be greatly increased. Meanwhile the station
has fallen behind in its publications, its finances have been in an
unsatisfactory condition, and its operations have been very largely of
a superficial character. Its future success depends on the establish- a(
ment and maintenance of a consistent and economical policy in the
conduct of its affairs.

ILLINOIS.

Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of Illinois, Urbana.


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The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 44-48 and the Annual Report for 1895-96.
Bulein 44, pp. 88, figs. 61.-Insects Idurious to the Seed and Root
.0ldian Corn.-This bulletin is largely an abstract of the more
u ...onic parts of the Illinois State Entomological Report for 1895.
BuUeftin 46, pp. 52.-Varieties of Apples.-A brief history of the
university orchard since. 1869; remarks upon pests, soil treatment,
life of trees, and identity of varieties; descriptions of 18 varieties
which have given most promise of usefulness, and of 550 varieties
which have fruited on the station farm, and a list of 304 varieties
which were planted but did not live to bear fruit.
BDulein 46, pp. 24.-Experiments with Corn and Crimson Clover.-
Ihmrovement of Retentive Clays.-The Importance of the Physiolog-
ea Requirements of the Animal Body.-This bulletin contains results
of culture and variety experiments with corn and crimson clover;
soesasful drainage experiments with the retentive clay or "hard-
poa" lands of southern Illinois, and the results of the attempts to
grow calves without coarse foods.
Butetin 47,pp. 60, pls. 5.-Broom Corn Smut.-A report of extended
investigations on the nature and life history of broom-corn smut
and on infection and germination experiments, together with a short
biblioaphy and suggestions as to methods of prevention.
B en 8, pp. 16, figs. I.-The San Jose Scale in Illinois.-A pop-
ular bulletin on the history of the pest in Illinois, its nature and
treatment.
Annual Report, 1895-96, pp. 16.-This embraces a general account
of the transactions of the governing board of the station, a statement
of the experimental work, and the report of the treasurer for the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1896.
The Illinois Station continues to do a considerable amount of use-
ful work. Its main investigations are concentrated on comparatively
few lines, and these are being steadily developed. In some respects,
however, there needs to be a more definite differentiation of the work
of the agricultural college and experiment station in order that the
latter may be relieved of the burden of enterprises involving mainly
ordinary farm operations and commercial transactions.

INDIANA.
Apioltur xperimt Station of Indiana, Layett.a
APARTMENT O F PURDUE UNIVERSITY.
The work of the Indiana Station during the past year has been
mainly along the same lines as heretofore, including feeding experi-
ments with calves, pigs, and poultry; field experiments with corn,







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A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by
this Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 61-64 and the Annual Report for 1896.
Buldletin 61, pp. 12.-Field Experiments with Wheat.-Results of
culture and variety investigations.
Bulletin 62, pp. 24, figs. 11.-The Udder of the Cow.-A popular
treatise on the construction and physiology of the udder of the cow,
illustrated by numerous original drawings and containing a large
amount of comparative data from a number of different herds on the
milk yield of the front half and hind half of the udder, yields from dif-
ferent types of udders, and from the right and left glands, and on the
results of milking one teat at a time.
Buldletin 63, pp. 18, pis. 2.-Bovine Tuberculosisin Indiana.-A
popular bulletin on the extent and nature of bovine tuberculosis in
the State, with directions for the use of tuberculin for diagnosing this
disease.
Buldletin 64, pp. 16.-Field Experiments with Corn, Oats, and For-
age Plaints.-A report on variety and culture investigations.
Annual Report, 1896, pp. 61, figs. 6.-Reports by the director and
heads of departments on work of the year, giving results of cul-
ture experiments and variety tests with oats and corn, the use of
dendrolene as an insecticide, close root-pruning of trees, investiga-
tions on punctures of ripe grapes as related to bees, together with
plans of various station buildings, lists of acknowledgments and of
bulletins issued, and a financial statement for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1896.
The Indiana Station is developing its work along lines of great use-
fulness to the State, and some of its investigations have much scien-
tific as well as practical interest. It is believed that by a sharper
differentiation of the college and station as regards farm operations
he efficiency of the station would be still further advanced.


wheat, oats, and forage plants, with fertilizers, and on roat tu.
crops and methods of tillage; horticultural investigations
testing of varieties; soil investigations; chemical studies of
beets, phosphate slag, etc.; pot experiments with roses growni..
different soils and with different fertilizers; studies on corn samu.t Ia"t..'
potato scab; and investigations on animal diseases. The lab.r.toi..
and greenhouse facilities for investigations on the physiology andl
pathology of plants have been improved. Noteworthy investigations.
on the physiology of milk secretion and the udders of cows are'in
progress. The chemist of the station continues to act as State chemist,
and to make fertilizer analyses with funds furnished by the Stati&.
The station has cooperated with this Department in experiments in
forestry and with sugar beets. Cooperative experiments with different
soils and fertilizers have been carried on in a number of localities.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
United States appropriation-------------- ---------------- $15,000.00
Farm products- ---------------- ------------------------- 2,065.49
Total. ----------- ------------- ------------------ ----------- 17,065.49


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With pigs; culture and variety experiments with cereals, sugar beets,
pa -n.es, and other forage crops: studies of soil moisture; chemical
ad botanical studies of grasses; entomological investigations, with
apeoial reference to insects feeding on grasses; variety, culture,
and coming experiments with fruits, roses, and other horticultural
pnts; and investigations of diseases of sheep. The work on prob-
has connected with the feeding of animals is being extended and
strengthened. Results of much practical interest have been obtained
from experiments in feeding and marketing lambs. The field work
is also being enlarged in the direction of a greater number of plat
experiments. Experiments with sugar beets and grasses are being
conueted in cooperation with this Department.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
Unitmd to appropriation--..--.-- .............---------------------------............ $15,000.00
a a---------------------- ---- ---- -- ---- ------ 2, 98.41
u s --..... .-...... ..................... ....... -- ....-7--,- 79.24
Total---------------------- ---------- ---------------------- 17,377.65
A report of the receipts and expenditures of the United States fund
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by
this Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 33 and 34.
Bulletin 33, pp. 83, figs. 2,6.-Lamb Feeding.-Steer and Heifer
Beef II.-Old Process r. New Process Linseed Jfeal.-Notes on Iniju-
rious Insects.-Fresh Cow r. Stripper Butter.-EnEmbraces results of
feeding experiments with 114 lambs, representing 11 breeds, and of
slaughter and block tests of the same; results of feeding experiments
for beef with 5 steers and 5 spayed and 3 open heifers and of slaugh-
ter and block tests; experiments to test the value of old versus new
process oil meal; illustrative, descriptive, remedial, and life history
notes on 7 injurious insects; and results of investigations on the
effect of period of lactation on the quality of butter.
Budletin ,4, pp. 102, figs. 3,pls. 22.-Stuies of the Life Histories
of Grass-Feeading Jass id.- Wreeds of the Mustard Family.-Notes
on Dairy BactIerioltgy.-Hwne. Projigaltionl.-Crop Notle, 1896.-
Embraces results of investigations on the life history, range of food
plants, and collection and identification of a large number of grass-
eeding Jassidr; notes on the identification and distribution of a
number of troublesome weeds, with methods of eradication; notes on
dairy bacteriological work at the station; methods of home propaga-
Stion of seeds, bulbs, tubers, corms, etc., and crop notes for the season
of 1896.
The Iowa Station continues to pursue an active and consistent Iolicy
and to keep in close touch with the farmers of the State. The rela-
tions of the college and the station are especially to be commended in













management of these college enterprises. Improvementsm.....
made in the buildings and water system of the college with In: !
State funds will be of material service to the station. '.

KAN SAS. qi l t
Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Manhattan. -,
DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, .
The work of the Kansas Station during the past year was
along the same lines as heretofore, including feeding experiments'::I-''.
steers and pigs; variety and culture experiments with wheat, ts, a!".
Kafir corn, grasses, forage plants, etc., and on rotation of crops; tIeZ^ G
tilizer experiments, chemical studies of corn, Kafir corn, etc.; s. itudit(s
of soil moisture; entomological investigations, especially of i-nitts .,^
injurious to fruits and alfalfa; studies of animal diseases, e ieca|fl.ia.:^
tuberculosis, "corn-stalk" diseases, and poisoning from weeds; t* v ii....::1:::
tigations of weeds and plant diseases, especially the smuts of cereal*, 31
corn, and sorghum; variety tests and other experiments in horticuitunft' i
and forestry. Irrigation experiments in cooperation with the:: St.At
Board of Irrigation were conducted at Oakley, but this substation hs "a. h
since been abandoned. Experiments in forestry and with sugar beets: |
are being conducted in cooperation with the Department. ..
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as foollows::1:r 2:
United States appropriation ------------------------------- $15,000 ';ii
Farm products ---------------------------------------------o-------- N i'
Total--------------------------------------------------------- 17,.04 .8 '.
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund" .
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this ..
Department, and has been approved. '
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 58-64 and the Annual Report for 1896. ,
Bulletin 58, pp. 24.-Corn Stalk Disease of Cattle: Preliminary
Bulletin.-A report on the prevalence of this disease, its extent, geo-
logical distribution within the State, and of the several outbreaks; the -:i
results of feeding corn smut and stalks affected with the Burril :li,|
bacterial corn disease to cattle; and the means to be employed in the -
prevention of the disease.
Bulletin 59, pp. 17.-Experiments with Wheat.-This gives the
results of investigations on growing wheat continuously without .
manure; early and late plowing; subsoiling vs. surface plowing;
time, rate, and methods of seeding; grading seed wheat; effect of pas-J
turning wheat; wheat in rotation; and results of a test of 47 varieties.'
Bulletin 60, pp. 40.-Steer Feeding Experiments.-A report ona a:
feeding experiment with 20 steers to further test the relative merits of
the balanced ration, ground corn, ear corn, and feeding in the open as
compared with barn feeding.
Bulletin 61, pp. 22.-(I) Kafir Corn, Corn, and Soja Bean Meal for .
Pigs; (II) Kafir Corn and Corn Mealfor Cattle.-Results of feeding :"
experiments with 12 pigs for 125 days to test the value of Kafir corn
meal and soja bean meal as food for hogs in comparison with corn


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aaimtofsmutand theageof corn; and notes on infection experiments
w 1 corn. The synonymy of the fungus and an extensive bibliog-
A are appended. Notes are also given on the occurrence of head
t of aorghum (Ustaago reiiana) on corn.
h|E id. 6, pp. 14.-Eperiments with Oa/s.-Results are given of
Jpin g and seeding experiments, tests of 51 varieties, and of a test
6t asertain the effect of a change in soils on the percentage of smut
inoat.
E. et i 64, pp. fO.-Eperiments with Corn.-A report is given of
the following series of experiments carried out during the past season:
Time oft planting; amount of cultivation; method of culture; sub-
uuige. surface plowing; butt, middle, and tip kernels for seed; fall
l spring plowing for corn; early, medium, and late varieties; and a
St" of 48 varieties.
Annual Repo ftor 1896, pp. 28.-A report of the council outlining
Sthie bulletins published and the general work of the year; notes on the
stado. personnel; list of publications issued since the organization of
the station; summary of inventories by departments; list of dona-
tionsl; and a report of the treasurer for the fiscal year ending June
mo, 189.
The experimental investigations of the Kansas Station were con-
ducted during the past year in an orderly and thorough manner along
line of great practical usefulness, and its financial and other busi-
naesm was carried on strictly within the provisions of the law. The
results of its work compare very favorably with those of other stations
having like resources. The college, of which the station is a depart-
met, enjoyed a year of great prosperity, having a larger number of
students and better facilities for instruction than at any previous
time in its history. Radical action on the part of the State legislature
and the governing board has, however, brought about a reorganiza-
tom of both college and station, taking effect with the beginning of
the current fiscal year, which has excited so great an agitation among
the friends and patrons of the institution and the people generally
throughout the State as to make the future of the institution full of
umnertainties. The changes which have taken place apparently have
their foundation in the peculiar political conditions of the State and
relate to questions of general policy which in no way affect the char-
acter or professional standing of the officers of the institution. In
March, 1897, the State legislature passed the following act:
AK ACN to powMs for the oanammnt at the Km- State Agirciltaur OoUle.
t medEb t. hoislature the State of Kanm--
1. Te i overmnt of Ve cdiep bollq ted In a board otf wvrenu nt,
MRB oapoied by -the Woaenr MW a4nd ymPconfirmed by the nd
w bmaf oacefthab9 ow Five of Sod Minn be appointed
= wIOn ydo frr day of AP%. on7me of vwhoman hold officntil the


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32 AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. .
J...
.... first day of April, 1899, and four of whom shall hold their office.until th ir
4 (of April, 1901; two shall be appointed on or before the first day of Apr4,
hold office until the first day of April, 1899, and on or before the first day o
1899, and every four years thereafter previous to the first day of Aptl'1
regents, and after the first day of April, 1897, four regents, shall be 'appoin-l
the governor and confirmed by the senate for a term of four years each,- th
terms expiring on the first day of April. 't
A But nothing in this act shall be construed so as to restrain the goverpur fromf .l
appointing regents before the expiration of the regular legislative session. ;
Whenever any vacancy shall occur in the said board of regents, it shall to |
J duty of the governor at once to appoint some suitable person to fill the vacaatyC
. And when any appointment is made while the legislature is not in session, ti
0, "... appointee shall hold his office until action is taken upon his appointment by th ..
:," senate; and if the senate fails to take action thereon, his term of office shall expire
.... .? at the close of the session and the governor shall fill the vacancy as in other 6cas
: ;" SEC. 2. No one connected with the college as professor, tutor, teacher,or employ* :
S shall be a regent.
SEC. 3. The regents shall elect a president, who shall be the chief officer of th
.:"' college and the head of each department thereof, and the secretary of the board
.... ,.of regents, and whose duties and powers, otherwise than as prescribed in this act,
Shall be prescribed by the board of regents.
:. SEC. 4. All acts and parts of acts in conflict with the provisions of this act are
hereby repealed.
:. '.: SEC. 5. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its publication
...in the Topeka State Journal.
The first effect of this act was to cause an immediate reorganization- 3
,.. of the governing board and to prevent the president of the college from
-.- "continuing to serve as a member of the board. The new board met: in A
"' April and passed the following resolution: "Resolved, That the term F
S'school year' as employed in the act entitled 'An act, etc.,' shall
begin July first of each year and end June 30th of the following year,
and that the term of employment of all present employees shall expire
June 30th, 1897." Inasmuch as the officers of the institution had pre-
.:,- viously held their positions on terms which practically insured perma-
\- nency of tenure during good behavior and efficiency, the passage of
the aforesaid resolution evinced a determination on the part of the
new board to make a reorganization of the faculty and staff of the
College and station on a new basis. Its effect. was, in short, to bring
Sthe Kansas Agricultural College as it had previously been known to
., an end on June 30, 1897, after which date a new institution bearing
S; the same name but having a new faculty and policy of management
Should begin its career. The work of reorganization has proceeded as
rapidly as circumstances would permit. As far as reported to this
office, out of fourteen persons constituting the station staff, whose
names were published in our official organization list (Bulletin 39)
February, 1897, six are now on the staff, three of the officers retained
being assistants. Our examination of the expenditures, publications,
and work of the station has not revealed any good and sufficient
reasons for this radical reorganization. Experience in station man-
agement yearly brings increasing evidence that permanency in policy,
^ personnel, and work is essential to the successful conduct of experi-
mental inquiries in behalf of agriculture. Changes due to the ordi-
nary vicissitudes of human life and to conservative efforts to increase
the efficiency of the station will at best be all too frequent. It must
be a very extraordinary set of circumstances which can produce such
a state of things as to justify an entire reorganization of a station
staff during a single year. Proved misbehavior or inefficiency ought
*to secure the speedy removal of a station officer at any time, but in
the absence of such causes for removal, he ought to feel entirely secure
in his position. On the old basis the Kansas Station made a good


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r....ii.il|KENTUCKY.;SatonL exig tnI
Ietuaky Agdroutural xpermt Station, LUp mt

mUMNY OF TEI AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF KENTUCKY.
The work of the Kentucky Station has continued during the past
yw mainly along the same lines as heretofore, including field experi-
meats with cereals, tobacco, hemp, potatoes, etc.; variety tests of
paus and other forage plants; studies of methods of soil analysis;
Analysis and inspection of commercial fertilizers; horticultural inves-
Itigatious; studies of fungus diseases of plants; entomological investi-
pmtcs; dairying, especially studies of the variation in butter fat of
the milk of cows. The station has undertaken field and chemical
investigations on sugar beets in cooperation with this Department.
The analysis and inspection of commercial fertilizers conducted under
State laws continue to yield a considerable net revenue, which is
devoted to agricultural investigations.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
USM State appropriation.------------- ------------------ $15,000.00
S0 for fertilizer analysis---------.-------------------------.---- 38,240.00
ya viwrodeIt ------------------------------------------------------1,280.48
----- --.--.. -.-.--------. .....----- .....-- ...-...-....... -8,282.84
.tOl---------. .------.---..----------.---...--------... ---. 22,758.27
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 64-68.
Bulltin 64, pp. 15. -Analyses of Commercial Fertilizers. -Tabulated
analyses and valuations of 127 samples of fertilizers, accompanied by
explanatory notes.
Bulletin 66, pp. IO.-Analyses of Comin ere ial Fertilizers. -Tabulated
analyses of 52 samples of fertilizers.
Bultin 66, pp. 39, pis. 4.-Tobacco.-Results of fertilizer tests;
extended notes on Northern and Southern tobacco worms, including
the results of experiments in feeding the worms varying quantities of
paris green, and noteson the insect parasites attacking them; further
notes on several other tobacco insects and on two imperfectly known
diseases of tobacco.
Budlletin 67, pp. 67, figs. 8.-The San Jlose Salde.-A popular bulle-
tin on this insect, giving its history and life history, descriptive notes,
Remedies, etc.
Bulletin 68, pp. 13. -A n)dyxes of Commercial Fertilizers. -Explana-
tory notes and tabulated analyses of 98 samples of fertilizers.
The Kentucky Station continues to pursue a consistent and perma-
nent policy. It is gradually increasing its facilities and developing
ts operations along lines of much practical importance to the agri-
Sculture of the State.
I H. Doe. 205--3












No. 2. State Experiment Station, Baton Rouge.
SNo. 3. North Louisiana Experiment Station, Calhoun. .. .
DEPARTMENT OF LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY AND AGRIOULTURAL.I" ap!
MECHANICAL COLLEGE.

ll The three Louisiana stations have continued their work dulringulflr
Pi, past year mainly in the same lines as heretofore, some of the p6.ni[|i,
i, '.. pal lines of investigation being as follows: -. : ";
;| Sugar Station.-Investigations on the breeding, fertilizing, cultak,4! ii
y "'t 1;and improvement of sugar cane and the manufacture of cane sUgasii!3
";', ~ chemical, microscopical, and biological.studies of sugar cane andit.
~:...,, products; field experiments with fiber plants, alfalfa, corn, sorghum, i
.. velvet bean, and other forage plants; chemical and other studies of:'l
T" frY soils; horticultural investigations, especially on citrus fruits; drainaa-
:y. : .' age and irrigation experiments.
,-:: ~State Station.-Field experiments with tobacco, cotton (especially ::
^^: ;Egyptian varieties), corn, and other crops; horticultural investga- I
r' | tions, including greenhouse experiments; investigations in entomology::.
,.. s and veterinary science; botanical studies, especially on the root tuber-
cles of leguminous plants;' feeding experiments.
V North Louisiana Station.-Field experiments with tobacco, cornm
: and other crops; horticultural experiments; feeding experiments; and
dairying. .
I', Work in connection with the State geological survey is still e-on
r:, tinued by the station at New Orleans under State laws. Analyses of
commercial fertilizers and paris green are made by the State Station
,,-,, for the State commissioner of agriculture. Interesting experiments
:' have been made in the importation of Northern cattle and their treat-
Sment to render them immune against Southern cattle fever. ,
^- The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
United States appropriation------ .... --.-..- ......- -$15, 000.00
S. State appropriation--....--- ...........-- --------------.------. 18,000.00
Individuals -(Sugar Planters' Association).--------------------. ------2,211.88
Fees for analyses of fertilizers and paris green ------------------------856.18
SFarm products.----.......-----..--. --.---------... ------------------ 882.0
SMiscellaneous --------------------------------------------- 216.538
...Total....---------------------................ ---- ----......-..-----... ------------- 37,116.68
'.' A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
S has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
S. The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 41-46, Report on Geology and Agriculture, Part 111,
." and the Annual Report for 1896.
Bulletin 41, pp. 27.-Tobacco: Yellow Leaf and Cigar Varieties.-
Includes a record of fertilizer and variety experiments at the North
S. Louisiana Station at Calhoun with cigar and bright leaf tobaccos and
.at the State Station at Baton Rouge with cigar tobaccos; results of a
Test of three methods of curing; and directions for harvesting, strip-
ping, and sorting, with a brief description of the station tobacco barn.
".. -. Bulletin 42, pp. 4O.--Horticulture: Results of the year 1895.-Gema
eral remarks on truck growing in the State and tabulated data and
,; notes on vegetables and fruits grown at the stations.



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S tabulated analyses of 96 samples of fertilizers. The text of the
law. pyviding for the inspection of paris green is also given and tab-
ial l analyses of 8 samples.
Buletn 46, pp. 12, fig. 1.-Leguminous Root Tubercles. -Results of
experiments to determine the influence on leguminous root tubercles
of deep and shallow planting, the depths to which nitrifying organ-
is penetrate, and the effect of transferring the organisms from one
xa to another.
M non and Agriculture, Part III, pp. 94.-A Preliminary Report
inos 6W Florida Parishes of East Louisiana and the Bluff, Prairie,
m a Hil Lands of Southwest Louisiana.-This deals with the greater
ptof the State of Louisiana south of the 31st degree. Different chap-
tA are devoted to descriptions of area, including the geography and
history, topography and drainage, the mounds, natural ponds, geo-
Igial history, brief history of the La Fayette and the Columbia for-
atious, soils, economic products, including mineral and vegetable
products, climate, the five islands, some geological sections (pine hills,
pine fields, prairies, and bluffs), with an appendix on the principal
plants of economic value in this region. A brief description is also
given of the detached and limited areas known as the "Islands" of
Orange, Petite Arise, Grand Cote, Cote Blanche, and Belle Isle.
Annual Report, 1896, pp. 12.-Report by the director on the work of
the stations at Audubon Park, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Cal-
houn during the year, with lists of station publications and a finan-
cial statement for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896.
The Louisiana Stations have been managed during the past year on
the same general policy as heretofore, lTheir work was actively and
successfully prosecuted and they received generous financial aid from
the State and the Sugar Planters' Association.

MAINE.
Maine Aguiculturl Experiment Station, Orono.
~DKPARTMKZT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MAINE.
i The work of the Maine Station during the past year has been prin-
i eipally in the same lines as heretofore, including investigations on the
Food and nutrition of man and domestic animals, box and field experi-
Smemte with fertilizers, horticultural experiments, botanical and ento-
mological investigations, and work in veterinary science and practice.
"Feeding experiments have been made with cows and digestion experi-
Sments with sheep. Box experiments on the availability of phosphoric


.-3- .:. ..













Vax urniJ.? Ln-L V L VL J V t' LJtL'm IA LII LtJ YV TJ U LD ALIIIJLWtJD, A.J LL.UK, V UivVwJ zv:t2I'a'.r T
ornamentals. Cooperative experiments in horticulture have aw..
conducted, especially in Aroostook County. In connection within
tigations on tuberculosis, the effects of careful treatmentunderpi
hygienic conditions are being tested. The work on the foo f
nutrition of man has been conducted in cooperation with this D` pt.
meant and has included especially studies on the digestibility of broS.
made from different kinds of flour and investigations with the bmbA
calorimeter. Under State laws the station has the inspection .of.ri-' :i
lizers, creamery glassware, feeding stuffs, and seeds. The laws relating 1
to feeding stuffs and seeds have gone into effect this fall. .' .
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as fo1iowlio :
.... .. "... ""E
United States appropriation .-...-----.-----...-- -...--..-....-------...... $15, O0.". _4:
Fees for fertilizer analyses .-----.....-...-------.....----..-------.-... 1,970. .
Farm products ---------------------------..-----------------------. 806.47.
Miscellaneous --.--.-.--.. ---------..-----------...-.... -.. 1,838 .79 ':

Total-...-..------....--------.......--.-----.---.---.-... 19,.:7I
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund i t
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by tils iI
Department, and has been approved. .
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year.
were Bulletins 30-32 and the Annual Report for 1895.
Bulletin 30, pp. 32.-Fertilizer Inspection.-Notes on valuation and
tabulated analyses of 142 samples of fertilizers. |
Bulletin 31, pp. 8, figs. 2.-A 3Modification of the Babcock Method.-.
A modification of the Babcock method of milk testing is discussed and 4
a number of comparative tests employing the method are reported.
Bulletin 32, pp. 8, figs. 3.-Three Troublesome Weeds.-Illustrated. |
and descriptive notes on the orange hawkweed, wild carrot, and but-
falo burr, with suggestions as to means of eradication.
Annual Report, 1895, pp. 174, figs. 18, pis. 5. -Reports by the director
and heads of departments on the work of the year, including the fol- I
lowing subjects: Analyses of butter, imitation butter, and miscella-
neous prodficts; field experiments with fertilizers; notes on the profit-
able amount of seed per acre for corn; digestion experiments with
sheep; feeding experiments with milch cows; notes on variety tests
of potatoes and corn; historical notes on tomatoes, with the results of
forcing experiments in winter; notes on the field culture of tomatoes,
on small fruits, and on plant breeding; notes on plant diseases and
insects injurious during the year, with more detailed accounts of those
new to the State or considered especially injurious; the use of tuber-
culin as a diagnostic agent; reprints of bulletins issued in 1894, and a
financial statement for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1895.
The present director of the Maine Station began his term of service
July 1, 1897, and the past fiscal year has therefore witnessed a partial-
reorganization of the station. The station staff has been increased by,
the addition of two chemists, and the facilities for investigation have
been somewhat enlarged. The management of the farm connected 4
with the university has been consolidated under the direction of the
station. This has, however, been done under such conditions that
farm expenditures for college purposes will not be charged against .
the station funds. "The station funds will be used, as in the past,
only to defray the cost of experiments." The changes in station man-

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DEPARTMENT O FMAiRYLAMD AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.


SThe work of the Maryland Station during the past year has been
mainly along the same lines as heretofore, including chemical investi-
gatIons, especially of feeding stuffs; feeding and digestion experi ments
with milch oows, pigs, and horses; breeding experiments with cows;
SSold experiments with corn, tobacco, lime, and fertilizers; horticul-
tmrl experiments; entomological investigations, and work in dairying.
T e State fertilizer inspection continues to be made by the college
with which the station is connected and the results are published by
The station. The equipment of the station for experiments in pig feed-
lug has been materially enlarged.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
UtIdStt appropriation. ----------..----------------------..------- $15,000.00
OW-.... ----....----------- -- --... ....-.............. ---- 1,194.04
.......... ..... ...8...... .............. 1.19
m..----------.....---.. .........----...------... 16,275.23
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
sa been rendered, in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
le publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 38-46 and the Annual Reports for 1895 and 1896.
Bulletin 38, pp. 8.-Potato Experimenwnts.-Results of fertilizer, cul-
ture, variety, and spraying experiments.
Bulletin 39, folio.-Spray Calendar.-Reprint of Bulletin 114 of
New York Cornell Station.
Bulletin 40, pp. 52.-Comnposition of Commercial Fertilizers Sold in
the State.-Includes a schedule of trade values of fertilizing materials,
a list of fertilizers licensed for sale in Maryland for the year ending
January 31, 1897, and tabulated analyses and valuations of 390
samples of fertilizers.
Bulletin 4 1, pp. 15.-Test of Methods of Prejparing (in d Feeding Corn
Fodder.-Results of feeding experiments with cattle to determine the
feeding value and digestibility of shredded corn fodder prepared in
different ways and the digestibility of bran. Notes are also given on
the comparative value of cotton-seed hulls and other feeding stuffs.
Bulletin 42, pp. 15, figs. 8.-MaryUtland Trees and Nursery-Stock Law
and Oiher Infotrmatin of Special Interest io Nurserymen and Fruit
Growers.-Text of the State tree and nursery-stock law, with corn-
meats; notes on the present condition of nurseries in the State;
descriptions of a new peach disease; the present status of the San
Jo"e scale in the State, with methods of detection; and notes on peach
Yellows and peach rosette.
Bulletin 43, pp. 22, fig. L.-Report upon the Vfdue of a New Corn
Product.-The new corn product consists of corn stalks ground into
meal after the pith has been removed. Results are reported of a
number of feeding and digestion experiments on 4 steers with this
material.

LLi::=









Bulletin 44,,pp. 20.-The Soil of the Hagerstown Valley .-T1 "
ress made in the classification and study of the soils of Ma4"
explained and mechanical analyses are given of soils and su
7 typical corn lands, 8 wheat lands, and 6 grass lands of the ..
area of this region, 5 samples of subsoil from the Hudson River s-'
". .. .. ...... .
and 4 from the peach lands on Cambrian sandstones. .... :::
Bulletin 45, pp. 50.-Composition of Commercial Fertna.-h
schedule of trade values of fertilizing materials; a list of fetil
licensed for sale in Maryland for the year ending January 81, itr
and tabulated analyses and valuations of 416 samples of fertf lllzu AI
Bulletin 46, pp. 16, fig. 1.-Tabulated results of cultivataiontd* i'
tance, and fertilizer experiments with corn and potatoes, .nd:tu..jf.....
variety tests of potatoes.2 .. :*
Annual Report, 1895, pp. 22, pis. 3.-Reports by director an4 h AdqM
of departments outlining the work of the year, meteorological siaps i
mary for 1895, and a financial statement for the fiscal year ending 'A
June 30, 1895. .
Annual Report, 1896, pp. 16.-Report of the director and heads ofi
departments on the work of the year, meteorological summary for
1896, and a financial statement for the fiscal year ending June 30, .180.. 6W
The work of the Maryland Station has been actively proaeuted.. ;
during the past year, and the investigations in the feeding and id :".g-4 .
tion of animals and on entomology have been considerably developed .
and strengthened. The station needs tb do more for the horticultural 1
interests of the State, and it is hoped that State aid may be secured
for the carrying on of additional and more thorough investigations in .
horticulture and on the diseases of plants.


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Hatch Experiment Station of the Massachusetts Agricultural College,
Amherst.
DEPARTMENT OF THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.


The work of the Massachusetts Station during the past year has
been mainly along the same lines as heretofore, including the analysis
and inspection of commercial fertilizers; field experiments with fer-
tilizers; variety, fertilizer, and culture experiments with corn, pota-
toes, forage plants, etc.; feeding and digestion experiments and dairy'
studies; horticultural experiments, largely tests of seedling and other
varieties; entomological investigations; studies of plant diseases and
nemniatodes, and meteorological observations. Experiments withcows
have been made to determine the comparative digestibility of hay
from salt-marsh grasses and the effect on milk and butter. Impor-
tant laboratory studies on the carbohydrates of feeding stuffs are in
progress. Experiments have been made on the effects of electricity
and of colored light on greenhouse plants, and with gases for destroy-
ing spores on such plants. The entomologist continues to render
important services in connection with the work of the State Gypsy
Moth Commission. Feeding experiments have been carried on with
poultry, with a special comparison of animal and vegetable foods.
Experiments in subsoiling have covered a number of years. A begin-
ning has been made of studies on the relations of climate to the growth
of corn. A State law providing $1,200 a year for an inspection of
feeding stuffs, under the direction of the station, went into effect
October 1, 1817. The chemical laboratory (fig. 1) has been enlarged


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MASSACHUSETTS.


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FI. 1.-CHEMICAL LABORATORY OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HATCH EXPERIMENT STATION.


















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A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendered, in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Deprtment, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the fiscal year were
Bulletins 40-44, Meteorological Bulletins 90-101, and the Annual Re-
poat for 1896.
Buletin 40, pp. 19.-Analyses of Fertilizers.-A schedule of trade
Tines, with tabulated analyses of 189 samples of fertilizing materials.
Bulletin 41, pp. 27.-On the Use of Tuberculin.-Article on this
subject translated from the Deutschen Zeitschrift fOr Thiermedicin,
22 (1896).
Buln 42, pp. 81.-Analyses of Fertilizers.-New laws for the
regulation of the trade in commercial fertilizers in Massachusetts, text
of the State fertilizer law, and tabulated analyses of 153 saiiiples of
ftllizing material.
BWetin 43, pp. 832, figs. 2, pis. 4.-Electro-Germination.-Results
of station investigation on this subject, with a description of the appa-
ratus and methods employed, and a brief review of the literature relat-
ing to the application of electricity to plant life.
Bulletin 44, pp. 48.- Variety Tests of Fruit.-Tests of Vegetable
Heeds.-Results of variety tests of orchard and small fruits, with
descriptive notes on a number of the varieties tested, together with
the results of germination tests of a large number of garden seeds from
different sources.
Meteorological Bulletins, 90-101, pp. 4 each.-Notes on the weather
and monthly summaries of meteorological observations for the year
ending May 31, 1897, with an annual summary for the year 1896 in
the December number.
Annual Report, 1896, pp. 254.-Reports of director and heads of
departments on the work of the year, embracing the following sub-
jects: Variety, fertilizer, and cultural experiments with a large num-
ber of farm crops; trials of hay caps; feeding experiments with poultry
for egg production; report of studies on a large number of plant dis-
eases; remarks relative to the carbohydrates of agricultural plants
and seeds; technical investigations on the distribution of galactan
and on the phloroglucin method for the estimation of pentosans; feed-
ig experiments with pigs; digestion experiments with sheep; corn-
Piled tables of analyses of fodder articles and dairy products and of
digestion coefficients of American feeding stuffs; field experiments to
study the effect of raising leguminous crops in rotation with grain crops
on the nitrogen resources of the soil; experiments with "nitragin"
for the cultivation of leguminous crops; observations with legumi-
Sions crops at Amherst; tests of mixed annual forage crops vs. clovers;
experiments to study the economy of using natural phosphates in
pie. of acid phosphates and to ascertain the influence of different
mixtures of chemical fertilizers on the character and yield of garden









A.,; fertilizer law; notes on basic phosphatic slag as a fertilizei-a.ig'
t' action of the chlorids of potassium and sodium on the lime re
of the soil, and on the effect of chlorid of potassium, on sulphaWti!4
ammonium in mixed fertilizers; and compilations of analyses of mhV
Serial substances, fruits, garden crops, and insecticides. ,
ll>1 The Massachusetts Station has enjoyed a prosperous year .'ia
jI*K State has continued its liberal support and the facilities for investing 'a-::!
l tion have been materially improved. In some lines the work ha been .
!i' extended and in others promising investigations have been under-"
Staken. .
l. MICHIGAN. .
:4i Experiment Station of Michigan Agricultural College, Agricultural College.

Yet- DEPARTMENT OF MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.
Li The work of the Michigan Station during the past year has been
mainly along the same lines as heretofore, including field experiments
i:. with wheat, forage plants, and other crops; feeding experiments,
especially with dairy cattle, lambs, and pigs; horticultural exper-
,: ments; fertilizer analysis and inspection; chemical studies of wheat,
,J -forage plants, etc.; entomological investigations; botanical and bac-
:" teriological studies; and investigations on animal diseases, particu- -
Slarly tuberculosis.
.. The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
,. United States appropriation ....---....--..-.-----------------...-- $15,000.00
Fees for fertilizer inspection. -------------------------------------1,220.00
,' Farm products- --------------. -------------------------------.---- 282.41
S'Miscellaneous ..-----------------...--------------.-----------------. 38,081.64
Total .---.----.--..----------..-..--------------------------..- 19,584.05
;., |A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
.^ -has been rendered, in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
; The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 133-144 and the Annual Report for 1895.
:' Bulletin 13, p)p. 13.-Tu berculosis.-A popular bulletin, giving a
S"brief historical sketch of the disease, methods of dissemination of the
virus, the symptoms of the disease and its diagnosis by clinical and
microscopical examinations and by the tuberculin test, results of
experiments with tuberculin, and an outline of proposed experimental
work at the station along these lines.
Bulletin 134, pp. 28, figs. 6.-A Preliminary Bulletin on the Pas-
tearization of Milk.-A popular bulletin on milk pasteurization, with
the results of two experiments on the keeping quality of milk steril-
,ized commercially by the De Laval apparatus.
*: Bulletin 135, pp. 15.-Fertilizer Analyses.-Explanatory notes, text
of the State fertilizer law, and tabulated analyses of 60 samples of
fertilizers.
Bulletin 136, pp. 22.-Fattening Lambs.-A Comparison of Fod-
ders.-Results of a feeding test made with 100 grade Shropshire lambs
to test the value of alfalfa, millet hay, oat straw, cornstalks, and bean
straw as a whole or partial substitute for clover hay.
Bulletin 137, pp. 6.-Feeding Corn Snut.-Results of experiments
in feeding large quantities of corn smut, in addition to other rations,
to four cows.


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S. I.39, pp. 37, figs. 85.-Bacteria: What They Are and What
.-.Do.-A general treatise on the subject, including a glossary.
.... i 140, pp. I, figs. 4.-Ropiness in Milk.-Results of inves-
tbi Lea of two epidemics of ropy milk in dairy herds, with a tech-
M al description of the microorganism causing ropiness.
Bulletn 141, pp. 30, I3s. 2.-Forage Crops aml Wheat.-Resulte of
|oultue experiments and variety tests.
*.t n 149"*, pp. 15.-Small Fruit TDWals at the College.-Descriptive
o eand tabulated data on a large number of small fruits grown at
the station during 1896.
Bullin 1,pp. 48.-Fruit Tests at South Haven.-Descriptive notes
ad tabulated data on orchard and small fruits, nuts, etc., grown at
h South Haven substation in 1896.
Buetn 14, pp. 26.-Vegetables, Old and Iew.-Descriptive notes
and tabulated data on several hundred varieties of vegetables grown
during 1896.
Annual Report, 18965, pp. 99-669.-This embraces a brief report by
thm director outlining the work of the year; results of culture and
feriber experiments with various forage and grain crops; the college
bod record; summary of results of sheep-feeding experiments; exper-
imenta in swine feeding; popular notes on dairying, handling of milk,
etc.; outlines of the work of the horticultural and chemical depart-
. meats; notes on some of the more injurious insects of the season;
notes on various Michigan weeds and on corn smut; results of the
season's work in the apiary; meteorological record for 1894; reprints
of station bulletins 111 to 124; reprints of press bulletins 7 and 8, on
Alaike Clover and Canker Worms in the Orchard, respectively; and
a financial statement for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1895.
The work of the Michigan Station has been actively prosecuted
during the year. The administration of the present president of the
college seems to have become firmly settled, and a somewhat more
liberal policy of management is pursued by the board of control.

MINXESOTA.
Agpicultural Experiment Station of the University of Minnesota, St. Anthony
Park.
DEPARTMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA.
The work of the Minnesota Station (luring the past year has been
along the same lines as heretofore, including field experiments with
grain and forage crops, flax grown for fiber and for seed, rotation of
crops, etc.; horticultural and forestry investigations; entomological
investigations, especially with reference to the repression of the
* chinch bug, Hessian fly, and grasshopper; chemical studies of soils,
Sflax foods, etc.; investigations in dairy farming and dairying; studies
Sin veterinary science and practice, with special reference to the use of
tuberculin and hypodermic cathartics; feeding experiments with beef
SAMe, sheep, and swine; pasturage expel iments with sheep and breed-
isg experiments with sheep and swine. A considerable amount of
Smiteresting work in the breeding of varieties of grain, forage, and root























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ing summer forage for sheep have attracted widespread attentitos"a
seem likely to prove of value to sheep growers. Important stui AU.
the nutritive value and digestibility of flour and bread have-b.
made in cooperation with this Department. The station has .'
cooperated with this Department in experiments in forestry ab, wi.tfil;l
sugar beets. Valuable books on Vegetable Gardening and TheUhi A.".
istry of Dairying, by officers of the station, were published during th.il
past year. .......
The substations at Crookston and Grand Rapids have been rega-......
larly organized and equipped, and a variety of experiments are14;.:
progress at these places. The State continues to provide funds for tef::::r
maintenance. : ':
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows.:.. "
United States appropriation.---...--.-..--.. --..-----.----------.........---- $15, 000..00 ,
State ------...-..----------------.-- ----......----....-----------... -.... 10,0.41 :
Farm products ......-----.-.---..-.-------------.-.--.----.-------- 3,883 86 '.

Total..------.-..-----.----.------ ---------------................. 8,904. t
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund. .
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this'
Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 47-52 and the Annual Report for 1895.
Bulletin 4.7, pp. 30, figs. 5.-Flax.-A report giving the results of
investigations of the draft of the flax crop on soil fertility; the chem- |
ical analysis of different types of seed, of the plant at different stages
of growth, and of the straw and flax when cured as hay; the amount
of oil yielded by different varieties of seed; the composition, digesti-
bility, and feeding value of linseed meal, and a study of the soils best
suited to flax culture.
Bulletin 48, pp. 240, pis. 16, figs. 187.-Insects Injurious in 1896.-
A comprehensive reporton insects injurious to vegetation during 1896,
giving results in some cases of spraying experiments for their repres- A
sion. The subject of parasitism, using the term in its widest sense, :
is considered at considerable length, illustrated descriptive and life-.
history notes being given for some 128 species, together with a num-
ber of recipes for dips, ointments, and other remedial measures.
Bulletin 49, pp. 45, figs. 13.-Rate of Increase on the Cut- Over Timber :
Lands of Minnesota.-Presents the results of a study of the cut-over
timber land of the State and estimates their probably natural
increase in value. The losses occasioned by forest fires, the forest
resources of the State, the conditions of stump land after burning,
and the rate of increase by actual measurements in small and scat-
tered trees are given at some length. The condition of the stump
land after logging and of natural restocking of unburned land are
described. Notes and miscellaneous letters bearing oi the subject of
restocking cut-over lands are appended.
Bulletin 50, pp. 37.-Progress at the Several Experimnent Farms in
1896.--Variety and Cultural Tests with Field Crops and Rotation
Experiments.-Briefly notes the progress at the several experiment
farms in 1896 and gives the results of variety tests with beans, barley,
corn, oats, wheat, peas, and various root crops; culture experiments
with corn, wheat, and sugar beets, and cross-rotation experiments,
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M|ii,:Sn enjoys tue support ana conuuence ou tue [armiers, as wein as or
ieh of other occupations, and the station continues to benefit
Ii lely by the liberality of the State. The organization of the station
ibhsi been strengthened by making the director more definitely its
igestive head, thus bringing the station management into harmony
wVfW lVh. 4 plan which experience shows is productive of the best results.
E." MISSISSIPPI.
M inppA Agrioultural Bxperlment Station, Agricultural College.
Pi||l DCPAX~KT OF MISSISSIPPI AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE.
SThe work of the Mississippi Station during the past year has been
I mainly along the same lines as heretofore, including botanical studies
Sa cotton, grasses, and fungi; variety, fertilizer, and culture experi-
ments with cotton, corn, oats, vetches, and other forage plants; feed-
ming experiments with milch cows with special reference to the use of*
sh.edded corn fodder and with pigs on cooked cotton seed; horticul-
tural investigations, especially with small fruits, fertilizers, and on
irrigation problems; chemical and physical studies of soils with ref-
erence to moisture and fertilizer requirements; entomological investi-
gations; studies in veterinary science and practice.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
UnitS Sttes appropriation ..................................... 15,000.00
i ---. .--------------------------------- 815.58
e64.96

'ol-..-...-....... ............................. -................. 15,880.51
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
. The .publications of this station received during the fiscal year were
A Bulletins 38, 39, and 41, and the Annual Reports for 1895 and 1896.
Bu!i letn 8n, _. 8. -Mississippi Fun i. -Lists of the observed genera
StuAsapeeie fungi in the State to fay, 1896, including 85 species
Stamped in former station lists. Twenty-one of the species are new
|L I7 we described for the frst time.


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LFlULLUM VY LJu L UTT YY uul D h U 0 Ut' UtJIJV uCMLLUtJ tiLUL niLL1jUj tlLJ LL LJ L IA r^ tAW.
jack beans and to compare then with rations of ordinaryM
'42
cotton-seed meal. ....
I Bulletin 41, pp. 6, figs. 4, map 1.-The Colorado Potato Be
1Mississippi.-Popular notes on this insect, giving its history and
tribution in the State and suggestions as to remedies.
: Ii Annual Report, 1895, pp. 108.-Embraces a financial statemet V i
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1895; report of the director outlir.n.....
work of the year and giving a list of bulletins published; reNdlW.t..
Ss"| variety, fertilizer, and culture experiments with cotton and CO. f:;:",
1 notes on grasses, forage plants, wheat, and miscellaneous crops; tit:,
V on the use of fertilizers and on the tile-drain, system at the station
,I results of feeding experiments with cattle; notes on various disease ..
/ i of horses, with suggestions as to remedies; descriptive notes' on '
i: K11
?3 number of orchard and small fruits growing at the station; generic l,
;i entomological notes of the season; report of digestion experiments o n
11r, sheep; results of analyses of soils, marls, fertilizers, insecticides, .J
pA waters, clays, etc., and a meteorological summary for 1895.
., Annual Report, 1896, pp. 3.-Report of the treasurer for the fiscal
y. : ear ending June 30, 1896, and brief notes on the general work of the I
:year.
**I Little change occurred in the affairs of the Mississippi Station until
1: ,near the close of the fiscal year, when the director and entomologist"
tiII; resigned. The station is proceeding under the new management with- :
*i-.out radical changes in work or policy.

... ISSOURI.
Missouri Agricultural College Experiment Station, Columbia.
I DEPARTMENT OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS OF THE
, || UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI.
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i The work of the Missouri Station during the past year has included
Field experiments with corn, oats, potatoes, forage crops, fertilizers,'
2. rotation of crops, etc.; feeding experiments with beef, cattle, and
o hogs; sheep breeding; field, greenhouse, and laboratory experiments
in horticulture; investigations of animal diseases, especially Texas
;" fever; entomological studies; analysis and inspection of fertilizers
and dairy products under State laws. The field work has been reor-
.. ganized and is now conducted with a definite plan on areas sufficiently
.' limited to admit of close supervision. Through the liberality of the
university authorities the quarters of the station in the university
: ",*-buildings have been enlarged and improved. Considerable scientific
apparatus and other facilities have been added to the equipment of
the station. The station is carrying on experiments with sugar beets
in cooperation with this Department.
S. The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
: :United States appropriation ----------------- ----------------- $15,000.00
Fees -------------------...---...---------------.----- .-------- 308.66
: Farm products ........-----------....-...----...-------. ------------------------- 1,024.66
Miscellaneous -----------------------------------------------1,779.79
STotal.----..-......-----.------..---- ..-----.----..-.-------- 18,113.20
f d.* :i.l
S' ? A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
S has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
.' Department, and has been approved.


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Lowlof ru mpsr.-An account of the damages-committed by these
inlmeta in Missouri during the years 1895 and 1896; their life histories
qMSl habits; and of experiments undertaken to determine the best
qulbi es for their repression.
B"t n 7, pp. 58, figs. 11.-Texas Ferer.-A report. on( experi-
mats carried on at the station grounds and in cooperation with the
State board of agriculture and the Texas Experiment Station con-
oertning the "Tick Theory" of the transmission of this disease, the
rvontion of Texas fever, and the disinfection of pastures; and to
Csrmine if the Australian cattle fever is identical with Texas fever.
Annal Report for 1896,pp. 16.-Includes a financial statement
fee the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896, and a report by the director
Sa tihe work of the year and on the station staff, buildings, and
equipment.
* The Missouri Station is being conducted on a systematic and pro-
gresive policy. Its work is being concentrated in lines of great
uiportance to the agriculture of the State, and its outlook for increased
usefulness and success is very encouraging.

MONTANA.
Montana Apioultural U apelmeat Station, Boseman.
DEPARTMENT OF MONTANA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.
The work of the Montana Station during the past year has included
field experiments with grains, forage plants, sugar beets, potatoes, and
other root crops; feeding experiments with sheep and pigs; horticul-
tural investigations, especially with apples, strawberries, tomatoes,
and celery; irrigation investigations; studies of alkali soils; chemical
and biological studies of poisonous plants and native forage plants; and
investigations of diseases of plants and animals. A survey of the
waters of the State is being made in cooperation with the United
States Geological Survey, and experiments with sugar beets are being
conducted in different localities in cooperation with this Department.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
uadstat s Ion-------------------------------.......................................... $15,000.00o
...------.-.-.-..-..------.........-.---.----.....-.....--------... 10,057.15
Srm oduct ....----------------...................----------..--.....--..------..-.. 1,946.17
s .................. ........................ .............. 97,008.8
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendered in Accordance with the schedules prescribed by the
Department, and has been approved.


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NEBRASKA.
Agricultural Experiment Station of Nebraska, Lincoln.
DEPARTMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA.


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The work of the Nebraska Station during the past year has been
mainly along the same lines as heretofore, and has included field experi-
ments with sugar beets, oats, corn, and forage plants; horticultural
and forestry investigations; botanical studies of grasses, forage
plants, fungi, and weeds; chemical investigations, especially of sugar
beets, grains, and corn; veterinary investigations, especially of hog
cholera and tuberculosis; entomological investigations, especially on
diseases of grasshoppers and the chinch bug; studies on soils and
irrigation. The field work of the station has been developed and
strengthened. The university farm is still under control of the station,
but is utilized more extensively than formerly for station purposes;.
Plans are being made for making the station responsible for the man-


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IJ-- Lt ,.' ,, "i"' Et'./- ... Ij,,i f itt.v -A F .-A w, vj F r r ,fF i'tWiL. .., -U sl / ,,M ,A....FL .. i,.
tigations on methods of soil preparation and seeding in gens
tice; quantity of seed per acre; variety comparisons; and I.T.n.t .M..
preventing smuts.
Bulletin 11, pp. 10, figs. 4:--Devices for Obtaining a ConaWt H
in Laterals with Variable Heads in the Main Canals or Reser
Points out the importance of better means of controlling and i
ing water and describes 3 devices for this purpose, one of whio'lkLwr
originated at the station. t -
Bulletin 12, pp. 46.-Annual Report of the Treasurer, DiOt:.....,i
Horticulturist, and Chemist, and a Bulletin on the Spaying of Maoi."w.
This embraces a financial report for the fiscal year ending June S
1896, and a report by the director on the personnel of the satWo!N l
farm buildings, experimental plats, the acreage and yield of genera &
farm crops, and giving a list of bulletins issued, acknowledgments,
exchanges, etc.; the report of the horticulturist on the work of the !.|
year, together with a list of the fruits growing at the station, results
of experiments in growing nursery stock, and of culture and variety::
tests of strawberries; a brief report by the chemist outlining thei::A!
work of the year, and a detailed account of the operations and, :'
results of spaying 22 mares. Directions are also given for the treat- -.
ment of potato scab and smut of grain.
Bulletin 13, pp. 15.-Drinking Water.-Popular notes on the prin-
cipal constituents of drinking water, the character of water from the
different kinds of soils, and the purification of water, together with,
analyses of 23 samples.
The college with which the Montana Station is connected has
obtained funds for the erection of buildings, and the station will soon
have greatly improved quarters for its work, especially in chemistry.
The buildings on the station grounds have also been improved. Much
attention has been given the past year to the reorganization and devel-
opment of the station operations and much useful work is now in
progress. The influence of the station is increasing, and the station
officers are making special efforts to keep in close touch with the farm-
ers. In general, the affairs of the station are in more satisfactory
condition than hitherto and its outlook is quite encouraging.

















sga' beets. It has been relieved of routine duties in connection with
0 State weather and crop service.
Tn income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
iM St a proprition--------------------------- ........................................ 0.00
----------------------------------------------------- 483.85
..----..-. ....---. .-- .-- ...-....-...-------.-.- -... .. 16,017.24
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
1 irtment, and has been approved.
t publications of this station received during the fiscal year were
Blletini 45-49 and the Annual Report for 1896.
uetn 4S, pp. 49, charts 87.-The Rainfall of Nebraska.-A com-
m;al p record of observations on the rainfall of Nebraska from 1876 to
189, with comments.
Bu.etn 48, pp. 56, charts 14.-Nebraska Weather and Climate for
Mi9t.-General notes on the weather, with summaries of meteorologi-
sal observations at some 125 stations in the State from January to
JUly, 1896.
'uletin 47, pp. 11.-Serum Therapy in Hog Cholera.-A general
dimension of the subject, with results of inoculation experiments at
the station and of field tests with 1,176 hogs.
Buletin 48, pp. 28, Figs. 5.-Windbreaks.-A popular bulletin,
summarizing 125 replies to a circular of inquiry on this subject and
giving the results of the station studies and observations along the
same lines.
Bulletin 49, Ip-. 6.-Suggestions for Chicory Cuilture-Brief popular
notes and cultural directions.
Annual Report, 1896, pp. 32.-Report by the director on the gen-
eral management of the station, additions to the station personnel,
station improvements and progress, bulletins published during the
year; outlines of work by heads of departments; and a financial state-
ment for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896.
The Nebraska Station has made progress during the past year in
strengthening its work, particularly in the direction of field experi-
ments and in obtaining relief from routine duties more properly per-
formed by other agencies. The needs of the agriculture of the State
are so pressing and varied that this station, as well as many others,
bhal to contend with more or less impatience on the part of the farmers
because results of immediate practical application are not more quickly
ad numerously obtained. Thus far, however, the State has not sup-
pleented the United States funds for experimental purposes to any
great extent, and the station is doing wisely in confining its attention
to comparatively few lines of work.























































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Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station, Reno. ''"I
DEPARTMENT OF NEVADA STATE UNIVERSITY.
~~~.... ,"i!ii: ii...,.
The work of the Nevada Station during the past year has i
field experiments with wheat, alfalfa, sugar beets, and Qther ero
horticultural investigations; studies in botany and entomology;
ical analyses; investigations of animal diseases, and experime46'.s ,
dairying. The station has in recent years been able to extend it.,F
field operations through the use of land belonging to the State ,.
cultural Society, but it would be much better if land in the immedi"*.te
vicinity of the university could be obtained on terms which woul.dS4i
permit its permanent use for station purposes. The station is earjii ,,
ing on cooperative experiments with sugar beets, grains, and pota.n '^.!
in different localities. :
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows: i
United States appropriation -----..------------...----..--------------. $15, OO.OG 0, ."!
Farm products .. --.----...... ..--.-. ....-.----. .---------- ..--- ..- -- .5
Miscellaneous --------...----.-------.- -------------------..--- i------ RS
___ i v ', :
*Total-------------------- .-.---- -... ..-. 15,..;:......-
To~~al 15 : "
: ". .../.* .":..i;
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United Statesfund. :|%,
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this :;
Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year .
were Bulletins 30 and 31 and the Annual Reports for 1894 and 1895. ,
Bulletin 30, pp. 7.-Wh7zeat Cutting at Different Dates.-Record of.
harvesting wheat at different dates, with food analyses of the different'
cuttings.
Bulletin 31, pp. 15.-Texas Cattle Fever.-Reprint of a press bulletin
issued in 1894, with additional matter pertaining to the subject.
Annual Report, 1894, pp. 28.-Reports by director and heads. of
departments on the work of the year, including results of culture
experiments with various field crops, and a financial statement for the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1894.
Annual Report, 1895, pp. 23.-Brief reports by the director and
heads of departments on the year's work, including results of variety
tests and culture experiments with wheat, and a financial statement
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1895.
The University of Nevada, with which the station is connected, has
in recent years very largely overcome the difficulties incident to the
building up of educational institutions in new and sparsely settled
communities. Naturally, the main efforts of the managers of the
university have been directed toward the establishment of the uni-
versity on a sound basis and the providing of proper facilities for the
care and instruction of students. Their efforts in this direction have
of late been quite successful, and the institution has prospered. The
strengthening of the university as a whole will doubtless in the end
be greatly to the advantage of the experiment station, but thus far
the station work has not been developed as fully as that of other
departments of the university. Greater attention is, however, now
being given to the needs of the station, and it is hoped that hereafteri
the station officers will be able to devote themselves more completely


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...... I. -- ---... ---- $15,000.00
.:wuninumay 1... .... -43 .00
---.---------- .--------- --- ----- -------- --------.------ 29029.68
M1. -18,272.68

.. .A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
i ha. been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
et, and has been approved.
pub tions of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 35-45.
Bib 5n &pp. 7, figs. 8.-The Codling Moth and the Apple Mjag-
g--Populnar notes on the nature and habits of these insects, with
ragghans as to remedies.
$t86, pp. 4.--Anlyses of Three Common Insecticides.-Re-
putsof analyses of Samples of Paris green, London purple, and white

:BuOin 57, pp. 4--Crimson Clover.-Popular cultural notes.
Bulletin 8, pp. 14, figs. 14.-The Tent Catrplar. -Popular notes
a the history, food plants, diseases, and natural enemies of this
IumS, with suggestions as to methods of suppression.
bAn B8$n9, pp. 1 figs. 10.-The Army Worm.-A brief history of
armyworm in New England, together with illustrated, descrip-
and life-history notes, and suggestions as to methods of repression.
0n 4, g. 16, figs. .4H Ann Report-Report of the
for tefiscal year en June 30,1896; list of bulletins
during the year, and brief reports by the heads of depart-
on the year's work, including the insect record for 1896.
I Do.IL D 2,05
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for treatment of potato scab.
Bulletin 42, pp. 8, fig. 1.-Tomato Growing in New Ha4m
Notes on Tomato Breeding.-Descriptive notes and tabalateSd di,"
56 varieties of tomatoes, with brief popular notes on tomato.
Bulletin 43, pp. 4.-Some Inferior Wood Ashes.-Results, :
ments, are given on analyses of a number of Canadian, domestic1
refuse ashes, and on one sample of adulterated Paris green, .
Bulletin 44, pp. 9, figs. 7.-The Cankerworm.-The life h'Sfl$
and enemies of the cankerworm are discussed and suggestions i""
as to methods of repression. : TA,;^
Bulletin 45, pp. 12, figs. 3.-Fruit and Potato Diseases.-Remu'.it&. ..n
experiments in the treatment of fungus diseases of fruit and pota0a'i !:i
The work of the New Hampshire Station has been steadily pumrrn$ Wl|
during the past year and the number and importance of its iuvesatli:l.
tions have been increased. The governing board has recently vot'edYi:"
to relieve the station of the management of the farm and creaery..
Field experiments will hereafter be confined to comparatively Sm.lfsl
areas and feeding and dairy experiments will be conducted inc'oep r n'
tion with the college. It is believed that this will enable the -staties: .
to concentrate its work more fully on important investigations and 4:.W
use its funds more strictly for experimental inquiries. .":;


NEW JERSEY.

New Jersey State and College Agricultural Experiment Stations, New4
Brunswick.
.70.
CONNECTED WITH RUTGERS COLLEGE.

The New Jersey State and College Stations continue to be under: .
the supervision of the same director and to issue their publications in
one series. The work of these stations during the past year has been
mainly along the same lines as heretofore, including analysis and i
inspection, of commercial fertilizers; chemical studies of fertilizers, :'
feeding stuffs, and dairy products; investigations on the food and :'
nutrition of man; investigations in dairying and dairy husbandry; ;
field experiments with fertilizers on cereals, vegetables, and fruits, 1
and in green manuring and rotation; irrigation experiments; horti-. i,
cultural investigations, with special reference to the nutrition of :i
horticultural plants; biological studies, especially on tuberculosis; 1
botanical investigations, especially on plant diseases; and entomo- ;
logical investigations. The work on the farm has been thoroughly
organized, and a number of useful and important investigations are ;
being conducted there. The equipment of the stations has been A
enlarged, especially in the departments of botany, horticulture, and
chemistry, including dairying. The investigations on the food and
nutrition of man have been conducted in cooperation with this Depart- M:
einClt. *
The income of the stations during the past fiscal year was as follows: .
State Station:
State appropriations (fiscal year ending October 31, 1897) --.--.----- $15,000
College Station:
United States appropriation- .--...------------..-----------..-.......-.---------- 15,000
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MMl." Oocsituents in 189; results or examinations o0 the standard
S applying them as well as of home mixtures, factory-mixed
and miscellaneous fertilizing substances, and analyses and
wif sms of 495 samples of fertilizing materials.
piluIds 118, pp. 24.-The Suppression and Prevention of Tubercu-
0emWidte and Its Relation to Human Consumption.-A popular
1iMibi on this subject.
uiisii~~l. 119, pp. M.-Appl* Growing in New Jersey.-Results of a
|iSIt 1 fruit survey of the State made in 1895, giving methods of
rfS.t and marketing at present employed in the State, and pointing
:. sjims of the underlying principles of successful culture.
-iiSi:~~ IO, pp. 19, pis. 5.-Field Experiments with Potatoes for
Mirii RSults of experiments for the prevention of scab and soil rot
N... l .. ad sweet potatoes, respectively, and of culture experiments
il dui. IOAf, mpp. 14,fig. 1.-The Harlequin Cabbage Bug and the
Plus! Lee.-A popular account of these two insects, with
wSv. and life-history notes and suggestions as to preventive
1m'edaI'l measures.
Rqort, 1896, pp. 563.-This embraces the financial reports
*i; taurers; report by the director outlining the work of the
. i"sitilizer statistics on the quantity and value of fertilizers
S..r.... New Jersey during 1895; review of the market price of vari-
li:fiMulizers, trade values of fertilizing ingredients for 1896, anal-
.s and valuations of 495-samples of fertilizing materials; results
.t*imveatigations on the availability of organic nitrogen in 53 samples
of fertilizing materials; results of investigations on the volumetric
estimation of phosphoric acid in 276 samples of complete fertilizers
by the official method in comparison with Kilgore's volumetric method;
analyses of a number of fodders and feeds; market prices of commer-
cia feeds from 1891 to 1896; compiled analyses of the more common
feeding stuffs; a reprint from Office of Experiment Stations Bulletin 35
on the Cost and Composition of Milk in Cities in New Jersey: notes on
the treatment of the various experimental plates of fruits and vegeta-
blee; notes and data on soiling and soiling crops: a reprint from Office
of Experiment Stations Bulletin 36 on Irrigation in New Jersey; results
of temperature observations and tuberculin tests with cattle; reprint
of Station Bulletin 118; results of extensive work with fungicides
upon truck crops and ornamental plants; results of irrigation expelri-
meats on garden crops; notes on mulching, the station herbarium, a
iew weed-need holder, and on various weels; results of experimental
workk with a number of blights and diseases and with peach-root galls;
brief abstracts of a number of other experiment station bulletins; a
General review of the insect depredations of the season, with a more
'xtnded account of those doing most injury; and a report upon






















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work during the past year. They continue to be managed."
active and progressive policy which provides for a com..
practical and scientific effort on behalf of the agriculture of tlii
.. ... : E.:.... '

NEW MEXICO. .
.. .....
Agricultural Experiment Station of New Mexico, Mesilla Pa.:.' j:,%
: .,.: !: ,,',ii,~
DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MIECH &ANf-IC." l

The work of the New Mexico Station during the past..yeaJw
included field experiments with wheat, sugar beets, sweet potf
and canaigre; horticultural experiments with orchard fruits, vw.:":
tables, and ornamental plants; experiments in irrigation; chm-er .
studies, especially on "alkali" soils, foods, sugar beets, and m.bdsI'
of soil analysis; studies in systematic botany, and entomnological!t ow.!,,
tigations, especially on scale insects and other orchard pests. ...T:hibi:g.
fully half the year the entomologist received no salary, but couti0. ........i
his studies with great assiduity, and has at length been rest()f...
his position as a regular member of the station staff. Invesigt*tll
on human foods, sugar beets, and insects have been carried oiartit|g
cooperation with this Department. A new building (fig. 2), 7-"t"ij.
about $10,000, is now being erected with Territorial funds, wvhicl wil
be largely used for the chemical and biological work of the .sttt ..:.-t
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as f:ltw :a::l
United States appropriation -"-------------- --------------- $1. f50 !i:i
Farm products-------------- -------------- i
r. .... !.- ,$.
Total-...-.......----------------------------... ....----...---..
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the Unitl eK i
fund has been rendered in accordance with the schedules p"o ibe.I|
by this Department, and has been approved. ': '
The publications of this station received during the past fieS'^:&&H.,
were Bulletins 19 and 20 and the Annual Report for 1896. .1 :::
Bulletin 19, pp. 20, fig. 1.-Report qf the Entomologist, P*.i.r4 ,;t..
An account is given of the localities visited by the entomologiptWa:
ing the past year, and the insects noted at each place. Special do...S.-,
tive and life-history notes are given on several of the more injurii6us,"
species.
Bulletin 20, pp. 26.-Seeds.-Popular bulletin treating of the sub-
ject under the following heads: General remarks; testing seeds; proc'. A
ess of germination; the improvement of crops by seed selection;.
change of seed; harvesting and storing; vitality: insects affecting;
treatment for smut; and amount of seed required for sowing per acre.
Annual Report for 1896, pp. 31.-Brief reports by the director and
heads of departments on the work of the year, including a subject
list of 64 papers published by the entomologist; reports by the super-.
intendents of the Las V4gas and San Juan substations, giving the
plan of the year's work; and a financial statement for the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1896.
The New Mexico Station made considerable progress during the past
year in strengthening and developing its work. Its financial affairs.-
were put on a sounder basis and economies introduced which were


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EXPERIMENT STATION.


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.NEW YORK.
M" Iew York Aioltral Experiment Station, Geneva.

'*I fto work of the New York State Station during the past year has
E! otil ed the analysis and inspection of commercial fertilizers; feed-
..g e.periments with dairy cattle, including comparison of breeds
SM .if dies of the sources of milk fat; feeding and breeding experi-
id with poultry; field experiments with potatoes, sugar beets, and
bg crops; investigations in plant nutrition, especially the ferti-
||a r requirements of fruits and vegetables and the foraging power of
C b iespt secies of plants for phosphoric acid; horticultural investi-
ipiths, including tests and other studies of varieties, plant breeding
a.. G'1ixeriments with fertilizers, and in forcing vegetables; studies
Diseases, especially leaf spot of plums and cherries, peach
IIi... carnation rust and stem rot, onion smut, and potato diseases;
gie investigations on cut worms, San Jose scale, apple fruit
iwml, woolly aphis, striped cucumber beetle, insecticides, etc.
I1n cooperation with this Department and the town of Geneva the
Matlic has made over A mile of "good road" on the neighboring pub-
lie highway, illustrating several different methods for the improve-
ment of country roads. Investigations in horticulture, including
plant diseases, were continued on Long Island under a special appro-
priation. Additions have been made to the equipment of the station,
and plans for additional improvements are being formed. The work
involved in the inspection of fertilizers is excessively great. More
than 1,600 different brands of fertilizers are now sold in the State, a
condition of things believed to be unfortunate alike for the farmer
and the manufacturer.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
utotd States appropriation ......................................... ----------------------------------$1,500.00
t -..-.--.-..--.-.-. --..----------------.......-----...-...---- 81,276. 54
m p o uct ....................................................... 1,715.08
Toi........................................................... ----------------------------------------------84.491.f3T
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States
fand has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed
by this Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the fiscal year were
Bulletins 102-124, and the Annual Report for 1895.
Bulletin 102, pp. 17, figs. 4.-Silage and Siow.-A popular bulletin
M thim subject.


















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me. .-.1 nlf 77 ii H1.-- l puptini UUI vvULL U UL uU10 iI l t i5 ll 11t. "7"au ......
of New York, with descriptive, life-history, and remedial W-l!7
brief remarks on natural enemies. I "!
Bulletin 105, pp. 22.-Effects of the Drouth on Milk Pmod '
Results of a study of variations which milk undergoes as A
climatic conditions, based on an analysis of the milk of 50O' .'..
cows supplying cheese factories in New York in 1895. ".. *";'
Bulletin 106, pp. O10.-Feeding Experiments with Laying ........ji..t|.
The Relative Efficiency of Whole and Ground Grain.- MW't. It
investigations on these subjects. "*: ? S'.A
Bulletin 107, pp. 61.-Report of Analyses of Commercial Feri se'.
for the Spring of 1896.-This bulletin includes explanations of tern*iW"!m||
used in statifig the results of analyses of fertilizers; notes on valu&".3
tion; comparison of selling price and commercial valuations; .ist 6 8I::
manufacturers complying with the provisions of the fertilizertlaw;
and analyses of 313 samples of fertilizers examined during the: i :^
of 1896. ... .-::
4 ." ...,:!:: !`:.. i.::
Bulletin 108, pp. 6.-The Real Value of "Natural Plant Food ,::
Popular notes on the use of this material as a fertilizer, baaed onwth!e.
result of chemical analyses. .....
Bulletin 109, pp. 22, pl. 1.-Strawberries.-Descriptive notes anid
tabulated data on a number of varieties grown in beds set one tAd
two years, respectively. .
Bulletin 110, pp. 30.-Milk Fat and Cheese Yield.- Results !:Ot,7 a
study undertaken for the purpose of learning the existing relatioa
between milk fat and casein or cheese yield with individual herds: t.
cows; and for the further purpose of ascertaining whether milk La.'
forms the fairest basis of paying for milk for cheese making.. Tb."
studies are based on the analyses of the milk of fifty herds of. :ows.
Bulletin 111, pp. 13.-Variety Tests with Blackberries, Dewberrw' ;
and Raspberries.-A brief report giving the result of the season'i :F
work along these lines.
Bulleti 112, pp. 13.-Economy in using Fertilizers for Raisg
Potatoes.--Details and results of fertilizer experiments with potatoes, j
Bulletin 113, pp. 7, pl. 1.-The Cucumber Flea-beetle as the Ga"us A
of Pimply Potatoes.--Result of investigations identifying the flea* j
beetle as the cause of pimply potatoes. 0
Bulletin 114, pp. 48, figs. 6, pis. 11; Popular edition, pp. 9, pls..4.-
Gooseberries.-This bulletin embraces a comparison of native with :
European varieties; notes on the botanical features of the species. 0,
from which cultivated gooseberries are derived; gooseberry culture
at the station; descriptive list of varieties; methods of propagatioq'P
field and garden culture, and notes on injurious insects. .
Bulletin 115, pp. 26, figs. 9.-Director's Report for 1896.-Gives the
status of the station when the present director assumed control;
methods employed in the distribution of station information; outline
of future work and development of the station; important results of ,
1896; notes on the character and work carried on in the second judi-
cial department, and a discussion on the relationship of New York
farmers to the station.
Bulletin 116, pp. 56.-Report of Analyses of Commercial Fertilier;
for the Fall of 1896.-This gives an explanation of the terms used i1,

























ajinw o ruowmosang uunworms tn unwon riu iS.-mne nswtory,
y ..... habits, and distribution of the dark-sided cutworm
mesaorie) are given, together with results of experiments
jisasotid66e for its repression and recommendations as to the
methods for its treatment.
6121, pp. S, figs. 14. Popular edition, pp. 6.-Spray Pumps
pr .u-.-A popular bulletin on this subject.
winlo pp. 12, pks. 3. Popular edition, pp. 5, pls. 2.-The
Cbna Bearer.-Popular bulletin on this insect, giving its his-
relationships, life history; distribution, and natural enemies,
Athe results of spraying experiments for its repression.
*ulhstin 1n,, pp. 6, figs. 2. Popular edition, pp. 6.-Spraying
Abbei.s on Long IlaUcd in the season of 1896.-Results of investiga-
thee, with directions for spraying potatoes, and of a test of a Bordeaux
qZinL g machine.
.... 4, pp. 14, pi. Popular edition, pp. pl. 1.-Anthrac-
S f fihe BaWuk Raspberry.-Results of three years experiments in
isaktng that disease.
Anman Report, 1895, pp. 666.-This embraces the treasurer's report
far the sal year ending September 30, 1895; a brief report on the
work of the year by the acting director; list of acknowledgments;
Sales of the station governing gratuitous chemical analysis for private
um ; report of the horticulturist on special work of the second
judisal department, testing orchard fruits, with descriptive notes on
a number of varieties of apples, crab apples, apricots, grapes, and on
tie Lutovka cherry, a paper on the productiveness of grapes as affected
by self-fertilization of their blossoms, popular notes on raspberry
mthraenoee, and on the treatment of common diseases and insects
Wxurious to fruits and vegetables; report of the first assistant giving
.... iosults of miscellaneous feeding trials with cattle and hogs; report
::of the mycologist on two destructive lily diseases, prevention of cab-
basHIsm club root, spraying tomatoes, a disease of Norway maples,
IIutbn brooms on cherry trees, observations on Exobasidium peckii
i3 amularia cylindropsia, inoculation experiments with Oymnos-
W WM macropUs, "belted" apples and pean, a new leaf-spot





















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** *UA S I S 'J. AL t tA '. SJ 5.'ra S Ni '. JSS l.W '.S pX'- t. K~0LJL )S V SAU..SDtS S. W. 5-A UVS.JJ R7 4 w
of the season, notes on remedies for the pernicious and *ot't
insects, and on the bramble or blackberry flea-louse; repri....t....
letins 88-97, and a revised reprint of Bulletin 99. :;.ii..
The past year has necessarily been a period of reorgni
the work of the New York State Station under the manage ....
director whose term of service began with the fiscal year. i,
the work along old lines has been continued, but a strenuomi|: ?
has been made to raise the grade of the investigations and to-
for the prosecution of thorough inquiries in new directions as deas...
by important agricultural interests of the State. Much emphasa*.4ih...
been laid on the proper preparation of popular bulletins, and a'H.i:ii^^,
officer has been appointed to put these publications into attrractiti3
and readable form. The station is doing a large amount of .n...M.lMl..
work, is reaching a great constituency of farmers, and enjoy'ti i thei
liberal financial support of the State. It deserves hearty and pieM:.. \
support in the important investigations which it is now undertaki "i.
along the higher lines of agricultural research. The aid which New l
York and some of the other relatively wealthy States are giving ...
the promotion of the more elaborate and profound agricultural lo .1...A...
ries is very encouraging. The outcome of such work will undoubtedly.:.i.
be of great importance to the agriculture of the whole country. :.


NEW YORK..
:.* ..
Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station, Ithaca.
S....* S
f :. .*"
DEPARTMENT OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY. ;" ,I

The work of the New York Cornell Station during the past years
been mainly along the same lines as heretofore, including hortieu l-
tural investigations; studies of plant diseases and remedies; entomn-o.
logical investigations; field and other experiments with wheat, oats,
leguminous plants, potatoes, and sugar beets; studies in farm
manures and fertilizers; chemical analyses of soils, fertilizers, forage
plants, fruits, etc. The station, as well as the college of agriculture1
has been largely engaged in special work provided for by a State
appropriation of $25,000 ($16,000 last year) for "giving instruction
by means of schools, lectures, and other university extension/ methods
or otherwise, and in conducting investigations and experiments; In
discovering the diseases of plants and remedies therefore; in ascer-
taining the best methods of fertilization of fields, gardens, and plant
tions; and best modes of tillage and farm management and improve-,
ment of live stock; and in printing leaflets and disseminating
agricultural knowledge by means of lectures or otherwise; and in
preparing and printing for free distribution the results of such inves-
tigations and experiments, and for republishing such bulletins as may
be useful in the furtherance of the work; and such other information
as may be deemed desirable and profitable in promoting the agricul-
tural interests of the State." :
The work of instruction conducted under this State law has been
mainly an attempt to secure the introduction of "nature" teaching
into the common schools of the State, especially in the rural districts..


*,

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I t Bppro---iat-------... ---------------------------$18,500.00
---- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---- --- --- --- 18,000.00
ii. - - --::i::..: -1.: .,,
w !b ------ 80,509.58
Ai.qpofi t of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
it, and has been approved.
publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
wRmBaletins 116-136 and the Annual Report for 1895.
........1,i'. ,pp. 29, figs. 5.-Dwarf Apples.-Popular notes upon
i abject of dwarfing in general, with remarks on dwarfing the apple
and e on the commercial value of such dwarfs.
B uletn 117, pp. 47, figs. 13.-Fruit Brevities.-Short popular arti-
es on the following subjects: "Packing houses for fruit;" "History
of the Ohio raspberry;" "The 'mistletoe disease' of the blackberry;"
"Rootgalls;" "Are dewberries worth growing?" "The goumi (Elsag-
s wlongipes);" "Winter injuries;" and "Crimson clover in orchards6"
Buletin 118, pp. 6O.-Fruit Preservatives and Butter Increasers.-
Result, of the examination of two food preservatives, "Preservitas"
and 'CalIerine," and two butter increases, "Chase's Butter Increaser"
and "Gilt-edge Butter Compound."
Bullin 119, pp. 6, figs. 3.-The Texture of the Soil.-A popular
bialetin tending to show the importance of having soil in good phys-
ical condition, with the results of analyses of an unproductive clay
a which beans failed to grow, of an adjacent soil on which they grew
well, and of a lime rock derived from the same locality.
Bulletin 120, pp. 22, figs. 11.-The Moisture of the Soil and Its Con-
ewr!on.-A popular bulletin.
BDuletin 121, pp. 2. figs. 6.-Ruggestions for the Planting of Shrub-
bery.-A discussion in popular form of landscape gardening "for the
betterment of home grounds in rural communities."
Bulletn I, pp. 834, figs. 18.-A Second Report upon Extension
Work in Horticulture.-A report on the progress of the work carried
an under the experiment station extension or Nixon bill, covering
the third year.
'; Bulletdin 123, pp. 14 pis. 4.- reen Fruit Worms.-Notes on three
wetuids-habits, food, history, distribution, life history, and natural
enemies, and suggestions as to remedies.
I Bulletin 11 pp. 17, fig. 1, pls. S.--The Pistol-Case Bearer in West
0_% New York.-Notes giving the history, distribution, appearance
















I! iBulletin 127, pp. 38, figs. 2.-A Second Account ofSwe
Notes on the second year's work at the university with
Descriptions are given of the varieties grown with numertln
the blooming period, quantity of bloom, height of stem,-see'
V :tion, etc., of 113 varieties. .
Ii Bulletin 128, pp. 38, figs. 9.-A Talk about Dahlias.-Brief::.
of the evolution of the dahlia; suggestions as to lines forf.t .A
iS: ^provement; methods of culture and propagation; and results *oftr
Eqo1 of 354 varieties, a number of which are described. ... :...
[ Bulletin 129, pp. 8.-How to conduct Field Experiments u W t4
S:tilizers.-A popular bulletin. .......... i.
ii |:|'Bulletin 130, pp. S13, figs. 3.-Potato Culture.--A report onkj *
; gations made to ascertain the possibilities of making the po0
S plant food of the soil available, and to note the effect of tillage .
:i crop.
I Bulletin 131, pp. 27, figs. 12.-Notes upon Plums for Western
:i York.-Embraces general remarks upon 10 types of plums, with mon.4
particular reference to the European and Japanese types; noteselr:,,y
;present status and future prospect of plum culture; a discusi::,ft.;,
i: planting, pruning, insect and fungus enemies, etc.; a report OMnboDlr|
i; ing 25 years' experience with plums on a commercial scale; anddesmdt7.
':' tive notes on 70 varieties. ., l"Oi
| Bulletin 132, pp. 30, figs. 20.-Notes upon Celery.-A general dEins-|
sion is given on the early and late blights of celery with an acc....:
of artificial cultures of the fungi and of remedies for their repreasion...
together with a short bibliography. Notes are also given on the obitii
struction of a celery storage house, and the results detailed of experi- ..
ments with fertilizers and of celery analyses. :l
Bulletin 133, pp. 26, figs. 5.-The Army Worm in New York.-Geu-it' "
~ eral, historical, descriptive, remedial, and life-history notes on *i4i
army worm, with remarks on food plants, natural enemies, habits;,et.::::;
and an account of the outbreak in New York in 1896.
Bulletin 134, pp. 6, figs. 2.-Strawberries under Glass.-Resultsw : o
culture experiments in the greenhouse during the winter of 1i896-.7,
Bulletin 135, pp. 26, figs. 6.-Forage Crops.-Data on the growth. 1f
a large number of forage crops and of mixtures of such crops, ..with
culture notes in most instances. .
Bulletin 136, pp. 20, figs. 7.-Chrysanthemums.-General remarksl ]
upon the province of the station in testing varieties, exhibiting flower:,
etc.; hints on the home growing of chrysanthemums; culture *aAnd::..
variety notes on the tests of 1896 and descriptive notes on 24 which 'A:!
;. ~ seemed to have special merit." ':
f Annual Report, 1895, pp. 721.-Brief reports by the heads of depart2. J
l ments on the work of the year, detailed financial statement for-'lb
.. i fiscal year ending June 30,1895, and reprints of station bulletins 84-I1O ..
`iL, The New York Cornell Station has enjoyed a year of great pros-
^ Iperity. By the generous aid of the State it has been enabled to-brin.g
ri .. t ...'
: \*" 1 : *:















ll.fh.3UY Or NORTH CAROLINA COLLEG01 E or AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC
ARTS.
i~irl t work of the North Carolina Station during the past year was
ulm along the same lines as heretofore, including fertilizer analysis
Sapection; feeding experiments with dairy cattle, sheep, and
.. poultry experiments; field experiments with grain and forage
MWa; botanical and entomological investigations; horticultural exper-
nt.x The extensive cooperative horticultural experiments at
pthem Pines, with special reference to the fertilizer requirements
t: orchard and small fruits and vegetables, have been continued.
*.Te State weather service, carried on by the station in cooperation
with the Weather Bureau of this Department, was discontinued Octo-
r A, 1896. By a State law enacted in March, 1897, the inspection
A[ery stock is put in charge of a commission consisting of the
eomimuaoner of agriculture, director of the station, and presi-
mt the 8tate horticultural society. The entomologist of the sta-
...... has acted as entomologist of the commission.
TihM e Income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
@fltatafppropriation. ...------------- ----- ----- ---------$ 15,000.00
e----- -------- ------ ---- ------ 10,000.00
tm rwduab -------------------------------- ------ 1,286.29
Total---------------------------------------.......................................................... 26,286.29
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendered in accordance with the schedule prescribed by this
Deportment, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 126-140, Meteorological Bulletins 80-83, Special Bulle-
tim 38-46, and the Annual Report for 1895.
Bulein 16, pp. 5.-Why Not Improve Your Poultry ?-A popular
bulletin treating of the magnitude of the poultry industry, with direc-
tions for the care of poultry, choice of breeds, and marketing.
BuAein 127, pp. 42, figs. 86.-Parasites of Domestic Aniimals.-
Includes a brief discussion on the general classification of parasites;
list of vermicides, with doses for various animals, and formulas for
tonics, washes, liniments, and ointments; illustrated and descriptive
notes on the principal parasitic worms and insects affecting domestic
animals, symptoms caused by each, and methods of treatment.
Butlletin 128, pp. 8.-Pests of Grain Crops.-Popular bulletin con.
training formulas for insecticides and fungicides for the repression of
the insect and fungus pests of a number of grain crops.
SBulletin 129, pp. 41, figs. 24. -Horticidtu ral Erperiments at Southern
ines, 1895.-Includes notes on the purpose of the experiments, loca-
ton of the farm, geology of the region, climatic conditions, the soil
and its comparative composition, plan of the tests, clearing of the
land, varieties of fruit selected and general treatment, laying out
ipate, setting plants and subsequent cultivation, details and results










:IB and their treatment, growth during 1895 and conclusions tb.y -'
4 Bulletin 130, pp. 54, figs 40.-Poultry Keeping for ProflUL-
ular bulletin discussing poultry houses, pure-bred poultry, .'
anatomy of the egg, the egg during incubation, natural id
: artificial incubation, feeding, breeds and breeding, dressing tan
:.A||. : ping poultry to market, etc.
V:1, -Bulletin 131, pp. 12, figs. 12.-Parasites of Poultry.-A popuolbs 1.
SAletinl on the subject, largely compiled.
itl. Bulletin 132, pp. 56, figs. 4.-The Home Vegetable Garden-.and ,
SPests.-Popular directions for the location, choice of soil, rotAa.lN,^^
.S' of crops, construction and use of cold frames, selection and. u ::'I
a ,lr,'1 manures, saving seed, etc., and on the culture of a large list of 'pl"ii%
S( usually grown in gardens. Notes are also given on insects and futng&i::
,,,, J" pests and on remedies for their repression. '"'g:': :I
,l Bulletin. 133, pp. 15, figs. 5.-Some New Forage, Fodder, and O i0 ...
M iN., I Useful Plants.-Results of variety tests, with brief descriptions Mid ":1
.notes on growth.
A.':' Bulletins 134 and 135.-Not to be published. .',
IAt. Bulletin 136, pp. 33.-Fertilizer Analyses of the Fertilizer Gonrot 4."
.. Analyses and valuations of 379 samples of fertilizers, withexplanato0zy *:.
Notes. :'
SBulletin 137, pp. 5.-A Warning in Regard to Compost Peddlers' .;
A.t if A popular bulletin warning the farmers against paying exorbitauit -
4' ,". prices for special fertilizers and fertilizer formulas. .
Bulletin 138, pp. 11, figs. 11.-The San Jose Scale in North Garo-
j, lina.-A popular bulletin giving a brief description of the insect, its-
life history, modes of dissemination, and reporting seven experiments A
., with insecticides for its repression. .
Bulletin 139, pp. 14.-Homne-Mixed Fertilizers and Gomposts.-A.
: popular bulletin on the subject, including a large number of fertilizer A
.:' formulas for different farm and garden crops.
'B Bulletin 140, pp. 6.- Vol umnetric Estimnation of Phosphoric Acid. -A
Technical bulletin giving comparative phosphoric acid results on
various fertilizing material by gravimetric and volumetric methods,
.. ,. with comments on methods employed.
/.: State WVeather Service Bulletins 80-83, pp. 16, each.-Monthly sum-
maries of meteorological observations by the North Carolina section
of the climate and crop service of the United States Weather Bureau,
cooperating with the North Carolina Station.
: Special Bulletins 38, 39, pp. 4, each.-Fertilizer Analyses of the, Fer-
S, tilizer Control.-Tabulated analyses of 69 samples of fertilizers.
,< :Special Bulletins 40, pp. 13; 41, pp, 13; 42, pp. 18; 43, pp. ; 44,pp.
24; 45, pp.28.-Fertilizer Anaalyses of the Fertilizer Con trol. -Embrace
abstracts of the State fertilizer law, explanation of terms used in
*'. stating analyses, notes on valuation, freight rates, and tabulated
\. analyses of 175 samples of fertilizing materials.
p:, eSpecial Bulletin 46, pp. 4.-Fertilizer Analyses of the Fertilizer'
Control.-Tabulated analyses of 42 samples of fertilizers.
": Annual Report for 1895, pp. LXI, 458.-This embraces a general
k review of the work of the fertilizer control station, notes on station
equipment, list of station publications during 1895; acknowledgments,
S, outlines by the director and heads of departments on the general work
,of the year, treasurer's report, and reprints of Bulletins 111 to 123.
,,, The work of the North Carolina Station was actively prosecuted
^,,.during the past year. Several causes combined, however, to make

LI o

















1'%m: was remove amu a zuruwr reorganzaiuu uon ot ne sIauuin stan
m w 'made. The offices of the director, horticulturist, botanist, and
ebso-logist of the station were removed to college buildings, but the
.hillmsr control laboratory remains in the building occupied by the
SW Board of Agriculture. This separation of the station has not
nmlted in any contest with the State Board of Agriculture, with which
1U station continues to cooperate in enterprises for the benefit of the
agriculture of the State. Meanwhile the validity of the State fertilizer
law has been attacked in the courts. If the suits now pending are
decided adversely to the State, the station will lose a portion of the
funds it has been receiving under this law and its work will be severely

the separation of the station from the control of the State Board
L griculture the station has become more definitely a department of
State College of Agriculture. It is hoped that the ultimate out-
| mi.e of this arrangement will be to remove the station, as well as the
K college, from political and other influences inimical to the best inter-
estsof educational and scientific institutions. Temporarily, however,
tiM station has been weakened by the loss of successful and experi-
enced officers and by the uncertainties attending a change of manage-
meat and a somewhat dubious financial outlook.

NORTH DAKOTA.
North Dakota Agricultural Bxperiment Station, Fargo.
DEPARTMENT OF NORTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.
The work of the North Dakota Station during the past fiscal year
has included soil investigations; chemical studies of corn, sugar beets,
and human foods; veterinary investigations, with special reference to
the effects of feeding millet to horses and the effect of tuberculin inoc-
ulation on dairy cows; investigations on plant diseases, especially
nsmuts and potato scabs; bacteriological studies of dairy products;
experiments in horticulture and forestry; field experiments with
grains, grasses, and other forage crops, in rotation, and on the use
of barnyard manure under the peculiar local conditions; and poultry
experiments. A dairy herd and creamery have been maintained by
the station and managed on a commercial basis, but very little experi-
mental work has been done in this line, and a way should be found to
relieve the station of the expenses attending this enterprise. Coopera-
tive experiments on soil moisture and with sugar beets are being
conducted, the latter in cooperation with this Department.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
UaIbStatessappropriationu-------.---------------------........-. .15,000.00
Itprodcta-----------------..-----.... .-........-..-----------------------...... 2, 448.78
ITo .......... ............................-...........- 17,448.78












Bulletin 24 pp. 16.-North Dakota Soils.-Results of. ,
number of samples of soil taken from different sections of. t
|i1with notes and comments on the saihe.
Bulletin 25, pp. 11, figs. 3.-Tree Culture.-A popular bulheeiq|
:_ :: subject, giving directions for forest planting and subsequent.: | ^
H descriptive notes on 18 varieties, largely compiled.
ii Bulletin 26, pp. 16.-Feeding of Millet to Horses.-Results at. .
..".... made with horses to study the effect of feeding millet as a eoArn1 i
too: der. Opinions of farmers concerning millet feeding for ..
V :. also given. :u
5' Bulletin 27, pp. 52, figs. 13.-New Studies upon the Smut of lw:;r,"T
Oats, and Barley, with a Resumn6 of Treatment Experiments for t
id1: Three Years.-Embraces results of investigations on the followq:K!.
2.' topics: Structural studies to determine the position and.effects' tSiij 3l7
S; fungus upon the cells of the wheat plant; the wintering of the ..... *
: of stinking smut; effect of various methods of treatment upon m.m 10?!
:; grain; treatment of grain for field purposes; treatment of oaut'iuls |
barley for smut in 1896; effect of the date of seeding on the preseaXa0f8
Sof smut in oats; amount of moisture absorbed by wheat in theooq0 i iq;|,
|r .of treatment; apparatus for dipping purposes; on the swelling,. :oi
: : :grain after treatment; cost of treatment and a short bibliography o1' 't':
other experiment-station literature on the subject. "'
'I" "The work of the North Dakota Station has been actively proseou^a&
l during the past year and investigations in a number of useful lines h iav.:i.!
been developed and strengthened. The college with which the statio..,i;
has been connected has prospered and the outlook of the whole ias:illr 5 1
A:j tion is in the main decidedly encouraging. Caution will, howev :,3
"..\. need to be exercised in regard to farm and dairy operations which'i e:!.
mainly commercial and educational. If these are to be maintained ^.
by the college, the State should provide for them and they should not -;
in any case be allowed to encroach on the funds given for experi- i
; mental purposes. The recent dismissal of the experienced veterina- j
rian and the appointment of an untried man in his place has awakened.
fears that the influences which hitherto have hindered the progress -:
the station are still at work. Unless meritorious training, experience,
and efficiency are sufficient safeguards to make station workers seeur 'l
in their positions, there is little hope that the station will do it.s full
.- duty to the farmers of North Dakota.

OHIO.
.':. ~Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station, Wooster. ,
.The work of the Ohio Station during the past year, as heretofore,
has included variety, fertilizer, culture, and rotation experiments with
field crops, especially grain and forage crops; feeding experiments
1. with dairy cattle, calves, and sheep; dairy experiments; horticultural :1
investigations; studies of plant diseases and weeds, and entomological
; investigations. Special attention is being given to experiments on
^ problems relating to the maintenance of the fertility of the soil.' In
Si' i? this work nearly 800 tenth-acre plats are used, which are located in


Lit
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FIG. 3.-NEw MAIN BUILDING OF OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.








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i nOhio, with suggestions as to remedies; results of an experiment to
4em the effect on bees of spraying trees in bloom with the arsen-
S.I.. &ad notes on the feeding habits of slugs.
,B u ... 69, pp. 21, figs. 8, pI. 1.-The Chinch Buy.-A popular
tiwi of the more important literature relating to the life history and
4*tii bation of the chinch bug, with the results of investigations at
SS tin for its repression.
,Bade"fi T70, pp. 27, pis. 4.-Forage Crops.-General results of
:eperlments with forage crops at the station since 1883, including
weisoda of soil preparation, quantity of seed used, manner of growth,
nghOf season required, and other data.
B et71, pp. 80.-The Maintenance of Fertfiily.-A discussion
baed on the results of experiments carried on at the station during a
period of eight years on the amount of fertility removed from the soil
by the average crops of corn, oats, wheat, timothy, and clover grown
tin five-years' rotation; on the quantity and cost of fertilizers used
-1ais the State in 1894; on the most economical means of restoring the
rihi^ ty removed in crops; on the sources and cost of fertilizing
materials; the home-mixing of fertilizers, and on the results of inves-
ttons on the value of so-called "natural plant food," or sof.


." "
li ll~ i iiiii^ ""!!!!"~ !ll!.iiiii .."!l-!!"':-- .::-^^ '" -- '.." Hi:..:: :









Jose Scale.--Tihe listriDution, symptoms, cause, effect,
J methods of spraying, and diseases mistaken for yellows are
H1j' with similar, notes on black knot and other contagious di
trees, together with descriptive, life-history, and remedial''w..n
t 3the San Jose scale, and an appendix containing the Ohio blad, k
2v yellows, and San Jose scale law. 0 .4:
ti-l. Bulletin 73, pp. 25, figs. 5, pis. 4.-Investigations of Plant
< ;:! in the Forcing House and Garden.-A preliminary report upon n
:.A: tigations of diseases of lettuce, diseases caused by nematodes, lesiii
I I mildews, on spraying with fungicides under glass, and upon diase&miil
... '. ". ..!:. :. : :
j of cucurbits and tomatoes. .: ,,:::,
H .i Bulletin 74, pp. 14.-Notes on the Weather.-Tabulated daily 4..
1 monthly observations at the station on temperature, precipit9ation
.,* '{;.: ..cloudiness, direction of the wind, etc., are given, and, for compax.,:,..
., ;.' ,.son, similar data for previous years from other parts of the Stat. a&P-4
:.. added. ..
., Bulletin 75, pp. 31, figs. 5.-Beet Sugar Production.-A reprint of'.,.
i' : FBulletin 55 of the Wisconsin Station, with additional notes on the:: ...
:, cost of production. ,
S.. Bulletin 76, pp. 16.-Potatoes.-Cultural notes, results of vanityl:
,. tests, and of experiments with fertilizers. .
SBulletin 77, pp. 23, mvaps 4, figs. 7.-The Chinch Bug and Other :
SDestructive Insects.-This gives the results of three years' study of an'.r,
WA. outbreak of the chinch bug in Ohio, together with notes and popular t
Descriptions on 4 foreign insects. -
3 Bulletin 78, pp. 44.-Corn.-Results of extended cultural investi-
'gations, comparative tests of varieties, and popular notes on corn,'
. .. smut and its treatment.
S:: Bulletin 79, pp. 44.--Some Diseases of Orchard and Garden Fruits.-
[A popular bulletin, with spraying calendar supplement.
.;!. Bulletin, Vol. 1, No. 1, Technical Series, pp. 112, figs. 21.-A Pre-.
7 limninary List of Birds of Wayne County, Ohio.-Descriptive and ;1
Critical notes are given of 83 species of birds known to inhabit this
Region, together with a hypothetical list of 82 others which are thought
to be occasional visitors.
; .Annual Report, 1895, pp. 43.-This includes a brief report by the
secretary of the board of control on the improvements and personnel
of the station; report of the treasurer for the fiscal year ending June
30, 1895; report of the director on the season's crops, work of the sta-
tion and substation, publications issued, and a list of donations made
% to the station; and reports of heads of station departments, including
S.. notes by the botanist on peach diseases, treatment of grain smuts,
Ohio weeds, etc.
Annual Report, 1896, pp. 43, dgms. 6.-Reports by the board of
control, director, and heads of departments on the work of the year,
including data on the yield and acreage of farm crops at the station
..:,. .in 1896, and notes on injurious insects of the season; announcements.
as to the scope of the station work; an inventory of the station build-
ings, with floor plans of the main building and of the dairy barn; a
S. list of publications issued and of donations and exchanges received
.: during the year; and a financial statement for the fiscal year ending
*June 30, 1896.
S..'.., The Ohio Station continues to enjoy the confidence and support of :
i. the State, which has largely supplemented the funds given by the J
.United States. With the completion of its main building, the station
"i *

















Jmran OF OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE.
Tiher work of the Oklahoma Station during the past year has included
Sinvestigations, field experiments with wheat, oats, corn, Kafir
o n, cotton, sugar beets, forage plants, and other crops; rotation
experiments; feeding and breeding experiments with cattle and hogs;
Shorticultural investigations; botanical and entomological studies;
chemical examinations of corn, Kafir corn, alfalfa, castor beans, and
Slitigation and- potable waters; studies of animal diseases. Cooper-
sirve experiments in connection with this Department have been con-
"'(ted with sugar beets, Egyptian cotton, grasses and forage plants,
Iat in forestry.
Th e income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
'I Stot appropriation .-------.......----------.-----------... $15,000.00
|. .. ------.------....---- .----- .------------- .--.-.- ---. --- 680.18
IE-------u---.- -.. .----------- 526.88
: ----Total-----------. ------------------------------------ 16,206.56
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
The publications of the station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins Nos. 20-25.
Bulletin SO, pp. .- Wheat Experiments in 1895-96.-Feeding Value
of Corn Scorched by Hot Winds.-Fruit Culture in Oklahoma.-
Peach Rosette.-Melon Lice.-Results of station investigations and
observations on these subjects.
Bulletin 21, pp. 16.-Experiments in Corn Culture, 1896.-Road
Making and Repairing.-Results of culture experiments and variety
tests with corn, with brief popular notes on road making and

Bti1 82, pp. --Climate and Crops in Oklahoma.-Field
IPperiments wih Kafir Corn. -This includes meteorological observa-
tions on the temperature and rainfall, notes on various field crops,
and the results of culture experiments with Kafir corn.
Bulen 28, pp. 14.-Cotton Culture in Oklahoma.-Popular notes
on the culture and possibilities of cotton in Oklahoma.
Bulletin 24, pp. 17.-Oklahoma Soil Studies.-Results of analyses
lad other studies of station soils, with popular notes on the impor-
.tamee of soil moisture, and a report on experiments made for its
,preration.
Butletin S6, pp. 8.-Loss by Erposure of Corn Stover.-Teosinte.-
mposit-ion of Pie Melon.-Fertiizer Analyses of Castor Bean
.-Reeults of investigations.
The Oklahoma Station has made definite progress during the past
in organizing its work on useful lines and within proper limits.
7 H. Doe. 205--5

















1 by this Department. It is hoped that this station will- hee.
Sable to maintain a consistent and permanent policy, and thus
D services of increasing value to the agriculture of Oklahoma.',:: 1


OREGON.
IT: n!.
[IOregon Experiment Station, Corv Ili .

I DEPARTMENT OF OREGON STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. ......

The work of the Oregon Station during the past year' has inAt
...field experiments with cereals, forage plants, flax, sugar beet,.tt..
i potatoes; experiments in the preservation of barnyard manure; 1...4 '
ing experiments; horticultural investigations, especially with pr!ut
and other orchard fruits; entomological investigations, particul" ,
on the prune twig borer, raspberry root borer, and a new apple se
chemical studies on soils, grasses, and prunes, and on the niutriti
IN value and digestibility of cheat as compared with clover. A.new t:
insectary has been provided for the entomologist.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows ;
United States appropriation---------------------------------------- $15 |
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United Stet0$'Ci
: ...... ...







;fund has been rendered in accordance with the schedules presioitbedoaii'.
KS by this Department, and has been approved. ON
g The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year?
r
rr fiwere Bulletins 43 and 44. p








I Bulletin 43, pp. 25, pis. 4.--Flax Culture.-A popular presentation ....
+; ...of the possibilities and advantages of flax culture for Oregon, largely
compiled. V
on hBulletin 44, pp. 49, figs. S13.-A Review of Oregon Sugar Beets.- '
: che Includes statistics, history of the industry, work done in the State andt'
1 l the particular results obtained, yield, and cost; together with extended
|:Jnotes on cultivation and manufacture. e.
S' The affairs of the Oregon Station during the past year have not bee:,,i
Sin a satisfactory condition. The station is doing some useful work,:: J
,:but the general policy of management of the college and station is n t.i.
Swell established. At the close e of the fiscal year the president and-i,';. .
,n I director was removed after one year's service. The horticulturist and.'
..i b assistant botanist were also removed. The station has been carryi ;
-:too heavy a burden of farm operations, a considerable portion of wbiobhi,
More properly belong to the college, and in general its work has been ,
"organized on too superficial a plan. A settled policy and increased .In
Sthe thoroughness of the experimental inquiries are essential to the..
16. | ..: ." ..

A !... L.. +. .. :...
H~~ + success of uthisvsation. an:auacue. :."

MR.


, &j. bu h eea oiy fmngmn'fte olg n to 1, n!
.......... ... .. ie trw s e o e fe n e rssr ic T eh riut iit iii
... ..... .. :,.. ,+,asitn boa itw r alor m ed Th stt nh sb enc .:y .,























Same oone farmer wno round tnat the intelligent as compared with
unitntelligent use of fertilizers increased the profits of the potato
nearly 850 per acre." The importance of puch tests in Pennsyl-
.. isindicated by the fact that according to official estimates the
bnr of that State annually spend about $4,000,000 for fertilizers.
Uflsing of horticultural varieties has been largely given up in order
WONd greater opportunities for the study of special horticultural
puib During the past year the horticulturist has given his
. .b.on mainly to investigations relating to the peach industry.
Beid:es a large amount of other experimental work relating to dairy
nming, the station has since 1889 graded up its dairy herd "until
tedoduction now averages about 350 pounds of butter per year." The
eding experiments with dairy cows conducted at the station during
the past three years have mainly been "a study of the relations which
mist between the amount and composition of the food and the yield
t milk and butter, particularly with reference to financial consider-
ations." The station has been making special efforts to extend its
influence more widely among the farmers of the State through regular
and special publications and the farmers' institutes.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
Unitbd Ste aprqoist-on..-..-----..---..----- -------....----$ 15,000.00
hum h rIusr aInalIyses------------------------------------ 8,585.17
eu tyws-------------........................................... 8,29585.17
lnm ym odaeto -. -. ... ..-..-.. -.._ 8,29.5
W.......................................................... ,--------------------------------------826.73
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
a been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 35 and 36 and the Annual Report for 1895.
BU in 86, pp. 6.-A Soil Test with Fertilizers.-An account of a
fertilizer experiment with potatoes on T-fracre plates, using nitrate of
soda muriate of potash, and dissolved bone black singly, two by two,
awl all three together, and compared with no fertilizer.
SBuetin 8, pp. 15.-Chestnut Culture for Fruit.-A popular bul-
lein containing general remarks upon the chestnut industry; the
distaut tree and its habits, native and foreign varieties, and cul-
tame.









r;' Annual Report, 1895, pp. 349, figs. 4, pls. 9, dgms. 6.--Enib Jra 9l |
":: report of the treasurer, outline of the general work of the year,
of some tables and notes on rational stock feeding, previouslym.
/~ lished by the station; results of extended feeding experimentis-...
i. milch cows; notes on the use of borax preservatives on creamg..
I* ing routes; directions for using the Babcock milk test; notes o
ter and butter substitutes, with results of analyses of a num-ber.,ot
samples; feeding experiments with steers; notes on white vs. yello-w, "
*l varieties of corn; work with vegetables and fruits in 1894; desr.1"i i..
i::i tive notes on a number of apples grown in 1895; reprint of StatiX q0.....
'l Bulletin 34; a paper on some Pennsylvania peats, with the chemibl....al
: analyses of a number of samples; experiments with soluble, reverted, '?
*^ ,,: and insoluble phosphoric acid; general fertilizer experiments; coat- C-
J position of wood ashes sold in Pennsylvania; analyses of miseeb "...I
a, jh' laneous fertilizing substances; results of variety tests of a number of ;
,3 ... ; farm crops; a paper on the home birds of the State; list of exchanges, .
1':: meteorological records of the year; soil temperatures for each month
": JJ ..: of the years 1894 and 1895, and the weekly crop reports for the same
.- periods.
J The Pennsylvania Station has been conducted during the past year
/' on the same prudent and thorough policy as heretofore. While
; increasing its efforts to disseminate useful information among the-i
':: .farmers, it has continued carefully planned investigations along a few
'-. well-chosen lines of great importance to the agriculture of the State. -
ii~ 'i The importance of the agricultural interests of Pennsylvania, as
related to its wealth, would seem to warrant more generous provision
on the part of the State for the development of scientific and practical
Inquiries such as this station might successfully and economically
; prosecute if its financial resources were enlarged.
. ..,. '.'
RHODE ISLAND.
"" Rhode Island Agricultural Experiment Station, Kingston.
!7
v DEPARTMENT OF RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS.
.; The Rhode Island Station has continued work mainly in the same
.' lines as heretofore, including fertilizer analysis and inspection; chem-
,':.ical and agricultural investigations on the use of fertilizers; variety,
fertilizer, culture, and rotation experiments with grain and forage
plants; horticultural investigations and studies of plant diseases;
Experiments in oyster culture and with poultry.' The fertilizer experi-
- ments have had special reference to the use of lime and the substitu-
tion of soda for potash. Cooperative experiments are conducted in
ten different places in the State. A vegetation house has been built
for use in investigations with fertilizers, and a greenhouse is being
utilized in the winter for studies on the preparation and manuring of
soil for garden vegetables. In horticulture, special attention is being
; 'paid to lettuce, peaches, and the Loganberry. A laboratory for sum-
mer work on oyster culture has been built in the vicinity of Kingston,
and an attempt is being made to revive the oyster industry, which
was once important in this locality. Experiments with geese have
been continued, and the raising of Belgian hares has been introduced
with a view to comparing the cost of meat from this source and from.
Si: poultry. By a State law enacted last winter the selection of an analyst
for the fertilizer control was left to the State board of agriculture.
This has resulted in the removal of fertilizer analysis from the station.'
,'t

















.i .l pubauleations of this station received during the past fiscal year
IIi. tlletlns 37-45 and the Annual Report for 1895.
.U.ii.s 57, pp. 15, figs. 8.-Apple UCture.-Popular directions for
ie ultivation and care of established orchards.
7 S M set 5, pp. 1O, figs. 5.-The Bordeaux Mixture.-Report on the
moosful use of Bordeaux mixture in combating the late blight of
SBuein 59, pp. 8. -Analyses of Commereial Fertilizers. -A Schedule
S.f Trade Values of Fertilizing Materkds.-Notes on valuations and
taulated analyses and valuations of 41 samples of fertilizers.
Emlelin 4t0, pp. 26, pls. 2.-Fertilizers.-Potato Sab.-Includes
tab lated analyses and valuations of 60 samples of fertilizers and the
selts of investigations on the effect of various substances on the
gMwth of potato scab.
Buetin 41, pp. 58, figs. 14.-Spinach.-Notes on spinach culture in
Rhode Island, with a classification and description of the various
varieties; results of irrigation experiments; brief notes on the leaf
miner and mildew of spinach, an historical sketch of the cultivation
and use of spinach, and directions for cooking.
Bulletin 42, pp. 18.-Fertilizers.-Analyses and valuations of 100
samples of fertilizing materials and of 5 home mixtures, and a brief
discussion on the value to the State of the fertilizer control.
Bulletin 43, pp. 15.-Additional Tests of (Garden Seeds.-Results of
tests of 151 samples of vegetable seeds with notes and comments.
Bulletin 44, pp. 46, figs. 19.-Celery.-Results of experiments in
level vs. trench culture; notes on diseases; a study of 59 varieties to
note their development during the last fifty years, and an historical
sketch of celery culture.
Buetin 465, pp. 16, figs. 8.-The Loganiberry.-Cultural and his-
torical motes on the Loganberry with an account of its growth at the
Station and suggestions as to best methods of propagation.
Anual Report, 1895, pp. 200, xv. figs. 47.-Report of the director
an the work of the year; investigations upon the growth of various
plants on upland acid soil before and after liming; substitution of
soda for, and its value in connection with, potash; a paper Imbased upon
experiments at the station and elsewhere on the recognition of the
acidity of upland soils and its bearing upon agricultural practices;
ammonium thiocyanate as an impurity in ammonium msulphate; fer-
tWlmr inspection and analyses; analyses of 12 samples of water;
port on two methods of heating greenhouse; shrinkage experiments
iwith Indian corn; notes on forage plants; results of growing legumi-
mous and other plants with different quantities of nitrogen and with-
out nitrogen; three seasons' experiments with geese; meteorological
neords of the year; lists of exchanges and donations; and the report
|at the treasurer for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896.
| Th work of the Rhode Island Station is wisely confined to a few
















3 DEPARTMENT OF CLEMSON AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.
3 The work of the South Carolina Station during th6 ........
included chemical studies of soils, phosphate rock, waters, m .
Potatoes, and sea-island cotton; variety, fertilizer, and rotations K,
K ? ments, especially with corn and cotton; horticultural exprmM#
"HI |||| work in dairying; botanical studies, including investigations i
., 1 table physiology and pathology, and investigations on disease ot.nIt
[4k;. mals. The analysis and inspection of fertilizers is carried aon a4i
,,.college utinder State laws and with funds provided by the State. :, ...
:1. station has cooperated with this Department in experiments in- tze&flti r
uk.: and with sugar beets. .
1.,'The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as folat
: United States appropriation- -.--..--. --........... ................. -- 5,, S:
I Farm products --------- --------- ------ ------------
,i Total -------.. -- -------------------.----- -----15, 877 ::::
I0 l.: A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund;j
KI% has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by tiq':
;r y;.: Department, and has been approved. ',.i
Si The publications of this station received during the past fiscal yeat,
Ij" were Bulletins 25-27 and the Annual Report for 1896. :'
4i. Bulletin 25, pp. 11.-Distemper in Horses and Mules.-A popua.K
bulletin on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of influenza ad .i4 .
i strangles. ,
,:|, Bulletin 26, pp. 16.-Founder in Horses and Red Water in Ga Ue.-.T
,' Popular notes on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of these
|'. diseases. ,'
:i Bulletin 27, pp. 8.- Wounds and Their Treatment.-Popular notesH.
; on this subject.
SAnnual Report, .1896, pp. 16.-Brief reports by the director and:::,:
: heads of departments on the work of the year, including some mnis- ;
.:' cellaneous chemical analyses; lists of bulletins published; donation :
Sto the station, and a financial report for the fiscal year ending June 30,.
... : 1896. ",
S ;Progress was made during the past year in strengthening the work.
; of the South Carolina Station. The facilities for experimental inqui-
L:ries in veterinary science and vegetable physiology and pthology
S,'. were materially improved, and useful investigations in these lines anEd
:' :,j in chemistry were undertaken. Unfortunately, at the close ofsthe-
S; fiscal year changes occurred in the positions of director and agrioub
jl tourist from causes beyond the control of the governing board. Nmew
.. |, officers have entered upon their duties in these positions, and it is
i hoped that success will attend their undertakings. The policy of'tie
Sii station has tended too much in the direction of educational work, ...
h *^lai 2is indicated by the statement in the report of the director for 18916,
'%|!i that "the station is rapidly becoming a sort of farmers' correspondence
S ." ". ... :
..... 14 1 ','- '..



















.. .. ...
South Dakota Agricultursl Experiment Station, Brookings.
DZPfRTMENT OF SOUTH DAKOTA AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.
The work of the South Dakota Station during the past year has
: Included field experiments with wheat, millet, corn, and forage crops,
and with barnyard .manure; soil investigations; chemical studies of
brg plants and supar beets; investigations in horticulture and for-
iary; botanical studies of grasses and other economic plants; investi-
gations on injurious insects and plant diseases; and biological studies
.... special reference to animal diseases. Cooperative experiments
k-bve been conducted in the James River Valley, including investiga-
tions relating to the practice of irrigation. The station has cooper-
ted with this Department in work in forestry and with grasses and
- sugar beets, The facilities of the station have been improved and
wl soon be still further enlarged through the remodeling of a build-
I hag which will be set apart for the station officers and laboratories.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
Ui em im p ......................................... $15,000.00
'United Stinks appropriation------------------------------- 00.00
... Br .700.00
hrm products ...-----..---------...--.---- --....----------------.... 466.05
T o .......... ............................................ 16,166.05
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
ha been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
won Bulletins 46-452 and the Annual Reports for 1894,1895, and 1896.
Buetin 4, pp. 18, dgms. 2.-Building Creameries and Organiza-
ion of Coope;rative Creamery Companies.-Articles of incorporation
and by-laws of a creamery, together with plans and equipment for a
areadmery building.
SBulltin 47, pp. 46.-Tomatuoes, Beans, Onions.-A Cheap Hot-
I! ho .-Results of variety tests and of culture and fertilizer experi-
mente with these crops, and a reprint of an article from "Market
Garden on a cheap and efficient greenhouse for the Northwest.
Bulletin 48, pp. 18,figs. 5. -Potato Scab.- Three Injurious Insects.-
Results of investigations with three fungicides for the prevention of
potato sb, and illustrated and descriptive notes on three injurious
Insects.
BuIletin 49, pp. !4, map 1.-Shalow Artesian Wells of South Da.
oth.-Notes are given on a number of artesian wells in different por-
tMons of the State, with results of mineral analyses of the waters from
these wells and of the water from one surface well.













till bu: wAJ J u 'y % -LL, U cLu. U1S1iUt'J ChIJLLUL5 j. tIC U LL5 U1I usV V a lu. i1 U l La70 tI L .4s. yi MN.
of forage plants, with popular notes on the value of silos ...
and descriptive notes on the station silo. :, a?**
Bulletin 52, pp, 32, pis. 11.-Irrigation in South Dakota.-A
on irrigation experiments with a large number of farm and..:-..::::.
crops.
Annual Report, 1894, pp. 34, appendix 208.-Financial, rr:
reports by the director and heads of departments on work of then
including meteorological observations, variety tests of farm eropg f
EIlil breeding experiments with sheep and swine, and reprints of sti
Bulletins 37-40.
; Annual Report, 1895, pp. 22, appendix 151.-Treasurer's rep.r:t:1,
outlines of the work of the year and of proposed experiments, an.U 1
,l. reprints of Bulletins 41-44. ..I
iI Annual Report, 1896, pp. 32.-Report by the director and heads ...:.t'
"J departments on the work of the year, and a financial statement fo:.::i"::
Ii^8: .the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896. A..t
Ij i ,., The South Dakota Station was much harassed during the past year-:;
..lby uncertainties growing out of a legal conflict over an amendmenOt .H:..I
; to the constitution of the State which abolished the subsidiary gov-.*
.I,, earning board, known as the board of trustees, and put the entire
;" management of the college and station in the hands of the board of
i .1 regents of education. The point at issue was the right of the governor "
rjiK of the State to appoint a new board of regents to take the place of the
j:t;r. board in office at the time the amendment was voted on by the peo-..
).,..I ple. The supreme court of the State finally decided in favor of the. *
. Anew board, but this decision was not reached until after the close of "
).,,L; the fiscal year. The general effect of this concentration of authority
:4 t|? in a single board will, it is believed, be greatly to the advantage of
Sthe institution by removing many causes of friction arising from the
(.t undefined limits of the functions of the two boards previously exist-
j ing. The members of the new board are appointed for terms of dif-
-r. .ferent length, the object being to secure a nonpartisan board. The
S. board has given assurances that political considerations will not affect.
: its action, and has thus far been quite conservative in its dealings
with the station.
Considering the peculiar conditions surrounding the station, the
S,.', activity which characterized its operations during the past year is
much to be commended. The publications of the station which had
fallen into arrears were brought up to date, the expenditures and
accounts were put on a proper basis, and much useful work was done
,! ;. in the fields and laboratories. The outlook for the successful man-
Sagement of the station is much better than it was a year ago, and if a
Consistent and permanent policy can be maintained, there is good rea-
1, son to believe that the station operations will be materially developed
^ i and strengthened in the near future.
"' |. .i

V 4i.; ...
:J


h i.. ..'..





















te suou o& fungiciaes on peaen oniage; anu enwomoiogical invesu-
gt i, particularly on plant lice and the San Jos6 scale. In cooper-
ation with this Department, the station has continued the mainte-
mmoe of a gram garden covering about 10 acres, in which numerous
varieties of grassmmes are being tested, and has undertaken experiments
with sugar beets. A vineyard has been planted on the farm which
will be used for experiments in the culture and 'pruning of grapes
with special reference to conditions existing in the State. An inter-
sting exhibit of the work of the station was made at the Nashville
Expostion and attracted much attention. Advantage was taken of
them opportunity afforded by this exhibit to prepare a large and hand-
some relief map of the State showing the various typical soils, based
oa the distribution of geological formations. The station staff was
aided in this work by the Division of Soils of this Department, the
United States Geological Survey, and the State geologist of Tennessee.
A bulletin containing a copy of this map and much useful information
regarding the agricultural value of the soils of the State will be issued
by the station. It is believed that this will be of great advantage to
the station as an aid to the future development of its experimental
inquiries. The analysis of commercial fertilizers, until recently made
by the station for the State bureau of agriculture, has been discon-
tinued. The station is thus relieved of a considerable amount of
routine work, but its funds are somewhat reduced.
Timhe income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
usind sajt appropriation -------------- ------------------ $1.5,000.00
fewa r wiSr analyses -----------------------------------...........................................499.00
m r ts-......................... ...--......--------.-.-... 541.44
To d ............................................ ............. 16.020.44
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins, Vol. 9, Nos. 1-4; Vol. 10, Nos. 1-2, and the Annual
Report for 1896.
Vol. 9, But. 1, pp. 384, figs. 20.-Apples of Tennessee Origin.-A
study of the seedling apples of the State, with descriptions and illus-
trations of a number of the most valuable, and historical data on two
varieties.
Vol. 9, BuL 2, pp. 13, pis. 6.--Strawberries.-Tabulated data and
descriptive notes on 54 varieties grown at the station and a list of the
most satisfactory sorts grown in different sections of the State.

















Stion. Two new varieties of merit are reported upon at 1i" A
illustrations given of 10 desirable sorts for planting in Ten.''"
i .Vol. 10, Bul. 1, pp. 18, figs. 15.-Apples of Tennessee Orsge&..
Report). -Descriptive notes on 19 varieties of seedling apples0
originated in Tennessee, with historical data in some cases.
Vol. 10, Bul. 2, pp. 10, figs. 5.-Pot Cultures of Lettuce.-'btbt..
I and results secured at the station in growing lettuce in p6t .
ot glass and in marketing the same. .
4 Annual Report, 1896, pp. 20.-Brief reports by the heads of D
|z.. Vments on the work of the year, including notes on certain plant 3i|1*:4'
AI''A eases in Tennessee; a bibliography of the station literature si1t iW
?;: ^establishment in 1888; and a financial report for the fiscal year .n4!.ijE
....... :, : ii
til June 30, 1896.
:: The Tennessee Station has steadily pursued its work during the WCWL
4I5 year in accordance with the policy previously determined upon. I|
^*M- being carefully and methodically managed and its operations t..:...
plannedd with reference to the general interests of the agriculture o
1 the State. The labor imposed by the carrying on of the farm, whir
ii prudently and economically bestowed, is still a heavy burden on ti. '
', station, and the financial aid of the State is needed to relieve it inth*f
S direction and to make possible further extension of its experimenutwli:|
Sinquiries. EXAS. ;i
1 TEXAS.
4 ll;:: Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, College Station. i

rt''. DEPARTMENT OF THE STATE AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TE.AS... :
. "A r: : :.. :
: The work of the Texas Station during the past year has included-
field experiments with corn, cotton, grain and forage crops, and ca-aa.
: gre; feeding experiments with milch cows and hogs; chemical ives-.
Stigations, especially on canaigre and on the soils of the coast region;
A I; horticultural investigations, especially on peaches and potatoes, and
...studies in veterinary science and practice. The substation at Bee-
i, :.i!'*' ville, in southern Texas, has been maintained mainly with State funds.
11 Special investigations have been made on a disease affecting pear
;: ,"trees in the coast region. The facilities for work in dairying have
;;j,| been improved.
S, The income of the station during the past fiscal yearwas as follows:
.. :i..: '. .' |. .
i United States appropriation ----------------------------------- $15,000..
| State appropriation for substations ----------------------------...------ 2,500-
S,. ATotal ---------0---------------------------------- -17, 500"
l A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fnd'
. iii has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this:
'iD, Department.
"I0Nji .*
i: r .|E %" L. i(,LI

: ; ,b L:1' ij



























appropriation made by the State has enabled it to maintain only one
. smbstation. Useful special investigations have, however, been con-
ducted in a number of places.
UTAH.
Apaultun Uxperiment Station, Logan.
DEPAR=TET OF THE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE OF UTAH.
The work of the Utah Station during the past year has included
variety, rotation, and irrigation experiments with cereals and other
crops; feeding experiments with dairy cattle, pigs, and poultry;
investigations in dairying, especially butter making and cheese mak-
ing; horticultural and forestry experiments; investigations in irriga-
tion engineering; field and chemical studies of alkali soils, sugar beets,
ad alfalfa; investigations of animal diseases. Work in entomology
has recently been undertaken. The investigations in irrigation, with
specal reference to the water supply of Utah and the best means for
Miing it in agriculture have been energetically and successfully
proeeuted in cooperation with the United States Geological Survey
and county officials. The chemical and other studies of alfalfa made
by this station have been of general value for a wide region. Co-
operative experiments in forestry and with sugar beets have been
conducted in connection with this Department.
The income of the station during the past fiscaml year was as follows:
UX itdi tatss appropriation ..-................................. .... $15,000.00
Fun mrodic...... ........-------------------------------- ----- $.8,5S5.05
Mu--------eou------------ ---------------------- .--------- 471.86
Total...... ................................................... 19,066.98
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
has been rendere4 in accordance with the schedules prescribed by this
Department, and has been approved.
The publications of the station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins Nos. 43-49 and the Annual Reports for 1895 and 1896.








BuUetin 48, pp. 64, p1s. 4.-Dairy Nvotes.--Tnhis embraces tjj%
herd record for 1894 and 1895, results of feeding expert ri
dairy cows, and some suggestions on the building and equipm'B|
f a c to r ie s .. ....
Bulletin 44, pp. 33.-Alfalfa or Lucern.-Report on the yi
feeding value of early, medium, and late cuttings; yield and:..
value of the first, second, and third cuttings, as shown b f'"d
experiments with steers; and the feeding value as compared:wit
red clover, timothy, mixed hay, and alfalfa mixed with straw. ,
Bulletin 45, pp. 19.-Experiments with Vegetables and F ritt ....
report is given on the results of culture experiments; variety teti
on onions, potatoes, beans, sweet corn, etc., with descriptive notes0-:'Oi:
a number of varieties of orchard fruits, and on the use of ce M.ii i
insecticides for the repression of the codling moth. .....NI
Bulletin 46, pp. 56, pl. 1, figs. 14.-Earthen Damns.-A discu BonAi'8
A. I of the character of material used in earthen dams, methods of -makI-n
N11i ing compact embankments and of constructing .core walls, the dimeao-l,"I
S|;isions of reservoir embankments, slope paving, outlet pipes and cMn-6
.. duits, wasteweirs or overflows, and State supervision of dams and
A:'^ reservoirs. Results are given of experiments at the station to deter- :
:Al mine the best proportion in which to mix gravel, sand, silt, and 'cl. 1 i
."AO in order to produce the most compact and impervious mass. Theo'.i
:' Connecticut and Idaho laws relating to dams and reservoirs are given
in an appendix. :
i..... .Bulletin 47, pp. 58, figs. 8, charts 4--Climate of Utah.-A summary
Fi'. is given of observations on temperature, pressure, humidity, preeip- l
Situation, etc., at 12 stations in the State during 1896; and the climate .
',*of the State, as indicated by the averages of observations during the
': five years ending with 1895, is discussed.
Bulletin 48, pp. 75, dgms. 12.-Alfalfa or Lucern; Its Chemical
.; Life History.-Results are given of analyses of a number of samples -
i of alfalfa-whole plant, leaves, stalks, and flowers of the first, second,
"J. and third crop-and of the first, second, and third crop alfalfa hay.
SThe relative value of the different parts of the plant from different
Crops is discussed, as well as the proper time of cutting alfalfa hay.
pl Bulletin 49, pp. 26, figs. 12.-Spraying.-Popular notes on spraying
S.for the repression of insects and fungus diseases, with brief notes and
: illustrated descriptions of. spraying apparatus.
Annual Report for 1895, pp. 5.-Treasurer's report for the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1895, and abstracts of bulletins issued.
SAnnual Report for 1896.-A financial statement for the year end-
ing December 31, 1896.
SThe affairs of the Utah Station have been in a more or less unset-
S, tled condition during the past year. The president of the college, the
director and agriculturist, and the horticulturist, being newly appointed
| officers, have necessarily given a large share of their time to studying
;.; ~ the general conditions under which experiment-station work can be
[ "i:: carried on in Utah. After a few months' service the horticulturist -
: .resigned, thus making necessary a further reorganization of the work
i: in this department. Recently the veterinarian has also resigned to
.: 0 accept a position at the Kansas Station. A readjustment on a more
l |equitable basis has been made of the salaries of officers employed in
j ~ both station and college, as recommended last year by this office.
Sl This station is doing considerable useful work and has great oppor-
"1i0{ tunities for efficient service in behalf of the agriculture of a wide
region. But until the uncertainty is removed which now character-
f1
i-




















eraUy the orange hawkweed; investigations in horticulture and
forestry, especially on plums, including the problems of pollination;
Sentmological studies, particularly on the "red spider;" and experi-
ments in bee keeping. Experiments with sugar beets are being made
in cooperation with this Department.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was as follows:
UnitS Stat. mppropn~~~.At-- -------- ----.s o.o
u Aflato appropre ....----------..--. ---......... ----...----------...... $15,000.00
]VWK farg" t iw mlymee -.-.....-....-.-.......- ................... 1,911.67
S fa rodatw...... &W--.--------------...---------------------. ... .055.30
Tot..-----...-------....-------------....-------..... 19,966.97
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fund
Shas been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by
this Department, and has been approved.
The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year
were Bulletins 53-59 and the Annual Report for 1895.
Bulekn 53, pp. 17, figs. 6.-The Pollination of Plumns.-A brief
disusion upon the general relationship of cross fertilization and
Sfruitfulness; results of an examination of over 2,000 plum blossoms,
With reference to defective pistils; experiments in protecting 25 to
300 blooms of each of 14 varieties of plums from cross fertilization;
21 cr sing experiments with 22 varieties, 319 pollinations being made;
and a conspectus showing the relationships of the various groups of
plums.
Buetin 54, pp. 15,figs. 8.-Salad Plants and &1dads.-General con-
siderations and illustrative and descriptive notes on several varieties,
with remarks on the preparation of salads for the table.
Bulin 55, pp. 12, figs. 9.-Apple 0arowing in Green Isle County.-
SInformation relative to the apple industry in this section-statistics
for the crop of 1896; methods of culture is vogue; favorite varieties;
packing, storing, marketing, storage houses, etc.
Bulletin 56, pp. 15, figs. 5.- Orange Hawk'weed or "Paint Brush."-
Popular notes on the nature and occurrence of this weed, with results
of experiments in cultivation and with salt for its repression.
Bulletin 57, pp. 31.-Analyses of Commercial Fertilizers.-Brief
notes on valuation of fertilizers; list of fertilizer firms licensed under
the provisions of the State fertilizer law; and tabular analyses and
valuation of 35 samples of fertilizers.
Bulldetins 58, pp. 13; 59, pp. 30.-Statements regarding the collection
of samples; list of companies licensed to sell fertilizers in the State;
notes on valuation and tabulated analyses and valuations of 158 sam-
ples of fertilizing materials.








SAnnual iceport, I&O, pp. rsc.--seport or mte director o0at..i..
of the year; abstracts of Bulletins 45-49; analyses of misc3
+I fertilizers and drinking waters, with notes on the consumptionu .
tilizers in Vermont; results of a study of the kinds, chemical."
Stion, cost, etc.; of commercial feeds in the State; pig-feeding e.
Wi ments; investigations on potato blights; methods of preparsati.o
k, Bordeaux mixture and field tests of the same; disinfection, 61.l
potatoes; orchard diseases and remedies; work on oat smut;"n-,:n
on the hawkweed; report on the insect pests of the year, with .iu
Stated, descriptive, and remedial notes on a number of the. Va
injurious insects; notes on the method of least squares as a ma.i4
determining the money value of commercial feeds, and the ret.
"f secured when applied to Vermont feeding stuffs; extensive dai* '01iS1] ;
L experiments, covering a study of the variations in milk, record of tbw: E
station herd for 1894 and 1895, tests of dairy apparatus, fast and stow..i
1 i: milking, miscellaneous fodder crops, with analyses of the same, and...'
4.^ feeding tests. ".
,. The Vermont Station has continued its work actively during the ...
past year, and the investigations in charge of its expert officers are :
i being conducted in a thorough and progressive way. The botan-
: ical division has greatly improved facilities in the new science build
::+: ~ ing of the university and the chemical laboratory has been recon' .
..j:. ..structed. The college has assunied a portion of the expense con* "
:: nected with the work in dairying hitherto borne by the station, but.'.:
",, ^ there is still need of curtailment of the farm operations in view of
S-! the limited resources of the station. It appears from the report of
'.: the director for 1896-97 that, though "no State funds are appropri-
::, ated to the station for any purpose whatsoever," an increasing num-
,,, ber of routine analyses of miscellaneous agricultural materials are "
made for private individuals by the station under a State law. The..
State for a time made an appropriation for this work, but withdrew
-:t ~ financial aid in 1890. The United States funds are not properly used :'
for this purpose, and in the absence of a State appropriation spe-
S., cifically for this work it should not be allowed to be a hindrance
Sto the investigations for the public benefit for which the station is
Maintained.
j ..
- "" VIRGINIA.
Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College Experiment Station, Blaoksburg,.
DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE.
-I The work of the Virginia Station during the past year has included
S, horticultural investigations, studies of plant diseases, botanical and
entomological investigations, chemical studies of staple crops, inves-
tigations on animal diseases, and field experiments with grain and
.. forage crops. The horticultural work of the stations includes exten-
;:' sive tests of varieties of fruits and vegetables, experiments with dif-
-\".:' ~ ferent methods of culture, and with fungicides and insecticides. The
,' studies on the chemistry of potatoes, tobacco, and other crops are of
,. i general importance. The farm operations of the station are not thor-
^ i ~ oughly satisfactory for experimental purposes. The station needs to
{ i be relieved from the care of so large a tract of land and from commer-
c, cial considerations attending its management. Buildings and other.
f1 |facilities for feeding experiments are greatly needed, and it is hoped
Stthat the State will supply these at an early day. Under State laws.

i : t:
A: i;.A':"

























[uArn in the cellar during November, December, and January.
B i s 59, pp. 6.-E-perimental Garden Notes, I.-Popular notes
m thie culture of tomatoes in the field and under glass, and on celery.
Buletn '0, pp. 14.-Experimental Garden Notes, IL-Popular
notes on the culture of onions, early garden peas, etc., and on the
construction and management of a hotbed.
Bulletin ~1, pp. -Splenetic or Texas Cattle Fever.-General infor-
mation on the nature, cause, and prevention of this disease, including
the text of the State law on the subject.
Bulletin 6, pp. 14, figs 5.-The San Jos8 or Pernicious Scale.-
Popular notes on the introduction and occurrence of this insect, its
habits, life-history, food plants, etc. The text of the State law con-
cerning the scale is appended.
Annual Report, 1895-96, pp. 13.-Brief reports by the director and
heads of departments on the work of the year, including a table show-
ing meteorological conditions for the year ending June 30, 1896, and
a financial statement for the same period.
The Virginia Station is doing considerable useful work. The col-
lege with which the station is connected is prospering, and this will
ultimately be to the advantage of the station. The special efforts
made to reach the farmers of the State through popular bulletins are
believed to be materially strengthening the station. Under the pres-
out policy the foundation is being laid for the development of the
station's researches, and with the aid of the State the station may
eaily devote itself to more thorough investigations, especially as
related to field crops and the feeding of animals.

WASHINGTON.
W.mhimgton Aptroultmural zperiment Station, Pullman
DPAJuTXENT OF WAS dIOTON AGRICULTURAL COLLGOB AND bMOOOL OF SCIZNCL.
The work of the Washington Station during the past year has
Included chemical investigations of soils and sugar beets; field experi-
mento with sugar beets, rain, and forage crops; feeding experiments;
horticultural investigations; studies of plant diseases and injurious









41mfliCJL 1A.j Uj.L A ui j LLL i. A j jL LA WLLJ.j i U M TIAJ. L V A Y V JJLJLLULLAS .FJ.I A
of destroying this injurious rodent. The substation at Puyfif
been discontinued until such time as the State shall provide .ft:J
its maintenance. Experiments with sugar beets are being AWt
in cooperation with this Department. ::' a
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was asfolo
United States appropriation ---------. -------..---- -.......-------.... .:
Farm products.....----.----.---- --..------.-------- ---------....
Total.------.. -----------... ---------------........-------.......
A report of the receipts and expenditures for the United States fnd mi
has been rendered in accordance with the schedules prescribed by tbi:':::::
Department, and has been approved. ""
:) ;i The publications of this station received during the past fiscal year-':
Aij were Bulletins 21-28. "::
Bulletin 21, pp. 8.-Susceptibility of Spermophiles to Pathogenic M,
H!:||[ Bacteria.-Results of inoculation experiments with squirrels and birds. :
!iNVII Bulletin 22, pp. 10.-Influenza.-A popular article giving synonyms 'Si
-I and discussing the cause, symptoms, forms, and treatment of his '
|.|i disease among horses. '
'1i Bulletin 23, pp. 19.-Some Notes Concerning the Nitrogen Cont. A:H,;
I, of Soil and Humus.-Investigations relative to the importance of
;:: humus in the soil are briefly reviewed and analyses are reported of:63 573f
samples of soil from 16 counties in the State. |
;'Ii,'; Bulletin 24, pp. 7, fig. 1.-An Acid Test for Milk and Cream.-A
Description is given of a method of using Farrington's alkaline table ts
in testing the acidity of milk, and a graduate by the author for testing
milk is illustrated.
SBulletin 25, pp. 27, figs. 11.-Pruning Orchard Trees.-Popular illius ;
i, i treated notes on this subject, with a list of the varieties of fruits nowt
Growing at the station.
,:4 Bulletin 26, pp. 36.-Experiments in the Culture of the Sugar Beet'in
SWashington for 1895 and 1896.-A report is given on the results of 14
cooperative experiments in the culture of the sugar beet, together
I with analyses with reference to sugar content and percentage purity
of a large number of samples.
+7 i Bulletin 27, pp. 48, figs. 69.-A Few Facts about Insects.-Popular
illustrated descriptive life-history and remedial notes on the more
": common of a number of orders of insects, together with formulas for
the preparation of 12 insecticides.
SBulletin 28, pp. 17, fig. 1.-Clearing Land.-Popular notes on the
'^!!" methods and cost of clearing land at the station.
; The Washington Station has continued its work mainly along the
,same lines as heretofore, and its affairs have been conducted in an
| orderly way with a view to giving practical aid to the farmers of the
A: |State. Recently, through changes in its governing board, the college
J i and station have been in a disturbed condition, but it is hoped that
nothing will occur to prevent the maintenance of a consistent policy
',: of station work. It does not yet seem to be fully understood by the
,. I!1 community in which the station is located that the funds given by
.. the United States for the station are for experimental purposes only,
Aii and that they can not lawfully be applied either directly or indirectly
Stogeneral college purposes. Whenever persons are employed in both
college and station, or farm operations or other enterprises are con-
ducted for the benefit of the college as well as the station, a fair
A': I.

"' 1 .:






































Uwmthe purchase of land and the equipment of the farm, but unless
t StatsU continues to aid the station it will be difficult for it to main-
tanItAied and feeding work on the scale on which it has been
leaS without detriment to the other lines of investigation in which
te station has egagsd and which are of great importance to the State.
The income of the station during the past fiscal year was a follows:
0Mstmftt.......................................... t5.,00o.0o
W~f----------a-----------------------------5, 40Lo7
a-a- -.m----m.--..--------- -..------------.--- 145.21&
---- --- ------------- ----------------------------- .......187.4
I.---------- --------------------------------------- 0,73W6U
I Arepaort of the uoeipt and gexpdiurm for the United States fund
babeM r= nerd i meo rdMe with the ehedules pre bed by the
a, ient, and has been approved.
S F pbUeatio of this station. received during the p-s i9lW yewr
w mBuletins 44 ad 46 and one Bulletin.
In sudAm 7o.-Praetia, Ieg-1J-0 -silrgius to
ranwf-md 6ropo Charaer tf a* he wd 0"0.
1 H. Doc. 20&--6












nations of 204 samples of fertilizers. c.; %* *.
The work of the West Virginia Station was earnestly a
fully prosecuted during the past year. Much effort l*wa'
given to the organizing of new lines of work. Great
vailed in the station staff, and the grade of work done w1,:::.
whole, higher than that'previously attained. Near the end4
year, however, the appointment of a new governing ..... t.
members, only one of whom had served in that capacity b....
brought about the removal of the director. After some nine.........
faithful service, during which period he had managed the st i
cessfully under unusual difficulties arising very largelyfrm
ceptions of the proper functions of an experiment station
the community in which the station is located- and strongly affee,
the action of the governing boards, and after having brought tA.4 pi:
tion to a high state of efficiency as regards both its prqio A
scientific work, the director was dismissed by the board at! I4
A; meeting, though no charges affecting his personal or pr.fe
U standing were preferred. Such an apparent violation of sound!,;:-
ciples of station management should not, in my judgment, be..
]'[ to pass without an earnest protest. It is action of this kind q
part of boards charged with the general management of the i
i:l ;which more than anything else weakens our experiment station
I discourages their officers, and leads to the substitution of. a |
^E. and temporary operations for those thorough investigations whieb.i,....
!'I be carried on only by men secure in their positions as long as hthey|i|
.H efficient in their work. Under existing laws this Department .0a
.! comparatively little toward preventing the waste of the Unite4,iStn.! ,i
II funds given for experiment station purposes unless governing b oe.s:
i base their action on sound business principles and make fitne0 .!...
1; efficiency the fundamental tests in the appointment and retentioit i
'^ ~ station officers., ..,,
WISCONSIN. K.1
Z.. .. : U"i : E
:' ~ Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of Wisconsin, (i.i,
|.~'|;i ~DEPARTMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN. :'" :;":!:
Ni ~The work of the Wisconsin Station during the past year hasi ii
i Along the same lines as heretofore, including investigations in agri- j
i cultural physics, especially studies of soils, drainage, and irrigaitfi
I;j chemical, bacteriological, and practical investigations in drying .
j;| especially a study of the processes involved in the ripening of cheegsel;,
i'., feeding experiments with pigs, lambs, and dairy cattle; horticuitu.rai(
Investigations, and chemical analyses of feeding stuffs and fertilizers,,:,.
|i Experiments with sugar beets have been conducted in cooperation::
with this Department. The facilities for investigations in hottieob-l
ture and physics have been materially increased by the enlargeifenit.
of the building used by these departments of the station. (See figi;.
5, and 6.) A handbook for farmers and a valuable treatise on "mtilk:
testing," by station officers, were published during the past year, ,



L 4i7,
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Fia 4.- MORTICULTU RAL- PHYSICS BUILDING OF THE WiSCONSiN.AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE AND ExPERIMENT STATION.































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