Citation
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Creation Date:
February 4, 1983
Language:
English
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Fred K. Shochet. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
44512277 ( OCLC )
sn 00229541 ( LCCN )
ocm44512277

Related Items

Related Item:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Full Text
Settlements roadblock peace
imy Carter
n WASHINGTON (JTA> Former Presidents
Oerald Ford and Jimmy Carter have called
Israels settlement policy on the West Bank the
major obstacle" preventing moderate Arab
countries from joining the Middle East peace
process.
"Israel must halt its settlement policy a
move that alone might break the diplomatic log
jam, the former presidents said in a jointly
copywritten article which will appear in the
February Readers Digest.
Reacting to the article, John Hughes, a
spokesman for the U.S. State Department, said
that Carter and Ford have "focused rightly on
Carter. Ford speak out
on Israel's policies
Israeli settlements-' as a "problem" in the peace
process, but refused to characterize them as the
"major obstacle."
Ford and Carter, bitter rivals in the 1976
presidential campaign, became friends when they
attended the funeral of Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat. They have issued several joint
statements on various subjects, but this is their
Continued on Page 23
Gerald Ford
"SJewisHi FloridHao
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
alume 13 Number 3
[ddler on the ?
Hollywood, Florida Friday, February 4,1983
fted Sftochet
Price 35 Cents
^sWsjr^SMSEMsMpafc -TfaaHMSWs- ^BV
.


i attacks
Miami r
pope's view of Jew
Page 3
By STEVE KATON
Israel is the Jew climbing off the cross
forever Israel crushes the Christian
view of the Jew as a wanderer, doomed to
be a wanderer because he dares to reject
the godhead in the form of Jesus Christ.
Senior Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat of
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
presented a religious interpretation and
analysis of Israel and Judaism today be-
fore the largest Shornrai gathering (163
attending) ever brought together by the
Jewish Federation of South Broward.
The rabbi called Jews in America products of a
Christian civilization. This manifests itself, he
said, when Pope John Paul welcomes Yasser
Arafat to the Vatican, yet denies diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel.
"The pope is playing his Palestinian card,"
Rabbi Bernat told the crowd at Temple Beth
Torah, North Miami Beach. The pontiffs aim is
to shrink the Jewish nation's identity: de-Judifi-
cation.
The State of Israel flies in the face of Christian
doctrine: Israel represents an end of the wander-
ing for the Jew. How can the Jews possess Jeru-
salem? the rabbi says Christians ask themselves.
Why is it that the Catholic Church lecoguiies
each and every infinitesimal Afro-Asian country,
yet not Israel? be asked.
Rabbi Bernat charged that Arafat demonically
represents the Vatican's interests, the interna-
tionalization of Israel.
The Jew as a redemptive figure "is good for the
world," Christians would have us believe, he said.
Guest speaker Rabbi Haskcll M. BenMt.
The world has not come to grips with the potent
Jew: the manly and womanly figure of Israel.
But like it or not, Israel is entering into the his-
Continued on Page 23-
Israeli: U.S. Jews could self-destruct
Says UJA can keep
the light burning here
The Jewish communities of the world, especial-
ly the Jews in the United States, are in danger of
extinction, says Asher Ben-Natan, Israel's former
ambassador to West Germany and later to
France.
Addressing last week's meeting of the board of
director's of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, Ben-Natan said, "Israel will survive
We have the power to survive "
He, however, questioned the power of the Dia-
spora in the United States to keep Judaism and
the Jewish ethic alive.
Only United Jewish Appeal can keep the light
burninK, he said.
The Israeli politician, who in 1938 made aliyah
from Vienna where he headed that country's un-
derground aliyah movement, is now a member of
the executive committee of the Labor Party.
He was the key speaker in the Federation's
latest "Fly-In," based at the Diplomat Hotel.
Hy-in gives South Broward Jews the opportunity
to exchange views with high-ranking Israelis.
Ben-Natan noted that 1963 is an historic year
Cantiaaed oa Page 17
Ambaasador Asher Ben Natan i* flanked by South Broward's Leater Grossman (left) and Alvin
Aibaum as tbey discuss current eveats in Israel, the United States and the world.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hotly wood
Friday, February 4,1983

How Riverside made its name.
>
-
X
I
I
s
It takes years to build a name that is
second to none.
It takes nearly 70 years of experience
and commitment to Jewish tradition.
It began with Riverside's founder,
Charles Rosen thai. He believed that being a
Jewish funeral director was more than just a
business. It was a very special calling that
demanded absolute integrity, genuine
compassion, true charity and a dedication and
deep involvement in Jewish life.
Today, Charles Rosenthal's beliefs are
Riverside's policies. People like Carl Grossberg,
Alfred Golden, Leo Hack, Andrew Fierand a
new generation of Jewish management are
seeing to it.
At Riverside, we've always tried hard
to be the best And to us that means no let-up of
effort. No compromising of standards. And no
cutting of service.
*.
That's how Riverside got its name.
That's how we intend to keep it.
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, Vice President, Religious Advisor
Andrew Fier, Vice President
RIVERSIDE
MmorUl Chaptl. Iw./Fonw.! Dirwton
The most respected name in Jewish funeral
service in the world.


Friday, February 4,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Making rrjusic .
Charlie Sherlock makes a few adjustments on his violin.
-
A lotta brass: trumpet players (from left) George Gold, Rudy DiLascio and Robert Cook.
(The Fiddler in shorts on Page 1 is Jack Baker)
Every Friday afternoon from 12:30 to 3, a room at
the Jewish Community Centers of South Broward
on Hollywood Boulevard is transformed into a
symphony hall... well, almost.
Under the baton of Sammy Fidler, long-time
accompanist for famous names like Jan Peerce (18
years), Margaret Piazza and Theodore Bikel, the
Broward Senior Citizen Orchestra is preparing for
its Hollywood concert dates.
Conductor Fidler says his musicians come from
all walks of life, some played professionally and
some as a hobby. Four months ago, the first call for
orchestra members went out from the JCC, a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
A maximum of 37 would-be orchestra members
have practiced at one time, Fidler says, including
four women. The senior citizen orchestra has
applied for a U.S. grant in aid, the leader adds.
Look for dates we'll be performing, Fidler says.
Community Calen6aR
feBRUARy
4. f Rioay
7. monoay
10, thuRstay
ll.fpiOay
13. Sunday
17. thuRstay
Sisterhood Shabbat, Temple
Israel, Miramar.
Women's American ORT,
Sandpiper Chapter, meets at
I p.m. at Broward Federal S & L;
call 435-2137 or 431-4151.
"Close Harmony" will be shown
to Hillcrest Hadassah members
and friends at 12 noon at the
Playdium; call 966-2024.
"She's the Best Man in My
Cabinet" by Renee Brandes will
be performed at the Eden Roc
for ORT members and friends.
Luncheon, 11:30; musical, 1:30 p.m.
Sisterhood Shabbat at
Temple Solel.
Charity Auction by Sabra-Scopus
Chapter, Hadassah, beginning at
7:30 p.m. at Temple Sinai;
call 963-5344.
National Council of Jewish
Women, Hills Section, annual
"Women in Power Luncheon,"
II a.m. at the California Club.
Conductor Sammy Fidler gives out assignments to saxophonist Sid Levin
and clarinetist George Freeman before a recent practice session.
Meno&h
OjapelS
Simple, Dignified
^According to
Jewish Tradition
Pre-Need and Cemetery
Counseling & Arrangements
Worldwide Shipping Available
Chapels in: Fort Lauderdale, Margate,
Deerf ield Beach, W. Palm Beach and N. Miami Beach
Broward 742-6000 Dade 945-3939
Palm Beach 627-2277
South Palm Beach 427-4700


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 4,1983
Jewish Floridian
and Shortr o< OruW Hollywood C F'MV'
FP.EOSHOCHET STEVE KATON SUZANNE SMOCMET
Editor and Pubhartar Aaaooale Editor Eiacutiva Editor
Published Bi Waakty Second data Pot i ag paid al Hanandaw Fia USPS 864500
MOLLTWOOO-FOTLAUOEROALEOFFIC.Ain Savingt 00 Bid-) 00E HaHandaia Baacf
Blvd Suite 707G. HaUanrJala. Fta 33009 Phooa 444 lUM
Mtatjaaji B. Mala I m. Adrertmng Supactraor
Mam OMice I Plant 1 NE ti St. Miami. Fla 33132 Pnone I 3'HfOi
Namaikr Form Mr* catena M Mark* flortdU-. O. Boa 01 2B7X NUM. Fla 1J101
Jawlafi Federation oi South Broward Otticert Pratidant. Ban Saltar, vica Pretrdentt Philip A
Lavin M.O.. Saul Singer MO. and Nat Sadler. Traaeurer. Theodore Nam man. Sacntlan/, Otto
Slieoor, Executive Director. Summer 0 Kaye Submit malarial tor publication to Latlia Silaa.
Public Relation! Director
Minieei JIA. Seven Ant. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA
Jevrlan FrerMlen doat not guarantee Kaattnrth ol Marchandlaa Mwtntd
SUBSCRIPTION MATES: Local Ante J SO Annual (2 Yaar Hmmm SfL o> by memberemp Jev.itn
FtasraWen 1 South Broward. 27t Hollywood Brvd MoMywood. Fla U020 Pnone t?ia 10
Owl or Town upon BJaaajaat
21 SHE VAT 6743
Number 3
Friday, February 4,1983
Volume 13
A growing
impasse
It would be nice to know whether it is the
United States or Israel that is telling the
truth about confrontations between Israeli
forces and U .S. Marines in Lebanon.
Of course, the State Department in
Washington denies the charge made by one
Israeli General that confrontations of this
sort have been taking place.
We can only judge by the general climate
of opinion as being shaped these days by
the Reagan Administration. More and
more, the President is determined to have
his way with his own "peace initiative." If
he does, this means that Israel will be
pushed back into her pre-1967 borders.
One other Israeli accusation is that the
U.S. is behind the growing Lebanese resis-
tance to come to terms with Israel in a new
accord. Knowing President Reagan's stub-
bornness as we do in other areas of his Ad-
ministration's business, we are hard-
pressed not to give credence to this ac-
cusation, as well.
In all, it is most likely true that there
have been confrontations between Israeli
fighting forces and U.S. Marines. Apart
from being profoundly sad, it only goes to
show just how far the Reagan Administra-
tion has come in its willingness to undercut
Israel and how far apart it has grown
from the Congress and the broad pro-Israel
sentiment that still characterizes most of
America's public opinion.
Unconstitutional for state
to employ paid chaplain
NEW YORK It is un-
constitutional for a state
legislature to employ a
salaried chaplain of one
particular faith for an ex-
tended period of time, since
such a policy suggests the
chaplain's sect is the "of-
ficial religion" of the state,
says the American Jewish
Congress.
In a friend-of-the-court brief
filed in the U.S. Supreme Court,
the Jewish organization contends
the practice of the Nebraska
legislature of having a chaplain of
a single faith open each day's
session with a prayer violates the
constitution's "Establishment
Clause" which requires separa-
tion of church and state.
The current chaplain, the Rev-
erend Robert E. Palmer, a Pres-
byterian minister, has been serv-
ing in the same post since 1965,
receiving a salary of slightly over
$300 a month for his services.
IN ADDITION, says the brief,
whose filing was announced by
Norman Red lie h. co-chairman of
the A J Congress Commission on
Law and Social Action, the orig-
inal violation was compounded
by the Nebraska legislature's
practice in 1975. 1978 and 1979 of
printing Chaplain Palmer'a in-
vocations at state expense and
distributing copies to all mem-
bers of the body and the public.
Court action in the case, which
is known as Marsh v. Chambers,
was initiated in 1979 in a suit
brought by Ernest Chambers, a
Nebraska legislator, who asked
the U.S. District Court for Neb-
raska to prohibit the legislature
from continuing the practice of
opening each day's session with
Reverend Palmer's prayers.
He noted that as a non-Chris-
tian, he felt so uncomfortable
that he ordinarily absented him-
self from the chamber during the
invocation period. Moreover,
legislative leaders acknowledged
during court testimony that a
non-Christian has no chance of
being appointed chaplain in Neb-
raska.
THE DISTRICT Court agreed
with Chambers that it was un-
constitutional for the State of
Nebraska to pay the chaplain's
salary or publish his invocations.
But it held that the Constitution
did not prohibit a legislature
from opening its daily session
with a prayer.
Chambers and the Nebraska
legislature filed cross appeals
with the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the Eighth Circuit. The
appeals tribunal upheld the lower
court by ruling that the retention
of one chaplain over an extended
period and the printing of prayer
books at state expense contain-
ing only Reverend Palmer's
prayers violated the "Establish-
ment Clause" of the Constitu-
tion. But it refrained from ruling
on the more general question of
whether it was unconstitutional
for the legislature to open its ses
sions with a prayer.
JFSB leadership speaks:
Federation must ensure
future for 'Jewlshness'
By BEN SALTER
I welcome this opportunity to share with you
* me of my views and prospectives concerning
our Federation and its future.
We are one of 200 Federations representing
over 800 communities spread across the length
and breadth of our country, led by Jews from all
walks of life who are primarily committed to
Jewish survival. Almost 2'/t million individuals
make financial contributions and we mobilize
more than 200,000 volunteers to engage in fund-
raising, policy-making and direct services.
We have created a communal structure rooted
in Jewish values of mutual responsibility. Human
and financial resources are pooled and
organizations and institutions have been
established to deal with a broad range of needs
cultural, human and communal. We have
developed fund-raising mechanisms that are the
envy of our neighbors, and have tied them into a
system of services with the highest standards of
excellence that span the entire age spectrum. Our
concerns are national and global, as well as local.
What are some of these concerns?
On the local and domestic scene the scope is
ever-expanding:
We are concerned about our aging population
and, as you know, we have them in rapidly
growing numbers about their housing, then-
nutrition, their health; especially the quality of
their lives in their golden years.
We are concerned about our young people
not only in rearing them in their heritage as Jews
to give them roots and stability but in their
education, in their vocations, in their relatedness
to their families. We are worried about one-parent
families, and the special help they need to provide
a decent family life for their children.
But what may ultimately be our greatest
concern looms threateningly on the horizon. It
has become tragically apparent that the very
existence of the American Jewish Community
(the most materially secure and influential in the
world) is no longer a foregone conclusion.
America is a land of freedom and option.
We are welcome here but this blessing created a
fertile climate that bore a dangerous fruit. The
internal threats of assimilation and in-
termarriage, the erosion of traditional values and
family breakdown, have seriously affected the
ability of the Jewish Community in America to
survive as a distinct Jewish entity. And surely if
there is no Jewish community, there is no need for
Jewish Federations.
Thus, our Federation in the future must no
longer content itself with the provision of social
services and community organization. We must
do more than meet the needs of Jews; we must
meet their Jewish needs. We must ensure that
"Am Yisrael Chai," that the Jewish people lives,
and that it is a Jewish people aware of its roots,
steeped in its traditions and dedicated to its
values; Jewish people in which each individual
member feels a strong sense of identity and
belonging.
Through Jewish education, through outreach
to college students, singles and other potentially
Continued on Page 19
An end needed to G-d idolatry
GOD. God. God. God. God.
God. I've written it out loud, and
I'm glad. But to placate the
powers that be, I herewith give
equal time to the other: G-d. G-d.
Gd.G-d.Gd.Gd.
I am reminded of the foolish G-
d form by a letter to the editor in
the Sunday paper last week, in
which a Jewish community
agency executive referred to God
as G-d, and the paper equally
foolishly published it that way.
The explanation for this kind
of nonsense apparently is that
Jewish tradition enjoins us from
mentioning the name of God.
Hence, G-d. But since when is
God the name of God, or even G-
d the name of G-d?
IN THE first place, God may
be a proper noun, but it is not a
Hebrew proper noun. It comes
from the Old Teutonic, and in its
present form it derives from the
Old English masculine singular
word, "god" (transliterated), a
common noun.
It was the early Christians who
adopted the old Teutonic
I Leo
| Mimllin
S ^^^^" |
>:*:*:-:-:-:-x-:.:-:.:.:w^
masculine, "gutho" (translitera-
ted), into the masculine concord,
"god" (transliterated), as a
proper noun. Hence God.
But what has any of this to do
with Jewish theological ex-
perience or etymological or lin-
guistic practice? Absolutely
nothing, and so the elevation of
God to G-d is a sort of pagan idol
worship totally foreign to Jewish
history, culture, tradition and,
most important of all, Jewish
sensibility.
FOR JEWS to speak of God as
if, indeed, this were the name of
God, or G-d as if this were the
disguised name of G-d, is to
engage in a very real kind ot
heresy. It is to succumb to
Christian theological notions
which. I thought all along. Jews
have been committed for millenia
to refuse.
But there is an even more
important consideration against
talking about the name of God as
holy in any language at all. No
doubt Yehovah is germaine to the
Jewish experience, while God is
not. Yehovah is at least Hebrew.
It combines both the infinitive
and the future forms of the
Hebrew verb, "to be."
In this sense, Yehovah is light
years ahead of the names of other
gods in other cultures and other
civilizations because it is a theo-
logical assertion about the Jew-
ish view of God as becoming
rather than as being or existing
full-blown and perfect.
For Jews, their Yehovah is a
Divine presence constantly
reaching toward some future
perfection. He is a symbol for
man's own reaching, man's own
Continued on Page 23
|


Friday. February 4,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
1
To Israel!
15 days, 5 cities ... a bargain
Bus tourists meet IBeth
Day School
kids
Shalom
The last stop on the
Women's Division's
recent bus tour of agencies
supported by the Jewish
Federation of South
Broward undoubtedly
provided the most nachos.
Singing and praying in
Hebrew, the Beth Shalom
Day School first-graders,
under the direction of
Principal Leon Weissberg,
entertained the bus tour-
ists and then stopped to
chat with their audience.
So many Federation
veterans and newcomers
showed up for the tour, a
second bus had to be add-
ed. Visited were the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens, the
Southeastern Florida Hol-
ocaust Memorial Center
and the school (all bene-
ficiary agencies of JFSB).
Sherwin Rosenstein of
Jewish Family Service
and Delia Rosenberg, WD
Beach chairwoman, ad-
dressed the crowd. Chair-
woman Avis Sachs
reminded that the
Metropolitan-West?
Grandview Bus Tour is
ready to roll Wednesday,
Feb. 16. Call Lisa Ber-
nstein at the Federation
for details.
Fifteen leisurely days in the
Land of Our Forefathers, the
most comprehensive tour of Is-
rael available and all at a low, all-
inclusive UJA price.
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward. in conjunction
with United Jewish Appeal and
again under the leadership of Nat
Sedley, is sponsoring this once-
in-a-lifetime chance for "Spring
in Jerusalem."
From March 13-27. a total of
five cities are to be visited.
Travelers will spend three nights
in Tel Aviv, one night in Haifa,
two nights in Tiberias, six nights
in Jerusalem and one night at the
Dead Sea.
"But those who want to take
advantage of this bargain (a spe-
cial price of $2,395 per person,
double occupancy has been ar-
ranged) had better hurry," ac-
cording to Sedley.
The mission also includes five-
star hotels, three meals a day and
round-trip airfare from Holly-
wood-Fort Lauderdale Airport-
According to Sedley and Mis-
sions Chairman Joan Raticoff,
some of the other highlights in-
clude:
Attending a welcoming cere-
mony at a Youth Aliyah Village.
Having heart-to-heart talks
1%
n." nintn"ri"n"
ftprii)g Mjission
with Israeli officials and laymen.
Visiting Israeli Defense
Forces installations: finest in the
world.
Seeing Israels unique solar
energy ponds.
Ascending Masada on a sky-
lift or roughing it by snake path.
Delving through the
museum of the Diaspora: Beit
Hatfusoth.
"If all of the above whets your
appetite to spend spring in Is-
rael," mission leader Sedley says,
contact Suzy Briskin of Rae Bein
at the Federation, 921-8810.
An-nell
Hotel
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
3 Full Course Meals Dally
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.


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar ofGreater Hollywood
Metro Pacesetter chairmen set
Dr. Samuel and Linda Winn
and Dr. Murray and Li la Zadeck
have been appointed chairmen of
the 1983 Metropolitan Pacesetter
Dinner-Dance, according to Dr.
Saul Singer, UJA-Jewish
Federation of South Broward
Campaign chairman.
The annual event for families
contributing a total of SI,500
(SI,000 for husband and S500 for
wife) is to take place Feb. 20 at
Temple Beth Torah on North
Miami Beach.
Best-selling author Michael
Medved ('What Really Hap-
pened to the Class of '65," "The
Shadow Presidents," and "Hos-
pital") who is a long-time Jewish
activist and who donates all his
speaking engagement fees to
Jewish charities, will speak.
Dr. Winn has been an ophthal-
mologist in the Hollywood area
for 15 years; he has been active in
Jewish causes, locally, for about
the same time.
Linda Winn, an art consultant
and dealer, has been a board
. member of Jewish Family Service
(a Federation agency) for six
years; has served on numerous
Jewish Community Centers of
South Broward committees
(another Federation agency) and
is active in Federation's Jewish
Family Life in the '80s.
In addition, Mrs. Winn is a
member of the Business and Pro-
fessional Women's Network,
Women's Division of Federation.
The Winns. who have two sons,
Peter. 15. and Andrew, 11, par-
ticipated in the 1979 Community
Mission.
The Winns are keenly involved
in Soviet Jewry.
The Winn's co-chairmen, the
If
a
M
Pacesetter Chairmen Dr. Samuel and Linda Winn .
campaign
cups 8?
Zedecks. also are long-time
Federation activists. They were
members and fundraisers for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion for years before moving to
Broward.
Murray Zedeck has been an
osteopathic physician for 20
years, serving as president of the
Dade County Osteopathic Asso-
ciation. He is past chief of staff of
the Southeast Medical Center on
North Miami Beach.
In addition to their UJA-
Federation activities, the
Zedecks raise funds for United
Way.
Lila Zedeck is active in Sabra
Hadassah. OUT, Brandeis
Women and the National Council
of Jewish Women. The Zedecks
are members of Temple Beth
Torah. where the Pacesetters
event is to take place.
The Zedecks have three chil-
dren: Karen, 20, David, 18, and
Sheryl, 15.
BEACH PACESETTER The 1983 United Jewish Appeal
Jewish Federation of South Broward High-Rise Pacesetter
Brunch with the theme of Chai, To Life' is to take place
Sunday, Feb. 6, at 11 a.m. at the Sheraton Bal Harbour, 9701
Collins Ave., Miami Beach. According to Chairman Otto
Stieber, the Sl.OOO-minhnum-gift brunch will give residents of
South Ocean Drive, Golden Isles Drive and Three Islands an
opportunity to hear and meet journalist David Schoenbrun.

DOIT
FQR ISRAEL
BY DONG IT
IN ISRAEL
Have a swim in (he cool Mediterranean.
Take a hike up breathtaking Masada
Or enjoy a delicious dinner
overlooking ancient Jerusalem
This year, do it in Israel
Because now more than ever,
when you do it in Israel, you'll be doing it for Israel, too
You'll be having more than the best vacation ever
You'll be showing Israel you love her
when she needs it most
So this year,
take that special vacation in Israel.
For Israel And for you.
And Dr. Murray and Lila Zedeck
aoRow
The delicious, nutritious Nosh's Ark
of pasta-shaped animals kids love!
Moms and kids go 'or Zooroni two by two! Kids think Zooroni
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vitamin-
ennched pasta simmered in lots ot yummy tomato sauce and
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it. too!
ISRAa.RIOiTNOvV
*****J-'.*J*++iA**/'AJ>J>AJVUl


.r\ i ,\ *** .vrr i.
- 4*
Friday, February 4, 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
AH Sunday, Feb. 13
Delia Rosenberg
Rosenberg
appointed
Chavarut
leader
'>
,
*
Delia Rosenberg, who has her
fingers in numerous Jewish phil-
anthropic pies, will serve as the
Women's Division, Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward, 1983
chairwoman of the Chavarut
luncheon.
In making the announcement,
Evelyn Stieber, 1983 Campaign
vice president, pointed out Chav-
arut was established two years
ago as the major Women's Divi-
sion event for the Beach area.
The 1983 Chavarut luncheon is
to be Monday, March 7, at the
Eden Roc on Miami Beach. Mid-
dle East expert J. Frederic Blit-
| stein will address the audience.
Mrs. Rosenberg's accomplish-
ments for Federation include
l>eing chairwoman of La Mer;
three years as vice president
campaign; being Beach chair-
woman, and numerous assign-
ments for Community Day, Mei-
rah. Big Gifts and the Retreat.
When not busy with Federa-
tion, she's active in Deborah,
Hadassah, B'nai B'rith, ORT, the
Florida Regional Campaign
Cabinet and the state Women's
Division's League Conference.
She and her husband, Jerome,
have two children, Harriet and
Mitchell.
Hollybrook
fetes Steins
Dr. Joseph and Sylvia Stein
will be honored at the Hollybrook
1983 United Jewish Appeal-Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward
Annual Dinner Sunday, Feb. 6,
at Temple Beth Torah, N. Miami
Beach.
According to Chairman Harry
("oldstein and Co-Chairman Dr.
Harold Goldberg, the minimum
commitment (*250| dinner for the
benefit of UJA-Federation wUl
feature journalist David Schoen-
brun, who has been reporting
Mideast events since before there
was a modern State of Israel.
The Steins, most active is
UJA-Federation in Hollybrook,
are members of Temple Beth
Shalom. He is past campaign
chairman at Hollybrook and is a
current Big Gifts co-chairman.
For three years Mrs. Stein has
served as co-chairman of the Hol-
lybrook Dinner.
The Hollybrook Division affair
begins at 6:30, according to Din-
ner Chairmen Ruth Goldberg and
Lillian Weil.
On campaign trail CAMPAIGN
Upcoming events sponsored by the United Jewish Appeal-Jewish
Federation of South Broward, in behalf of the 1983 Campaign, include
breakfasts all on Sunday, Feb. 13 at the following locations:
DeSoto Park residents will breakfast with Israel Amitai, a Sabra
who is a television producer and director, an author, lecturer and
journalist. DeSoto Park resident Claire Bemhang, according to
Chairman Ruth and Lawrence Nathan, wUl be honored.
Co-chairmen are Carl Rosenkopf and Harris A. Herman: Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Lupu are to be hosts. Breakfast begins at 10 a.m.
Presidential Towers, under the chairmanship of Alex Goldberger.
will breakfast with Jerome Gleekel, an authority on Israel, beginning
at 10:30 a.m.
Hemispheres residents also will hear Gleekel, according to
Chairman Molly Roth. The breakfast there is to start at 10 a.m.
Also at 10 a.m., residents of Quadomain will witness a production
by the Habima Players, courtesy of UJA-Federation. Chairman of the
effort there is Sam Staff.
Park Place residents will begin there breakfast at 11 a.m., ac-
cording to Chairmen Ted Hodes, Harold Gluck, Lou Fine and Lou
ft clips 85
Singer. Guest speaker will be Henry Levy, former director for HIAS
and previously in charge of the Joint Distribution Committee's Latin
American operation. There is a $100 minimum commitment to the
1983 UJA-Federation Campaign.
At 4 p.m., residents of Golden View will gather to hear Israel
Amitai, according to Chairman Wilhelm Meister.
And, on Thursday, Feb. 17, residents of Fairway Apartments will
meet for a complimentary reception in honor of Dorothy Lenz and
Bernice Fields.
According to Chairman Albert J. Schiro, the event, which will begin
at 2:30 p.m., is to feature Israel expert Jerome Gleekel. Co-chairman is
Dorothy Lenz.
Hmtor
ttra
Jewish survival depends on
your cash.
We urge you to pay your pledge to the
UJA-Federation Campaign NOW.
You make the difference.
Cash Collection Committee
(jSh Jewish Federation of South Broward
V [V 2719 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Florida 33020 Phone: 305/921-8810


Pace 6
Page 8
TAe Jewi*/. Floridian and Shofar of Ortattr Hollywood
Friday, February 4,1953
Philanthropic Fund
a boon ail around
This is another in a series of articles about members of the
South Broward Jewish community who have created philan-
thropic funds in the Legacy and Endowment Fund of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward For more information, please
contact the Federation at 921-8810.
By MICHAEL J. MOSKOWITZ
Federation Staff
It was the end of 1982. Da-
vid and Frieda Geller needed
a tax deduction. They had a
certain stock that was not
vital to them. In talking with
friends, the Gellers learned
about Jewish Federation of
South B reward's Philan-
thropic Fund.
The Philanthropic Fund
allows a donor to suggest a
specific use for his or her
charitable dollar and simul-
taneously obtain maximum
tax deductions.
The Gellers acted quickly.
They opened the Geller
Philanthropic Fund, con-
tributed the stock and ob-
tained a full fair' market
value tax deduction (or their
contribution.
Are the Gellers extra-
ordinarily wealthv and-or
charitable? Frieda Geller
laughs heartily to such a
question and offers a
resounding'"no."
Frieda and David Geller
grew up in Brooklyn, in
modest homes. Mrs. Geller
recounts that her father was
the type of individual "who
would give you his last
nickel."
David Geller was educated
as an attorney, at New York
University. He later formed
David Geller and Associates,
a prominent Manhattan
publishing-advertising busi-
ness.
Mrs. Geller has been
active in Hadassah and UJA
on Long Island. Geller has
served on the board of the
South Nassau Community
Hospital and as past presi-
dent of the Baldwin Jewish
Hospital.
David and Frieda Geller
About seven years ago.
the Gellers began spending
half of the year in Hillcrest.
where they are avid golfers.
Locally, the Gellers feel a
special affection in their
hearts for the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens.
Asked about the Holly-
wood Jewish community.
Mrs. Geller replied:
"I feel that the focal point
of American Jewish life is
shifting from the Northeast,
where I grew up and lived, to
this area for young and
old alike. This is why we
established our Philan-
thropic Fund."
FENSTERSHEIB & TEMKIN
Attorney At Law
Free initial consultation
wills & trusts
probate
personal Injury
at 1801 S. Ocean Dr
Suite 100
HallandaieBch.
taxation
real estate
general civil & domestic
456-2488
PASSOVER
Deauville
Flnr.rt. Warmth With HOTEL MMur. ate*.
Florida Wirmth With
Gncious Hospitality
H0CHD0RF FAMILY
& MEHL FAMILY
In Association With The
BERKOWITZ FAMILY aT blah
l(T TMC CO**
KOSHER FOR
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10 DAYS 4 SUMMITS
Bt. With "inner
Sunday March 27
To April 5 After Dinner
900 King size AccsMtaUeM Wifltiprtnj Mac* 2 Paris
PeeitiCe ChUOsn 1 Atct Hmki On Prtmite Tawii Dancing
(niartainmtnl A Shawl Oaliciaus 6LATT KOSftf Cumne
Tea Asa* i Cecklatl Parties SEOURIM Services Will at
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For Complete Information Call
1-865-8511
Evenings A Week-Ends Call 1 -673-8133
On The Ocean at 67th St. Miami Beach. .
Baum at Middle East Forum
Reagan team 'undid'
remnants of Camp David
The Reagan administration
purposely has thrown a monkey
wrench into what was left of the
Camp David Accords, Phil
Baum. associate executive
director of the American Jewish
Congress, told South Broward
residents at the second Middle
East Forum.
He said there is a great deal of
confusion and uncertainty in the
Jewish community regarding
Reagan's proposals, his overall
strategy and his underlying mes-
sages.
Speaking at Temple-in-the-
Pines. the Community Relations
Committee, Jewish Federation of
South Broward. audience heard
Baum expound on Reagan going
far beyond Camp David in the
president's words to the world.
Baum said that according to
Camp David, which had been con-
sidered a contract for peace that
was not supposed to be deviated
from or superseded, two issues
never should have been proposed
publicly:
Opening Jerusalem to nego-
tiation.
Questioning the right of Is-
raelis to Judea and Sumaria. re-
garding the Palestinian issue of
autonomy.
Baum said that the genius of
Camp David was that it allowed
the parties involved to learn to
accommodate each other and live
together, using a five-year period
to decide the autonomy of the
West Bank.
He said the United States as a
mediator had a right to present
proposals but not to the public
as Keagan did Sept. 1.
Baum said none of the major
political parties in Israel have
recommended Reagan's peace
proposals. He added that Reagan
broke a seven-year agreement be-
tween the United States and Is-
rael, stating that agreement must
be reached before either party
went public on a policy.
Asked about the Begin gov-
ernment. Baum said that he. per-
sonally, is a problem to the Israe-
lis. He said he believes that the
Reagan proposals were created
and announced to cause woe for
the Begin regime.
The ceremonious visit by Israel
President Navron to Washington
also was timed to make Begin
Phil Baum speaking
Temple-hvthe-Pine8.
at
look bad. Baum told the South
Broward audience.
On the 1982 election in the
United States, the American
Jewish Congress executive said
that the overall picture is a good
one. There now are more Jews
than ever in the U.S. House and
Senate.
Baum said there were no major
anti-Semitic attacks during the
campaigns nationwide, and that
the Moral Majority did not have
any effect of the election results.
On arms sales to Jordan
which he said probably would de-
velop into a major fight in the
House and Senate Baum pre-
dicted the American Jewish com-
munity would lose out to power-
ful arms dealers.
On U.S. Secretary of State
George Shultz, Baum expressed
confidence. The secretary's back
ground with the Bechtel Corp.
unlike many other observers
has not had any effect on Shultz s
decisions, Baum believes.
He called Shultz very forceful,
but did admit that Reagan's
Mideast proposals probably were
the brainchild of Shultz.
Baum said that Jewish com-
munities across the nation can
disagree with Begin and his ad
ministration, but they must re-
member that to go on national
television or to speak to newspa
pers and condemn Begin will not
serve Israel or its allies.
Baum closed with the hope
that if in fact the Palestinian
Liberation Organization does
change its view of Israel, there is
room for negotiation.
PASSOVER PACKAGES FOR
OUR SOUTH FLORIDA FRIENDS
11 Days-10 Nights
March27April6
From
$650.
Per Person
Double
Occupancy
Includes Room And Meals
At Waldman Hotel

Holiday Services Conducted
By
Cantor Rueven Blum
10 Days-9 Nights
March 28-April 6
'575.
Pet Person
Double
Occupancy
*850. Sin0le
Room At Adjacent Atlantic
Towers Hotel-Meals At
Waldman
Miami Beach's Finest Glatt
Kosher Cuisine Included
Eery Oceanlront Feciliiy
' Deity Reiigioui Service*
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1 Full Enterteinment Program
I Sedurlm and Holiday Service!
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PHONE: 538-5731
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It's cheaper to ship your car via
trans Auto and fly... than it is to drive! *
FLORIDA AUTO TRAIN
Florida Reservations: 1-800-432-9989
National Reservations 1-800-327-5353
Oriandq 1305-628-9797 New Jersey 1-202-589^426
See your Travel Agent
mi mi ii m n n iin
at^aa
J&*U~&-*>


Friday, February 4,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
Jcc
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
2838HCX.LYWOOOBl.VD HOLLYWOOO. FLORIDA 33020
JCC hires director
of membership-PR
,
Beverly Marshall
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Broward announces
the hiring of a part-time member-
ship and public relations director.
"My main job is public speak-
ing," the newest JCC worker,
Beverly Marshall, says. She will
be available to speak about the
JCC to any group interested.
THE FAMILY JACOBS

Mrs. Marshall, a graduate of
the University of Miami, major-
ing in speech and drama, is a
teacher who is still employed by
the Dade County School System.
She lectures for Dade on
current events, book reviews and
on various topics related to psy-
chology. In addition, she has
served as adult education pro-
gram coordinator in Dade.
She and her husband, Arthur,
have two children, Michael and
Beth, and live in Pembroke
Pines.
Asked what her main role will
be at the JCC, Mrs. Marshall re-
sponded:
"There are hundreds, maybe
even thousands of South Brow-
ard people out there seeking the
JCC; the JCC is seeking hund-
reds, maybe thousands of South
Broward residents. My job?
"Get them together."
Daze right
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Broward announces
a special benefit performance of
the Beth Shalom Players
"Broadway Daze" on Sunday,
March 6, at 7 p.m.
The show will be at the Holly-
iwood Hills High School and the
cost is S10. Seats are reserved.
For more information, call
Dene at 921-6511.
OCEANFRONT
BOARDWALK
25th A COLLINS
MIAMI BEACH. FLA. 33139
KOSHER Om" >u MM
PASSOVER
'to Days* 11 Nites
March 27
to April 6
3 Meals Daily
s625. Per Person
Dbl. Occ.
CALL 1-538-5721

Fitness class
The JCC at 2838 Hollywood
Blvd. will be offering Dance Fit-
ness with Keri Lynn Fair on Fri-
day mornings at 9:30-10:30
starting Feb. 25 at the center.
The class includes a complete
workout, cardiovascular training
and simple dance routines
suitable for all ages.
Special introductory offer
eight weeks for $25 for members
and $30 for non-members.
/,
IM/VN05
3-6 PM Daily Specials
SIRLOIN STEAK, FILET OF SOLE, T-BONE,
BBQ CHICKEN, FILET MIGNON, Plus I more en-
trees, with oup, salad, potato, garlic bread, coffee or Iced tea.
4.95 to 5.95
Grace & Camille Romano
Members of B'nai B'rith & Beth David Synagogue
Are Delighted With the Wonderful Welcome You Gave Us
In Our New Jewish Community.
We Will Be Happy to Greet You Personally
11850 N. SL Rd. 7 (441), Hollywood, Fl. 33024 !
So. of Shecldan-981 9585 |
. AND ALL ISRAEL DANCED ... with all their might with songs, lyres, harp., tim-
brels cymbals mid trumpet. (I Chronicles). Paying tribute thi. year to Yom Ha'atZmaut
Israel. Independence Day), this Jewish Music Season poster signal, an 11-week celebration.
H^Lin Hollywood. From 10 a.m. to 4 pan., South Broward residents Jew and Gentile alike will
view art display, hear and see entertainment and relwh in culinary delights. Watch for more
*s^'r^ "to get fa,vo,wd' cont*ct c jewkh ~.*<**" <"
S*H*aB
w
GREEK
FESTIVAL
, 1111 -1111
(under the Big Tent rain or shine)
------FREE ADMISSION------
February 4-5-6, 1983
Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m. to midnight / Sun. 12 noon to 11:00 p.m.
MS* AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING
Music. Creek & American Dance Band Shish Kabab .
Grecian Chicken ... Loukomades and variety of Greek Pastries .
Gyros Hot Dogs Feta Cheese Game Booths
VAUTHENTIC GREEK TAVERNA / GREEK COFFEE
Ul
Food Entertmnment Fun
TO BE HELD AT
Saint George Greek Orthodox Church
425 North 58th Avenue, Hollywood. Florida 33024



l_ r___j_i
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 4,1983
'Silent no more'
Not all Russia anti-Jewish,
.'
Soviet Jewry update S. Broward travelers say
EFIM SOLOVEICHIK of
Kharkov has been given a "final
refusal;" as were MIKHAIL
KONSON and LAZAR KAZ-
AKEVICH both of Lenigrad.
Reports from Bendery in Mol-
davia indicate that the OVIR of-
fice is virtually closed. There are
neither "permissions" being
granted or new applications re-
ceived.
SI MON SHNIRM AN of Kerch
who as we reported is under
threat of imminent arrest because
of his second refusal to be con-
scripted (he has already served
2Vi years in prison) has in the '
meantime received a further
"refusal."
It has been learned this week
that Shnirman has been mar-
ried for some time and that his
wife is in her seventh month of
pregnancy.
At the end of last year DR.
VICTOR BRAILOVSKY was in
formed by the authorities that
they rejected his request for re-
mission of his sentence for good
behavior.
Brailovsky was arrested in No-
vember 1981 and was later sen-
tenced to five years exile for de
faming the Soviet state.
The U.S. Edition of the 1982
Guinness Book of Records con-
tains the following entry on page
388:
Most Patient Refusenik. The
USSR citizen who has waited
longest for an exit visa is Beny-
arain Bogomolny. He waa born
on the 7th April 1946. He first
applied for his exit visa in 1966.
UPDATE:
The KGB visited LEONID
BRAILOVSKY in an investiga
tion to determine whether his
father, VICTOR, should be re-
leased from prison ahead of
schedule. Leonid was told, "Peo-
ple who recant their crimes and
reform are entitled to early re-
lease. Your father has not done so
and therefore he is not entitled to
early release."
POC VLADIMIR TSUKER-
MAN was to meet with his par-
ents Jan. 10-13.
Fifteen-year-old EMMA
SHIFRIN was recently threat-
ened with arrest by KGB officers,
who accused her of "spreading
propaganda." Soviet official hf .-
assment seemingly has no limits.
POC VLADIMIR YEL-
CHIN, who was sentenced to five
years in labor camp for "defam-
ing the Soviet state" in May
1982, has been denied correspon-
dence for the next two years.
POC LEV SHEFER, sentenced
at the same time on a similar
charge, was beaten up in his labor
camp.
Seventeen-year-old SASHA
KREMEN was recently arrested
under Article 146 of the Soviet
Criminal Code, "assault with the
attempt to commit robbery."
This charge carries the sentence
of three to six years. His father
MIKHAIL fears that the photo-
graphic equipment which was
confiscated from his apartment
will be used against Sasha as
evidence of smuggling.
FELIKS KOCHUBIEV-
SKY's appeal was supposed to
have been heard at the court in
Moscow Jan. 10.
Fifteen more refuseniks in
Moscow were called to the OVIR
and were given "life refusals,"
according to the decision of the
Interior Ministry. Among them
are YURI ILIN-ADAYEV and
ISSAK KAIZLIN.
The following note was writ-
ten by YURI TARNOPOLSKY
after he ended his unsuccessful
40-day hunger strike which he
undertook in the hope of winning
permission for him and his family
to emigrate.
"... I thank you and all other
people who are struggling for our
freedom ... I am all right. I
didn't want to harm myself
though I admitted that possi-
bility. I didn't want to trouble
my friends. I simply couldn't live |
without protesting this outrage. (l
Twenty-two-year-old KAREN
KHACHATURYAN, the son of
refusenik ARMEN of Moscow,
was expelled from his fourth year
of studies at the Physical De-
partment of Moscow University.
"Our family is even ready to
wait permission for emigration
for some time" the father
pleads "if the authorities allow
at least our son to leave the coun-
try to join my wife's sister in
Israel to continue his education."
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHTAND SOLD
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Israel Securities

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naso Corporation Toll Free (800) 221 4838|
The practice of Judaism of-
ficially is received with a wide
range of difference in the Soviet
Union, according to Dr. Samuel
and Linda Winn and Dr. Robert
and Evelyn Glasser, who spent
two weeks there.
Reporting last week to the So-
viet Jewry Committee of the
Community Relations Committee
(CRC), Jewish Federation of
South Broward, the local doctors
and their wives were part of a
medical group of 60 physicians
visiting the USSR.
The Jewish practices and
status of refuseniks varies from
community to community in
Russia, they said. Where in Mos-
cow refuseniks cannot study
Judaism openly, and are greatly
harassed, in Central Asia Jews do
seem to be able to be Jews
without real threat or harm.
The Winns and Glassers
visited Moscow, Leningrad,
Tashkent, Samarkand and Dou-
chanbe in their 14 days in the So-
viet Union. Nine of those 14 days
were used to try to make contact
with refuseniks.
Calling the resisters of Com-
munist authority heroes, the
doctors and their wives urged
every Jew to journey to Russia, if
possible.
For three days in Moscow, the
Winns and Glassers met with re-
fuseniks. One of the Russian
Dr. Samuel and Linda Winn, Dr. Robert and Evelyn Glasser
I right).
families had a child who had been
twinned with a nephew of the
Winns.
In twinning, the Jewish child
in the free nation speaks his haf-
torah during his bar mitzvah for
the child in a country behind the
Iron Curtain.
One interesting note the South
Broward travelers made was that
refuseniks have no knowledge of
what other refuseniks are doing.
There is little or no coordination.
' LIMITED EII6 AGE
Mft.MrtUll
UVIU AND (OKU HIOOUCTKMt
n wrttt KOMQ4A THf ATRI Prm
Marion Salter
Post Haste Shopping Canter
4S2S Sheridan St.. Hollywood, Fla
Phone 961 6998
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WsWTMCTHr:
'HOTIl *MtC
Ift Easy to Feel Like a MKon
Without Spendng a Dime
At first glance, its just a living room
fiHed with Unftfl* Or maybe its
a oarage filled with tools. Oractoeet
tilled with clothes.
It might not be worth much to you,
but to m *s worth mttons, its worth
medicine and medical suppaes tor
Indigent residents of trte'Miami Jewish
Home and Hospsai lor the Aged
Everything you donate to the
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is
tax-deductible Of course, we wi be
glad to pick up your merchandise at
your convenience. A licensed
appraiser is available upon request.
Call the Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops when you re-decorate your
home, clean out your garage and
straighten up your closets.
Its that easy. And you'll feel like a
million without spending a dime.
' r"1
(N.
ndS.PslmBoch)
5713 N.W. 27th Awe.
5O0N.E.79thSt.
3149 HeJandale Beach Blvd.
Irving Cypan. Chairman o the Board
Harold Beck, President
Aaron Kravitt. Chairman, Thrift Shop
Committee
Fred D. Hirt. Executive Director


Friday, February 4,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page II
Publix
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Select a single mug color for a coordinated
tablesetting. Or mix and match the
multiple mug colors for a bold look.
Oven-to-table convenience
Dishwasher, freezer and oven-safe
Microwave oven-safe
NINE FASHION COLORS Mug holds a full 12 ounces
Mix and Match These 3 Fashion Color Groups.
Warm Earth Cool Blues Painted Desert
Beige Ice Gray Cranberry
Chocolate Sky Blue Ulac
Butterscotch Royal Blue Dusty Rose
Plate is 9W
Bowl is an
oversized 7V2"
where shopping is o pleasure Publix


n. a
ti. r___j-i
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 4,1963
Something's
in our
Pantry!.
ONLY AT
A
mti^.
EIGHT
O'CLOCK
BEAN

cPiIde
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD
THURS.. FEB. 3WED., FEB. 9, 1983
^v^
s
Join us for a cup of fresh
8 O'clock Coffee every Sunday
as you shop. And it's all Free,
of course! (With donut.) From
ry 8a.m.11 a.m. every Sunday.
'(coffee is shown in a cup from the beautiful
Stoneware ColecOon 'Sweet Flowers')
Fresh ground coffee!
Americans have been enjoying famous Eight O'clock whole
bean coffee for over 100 years. It is most unique because it
is packaged fresh daily, is roasted, dated and promptly
shipped to your grocer. It is freshly ground to order at time
of purchase. D'licious.
Now! Exclusively at Pantry Pride!
Meflo, rich and always fresh!
Something else is perking at Pantry Pride!
Keep in ccvered
container in your
refrigerator.
Dishes
Enjoy that defidous first
Cup of Eight Ododc Coffee
out of a beautiful brand
new cup of your own!

ONiy

49*
i-JE&JP-ACE
SEITTNG!
32 pieces for only $3.92
4 piece place setfrigs in your choice of
Cup, Saucer and Dessert Dan.
(See detail! in atora.)


Friday, Febmmry 4.1963
_M*.
The Jewish Ftoridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Page 13
%
wont
[here's no chicken Ike chicken fresh
from our Rantry. We buy only the best
to give you, our customers, only the best
Our chickens are always fresh. That
means Florida fresh and shipped to you
that way-packed in ice. Pantry Pride
chickens are always shipped this way.
Premium shippBTg means a premium
taste, but never a premium price.
They look good and taste so good! They
cook up juicy and tender with lots of white
meat! Whether you boil, broil, bar-b-q, fry
or roastyou're going to love our chicken.
They're fresh from our Pantry.
our
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
(3 BREAST QUARTERS WITH BACKS,
3 LEG QUARTERS WITH BACKS,
3 QIBLET PACKAGES)
WHOLE FRYING
ni.ua
FLORIDA CW SHIPPED
PREMIUM FRESH
(LIMIT TWO. PLEASE)
LB
49*
FLA Ofl SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer Breast Quarters
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
(THIGHS BREASTS DRUMSTICKS!
Fryer Combo.........
FLA OR SUPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer Thighs.........
WHOLE CUT-UP
FRYING
CMofcmB>Mst'
MSmStSmdBSEm
SKMIESS LB
I 1 a
FLORIDA OH SHIPPE 0
PREMIUM FRESH
FRYER LEG
QUARTERS
* l> 13
FLORKM OR SHIPPED
PREMIUM FRESH
59*
49*
SSo&.Ltaem
cPtIde
B .59
w
L..89
6PAK 12-OZ CANS
2.49 Miller s"19
M Lite Beer 4& *&**
99 GOLDEN
t79 Ripe 9*2t
Bananas lb fail
PANTRY PRIDE
All Beef t%Ckt
Franks 1&G2 *J*J
PANTRY PRIDE HOT DOG BUNS 3 PKGS. OFIFORtl.OO
PRICES EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 3-FEBRUARY 9. 1993


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 4.1983


NORTON
SINCE 1SS4-

SAfETT
HUTCH

/

r'yw
is vj
IP-METRIC TUBELESS
'X' WHITEWALLS
SIZE
PRICE F.E.T.
P155/80R13 39.84 150 145x13 36.26 163
P165/80R13 44.70 164 155x13 41.39 1-42 size I price If.eI
P185/75R14 59.55 2.00 165x13 46.45 1 55
P195/75R14 62.53 2.13 175x14 53.18 208
P205/75R14 70.73 234 185x14 57.35 215
P215/75R14 73.66 249 165x15 51.36 172
P205/75R15 71.95 2.44 165/70-13 44.76 155
P215/75R15 74.98 2.59 175/70-13 49.93 166
P225/75R15 77.48 2.74 185/70-13 55.24 178
%*">":&&
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
PERFORMANCE PACKAGE
4TRXRADIALS
& 4 MAG WHEELS
190/65-390 or 220/55-390
CALL US TO SEE IF IT FITS ON
YOUR PARTICULAR CAR
P235/75R15 86.81 2.96 185/70-14 58.94 1 99 SPECIAL LOW PRICE
PRICE F.E.T.
XVS
TUBELESS
BLACKWALLv
195/70-14
81 .85 2.27
205/70-14
87.33 2.40
RADIAL BLACKWALLS
>\ .
165/70-365 77.08 1.7S
220/55-390
WHITE
180/65-390 90.30 I'M
190/65-390 99.91 2.09
102.39 2 26
XCA
LIGHT TRUCK
TUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
700x15
___*___
750x16
___j&___
800x16.5
op*_____
875x16.5
950x16.5
aP'Y_____
10x16.5
Bp'r
PRICE F.E.T
73.81 2 97
87.914.15
90.65 3 79
98.104 55
111.95495
116.664 76
iFGoodrich
BELTED CLM
P-METRIC POLYESTER CORD
FIBERGLASS BELT WHITES
SIZE
P155/80B12 31.49 149
P155/80B13 31.97 144
P165/80B13 33.81 150
P175/80B13 35.75 163
P185/80B13 37.93 169
P175/75B14 38.79
P185/75B14 39.88
Jfi
P195/75B14 41.82 195
&
wen
P225/75B15
P235/75B15
PRICE
P205/75B14 42.92 2.07
P215/75B14 44.25 2.20
P225/75B14 46.57 2-35
P155/80B15 35.75 168
P165/80B15 37.44 183
P205/75B15 44.14 2.15
P215/75B15 45.60 2.34
47.78
50.10
F.E.T.
1.70
1.79
2.46
2.65
UFESAVER XLM
STEEL BELTED RADIALS
SIZE SALE PRICE F.E.T
P155/80R13 45.04 1.53
P165/80R13 46.86 1.69
P175/80R13 48.57 178
P185/80R13 49.85 1.92
P195/70R13 50.82 1.98
P205/70RDISCONTINU EDH
P205/70R14 56.92 2.23
P175/75R14 47.50 1.83
P185/75R14 52.32 2.04
P195/75R14 56.92 2.18
P205/75R14 59.37 2.34
P215/75R14 60.45 2.48
P225/75R14 64.62 2.68
P195/75R15 59.70 2.33
P205/75R15 61.73 2.47
P215/75R15 64.09 2.59
P225/75R15 66.44 2.78
P235/75R15 71.26 3.01
WE
E NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
NORTON
-SlMCE 1924-
TIRE C
MRTf|
kMMf MASTER CARD VISA
AMERICAN EXPRESS.
0MER S CLUS
CORAL GABLES
Bird A Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N.W. 7th Aw. 681-8541
-NIHAHiBEACH
1700NE. 163rdSt 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH DADE
9001 S OixwHwy 667-7575
CUTLER RIOGE
20390 S Dixie Hwy 233-5241
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 49tiSt 622-2500
MUM- AIRPORT
N W 25 St t mm Oairy Rd 593-1191
WEST MUM
Btrd t GaHoway Rds 552 6656
K0KMU. DR./WGATE SOU ARE
13672 S.W SStfi St 367-0128
'HOMESTEAD
30100 S Fad.nl Hwy 247-1622
t*W. HOLLYWOOD
497 S State Rd 967 0450
?OAVMSI Rd 64,ust3t
OADE: Export/Wholesale
82A.
1666 NW 82*ve 593-7040
t *FT. LAUOEROALE
1740 E Sunns* Blvd 463-7568
PLANTATION
381 N Stale Rd 7 587 2186
TAMARAC
441 A W. Commercial Brvd 735-2772
'TAMARAC
N UnrwrMy Or A McNati Rd 721-4700
**OMPANO BEACH
3151 N. Federal Hwy 943-4200
WEST PALM BEACH
515 South Done 632-3044
of Unrwrsrty Or 473-4700
LAKE PARK/N PALM BEACH
532-N Lake Blvd 848-2544
f DCERP1ELO BEACH
2265 W HMsboro Blvd 427-8800
t 2604 South 4th SI 464-8020
VERO BEACH
755 21st Strut 567-1174
?DAYTONA BEACH
907 Volusia Aw 255-7487
'NAPLES
20S5E.lMmlTr. 774-4443

&
|
*~


w.
%y, February 4,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
w
Jg'-{
7
Bl .
Jm
sf
FAIRWAYS ROY ALE Guest of honor Helen Waterman is
surrounded by two of her favorite people, Murray Cudrin (left)
and Erwin Gold, as residents of Fairway s Royale pay tribute to
her at the annual UJ A Jewish Federation of South Broward
fund-raising breakfast.
Protestant feels 'shame'
^PRESENTED Residents of 50 Hollywood and Hallandale Beach buildings were
fcsented at the recent U J A Jewish Federation of South Broward Low-Rise Breakfast at the
day Inn. Pictured here (standing, left to right) are Dr. William Feder of Oxford Towers;
iDan Pollin and Joe Reiss, co-chairmen of the event. Seated from left are Phil Olender,
nan; Sumner G. Kaye, JFSB executive director; and Israel expert Akiva Baum.
With G.Washington's"Seasoning
and Broth they'll never say
'Fen' to your flanken!
G. WASHINGTON'S
RICH BROWN FLANKEN L
For t more llavorful flanken, mix
in G. Washington's Rich Brown
Seasoning and Broth when you
add the water and vegetables to
the meat G Washington's Sea-
soning and Broth is more than a
flavor enhancer. N's a complete
seasoning. The special Mend of
herbs and spices flavors your
flanken in more ways than one.
And it does wonders for your
stock, too! With G Washing-
ton's they'll never say 'feh' -
they'll say'more!'
iCmmtKotlmMtnm
TORONTO (JTA) -
The head of Canada's larg-
est Protestant denomina-
tion has expressed his
shame at the spectacle of
"Christians" perpetrating
"a pogrom" in the Shatila
and Sabra refugee camps in
west Beirut.
In a sermon delivered in Acron,
Ontario, the Rev. Clarke Mac-
Donald, recently elected
Moderator of the United Church
of Canada, declared: "The elo-
quent, almost total silence on the
part of the Christian community
in Canada regarding events in the
Middle East, especially the mas-
sacres which took place at Shatila
and Sabra, speaks volumes. As
one of the leaders in that com-
munity, I admit complicity in
this silence, although I would re-
ject the notion that it is a con-
spiracy of silence."
4 pounds Hank steak
2 tablespoons shortening
IVi quarts boiling water
3 packets G Washington i
Rica Brown Seasoning and Broth
Lightly brown flank steak in shortening, dram. Add remaining ingredients;
stir Cover and cook for 2 hours over low heat, or until flank is tender.
Strain stock, set aside as soup Slice the meat. Serves 6 to 8.
6 whole peppercorns
3 stalks celery
3 sprigs parsley
2 carrots
FIYFREE
SAN JUAN
ind see more of the Caribbean on Costa's
ICarla C, World Renaissance & Daphne.
I We can show you how free and easy it is to spend 7 days sailing
p Caribbean on a Costa Cruise You'll sail from San Juan in the
lart of the Caribbean so you ll see more portsup to a port a day.
I"i to Caracas. St Maarten. Guadeloupe. Barbados St Lucia.
1'igua and St Thomas among others
[Combine any two 7-day cruises lor a luxurious 14-day vacation.
Id visit up to 12 ports at a special low price.
I Ask us about our special fall offers Good space is still available
J Christmas and New Year s sailings
I Call and let us help you select the Costa cruise that s right for you
PHOH
'P****^*^ occupancy "joana-trip oftar ^r *a(\C-
""iBltaa-aakaaaaonand holiday prioM w / M TOO
ttlyNghar

BETAR CAMP TOUR IN ISRAEL
Offers you the summer of your
Ifetime for teenagers 14-18
Spend SIX EXCITING WEEKS in ISRAEL
For two weeks, live work and experience
the unique Moahav way of Sfe.
For four weeks tour the entire country
from the Golan Heights to Exat
Discover anew the beauty of
Eretx Israel and the charm
of Jerusalem.
Visit a secret air force bate
and meet lereoe paoti.
Hear poetical briefinpa from
members of the Knesset
and ministers in the government.
sV!i. $1,620-
mom tor only Wm9mmm
For more information contact:
BETAR -
NORTH AMERICA
41 E 42 St Suite 817 NYC 0017
W(212)*i7-4502
""' Irom Miami, FL
t call your travalaaant.
~> lake It May Taka Coat*.
Costa Cruise is easy to take.
******m *o Wa>V*rj
'>:< HaHBaHHi
>_______________________________________
:.%v.Y.vv.vv.ViV.v.VtV.v.v .v.v.v
m


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 4,1963
' )
PARK PLACE BIG GIFTS UJA-Jewieh Federation of South Broward prime activists at
Park Place, who recently celebrated their annual Big Gifts event, are (from left) Vivian
Levinson, Co-chairman Harold Gluck, Harold Nestler, Co-chairmen Ted Hodes and Lou Singer,
Toby Sill and Dorothy Jarow. Not pictured is Co-chairman Lou Fine. The Park Place Breakfast,
featuring Henry Levy, is scheduled for 11 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 13.
AT GALAHAD NORTH James (left) and Sally Kofman,
prime movers of United Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federation
activities at Galahad North, were honored by fellow volunteers
at a recent breakfast. Presenting the mosaic plaque to the
Kofmans is Louis Huberman. Israeli expert Jerome GleekeL
addressed the crowd.
FAIRWAYS RIVIERA activists for the 1983 UJA-Jewish Federation of Sooth Broward
Campaign gather for a recent fund-raising breakfast. Workers from left to right are Hy Wyman,
Mae Wiener, Murray and Ruth Feuerstein, Sidney Jacobs, president of Fairways Riviera, and
Henry Klee.
Family Mission
1
!
Under the leadership of Dr. Saul and Susan Singer,
the Jewish Federation of South Broward announces a
unique experience in Israel
July 17-27.
The Family Mission will draw together generations
of South Broward Jews with the Jews of Jerusalem,
Tel Aviv and Hod Hasharon.
For further information, contact Suzy Briskin at the
Federation [921-8810], or submit this coupon to
JFSB, 2719 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Fla.
33020, with your name and address.
I
I
-
I
i
i
i
i
*
/ RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL V--------------------------N
The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking *
Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ar-dee Cheese Ravioli.
V* cup chopped or whole small
onions
Yi cup chopped carrots
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
Vi package (10 oz.) frozen whole
1 can (15 Oz.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
dash garlic salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
parsley
green beans, cooked and drained Vi cup water
1. Saute onions and carrots in butter in medium-sized
saucepan.
2. Add remaining ingredients; cover and simmer for
15 minutes. Serves 4.

CTUDI0
"ifliiniii"" '"iiinipi
Continental
Cuisine
FREDJOSSI
welcomes
you back lo
hi renowned
rruoto
RESTAURANT
tor a unique
dining avpenanca
Match your lama lo your
mood in on* ol 5 individual
rooms The Tent
Win* Cellar. Studio. Placa
Plgall*. Solas Chalet
Fin* Entartainmant
at th Piano
Also violin playing
for your plaatura
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(prtvata Luncheons arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO" 1
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
2340SW32AVE.
445-5371
closed Mondays
M I t I > I > I I.

sas-top;
*8
ne*tooU>-
rA8V *^ C\Q&
Shtpt of P*njjrv*nisMi j


Friday, February 4,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 17
**
* I
>s


___________________________I ;
^LAH^bJSyT?ie,d ^f^"* ** >t week for the United Jewish Appeal-Jewieh
Federation of South Broward Campaign. Chairman Sydney Holtzman (center) portedUn
bssasAttsryw-Shown a the ch-i'n (from 5SSa
f.S. beer to be made in Israel
NETANYA (JTA) An
Anheuser-Busch beer will be
irewed in Israel and distributed
kationally under a licensing
lureement signed here. It will be
the first American beer to be
broduced in Israel.
The agreement by Anheuser-
Jusch International, Inc.
licensed National Brewery Limit-
ed to brew and distribute one of
Inheuser-Busch's beers for sale
late 1983 or early 1984. The
brand was not specified, but
Vnheuser-Busch products in-
ludc Budweiserand Michelob.
August Busch III, chairman
Ind chief executive of Anheuser-
Busch Companies, Inc., said
upon signing the agreement here,
"We are delighted with this
important development for our
company and are confident that,
as with all our international
licensing agreements, National
Brewery will brew our beer in
their excellent facilities to our
rigid specifications for taste and
quality control."
National Brewery Limited,
which is an Israeli company,
produces 90 percent of all beer
brands marketed in Israel. The
remainder is imported from
Europe. Murray Goldman, owner
of National Brewery, said the
company is proud of its achieve-
ment of standards which enables
it to join the Anheuser-Busch
family of international licensees.
Anheuser-Busch International
brewmasters have worked closely
with National Brewery for more
than seven months, and the first
test brew is expected to be ready
soon.
Medicare Is
Not Enough:
Edward and Srtnut Kapi.in
You Probably
NeedB'nai Brith's
Senior Security
Supplement, loo.
(MOD-AS-13077)
Tor many medical
charges, il pays the
difference between
the actual fee and
what Medicare pays.
II includes private
duly nursing in I Ik-
Itospilal.
II includes doctor's
ollicc and Itospilal
visits beyond what
Medicare pays.
Hospital deductible*
covered.
a Acceptance is
guaranteed."
"tlH mH'iiiIm i % ,*ij< 6S .11 "I
IM'f I'l. isliri(( I mi.M" mi -
iin itnvirtl l>*i Ihc llrsl l>
in, units .(,., mi. %n,
for It iu* M rtth in. intM i s nih
Vtc in-ill MM members
B'nai Brith's
tiniup Insur.iiK i- -*.
Un6crteiil.cn (y "l|l!j
MONY ^^
Miilu.il I ill InsurdlKl
ClMM|MII> i il NoV, Vlllk
Jules L. Solomon Berhard G. Kaltman
Solomon & Kaltman
Health & Life Insurance Consultants
2632 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Florida 33020
925-7766 or 925-7768
Ambassador
Continued from Page 1
for Jews and Israelis. It marks the 50th anniver-
sary of the coming to power of Adolf Hitler and
the 35th anniversary of the State of Israel.
Now, he said, it also marks the year of the fifth
war for Israeli survival. He called the war against
Lebanon "a huge service to the world." "Opera-
tion Peace for Galilee" has not been recognized by
the world as the rooting out of evil that it was, the
ambassador said.
"It handed Lebanon to the United State on a
silver plate," Ben-Natan added. A total of 450 Is-
raeli boys were killed, he said, and in the long run
Israel really gained very little.
"We saved Lebanon: now we must negotiate
with them Peace is the object." Ben-Natan
said.
The ambassador said the quality of peace,
though, is the ability of Israel to defend itself.
Twenty-five percent of the Gross National
Product of Israel goes to defense. That is the
largest percentage per person of any country in
the world.
As proof the Israelis' interest in peace, Ben-
Natan cited Sinai, where Israel gave up land
worth $17 billion.
"Sadat learned," the ambassador said, "that to
make war Egypt needs the Soviet Union; but to
make peace, Egypt needs the United States."
The LUXURIOUS, KOSHER
Air Conlili>n,< "* M.l.
6r*V
HOTEL
On ma Ocaan 32nd to J4lh Sit Miami Baach
Join Us For The
suit
FESTIVE PASSOVER HOLIDAYS
Sedurtm 4 Synagogue Services Conducted
V
Cantors JACOB ERBUCH
tROBERT VEGH
Inquire About Our Special Packages
11 Days A
10 Nights
tram
Including
3 Kosher Meals Dairy'
PLUS! full Hotel Facililier
Olympic Pool Private Beach. Dancing
I Entertainment
Maxwell House" Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox 'n bagels 'n cream cheese is al-
most as much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mezuzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomical innovation is Maxwell
House Coffee.
The full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House
has been delighting lovers of good
food for half a century. And why not?
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food without great coffee!
So, no matter what your preference
instant or goundwhen you pour
Maxwell House you pour flavor. At
its most satisfyingconsistently cup
after cup after cup.
HOUSfl^^l^XWELl
^HOUSI
K Ortilifd Ko*hrr
Grm*i*FooJ,
Corpormom
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a cejntury



'
Page 18
Tha Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Qraatar Hollywood
Friday, February 4.1963
No-smoking class to begin Feb. 17

'DAUGHTERS OF PEACE' gather at Coconut Grove's Grove Isle Club to celebrate the
Women's Division, Jewish Federation of South Broward, Big Gifts event: B'not Shalom. A
whopping 21 percent increase ($405,304) has been pledged, with $58,000 represented on the day
of the event alone. The Women's Division's Big Gifts report shows pledges of $500 to $40,000.
Shown in front of one of the indoor statutes (from left) are Elaine Pittell, co-chairwoman of the
B'not Shalom luncheon; Evelyn Stieber, vice president campaign; Nancy Brizel, WD
president; Nancy Atkin, luncheon co-chairwoman; and author-speaker Gloria Goldreich.
Left-Wingers protest
West Bank building
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Three
leftwing components of the His-
tadrut Mapam, Sheli and the
Communist Party have
strongly protested at a Histadrut
decision to allow the labor federa-
tion's construction companies to
continue to operate within the
West Bank.
The labor federation's holding
company Hevrat Ovdim decided,
after a lengthy debate, that the
Histadrut had on this issue to be
governed by economic considera-
tions, and not by political philo-
sophy.
It said the Histadrut construc-
tion companies would have to
dismiss workers if it did not win
tenders for occupied area
housing. If the Histadrut's Solel
Boneh and other companies did
not build there, other private
companies would do so.
The Hevrat Ovdim said that
the decision to build should be
taken on sensible economic
grounds, and not to make a quick
profit. Opponents of continued
Judaea and Samaria building
said that by accepting housing in
the occupied territories, the His-
tadrut and its majority Labor
Party component were compro-
mising their ideals.
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
A "Freedom from Smoking
Program" will be offered begin-
ning Thursday, Feb. 17, from 2-4
p.m. by Community Hospital of
South Broward in cooperation
with the American Lung Asso-
ciation.
The six session program run
weekly uses behavior modifi-
cation techniques to help partici-
pants eliminate the smoking
habit.
The first session consists of an
orientation (first hour) and is de-
signed to answer questions and
provide further information
about the program. This session
continues with understanding the
habit and health-related informa-
tion. Participants are asked to
quit by the third session. Be-
havioral techniques, group sup-
port and invididual problem solv-
ing are used.
Registration can be made by
calling 966-8100 by Feb. 16 be-
tween the hours of 10 a.m. and 4
p.m. A $25 registration fee, paya-
ble the first session, is refundable
if the participant attends all of
the sessions. Space is limited and
only 30 registrants can be ac-
776 6272
HOWARD
APES
ACKACING
1201 N 45 STREET
FORT LAUDEROAIE
cepted.
Community Hospital is at 5100
W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
SOMEINSURANCE
AGENTS ARE LOCKED
INTO ONE COMPANY
m
NOT Jack Barman
Insurance Agency, Inc.
There are 2 ways to buy Insuran-
ce. You can buy your Insurance
from a one-company agent. But
he's locked Into only those
policies that his company sells.
So his hands are tied.
Or you can buy Insurance from
an Independent Insurance
Agent ...the More-than-one-com-
pany agent. You see, your
Big "I" Independent Agent
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THE MORE THAN ONE COMPANY
INSURANCE AGENT!
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Insurance Agency, Inc.
2739 Hollywood Blvd.
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July 2-17 $2 126 00
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August 1-15 $1 943 00
(Revisited tour
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August 22-Sept 5 $1.943 00
November 17-27 $1.426 00
December 22-Jan 1 $1626 00
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Including
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VIP receptions
Optional extensions in Israel
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Groups designed to include
families with children of
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Couples' buses on most tours
when traveling without children
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May 2-16 Si.882.00
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for round trip air from Miami
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Deposit $100.00 per person
(make check to Temple Israel)
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Mail to Temple Israel
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For information call
Temple offices
622-1435-W Palm Beach
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HOW TO RECEIVE FROM 9% to 20% ANNUAL RETURN FOR LIFE FROM A
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I
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NO OBUOATtON NO SOLICITATION OF FUNDS


I, February 4,1983
Tkt Jewish Floridian and Shofar ofOrmUrHollywood
Page 19
H
Leader Sa/ter speaks
LOVING MEMORY Mrs. Isadore Spielman accepts an
oree plaque bearing the name of her late husband, who was
norialbed at the Hallmark's 1983 United Jewish Appeal
lisn Federation of South Broward fund-raising event,
kugh the auspices of Harry S. Truman Lodge of B'nai B'rith.
Renting the remembrance is Dr. Saul Singer, UJA-
eration Campaign chairman.
Continued from Page 4
alienated groups, through programs aimed at
strengthening the faltering family and through
programs to enhance participation in synagogues
and other forms of Jewish communal life, our
Federation must become a building block in the
structure of Jewish continuity in America.
How does all this fit in and affect our intimate
relationship with Israel?
Our relationship with Israel is far from one-
sided. More and more we have come to realize,
and our Federation must do everything in its
power to foster such a realization, that Israel is a
resource which gives as much, if not more, than it
receives. We have a deepening awareness that
Israel is a most important and effective source of
Jewish identification and pride a rallying point
for Jewish action and commitment wherever Jews
may live.
Through missions, through Israel-oriented
community activities and above all, through
people-to-people programs such as Project
Renewal, our Federation must bring home to ail
of us this new found sense of Israeli partnership.
Project Renewal may well be the handwriting on
the wall pointing toward a new type of
relationship.
The American Jewish community has been
accused of exercising undue influence in the
political process of this country and such ac-
cusations have created a discomfort and
defensiveness among us which we must not
permit to undermind our resolve. This is a
dangerous virus; the disease it produces can be
terminal and we must inoculate ourselves against
it now. It is our responsibility as Jews, our right
and even our duty as loyal Americans, to continue
to use whatever influence we have in the task of
defending Israel from her enemies and detractors,
both in the Middle East and here at home. The
American government must honor its com-
mitments to the survival and security of her
staunchest ally and keeper of democracy in that
vital part of the world.
Turning again to the functioning of our
Federation in our own community, we have
become painfully aware of the impact that the
present economic situation and the ad-
ministration's policies are having and will most
j likely continue to have on the agencies and
programs we support, and above all, on the
everyday lives of the people we serve. The cut-
backs of funding of social welfare programs has
placed an even greater financial burden on
voluntary agencies. We have no alternative but to
turn to our contributors and say to them:
"You must do more! In addition to meeting the
needs of Israel in this year of emergency, you
must try even harder, whatever your own per-
sonal difficulties, for the sake of those who find
themselves in even greater difficulties."
The task of balancing our communal budget, of
maintaining a just and healthy equilibrium be-
tween what we allocate for local needs and what
we contribute to Israel, is never easy. In the
current economic crunch, that task has become
much more difficult sometimes even heart-
breaking. In our own community, this precarious
balancing act which we must perform without
becoming paralyzed into inaction, is com-
pounded by our lack of physical facilities which
have become urgently required if we are to meet
the pressing needs that have multiplied so rapidly
in recent years.
The cost of just two of the needed facilities a
Jewish Community Center multi-purpose
building and a long-term nursing care home for
our elderly is estimated at $10 million, and we
must acquire appropriate land soon if these
structures are ever to become a reality.
The challenges inherent in this situation will
test the minds and hearts of all of us yet
meeting desperate challenges is what Jews have
learned to do better than any other people in
history, and I am sure we will not be found
wanting in the fulfillment of the all-pervasive and
unifying Jewish commandment of "Tzedakah."
ivifs cited
JEW YORK Jacob K.
jits, who served 24 years as a
filed States Senator from New
rk, has been selected as the
lipienl of the 18th Charles
lans Hughes Gold Medal of the
Itional Conference of
Iristians and Jews, the organi-
non's highest award, it is
nounced by Irving Mictchell
It, national chairman of
-CJ's Executive Board.
Javits will be presented with
gold medal at the Charles
ms Hughes Gold Medal
iner on Mar. 7 in the Grand
allroom of the New York
lillon.
mm
It DAYS FROM MIAMI
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Jun 15 thru At* l$S 2*77.99
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Round trip airfare
4 nights Athens (Continental
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(half Board)
First Class Hotel (Breakfast
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7 Day Cruise (All Meals)
Outside Cabins Stella Solaris
Sightseeing, Transfers,
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Motorcoach, Guide and Taxes.
Ask for Complete Itinerary
May be Upgraded
at a Supplement
Call
Trans Olympia Tour
1800 S. Young Circle
Hollywood, Florida
Miami 944-4879
Hollywood 925-5220
You go to buy
Empire
Kosher
Poultry,
but can't
find any.
9
it
What to
If you don't see Empire
products in your Kosher
Butcher Shop, Food Store
or Deli, could be it's
because they're sold out.
Or, could be your merchant
expects you to settle for"second choice".
Call the Empire Distributor:
Mendelson, Inc.
Miami Beach (305)672-;
sttit


Page 20
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday. February 4.1983
Whole family benefits from talking sessions
Mr. and Mrs. T. requested
ounseling for their 16-year-old
laughter, who in the past year
nad gone from being an "A"
student to failing and who had
(come quite sullen, angry and
.'Xtremely sloppy.
The counselor agreed to meet
with the whole family which con-
sisted of Mr. and Mrs. T., a
couple in the mid-30s. their
laughter. Clara, and their son,
Todd. 10 In the initial interview
the mother and father appeared
^ery angry and kept accusing
Clara.
The counselor probed the
'amily relationship extensively
ind learned that until a year ago,
Clara had been a well-adjusted,
high-achieving girl who could do
no wrong. She had been very
close to her mother and the
mother still had a residue of good
will.
The father, who had rarely
i been involved in her care, has lit-
tle good feelings toward her. The
father, who was a laborer, had
been injured and was on dis-
ability: the mother worked only
part-time because she felt guilty
about leaving her son alone.
Apparently the mother never
felt as comfortable raising Todd
as she had Clara. Todd was also
involved in pointing his finger at
Clara.
By the end of the second inter-
view, it was clear that, because of
the father's disappointment in
his own life (he no longer worked
and was on disability) that he put
all his hopes on Clara. This was a
lot of pressure on Clara.
In hopes of changing the situa-
tion for Clara, the counselor be-
gan to focus in on the father.
Clara had her life and the father
had his. The counselor focused on
what he did have left, his brain
was still active. Both mother and
father got excited about both
their possibilities and rapidly
they began to pursue dreams of
their own.
Mrs. T. wanted to go to college
and she had missed that in get-
ting married and then pregnant
so young. Mr. T. was reluctant to
think about school but did begin
to think about how he could gel
more involved in his coin collec
tion.
Each week, as the interviews
focused on Mr. and Mrs. T., less
time was used talking about
Clara. Gradually as the pressure
was off her, Clara had caught up
in algebra, kept her room cleaner,
etc.
After about two months, Mr.
T. was asked by a friend if he
would help out in his stamp and
coin shop. Because of his exper-
tise, he was ultimately offered a
small share of store's profit and
he began to earn a living. As the
business expanded, his wife and
Clara began to get involved on
the business end. Mr. T. de-
veloped a healthy respect for his
daughter's business acumen.
There were two issues regard-
ing Clara that were dealt with.
The counselor was able to open
up for Clara the question of
hours, and after the air was
cleared regarding his fears
around adolescent sexuality,
Clara and he were able to nego-
tiate her curfew.
Because of Clara's own con-
cern, the counselor encouraged
Mrs. T. to chaperone Clara's
school youth group. This eased
the teen's anxiety.
Mr. T. became so involved in
business (he gave up disability)
that the counselor was left to deal
with Mrs. T. As Clara got better,
Todd got worse. Mrs. T. dis-
cussed her discomfort with Todd
and the mutual anxiety and de-
pendence they felt.
With encouragement, Mrs. T.
began to work with her husband
"benignly neglecting" Todd and
his dependent needs. Within two
months, Todd was out playing in
Good Old Days
finale planned
the neighborhood, rapidly de-
veloping friendships. He no
longer clings to his mother. This
in turn helped Mrs. T. to feel
Todd was adequate.
As this problem resolved itself,
the family and the counselor had
accomplished their goals. Clare
and Todd were happier and living
full lives, as were Mr. and Mrs. T.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact us at: Jewish Family Service
of Broward County, 4517 Holly-
wood Blvd.. Hollywood. 33021.
Telephone: 966-0956. Hours
Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Brcvard County, 3500 N. State
-
COMPUTERS at CAMP for March 14
professionally designed and conducted course
available lor children of all ages enrolled at our
eight-week camps
CAMP WOHELO for girls
CAMP COMET for boys
12811 Old Route 16, Waynesboro, PA 17268
SSth Year of Qualify Camping
High In The Blue Midge Mountains
{Contact: Owner-Director, Morgan I. Levy, COD.
Winter Address:
1531 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami, FL 33144
Telephone: (305) 261-1500
-j^ A Well Balanced Summer Program ..
SPORTS NATURE ARTS SCIENCE COMPUTERS
I { Largo Florida Enrollmont...Staff Inqulrloa Invltoci, Mln. ago 19
SOUTH FLORIDA REUNION
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13,1983 1P.M.-4 P.M.
Tropical Park Shelter #8,7900 S.W. 40th St., Miami
Enrolled campers, former campers, prospective campers and staff.
| LUNCH-FAVORS-GAMES-FAMILY FUN-SLIDE PRESENTATION OF1
OUR CAMPS.
Call 261-1500 In Miami for a reservation to loin u*.
I These outstanding camps have been owned and directed by a Miami
| family since 1929. We will be happy to call on you in person if youl
I cannot make the reunion.
uuluii
You have the power to Will the future by
leaving a legacy to Hadaaaah today!
Your Will can continue Haderre achievements
in Israel for a better tomorrow.
hadassah
f MAIL TO HAOAMAM. WU.S BtOueSTS DEFT
SO WMt SSMl SUM! N*w VOrk. NY 1001* (212) 3SS 7900
I Html mi* mt ii*>mmN*titochon -They SlMtBa nttimnbindmPrmm'
I

I
| Addn
I
L.
Broward County will comme-
morate "The Good Old Days"
March 7-14 with a grand finale
Monday, March 14, at the Sun-
rise Musical Theatre.
The event will be coordinated
by the Area Agency on Aging, as
an educational experience to ac-
quaint all Americans with the
abilities and needs of Broward's
elders.
The County Commission and a
majority of the cities already
have issued proclamations of-
ficially declaring the celebration
of "The Good Old Days."
Community organizations, rec-
reation departments, area schools
and libraries also will plan events
to highlight the week. Senior cen-
ters, funded through the Area
Agency, will serve as focal points
for competitive events in each of
the following categories for per-
sons 55 and over:
Best exhibition of the good old
dances, best group singing the
good old songs; best solo rendi-
tion of the good old songs, and
beat instrumental rendition of the
good old music.
An additional category will be
open to groups combining older
persons with those under 55
years of age: beat performance
song-dance by an intergenera-
tional group. Finalists from each
sector of the county will perform
March 14 at the Sunrise Musical
Theatre.
Applications for the competi-
tive events are available now.
The closing date for entries is
Feb. 10.
Forms may be picked up at:
SE Focal Point Senior Center,
2838 Hollywood Blvd., Holly
wood, or SW Focal Point Senior
Center, 6700 SW 13 St., Pem-
broke Pines.
All tickets for the finale are
12.50.
Road 7 Suite 399. Fort
Lauderdale. 33319. Telephone:
735-3394. Hours Monday,
Wednesday and Friday 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
day 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 W. Hills-
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8508. Hours Monday. Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency for the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and The
United Way of Broward County.
JFS offices are moved
The offices of Jewish Family Service serving South Broward
have been moved to 4517 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 33021.
The new telephone number is 966-0956.
According to Brian Sherr, president of JFS of Broward
County, and Sherwin Rosenstein, executive director, the larger
amount of office space at the new location (the old address was
downtown on Harrison Street) will allow the agency to broaden
and add new programs.
JFS provides counseling to individuals, families, single
parents, adolescents, as well as a variety of offerings to senior
citizens. It is a beneficiary agency of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward and Greater Fort Lauderdale, in addition to the
United Way.
y
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Telephone: (914) 794-S3O0
DIMCTIONS
Rout* 17 (Quick woy) lo Exit 106 rhn go up Broodwoy to
Montkolto Pot Offico thon turn right into liberty St.
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An active adult community located lakeside in Deerfield Beach.Meadowrkhje
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tsss,%ji---^ -.....-
r%'


February 4,1963
Tht Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 21

THIS YEAR,
VISIT YOUR COUNTRY HOME
Israel. Where the warmth of belonging begins.
And you feel content in a way youVe never felt anywhere else.
Vacation in Israel this year. See the sights of your
ancient homeland from the balcony of your modern hotel.
Swim in its bright, blue seas.
Let its sunshine warm you. And its people. Israel.
Another country. Yet, somehow your own.
COME TO ISRAEL.
The Miracle On The Mediterranean."
s

Israel is much less expensive than many pwple think. For information on low-cost packages, call your travel agent. Israel Government Tounst Office, 4151 S.W. Freeway. Houston. Texas 77027.
-v
*


Page 22
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 4,1983
<
-
"\
Synagogues
Talmud to be topic at Hallandale Center
The last in the current Hallan-
dale Jewish Center Lecture Series
will be delivered Thursday, Feb.
10, by Dr. Shemarvanu T. Swir-
sky, rabbi of Beth Jacob Congre-
gation of Miami Beach for 20
years.
His topic will be "The Talmud
and its Relevance Today." The
lecture will delivered in the Hal-
landale Jewish Center Chapel at
7:30 p.m.
Kabbi Swirsky is a scholar not
V
Jewish Books
juub in Review
is a service ol the IWB lewish Book Council,
75 East 26th St., New York. N.V. 10010
'Rabbis and Wives'
universally excellent
Rabbis and Wives: By Chaim
Grade. Translated from the Yid-
dish by Harold Rabinowitz and
Inna Hecker Grade. Alfred A.
Knopf, 201 E. 50th St., New
York. N.Y. 10022. 1982. 307
pages. S15.95.
Reviewed by Jacob Kabakoff
The late Chaim Grade was a
distinguished Yiddish poet, but
he also received acclaim as a
superb novelist and short story
writer. A survivor of the Young
Yilna group of writers, he was the
author of several volumes of
poetry in which he immortalized
the life and tradition of European
Jewry.
The three novellas included in
Grade's newest volume represent
his fifth prose work in English
translation. Asked in an inter-
view why he had turned to the
writing of fiction, Grade replied
that his purpose was twofold.
First, he felt an historical ob-
ligation to describe the human
tragedy (and comedy) of Euro-
pean Jewish life before it was
systematically uprooted. And he
wanted to show, through the
medium of art, that the problems
and struggles of the Jews of
yesteryear were relevant to our
own times because these prob-
lems and struggles never really
change.
What Shmuel Yosef Agnon,
the Nobel Prize laureate, suc-
ceeded in doing for Galician
Jewry, Grade accomplished for
the rich world of Lithuanian
Jewry. He has peopled his
novellas not only with rabbinic
figures, with ascetic recluses and
with contentious Mizrachi and
Agudah supporters, but also with
a host of strong women, with
shopkeepers, and other mundane
types.
He depicts the rhythm of their
daily lives without nostalgic em-
bellishment and dwells on the
shadows as well as the lights of
their existence.
Because of his absorbing psy-
chological treatment of his
characters, Grade makes their
concerns and conflicts real and
meaningful for us. In the novella
"The Rebbetzin" we follow the
machinations of a scheming,
woman who is motivated by die- .
appointment and envy. \
The second novella, "Laybe-
Layzar's Courtyard,'- which is
set in Vilna, is filled with closely
packed action, including a
dramatic clash between an in-
flexible, fanatic father and a
gentle reclusive rabbi who cannot
escape involvement in com-
munity affairs.
The last novella, "The Oath,"
relates how, by a clever turn of
events, a dying Vilna wheat
merchant is able to provide for
his wife's marital future but is
unsuccessful in keeping worldli-
ness from engulfing the lives of
his son and daughter.
Grade's novellas, like his pre-
p#
vious large-scale novel. "The
Yeshiva," are anchored in reality
and chronicle day-by-day hap-
penings, but at the same time
they touch on transcendent uni-
versal issues which speak to the
mind and the heart.
Dr. Jacob Kabakoff is profes-
sor of Hebrew Literature at the
City University of New York and
editor of the Jewish Book
Annual.
Buddy Hachett
to do benefit
The Hollywood Auxiliary of
the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens will sponsor "A
Fabulous Nite of Entertain-
ment," starring Buddy Hackett
on Saturday, Feb. 19, at 6:30
p.m.
Cafe Cristal at the Diplomat
Hotel is the location. A $150 per
person contribution includes a re-
ception, dinner and the show. For
further information contact,
Cornelia Philipson at 751-8626.
The Home and Hospital is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federaton of South Broward.
only in all branches of Jewish
knowledge but also secularly. In
addition to serving as rabbi, he is
a full professor of history and
western civilization in Miami-
Dade Community College, North
Campus.
In 1975, he was named "Out-
standing Educator of America,
Department of History." In 1976
the Religious Zionists of America
presented him with the Ramban
Award for outstanding service in
the cause of Jewish education in
the United States.
Rabbi Swirsky is listed in the
Cambridge International Edition
of "Who's Who in Religion" as
well as in "Who's Who of Intel-
lectuals."
Remaining educational classes
being offered at Hallandale
Jewish Center include beginner's
Hebrew, elementary Hebrew con-
versation, intermediate Hebrew
conversation, Talmud, Bible, ad-
vanced Hebrew, Yiddish and
more. Call the temple for days
and times.
The annual siyyum (closing
celebration) of the adult educa-
tion program will take place
Thursday. March 17, at 8 p.m.
Singles group
new at Solel
A new singles group for 20-35-
year-olds is being formed through
the auspices of Temple Solel.
At its first function. 120 Jew-
ish singles responded, according
to Jeff Bauman.
For membership information,
call Haumari at the temple office,
989-0205.
Temple Solel
pair winners
Karen Kaminsky, director of
education of Temple Solel, and
Rose Edith Grosswald, special
education teacher, have received
an award for their special educa-
tion curriculum.
The National Association of
Temple Educators of the Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions presented the Chapman
Award to Mrs. Kaminsky in New
York City.
The curriculum has been sent
to several other religious schools
which will use it as a model.
ICERTIFIED MOHEL|
Your Baby Deserves
The Best!!
RABBI Y. SELMAR
Staff Mohel
Mt. Sinai Hospital.
Will Travel (3061673-5062
f Candlelighting Time
+ Friday, Feb. 4-5:48 p.m.
? Friday, Feb. 11-5:53 p.m.
t t i v iv f :
T |T ; I ; -;
:natf Stf 13 phnrb ran
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam,
Asher kid'shanu B'mitz-vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
L had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.
.?
?
ALLINGTON TOWERS residents honored fellow residents
Fela and Leon Bankier (center) at the 1983 UJA-Jewish
Federation of South Broward breakfast. Presenting the plaque
to the honorees are Manual Feldman (left) and Eli Stiftel.
Allington Towers chairman.
Kabbalah on tap
Feb. 7 at Sinai
Dr. Reuben Luckens, rabbi,
author and lecturer, is to lead off
Temple Sinai's spring lecture
series on Monday, Feb. 7, at 8
p.m.
The rabbi's topic will be "The
Religious Dimension in Holistic
Healing Practical Kabbalah in
Action."
Temple Sinai is at 1201 John-
son St.
Need a ride?
Temple Sinai will transport
prospective members who live in
the South Ocean Drive area to
services free of charge.
For more information, contact
the temple at 1201 Johnson St. or
call 920-1577.
-/
PEACE AWARD Alan
and Adrienne Fiske will be
honored by Temple Solel and
Israel Bonds at an Israel Din-
ner of State on Sunday, Feb.
13, beginning at 6:30 p.m. The
Fiskes will be presented with
the City of Peace Award.
Chairmen of the event are
Joan and Douglas Gross.
Religious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley St.,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:55 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock; Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
1 -o.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Daily services, 7:30 a.m.. sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning 9
o'clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
Conservative
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon, 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 981- I
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services, 7:45 a.m.,
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:15 o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8.
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood; 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday, Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, Judaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Miramar 6920 SW 36th St.; 961-1700. Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Daily services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 pjn.;
Sabbath morning, 8:45 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten8. i
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St.. Hollywood: 920-1577. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Daily services 8:25 am., 5 p.m.; Sabbath,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:35 o'clock. Religious school: Pre- '*
kindergarten Judaica High School.
ffeforn)
I'S^e?** ,El"r.12S1 S 14th Ave- Hollywood; 92W226.
S2SS&** ^^ -*8 F "^
Temple Beth Emet Pines Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
Road, Pembroke Pines: 431-3638. Rabbi Bennett Greenspon
ten-10 8^V,C88 8:16 pm Rdfe**" chool: Kindergar
Temple Solel 5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood. 989-0205. Rabbi
r.*?m S"00*411 services, 8:15 p.m.; Sabbath mor
mng, 10:30 o clock. Religious school: Pre-school-12.
F}ecoi)structioDist
&r WE-TeL-^ll W Broward B,vd- PtanUtfon: 472-
3600. Rabbi Elliot Sk.dell. Sabbath services. 8:15 p.m. Religious
school: Pre kindergarten-8. v
~~ ~ 'j.:r-.--------=srrr~ '
*


February 4,1983
The Jewish FloridUmand Shofar of Greater Hollywood
V
Page 23
"%*

JMRAI CHAIRMEN Nat and Dina Sedley and Dr. Paul and Ruth Rodensky obviously are
ig a good time at their 1983 party.
omrai hears Rabbi Bernat
Continued from Page 1
of real nations, the rabbi said, "and is even
bled to a moral blunder, an error from time to
The luxury of powerlessness Jews have en-
for 1,800 years is over," Rabbi Bernat told
[South Borward Jews. But we paid a price, he
1, six million prices in Europe, alone.
Vision without power leads to Auschwitz," he
"But never again ... we are off the cross
Iver."
[alilii Bernat, who was ordained 22 years ago
has been spiritual leader in temple in Flush-
ing, N.Y., Louisville, Ky., Lexington, Mass., and
Hollywood, Calif., before moving to Miami, is na-
tional chairman of the Rabbinic Cabinet for
United Jewish Appeal.
The rabbi said all the Jew wants to be is a
human being. Israel represents a reach for nor-
mality, dignity, power and morality, he added.
"Israel is the beginning of the flowering of our
redemption. .
You will keep the flower alive," Rabbi Bemat
concluded.
Settlements blocking peace
Leo Mindlin
G-d idolatry
Continued from Page 4
striving toward perfection as the
purpose of man's life.
IF JEWS therefore refuse to
say Yehovah's name, that is their
choice, not the old Teutons'.
They have invested their theolo-
gical view of the purpose of Jew-
ish life with some Divine afflatus
vhich they sanctify as unuttera-
ble except by various symbols
the "Y" (transliterated) offered
as the letter yud beginning the
name, Yehovah; or as El or
Elohim, singular and plural of
their view of God. not the Old
Teutonic God. Or in the verna-
cular simply as Shem, meaning
"the name." There are still
others.
But none of these symbolic
manifestations is any more
allowable than Yehovah is. For
all of these forms of the name of
the Hebrew God are man's names
for God. To think otherwise is the
ultimate sacrilege.
I am reminded of Martin
Buber's reference to God as just
another word, for it is consum-
mate gall to believe that we can
possibly conceive of Him, let
alone know his name. Buber
suggested that to say the word,
"God," as if it were God's name
is insulting in the same way,
say, as to call God a teacup. He
will still be what He does
provided, like the teacup. He is.
But unlike the teacup, He is also
becoming, and so names are
irrelevant to His being.
BUBER'S POINT is simple.
There is no appropriate word of
which man can conceive for what
God really is, since we are in-
capable of that sort of ap-
prehension.
For the Protestant theologian,
Haul Tillich, the argument
against hallowing the word,
"God," was pretty much the
same. Tillich also believes that
God is beyond man's compre-
hension. Therefore, God's name
must be beyond man's compre-
hension and is unutterable.
Both Buber's teacup and Til-
lich's unutterability are essen-
tially the same. Each, symbolic of
that which we picture in our
minds, hence is. Each reduces
God to an object in the simplistic
sense, and God is either an object
too (inadmissible to Buber) or
becomes unutterable to avoid the
tautology and the absurdity
(Tillich).
IN THE end, we can call a
teacup a teacup, or by any other
name, and it will still be what it is
as defined by its function, a
domestic instrument used for
drinking tea. But what is God?
How do we define Him by His
function? The answer is that we
can call God by no name, for His
being can not be defined by any
of these criteria or indeed in any
other way man knows of. So we
can not picture Him either, and if
we make the attempt, we have
reduced God to mere idolatry.
So let us have enough of G-d,
which is more than insulting and
more than sacrilege. It reveal.'
the ignorance of the user.
We Hope
You Never Need Us ]
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
7610 Northeast 2nd Avenue
Phone 759-1669
hi the Middle East. The article was written
sponse to a request from Readers Digest for
views on how to achieve peace in the
ust.
hi' two former presidents also called on the
:> countries to demonstrate "the courage to
forward to negotiate for a Palestinian
eland with an Israel that they recognize as a
>w nation." In particular, they urged King
ssein of Jordan to join the autonomy
otiations. They said this would be a "dramatic
lure" that could put the government of Iraeli
mier Menachem Begin "under immense
sure to reciprocate."
s for President Reagan, his precedessore
d him "to commit every political resource to
! awesome, intricate and at times frustrating
llenge of bringing Arab and Israeli to the
lization that peace and security can come
ui only through reconciliation and relations
ilt on trust."
t'ressing their support for the Camp David
reements, Ford and Carter suggested that
cause of the "stigma attached to the term
'amp David' by some Arab leaders, diplomatic
ork within that still binding agreement and
nder the aegis of U.N. Resolution 242 should be
Tried out under other terminology." They said
at Resolution 242 was the "cornerstone" of the
ace effort in the Mideast.
While Carter and Ford outlined steps for the
nited States and Arab countries to take, most of
heir article was aimed at Israel They said they
come to the "painful conclusion" that the
gin government "is not living up to" the
mm itments it made at Camp David.
"It has shown little inclination to grant real
utonomy to the Palestinians in the West Bank
m.mued to confiscate properties in occupied
itories and to build setUements as if to create
de facto Israeli ascendancy there. It has
blicly repudiated the Reagan peace plan which
alls for a freeze for Israeli settlements.'
I They said that the Begin government must
[realize that however it may define its intentions
i the West Bank or Gaza, however it may seek to
rationalize its actions there, the evidence is
_ nvincing to the Arab world and beyond that the
l^aeli leaders have simply chosen to seize these
nds, and hold them by force."
While criticizing the Israeli invasion of
non and accusing the Begin government of
|n inclination toward a military rather than
Continued from Page 1
a diplomatic solution to Israel's problems," the
former presidents conceded that before the
Lebanese invasion, all that Israel could perceive
were threats from the Palestine Liberation
Organization rather than diplomatic efforts by
Arab moderates.
"Indeed, the need for credible voices ar-
ticulating Arab and more precisely Palestinian
concerns cannot be overstressed," they ob-
served.
Carter and Ford stressed that there are two
realities that have to be acknowledged: Israel is a
nation and as such "has a right to exist and to co-
exist in security and peace in the world com-
munity"; and there are four million Palestinian
people "scattered throughout the Middle East
and other regions and they cry out for their own
home, in which their legitimate rights may be
exercised."
The former presidents said that they support
President Reagan's Sept. 1 peace initiative, "but
now the Arabs are waiting to see if Washington
means business." They pointed out that the
American role both as a "catalyst and mediator"
is difficult. "It would require every skill of
diplomacy and more; it will be tiring, bewildering
and even politically dangerous at times." They
added that at times, only the president's personal
intervention will be able to help the parties
"overcome timidity, suspicion, anger."
But Carter and Ford stressed that "it is vital
that the negotiating process continue however
slowly at times toward the goals of peaceful
community in the Middle East. Every avenue
must be pursued, every reasonable alternative
explored. If it is not initially possible to bring all
parties to the table, we must be reedy with
alternatives."
The State Department noted that Reagan had
urged a freeze on further Israeli West Bank
settlements in his Sept- 1 peace initiative.
"Israel's long-term security can only be assured
by real peace," Hughes said, "and real peace can
only be achieved through a negotiated exchange
of occupied Arab territories." He stressed that
the Reagan administration has said "on a number
of occasions" that Israel's settlement policy
"damages the chances for peace."
Hughes, however, refused to restate the
position of the Ford and Carter administrations
that the settlements are illegal The Reagan
administration has never questioned their
legality, but has said only that settlements are
"unhelpful'' to the peace process .- -^
alia
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\-


Page 24
The Jewish Floridian ami Shofar of Greater Hollywood
i %
Friday. February 4,19M
$80,000 AND CLIMBING Grandview Chairman Paul Sigel (left) report* pledgee to the 1983
I J A-Jewish Federation of Sooth Broward Campaign are moving along very wefl. He told a
recent breakfast meeting that the goal of $100,000 ia now within reach. With the chairman, from
left, are George Steinberg, Leonard Schiff. Charlea Moaee and gaeat speaker Jerome Gleekel,
expert on Israel affairs.
MRECT FROM NEW YORK
iij iiija jpanhigruiinirrtf-rt*"' **v~* ".....
Raymond Anal and David Carey
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