Citation
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Creation Date:
December 16, 1977
Language:
English
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Fred K. Shochet. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
44512277 ( OCLC )
sn 00229541 ( LCCN )
ocm44512277

Related Items

Related Item:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 7 Number 25
Hollywood, Florida Friday, December 16, 1977
Price 35 Cents
Journalist Toth Pleads for Human Rights
"The human rights issue dates
back to the post Stalin era,"
noted Los Angeles Times Wash-
Moscow Bureau Chief Robert
Toth. Speaking to more than 700
members of the South Broward
community, Toth shared his
views on current Soviet Jewry
situations and his own experience
of detainment and interrogation
by the KGB, prior to his return to
the United States.
"Since World War II, the ac-
tions and attitudes in the Soviet
Union towards the Jewish popu-
lation are a reaction to Israel and
Zionism," Toth explained. "Zion-
ism is the cause of Soviet emigra-
tion as we know it. Con-
sequently, in the late 40's, the
Jewish population in the Soviet
Union was halved.
"There are many Jews in the
Soviet Union who wish to remain
there and we should be aware of
that, too," he added.
According to Toth, the simple
fact that a person wishes to leave
the country he or she lives in and
is denied by their government is a
clear violation of their right to
have freedom of choice.
"In the case of Anatoly
Sharansky, he did not do any-
thing wrong. All he wanted to do
was leave the Soviet Union. He
was denied that human right,"
said Toth.
While noting the friendship be-
^ 1 WFyw IaV~ ~aWI
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The Jewish Federation of South Broward and its constituent
agencies sponsored a Human Rights rally for Soviet Jews,
featuring Los Angeles Times writer Robert Toth. Gathered at a
pre-rally meeting are (from left) Rhoda Marcus, chairman of the
day; Robert Toth; The Rev. Claude Tucker, co-chairman of the
South Broward Inter-Faith Council; Dr. Joel Schneider, chair-
man of the Federation's Community Relations Committee;
Hollywood Mayor David Keating; and Elaine Pittell, chairman
of the Federation's Soviet Jewry Committee.
m ........v
Speaking before a crowd of nearly 700 persons, Los Angeles
Times correspondent Robert Toth describes his experiences as
the newspaper's Moscow Bureau Chief, at the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward's Human Rights Rally for Soviet Jews.
Atherton to Head Our
Delegation in Cairo Talks
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Alfred L. Atherton, who will head
the U.S. delegation to the Cairo
conference, is generally recog-
nized here as both an astute dip-
lomat and a leading authority on
the Middle East.
Atherton, 56, has been in-
volved in the State Department's
Middle East affairs since 1965,
and was named Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs
in April, 1974 by then-Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger
HE WAS promoted to that
position in succession to Joseph
J. Sisco, now president of
American University, who had
been advanced to Undersecretary
of State for Political Affairs.
Atherton, as Sisco's deputy
and in his own right as Assistant
Secretary, has frequently ap-
peared before Congressional
committees and has often ad-
dressed both Jewish and Arab-
American meetings. "He is a
master at double-talk," a frus-
trated Congressman said of him
recently following a committee
said of him recently following a
committee hearing at which
Atherton skillfully parried
questions relating to U.S. views
on Israeli positions.
tween Anatoly Sharansky and
himself, Toth said, "Sharansky
was a spokesman for the Jewish
activists and the Helsinki demo-
crats. He helped me with many of
my projects. We had an open
relationship. When we met, it
was in public and there was
nothing secretive about it, but I
knew we were being followed by
agents of the KGB. As we all
know, Sharansky is now in prison
with a charge of treason against
him. The case will come for
review very soon. The Soviets
will be making a grave error to
martyr Sharansky.
"My arrest came three months
after Sharansky's. While walking
down a street, a car pulled to the
curb, two men got out and forced
me into the back seat. That
physical treatment was probably
the most frightening part of my
ordeal. The KGB accused me of
collecting secret information.
(Toth noted earlier that in the
Soviet Union, a common gas bill
is considered secret.) After
several days of intense ques-
tioning, I was advised that I
could leave as planned, which I
did," said Toth.
"There are only a few human
rights that are universal to all
countries," concluded Toth, "and
we must not be blind to our
human rights or the rights of
others. The people of the West
must continue to be sympathetic
to the plight of the Soviet Jews,
so they can remain strong."

Ch aim Herzog Featured
Speaker at Shomrai Dinner
.... Chaim Herzog, Israel's ambassador to i he United
Nations, will be the featured speaker at the tl ird annual
Shomrai Dinner of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's 1978 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund, to be held Sunday at 6:30 p.m., at Temple
Beth Shalom in Hollywood.
The Shomrai Dinner will be attended by leaders of the
South Broward Jewish community who contribute a
minimum of $5,000 to the annual humanitarian campaign
to benefit world Jewry, and is the trad it ion a kick-off of
the CJA-IEF in this community.
Herzog is a native of Ireland and came to Palestine as
a young man. He attended Cambridge University and
Sandhurst (England's West Point). In Israel, he served in
various command and staff posts in the Defense Forces
and retired as a Major General in 1962.
During the 1967 and Yom Kippur Wars, he was chief
spokesman of the Israel Broadcasting Corp. He also
served as first Military Governor of the West Bank.
He has been president of ORT and is a member of the
executive committees of the Hebrew University, Bar-Han
University and the Weizmann Institute.
VIEW FROM ABROAD
Egypt Hails Influx
Of Israeli Newsmen
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
journalists have begun reporting
and broadcasting from Cairo and
with diplomatic developments
marking time before the Cairo
conference opens, the main news
is about the warm welcome they
received from Egyptian officials
and from Cairones in general and
the small Jewish community in
particular.
But Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan, at the Cabinet session,
rebuked two television jour-
nalists for going there on Egyp-
tian property.
THERE ARE at least a half
dozen Israeli correspondents in
the Egyptian capital and more
arrive each day. Most of them en-
tered Egypt with non-Israeli
passports. These include Ada
Luciano of Rome and Tamar
Golan of Paris, who were sent by
Maariv, Hans Knopp of Amster-
dam and Eliezer Strauch, who are
covering for Yediot Achronot,
and Ben Ami, another Yediot
man from Israel, who made his
first broadcast from Cairo over
Israel's armed forces radio
station.
The biggest stir was created by
Sami Greenspan of Yediot Ach-
ronot, who was the first Israeli
reporter to land at Cairo Airport
with an Israeli passport. He
arrived late night via Rome with-
out an entry visa. He was kissed
on both cheeks by the Egyptian
passport control officer and given
permission for a week's stay in
the country.
GREENSPAN attended Sat-
urday morning services at Cairo's
Great Synagogue. The con-
gregants, mostly people in their
seventies, were overcome by
emotion.
They kissed his Israeli pass-
port with tears in their eyes and
offered prayers for the safety of
Israel, the well-being of the
visiting journalists and for peace.
Greenspan is traveling around
Cairo with an Egyptian body-
guard and an official car and
Continued on Page 8
Amitay, Netzer at College Seminar
Morris Amitay, executive
director of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee, and
Yuvall Netzer, consul general of
Israel in Atlanta, will lead two
seminars for college students,
designed to combat Arab propa-
ganda on their campuses.
Amitay will be speaking Mon-
day, Dec. 26. 7:30 p.m.. at the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, 18900 NE
25th Ave., North Miami Beach.
Netzer will lead the second
seminar, Wednesday, Dec. 28,
7:30 p.m.. at the JCC-Hollywood
Extension. The Netzer seminar
will be followed by Israeli songs,
dancing, and falafel.
The programs are being
planned jointly by the Women's
Division and the Community
Relations Committee of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
"All college students who will
be in the area for their semester
breaks are invited to attend,"
noted Dr. Joel Schneider, chair-
man of the Federation's CRC.
According to Joyce Newman,
CRC co-chairman, Amitay and
Netzer will have the necessary
information needed by students
to contend with "a wave of
propaganda that is being
financed by the governments of
the Arab nations.
"Of course, we cannot and will
not fight dollars with dollars,"
said Newman. "After meeting
with Amitay and Netzer, our
students will be equipped to use
their knowledge instead of their
wallets."
For further information, con-
tact the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.


I
Page 2
''. ,\ ., ,, .' ,./ >'-', .',
.
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 16,1977
Women, Money Discussed at Seminar
Beginning with the setting of
financial directions and ending
with the technicalities of settling
a will, Beth Collier, Arnold Ganz,
Philip Heckerling and Ben Salter
served as panelists for a com-
munitywide seminar on money
management sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward Women's Division.
According to Beth Collier,
most women do not keep records
and don't know where they spend
their money.
"RECORDS must be kept. If
not for your sake, for the sake of
those who will have the unfor-
tunate task of sorting out
belongings if something happens
to you," he said.
Economist and investment
counselor Arnold Ganz described
the value to the dollar in our
society.
"We have an economic system
where people have been encurring
debt to great proportion. 1
recommend that you spend your
money! Travel, buy for yourself.
enjoy the capital while it is worth
something. The years of owning
just stock is over. Don't buy just
one thing, the keynote is diver-
sification," he said.
"WISE MONEY management
will keep more money for yourself
and keep Uncle Sam from
becoming too much of a partner
in your financial affairs," noted
Philip Heckerling, founder of the
University of Miami's Institute
on Estate Planning and director
of graduate divisions in taxation
and estate planning.
The final address, given by
Ben Salter, chairman of the
Federation's Legacy and Endow-
ment program, noted that there
are far too many uninformed
people in our community.
"The next seminar should in-
clude participation from the hus-
bands," said Salter, adding,
"money to organizations like the
Federation are tax deductible,
but just the idea of giving is a
kind of enjoyment like nothing
else."
The hostesses who gathered to plan for the Jewish Federation
of South Broward's Money Management Seminar for Women,
Dec. 8, were (upper photo, from left) Louise Diamond. Bobbi
(Jotkin. Helen Cohan, Bobbie Levin and Eileen Dworkin; (lower
photo, from left) Norma Levine, Wendy Benjamin, Loretta
Seffrin, Jo Ann Katz. Mimi Simon, Susan Singer and Delia
Rosenberg.
Annual Premiere Set
Chairwoman Marcia Tishman
and her committee of 33 com-
munity workers met at the
suiting place to kick off the
fourth annual champagne
premiere of Neil Simon's new
comedy. The Goodbye Girl, a
motion picture starring Richard
Dreyfuss and Marcia Mason.
The event will be presented at
the Hallandale Theatre on
Tuesday, Dec. 20. There will be a
champagne reception in the lobby
at 7:30 p.m., followed by the
movie at 8:30 p.m.
Proceeds of the premiere will
be used by the Starting Place, a
Broward County comprehensive
mental health facility, special-
izing in referral, outpatient, day
care, education, family coun-
seling and drug abuse-related
problems.
Tickets may be obtained by
calling the Starting Place.
RELGO, INC.
Religious Goods, Gifts,
Books & Records
1507 WASHINGTON
AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
532-5912
Dinner to Honor
Alfred Golden
CONTINENTAL
JANITORIAL CORP.
"Lei The Professionals
Do The Job"
HOME CLEANING,
RUG SHAMPOOING.
WINDOW CLEANING,
FLOOR WAXING.
Insured* Bonded* References
Offices Homes
Condominiums
Free Estimates:
987-9498
Marion Salter
and
Big Gifts Set Pace for 78 CJA-IEF
Top leadership of the South
Broward Jewish community
gathered at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Moses Hornstein to pledge
support for Israel and world
Jewry.
Some 60 persons attended the
parlor meeting which, with the
Shornrai Dinner on Dec. 18, will
officially launch the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward's 1978
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
THE GUESTS heard Herbert
Friedman, former executive vice
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal, speak on the current
Middle East peace initiative.
Lewis E. Cohn, Federation
president, noted that the
gathering was the largest in
Federation's history and double
that of last year.
"We are now witnessing the
coming of age of our com-
munity," he said. "We have
become far stronger than every
before, and we not only are con-
cerned about the needs in Israel,
but also about the need for more
funds than last year to meet the
requirements here in South
Broward."
COHN WENT on to say that
this year's task is a monumental
one, "a task in which we must
take the lead and the respon-
sibility to set the highest level
pace for this year's campaign to
help relieve suffering of world
Jewry. Jews here depend on it.
Jews in Israel depend on it," he
said.
ALFRED GOLDEN
South Florida Jewish com-
munity leader, Alfred Golden,
will be honored at the annual
Temple Beth El Israel Dinner of
State on Sunday. Jan. 8, to be
held at the temple, it was an-
nounced by Rabbi Samuel Z.
Jaffe. spiritual leader of the
congregation. Golden will be the
recipient of the State of Israel
United Jerusalem Award.
Dinner chairmen will be Mr.
and Mrs. Owen L. Whyman.
AN EXECUTIVE with River-
side Memorial Chapels, Golden
has been active in the leadership
of the Iyael Bond Organization.
He is a member of the board of
directors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. National
Commissioner of the Anti-
Defamation League and the
Hillel Foundation.
David Schoenbrun. radio and
television broadcast journalist,
will be the guest speaker. He is
the winner of numerous reporting
awards, and was a correspondent
during World War II. covering
the invasion of Normandy. After
the war. Schoenbrun became
Paris correspondent for CBS
News. He regularly covers events
in the Middle East.
Local Leaders Named
Delegate Candidates
Rabbi David Shapiro and Dr.
I. A. Rosenthal of Hollywood
have been named by the Ad-
ministrative Board of the Zionist
Organization of America to bs
candidates for election as dele-
gates to the twenty-ninth World
Zionist Congress which will take
place in Jerusalem Feb. 20-28,
1978. The election will be by
secret mail ballot in early Decem-
ber. All members of Zionist
groups are eligible to vote.
Moses Hornstein (left) hosted the Big Gifts parlor meeting of
the Jewish Federation of South Broward's 1978 Combined Jew-
ish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. With Hornstein. who is a
Federation vice president and Big Gifts chairman, are (from
left) Herbert Friedman, former executive vice chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal; Lewis E. Cohn, Federation president;
and Dr. Stanley Margulies, 1978 CJA-IEF general campaign
chairman.
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom. For
this reason we do not allow our name to be
represented by any other organization. Each
chapel is exclusively a Riverside Chapel.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
HOLLYWOOD:
2230 Hollwood Boulevard/920-1010
SUNRISE:
1171 Northwest 61st Avenue(Sunset Strip)/584-6060
North Miami Beach,Miami Beach,Miami and
West Palm Beach.
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan area.
Riverside
Memorial Chapel.Inc./Funeral Directors.
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
r^
M12-14-77
H12-14-77
H12-14-77
A


Friday, December 16,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Women Attend leadership Assembly 'Torah IS Wave Of the Future'
The major Jewish Women's or-
ganizations combined efforts
with the Jewish Federation of
South Broward for a leadership
assembly. Rep. Elaine Bloom ad-
dressed more than 150 women
from the 13 contributing or-
ganizations on "The Role of the
Volunteer Worker in Today's So-
ciety."
"My background in Jewish
communal work has helped me
with my political career. My poli-
tical interests developed while I
was working with legislation for
the Community Relations Com-
mittee at the Federation," ex-
plained Rep. Bloom.
REP. BLOOM noted, "While
not meaning to sound feminist,
women's organizations accom-
plish more than men's organiza-
tions. This can be attributed to
the fact that women are better
organized and better trained. The
work must continue," she added.
Workshops were held prior to
Rep. Bloom's address. These
sessions included: How to con-
duct a meeting, led by Nancy
Seng; Leadership Development,
led by Alma Hofstadter and
Adele Beckerman; Membership,
led by Sylvia Berman; How to
fund-raise in an organization, led
by Vivian Herz; Speaker
Training, led by Marcy Levin;
How to best use the major media,
led by Sheila Rosen; and Per-
sonal Power, led by Francena
Thomas.
Organization exhibits were on
display to explain the purposes
and actions of the respective
groups.
To illustrate the organization
overview given by Shirley
Cole, Ann Leffel (pictured)
shows that the volunteer
woman is a real, involved per-
son and not a plastic person,
regardless of the clothes and
accessories that are worn.
Speaking to members of 12 major Jewish women's organiza-
tions at the first annual Leadership Assembly held in conjunc-
tion with the Jewish Federation of South Broward Women's
Division was Florida Representative Elaine Bloom (center).
Discussing her topic of "The Role of the Volunteer Worker in
Today's Society" are Phyllis Kraemer, Women's Division
president (left), and Nancy Brizel, vice president of Community
Education.
ATLANTIC CITY (JTA) -
"The new recognition in Israel
and elsewhere that Torah is the
wave of the future for Jews,
paves the way for Orthodox
Jewry to broaden its influence on
Jewish life the world over," Rab-
bi Pinchos Menachem Alter,
chairman of Agudath Israel in
11srael, told 3,000 delegates at-
tending the Agudath Israel fifty-
fifth national convention at the
Sheraton-Deauville Hotel.
Alter, who is also a member of
the Moetzes Gedolei HaTorah
(Council of Torah Sages) in
Israel, alluded to Agudath
Israel's participation in Prime
Minister Menachem Begins
government coalition, when he
said: "Never before has Torah
Jewry in Israel faced such oppor-
tunity to thrive spiritually
because of a new climate of good-
will."
A STATUS report on the
agreement between Begin and
Agudath Israel live months alter
it led to a coalition for the Likud,
was made public for the first time
by Rabbi Menachem Porush,
Agudath Israel Knesset deputy
and chairman of the Knesset
Committee on Labor and Social
Betterment.
He noted that the demands for
rights for Orthodox Jews were
"systematically being met by the
Begin administration."
Reading from a dossier of docu-
ments, Porush cited such pnn
vious controversies as auto,,-
sies, work on the Sabbath, anO
conscription of religious girls into
the armed forces, as examples of
problems nearing solution.
The veteran Orthodox leader
continued: "Despite its preoccu-
pation with security and the
economy, the government has
not abandoned the religious
agenda."
IN A MESSAGE to the con-
vention. Begin stated: "I wish to
inform you dear friends and
teachers that the collaboration
with your colleagues in Eretz
Yisrael is genuine and hearty. It
is self-understood that the coa-
lition agreement will be observed
in language and spirit, please
God."
In his keynote address, Rabbi
Moshe Sherer, executive presi-
dent of Agudath Israel of
America, criticized the American
Jewish leadership "for lagging
behind their Israeli counterparts
in recognizing the religious in-
gredient of the needs of the
Jewish masses."
He cited the "snail's pace" of
the Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies in meeting its respon-
sibilities towards Jewish edu-
cation.
SHERER charged that al-
though there are many who now
are slowly recognizing the value
of Jewish education, "it is incon-
ceivable that soaring assimilation
through intermarriage will wait
for creeping decision-making."
arnett
lanK
Barnett Bank
of Hollywood
Tyler Street at 19th Avenue Phone: 925-8200
Marine Supplies
Hardware & Print, Inc.
Houtcwarei & Gift!
Home Decor
Patio I Dinette Furniture Both / Cloet Shop
BEADED WINDOWS
WINDOW SHADES
DRAPERY RODS
WALLPAPER
KEY & LOCK WORK
Store Houri: 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Closed Sunday
100 East Beach Boulevard
, Florida 33009
Phone 456 0566
ROOM DIVIDERS
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS
FOLI AGE
plATots
patio furniture
ft
Prof. Allen Pollack (center), a noted authority on Soviet and
Middle East affairs, was guest speaker at the December
meeting of the Leadership Development Committee of the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward. LDC Co-Chairmen R. Joel
Weiss (left) and Merv Weinstein discuss Pollack's topic, "Jews
in the Diaspora," at a pre-meeting session.
In the World Zionist Congress Elections:
VOTE FOR
THE BUILDERS
OF ISRAEL!
VOTE
LABOR
ZIONIST
VOTE SLATE 2
Labor Zionist Alliance, Pioneer Women,
Friends of Labor Israel. Friends of Pioneer Women, Habonim/Dror
Qyctica $nte/uo/t2 9$o/ttsts
LOCATED IN THE NEW
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5822 StG^tug cihad
SPECIALIZING IN:
INTERIOR PLANT & FLORAL DESIGN
DAILY FLOWER SERVICE
PRIVATE PARTIES AT HOME
WEDDINGS (LARGE OR SMALL)
BAR-BAT MITZVAHS
C(M Qtktt 9b* "tJlc ^Ufomate S <3fom( ufettftg
987-2443


**J14
TIi- f .,.'.* FUmduM W CJ.~&... SS2.
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Page 4
77u? Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 16,1977
Editor's Corner
A Change for the Future
"It is possible to take care of the future only if we
examine the ever-changing realities, not with the eyes of
yesterday and the day before, but with an insight into the
stream of change."
David Ben-Gurion
We speak of the future a great deal, the future of
Jewish heritage and Jewish culture, the future of the State
of Israel. No one can say for certain what the future will
bring, but it is a universal truth that the future brings
change. It is not enough merely to sit back and wait for
those changes to occur. As every successful businessman
knows, we must make those changes ourselves.
On Sunday evening, contributors of $5,000 and more
to the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign of the Jewish Federation of South Broward, will
gather at Temple Beth Shalom in Hollywood for the 1978
CJA-IEF annual Shomrai Dinner. The event marks the
official kick of f of the campaign.
Those who attend, who give to their fullest capability,
are performing a mitzvah for the future of the whole
Jewish people, as are those who will participate in the 1978
CJA-IEF campaign whatever their financial situation and
capability.
We urge everyone who can,to attend Sunday night's
dinner. It will be a message to the people of Israel, the
Jews of our community and the world that we will not
allow our future to be less than it can be, less than it
should be, less than it must be.
The war against terror must be fought by all of us.
The battle for freedom from want and fear is everyone's
battle; and, when the victory is won, it will be everyone's
victory. We Are One.
The Waldheim Goof
The upcoming conference in Cairo should be viewed
as another step forward in the long road to a com-
prehensive peace settlement in the Middle East, a step
that follows the successful talks between Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin in Jerusalem.
That is why many found it difficult to understand
why it took the Carter administration so long to agree to
go to the meeting along with Egypt and Israel.
Harder to understand than the U.S. delay to join
Israel and Egypt in peace talks was the surprise an-
nouncement by United Nations Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim after he said that he will have a repre-
sentative at Cairo that there should be a meeting at the
UN of all parties to the Mideast dispute after the Cairo
conference and before the Geneva conference is held. The
Israelis rightfully rejected this saying with Sadat the next
step after Cairo is the Geneva conference.
UN ^tiaar "e ^^ tit ^
grsSSSSSSSHS
Was Waldheim acting on his own in an effort to get
the UN into the act, or was he acting for the Soviet Union
which has been trying to wreck the Sadat initiatives?
Sadat himself outlined the Soviet reasoning most clearly
when he told the Egyptian Peoples Assembly: "The
Soviets wanted us to live in a no-war, no-peace situation
because as they analyzed it, they thought they would not
have a role in the Middle East if peace were established."
Instead of trying to throw a monkeywrench into the
operations, Waldheim should have been using his office to
try to persuade the Soviet Union, Syria, Jordan and
Lebanon to go to Cairo.
How Dare They Make Peace?
UNLESS PLANS have
changed, by the time this is in
print Egypt's Ambassador
Ashraf Ghorbal will have ap-
peared in an address before the
Synagogue Council of America in
New York.
I remember a political series
published several years ago
detailing Ghorbal's extensive
anti-Semitic activities in
Argentina and my own vitriolic
comment on it.
A letter to me from the
Egyptian Embassy in Wash-
ington vigorously denied the
truth of the series. I have kept
the letter in my files all this time,
and on every occasion that I have
come across it, accidentally or
otherwise, I could sense the aura
of the enemy bursting forth from
the envelope.
NOW, Ghorbal not only ap-
HHMii.i.in.iii
Leo
Mindlin
pears in an address before the
Synagogue Council of America,
but suddenly it is reported that
he is an old and steadfast, if
secret, friend of Rabbi Henry
Siegman, executive vice presi-
dent of the Council.
Surely, this is millennial. Or is
-&
OT^V
it? Shakespeare wonders in King
Henry VI, "For how can tyrants
safely govern home/ Unless
abroad they purchase great
alliance?"
This is the principle that
motivated the Arab leaders in
their Algerian meeting last week.
They see a threat to their hege-
monies in the puissant possibility
of peace between Israel and
Egypt. I can understand their
politics, even if they are para-
doxical politics.
THE WHOLE western world
is changing because of the vast
migration into it of Middle
Eastern and African populations
a migration that is causing the
kind of human relations challenge
mainly we, in the U.S., seem best
to be meeting because, for gener-
ations, we have had so much
more experience with it than, say,
the Europeans, who are only in
the last decade beginning to bear
what often is the frank burden of
it.
At the same time, there is a
disproportionate movement of
import dollars, pounds and
marks from west to east that is
far more disruptive to the sur-
vival index of the western nations
than the movement of the peoples
into the western midst, difficult
as that in itself has been for the
west to bear.
In geopolitical terms, this
means that the Middle Eastern
and African nations, which
ironically we continue to call
"emerging" and/or "have-not"
nations, in fact have us on the
ropes with their material wealth
and indifference to the needs of
their own people.
THEY ARE willing to suck
out our economic bone marrow
through their export oil policies.
They unsettle our social and
political structure by en-
couraging the emigration of
populations into our midst that
they'd rather not commit them-
selves to support.
On the other hand, they are
unwilling to tolerate western
Continued on Page 13
Vanessa Redgrave's PLO Push
Vanessa Redgrave, who is currently
starring with Jane Fonda in Julia, a film
about the Nazi era, based on Lilian Hell-
man's memoir Pentimento, appears to have
taken up a new cause the destruction of
the Jewish State.
"She told me Israel has no right to exist,"
comedian Joey Adams reports. "She said
that as long as Israel exists, there will never
be peace in the Middle East so it must be
destroyed."
ACCORDING TO Adams, Redgrave -
who is known for her radical left, Trotskyite
political views telephoned him the other
day to seek the assistance in promoting a
"documentary" on the Arab struggle against
Israel, a film she claimed she had produced
with Yasir Arafat, chief of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
Adams, who has helped raise some $200
million for Israel, was stunned.
"1 couldn't believe it," he recalled. She ob-
viously didn't know who I was or what I
believed in, or she wouldn't have called me in
the first place. At first, I thought she was
kidding or something. I asked her if her film,
which she said she wanted to get on tele-
vision, was balanced; if it presented both
sides of the Middle East issue. "Oh no," she
said, "there is only one side Israel is a
racist, fascist state and it has to go."
IRONICALLY, Redgrave, as Julia, plays
a Jewish woman who sacrifices her life
fighting the Nazis.
"And she told me the Jews she might
have said the Zionists helped Hitler
during the war," Adams said. "She must be
very sick."
Redgrave could not be reached for com-
ment. The Jewish Wee*
"Oewisli Kloridiari.
and SHOFAR OF ORE ATE R HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Off Ice 12 S. Federal Hwy.. Suite M Dante, FT*. SS004
Telephone BSO-Ml 8
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT .130 NE 6th St.. Miami, Fla. J8112 Phone ITS-eWe
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE 8HOCHET SELMA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publlaher Executive Editor AaalaUnt to Publisher
The J ewish Floridian Owe* Nat Guarantee The Kashrvth
WTho Merchandise Advertised In lt Columns
PubUahed Bl-Weekly
Second Claaa Poatae Paid at Dante, Fla. 8M600
The Jewish Floridian ha* absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.. I
Met..ber of the Jewish Tetetraphlc Aeency, Sevan Arts Feature Syndicate, World-1
wide Maws Service, National Editorial Association. American Asaaciatten ofII
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Assaetettefi.
SUESCRIPTION RATES: (local area) One Year7.J. Out etTown Upon Request.! j
Friday, December 16,1977
Volume 7
6 TEVETH 5738
Number 25
wmmmmmmmm.......................iMmmmnm.....................m
| College Students-Learn How To I
i
Combat Arab Propaganda on Campus
Dec. 26 7:30 P.M., guest: Morris Amitay, executive
director of the American Israel Public Affairs
Committee-at Michael Ann Russell JCC.
Dec. 28 7:30 P.M.,guest: Yuvall Netzer, consul general
of Israel at Atlanta Films, singing, music,
talafel, conversation at JCC Hollywood
Extension, 2838 Hollywood Blvd.


Friday, December 16,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar ofGreater Holly wood
Page 5
Israel Prepared for Peace 'Any Time,'Day an Tells Germans
By JON FIDLER
BONN (JTA) Israel
would be prepared to sign a
separate peace treaty with Egypt
"any time," even before the
planned Geneva conference,
Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan told a press conference
here at the end of a three-day
official visit to the German
capital.
Dayan said he was "very
happy and satisfied" with the
outcome of his talks with German
political leaders. He had received
assurances that "the German
government will not negotiate
with or recognize the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization as
long as the PLO does not change
its attitude to Israel."
HE SAID Bonn also promised
to "grant full support to Presi-
dent Sadat's peace move, even
though some Arab countries are
Oldest Yiddish
U.S. Newspaper
Shuts Down
After 87 Years
NEW YORK (JTA) The
oldest Yiddish newspaper in the
United States. Freie Arbeiter
Stimme (Free Voice of Labor),
ceased publication Nov. 30
iKK'uasc of insoluable financial
problems. In its Hi years of pub-
lication, the organ of Jewish
anarchist philosophy had a peak
weekly circulation of ISO.IKX). Its
last press run as a monthly was
1.700 copies.
\hrne Thome, the editor who
has comprised the paper's edi-
torial staff, said the newspaper
could not support itself from its
firsl day of publication. Because
the paper could afford to pay only
a bookkeeper. Thorns volun-
teered his services, starting 17
years ago.
UNTIL HIS retirement three
year ago, Thome earned a living
as a lithographer for the Jewish
Daily Forward, the 80-year-old
only Yiddish daily still being
published.
Thome said that the Stimme
was started to help newly-ar-
riving Jewish immigrants with
their cultural, social and
economic problems and that it
had a key role in the formation of
the International Ladies Gar-
ment Workers Union, the bakers
union, the millinery and cap
makers unions and others.
The Freie Arbeiter Stimme
vacated a two-room office on
Union Square Nov. 30, and
another chapter in American
Jewish journalism ended.
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not exactly supporting this
move." Based on these comments
alone, the Dayan visit can be
described as a diplomatic suc-
cess.
Prior to the visit, Israeli
sources had expressed dis-
appointment at Bonn's slow and
hesitant welcome to the Sadat
initiative and irritation at Bonn's
support for the European Eco-
nomic Community's (EEC) stress
on Palestinian rights at Israel's
expense.
But Dayan indicated that some
points of disagreement persist.
He said he had criticized recent
German and EEC support for UN
resolutions condemning the pro-
vision by Israel of better housing
for Gaza Strip Palestinians and
condemning new West Bank
settlements by Israel. "I can't
say after I explained our position
that the German government will
change its policy or position,
though I am grateful that I was
given the opportunity to ex-
plain," he said.
DAYAN TOLD reporters that
he personally would prefer to
have all the Arab countries repre-
sented at the coming Cairo
meeting, adding that in that
event Israel would still only
accept bilateral negotiations with
each country. But "even if
Jordan and Syria don't come, it is
better to deal with Egypt alone
than to have no negotiations at
all."
The Soviet refusal to attend
Cairo "made sense" in view of
anti-Soviet statements by Presi-
dent Sadat. But, Dayan added,
'it is up to the parties not to
the Geneva co-chairmen U.S. and
USSR to decide what, where
and when to negotiate."
Asked about UN Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim's in-
vitation to an umbrella meeting
at the UN. Dayan said: "My
personal view is that face-to-face
negotiations as last week in Jeru-
salem and shortly in Cairo should
be sufficient before Geneva. It is
not necessary to have any further
meetings."
HE SAID that Sadat could, "if
need be," make war or peace
alone, whereas all the other Arab
countries, even together "can't
do so." He believed Jordan and
Saudi Arabia would "not come
out against Sadat, though I don't
know if they will give him
positive support." He also did
not know "whether the Egyptian
military forces and people
support him."
Earlier. Dayan told West
Germany's leaders at a dinner in
his honor here that Israelis were
sorrowed by "the latest anti-
Semitic incidents among youth"
in Germany and "the attempts to
rewrite history and the nostalgia
for the Hitler era in which can be
detected an indulgence toward
Nazi war criminals and their
deeds."
While Dayan mentioned no
specific incidents, he was ob-
viously referring to the recent
symbolic "jew-burning" by
cadets at a Munich officers'
training school, the recent ap-
pearance of books explaining the
"human" side of Hitler and a
controversial documentary film,
Hitler A Career.
DAYAN spoke of his visit to
the site of the notorious Bergen
Belsen concentration camp, his
first act on arriving in Germany.
"One should never forget this
mass annihilation, not to incite
hatred but to hold before the eyes
of youth throughout the world
what happened on this continent
in our generation."
Dayan said, however, that the
Israeli government knew the
German government and its
leaders recognized these dangers
and hoped "that they will take all
necessary measures against such
dangerous occurrences."
One of Dayan's departures
from his planned itinerary was to
visit an exhibition on Egyptian
art and history. No Egyptians
were present during his visit.
VOTE Z.O.A. ACTION
SLATE NO. 3
Vote: RABBI DAVID SHAPIRO
DR. I.A. ROSENTHAL
Delegates to the World Zionist Congress
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 16,1977
T
8
a
e
e:
VI
I

o
il
r
How Soviets Use Psychiatry to Suppress Dissidents
:
By LYNNE IANNIEI.LO
Executive Manager
ADL Communications Division
Andrei Dubrov was lucky. He
was released from Moscow's Psy-
chiatric Hospital No. 3 after only
two weeks. He was 22 years old, a
former student who had been ex-
pelled for dissident activity.
Soviet authorities put him in the
hospital for "observation." The
reason: He refused to join the
Red Army after a last-minute
revocation of permission to emi-
grate to Israel with his mother.
He shared a ward with 19
others, "naked men ... tied down,
writhing in convulsions, issuing
wild cries. From time to time, an
orderly gives them a punch in the
stomach ... They quiet down for
a time, just moan ... almost all of
them are injected with aminazin
(a Tranquilizer) ... The ward is
permeated by a sickening smell of
rotting; the patients perform
their natural functions on the
beds they are tied to... "
AFTER TWO weeks, as Wes-
tern publicity and protests
mounted in his behalf, Dubrov
was discharged following
interrogation by a commission of
Soviet doctors. The questions
they asked were curiously non-
medical in character: "Do you in-
tend to be politically active in the
West?" "Will you take part in
the Zionist movement in Israel9"
Dubrov's case is one of more
than 200 described by Sidney
Bloch and Peter Reddaway in
their book, Psychiatric Terror:
How Soviet Psychiatry is Used
to Suppress Dissent" (Basic
Books). The work, which details
the evolution and character of
Soviet psychiatry, was timed for
publication just prior to the sixth
congress of the World Psy-
chiatric Association held in
Honolulu the last week of
August.
It is credited with playing a
large role in that group's censure
of the Soviet Union's "system-
atic abuse of psychiatry for
political purposes."
IN NEW YORK for a series
of interviews and television
appearances. Dr. Bloch, a British
psychiatrist and lecturer in psy-
chiatry at Oxford University,
talked about the conference and
the book. "At last," he said, "the
World Psychiatric Association
has Rotten off the fence and acted
in a morally responsible fashion."
PROMINENTLY opposed,
too, were Scandinavian asso-
ciations which favored talking to
the Russians, "and who knows
what other groups were opposed,
perhaps because of skepticism,
perhaps because of fear of giving
the entire field of psychiatry a
black eye."
Buko vsky, who spent a total of
nearly 10 years in Soviet psy-
chiatric hospitals for various
charges of anti-government agi-
tation and was under arrest at
the time of the Mexico confer-
ence, had sent to Western psy-
chiatrists documented reports of
his own incarceration, as well as
that of other dissidents.
HE WAS finally released in
1976, following strong Western
campaigns in his behalf, and now
lives in Bonn, Germany.
"This time, it was different,"
Dr. Bloch said. "Even more im-
portant than the vote to censure
was a 121 to 66 vote to establish a
permanent committee to inves-
tigate the political manipulation
of psychiatry anywhere in the
world."
Countries suspected of using
psychiatric "treatment" to sup-
press dissent include South
Africa, Rumania, Czecho-
slovakia, Chile and Argentina.
But the evidence is scanty or
inconclusive.
"THERE IS no doubt," Dr.
Bloch said, "that Soviet psychia-
trists have labeled dissenters
mentally ill and hospitalized
them solely becuase of their poli-
tical activities."
Diagnoses include such things
as "sluggish schizophrenia" and
"paranoid delusions of reforming
society." They are made by a
relatively small number of Soviet
psychiatrists, "a sort of elite
group," described by Dr. Bloch
as being "made up of doctors who
became important partly because
of their political astuteness.
They recognize what the party
wants and give it to them a
formula in which dissent can be
paired with mental illness."
Then, in the prison and civil psy-
chiatric hospitals, more and more
doctors are involved.
"THERE IS a problem of dual
loyalty to the patient and to
the employer, which is the
government," Dr. Bloch said. It
starts, he went on, with social
conditioning. The psychiatrists,
who take an oath "to be guided
by the principle of communist
morality," may really believe
that "those who disagree with
the political system are strange.
And if they do not, then they are
dissenters. It is easier to play
along."
There have been doctors who
raised questions or protested and
were warned not to make prob-
lems or were themselves arrested.
Do the psychiatrists need psy-
chiatry? "That's been dis-
cussed," Dr. Bloch said. "It's a
frightening thought. "
But at the Honolulu meeting.
internationally-known Prof. An-
drei Snezhnevsky, whose theories
on schizophrenia effected the use
of psychiatry to stifle dissent,
called criticism a "malicious con-
coction ... a psychiatric variant
of anti-Soviet propaganda."
AT A PRESS conference called
by the Soviets on the afternoon of
the vote, he and Dr. Edward
Babayan, the chief Soviet dele-
Art Courses Offered
Painting, sketching and multi-
media crafts are a few of the new
courses now being offered as part
of the Senior Adult program of
the Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida-Hollywood Ex-
tension.
All JCC members are eligible
for the beginners art classes,
which will be taught by Caryn
Ward. Ward, a native of New
York, has had several one-woman
shows.
She has had experience in art
instruction for senior adults and
has worked with children. In
addition, she has a background in
photography, art history, adver-
tising and fashion illustration.
All senior adults interested in
the art classes are urged to call
the JCC.
Hadassah to Meet
Dr. and Mrs. Sam Meline will
address members of the Sabra-
Scopus Group of Hadassah at a
general membership meeting on
Tuesday, Dec. 20, at the Wash-
ington Federal Savings Bank on
North Park Road. The guest
speakers will recount their ex-
periences of a recent trip to
Israel. Bunny Goldstein, pro-
gram chairperson, will serve as
mistress of the ceremony. The
public is invited.
A card party and luncheon was
held Dec. 14 at the Emerald Hills
Country Club to raise funds for
vocational education, one of the
programs conducted in Israel by
Hadassah.
Hemispheres to Meet
B'nai B'rith Women Hemi-
spheres Chapter-information, is
holding a membership meeting
Monday, Dec. 19 at 12:30 p.m. at
the Ocean Terrace Room in
Hallandale. Members and
prospective members are invited
to attend.
Guest speaker will be Alfred
Golden, national commissioner of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. Golden will discuss
current situations and actions
now being taken by the A.D.L.
locally, nationally and inter-
nationally.
MELWHYTE
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gate and head ot the Soviet
Health Ministry, referred to Dr.
Bloch as "a doubtful psychia-
trist" and dismissed his co-
author, Peter Reddaway, a senior
lecturer in political science at
the London School of Economics,
as unqualified. Their "so-called
book," the Russians said, is "a
good compilation of slander."
"The book," Dr. Bloch said,
"represents six years of research,
of collecting evidence, of inter-
viewing Soviet emigrants psy-
chiatrists and dissenters who had
been hospitalized for non-medical
reasons. There is no way of
knowing how many such people
remain in Soviet psychiatric in-
stitutions or how many more will
be confined."
The Honolulu conference rep-
resents a positive step, he said.
"It created the machinery to
monitor psychiatric abuse. It also
set the stage for worldwide pro-
test and that, more than any-
thing else, is what will stop the
practice and get people released."
JCC Senior Adult Program
DECEMBER MOVIES
WEDNESDAYS -1 P.M.
DEC. 21
"Ballet With Edward Vilella"
Watch as Villella injects amazing vitality into subject of
ballet.
"Bolero"
Ravel's Bolero as performed by Los Angeles Philharmonic
with Zubin Mehta conducting.
DEC. 28
"Vacation Travelogues"
Alaska, the 49th state Caribbean African Odyssey
LECTURES
THURSDAYS -10:30 A.M.
DEC. 15
"Muttel de Messer" Songs & Mish Mosh
Fun with Max Frank, Humorist
DEC. 22
"Travel To The Far East" Slide presentation Mr. and
Mrs. Norman Zlatin
DEC. 29
"Remembering & Reminiscing" Where were you 50 years
ago on New Year's Eve? Elaine Goldstein, JCC staff.
Moderator. Punch and cookies will be served.
Johnny Cash in Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) Johnny Cash, the famous
American country and Western singer, recently visited the
Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center here twice in two
days. "I was so impressed when I first came to see the famous
stained glass windows by Marc Chagall, that I couldn't forget
the place and had to return to visit with soldiers in the wards."
he said. In Israel to make a CBS-TV film. Cash said, "This is
my fourth visit to Israel. I just hope that some day there will be
peace."
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Friday, December 16,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Sadat Saddens U.S. Arabs
j f %
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Sen. James
Abourezk (D., S.D.), anrl
leaders of Arab-American
organizations dislike and
are concerned by Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat's
visit to Jerusalem and his
Middle East peace initia-
tives, a survey by the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency
shows.
Abourezk said, "There
seems to be a tendency for
Sadat to move without the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization and Syria. Any
agreement without Pales-
tine support will endanger
peace rather than enhance
it."
"ABOUREZK did not par-
ticipate in the Senate discussion
when a resolution commending
Sadat and Prime Minister
Menachem Begin was adopted
without dissent.
Dr. M. T. Mehdi. president of
the American Arab Relations
Council that supports the PLO.
said Sadat is "a well-meaning
fool." and his speech to the
Egyptian Parliament was "a
great disappointment because
"it did not contain any Israeli
concessions."
Joseph Baroody of Washing-
ton, president of the National
Association of Arab Americans,
said. 'What Sadat did
Race For Life
Fund-Raiser Set
Race For Life, Hroward Coun-
ty Vmerican Cancer Society's
largest single fund-raising event
of the year, is set lor March 15.
19"8, according to this year's
chairwoman llene Weisberg.
Haci' ihi |,iff, a day at (iulf-
stream Track in nallandale,
raises more money in one day for
the American Cancer Society
(haii any other single day event
in liroward County.'' explained
Weisberg.
"THIS YEAR, with the help of
my co-chairwomen Ana Sonkin
and Fran Knee, we expect the
largest turnout ever for a spec-
tacular day, with a surprise
theme, to benefit the American
Cancer Society." she declared.
Weisberg said that the Race
For Life day begins with a lun-
cheon at the Gulfstream club-
house, which will be decorated
with a surprise theme by Bottieri
Florists of Hollywood.
"GULFSTREAM generously
donates the money from one
race to the day's proceeds,"
Weisberg commented. She went
on to explain that band music
will be provided by I-es and
Elaine Wagman, and the photo-
graphy will be provided by Can-
did Camera's Norman Bryer.
Race For Life will be preceeded
by a cocktail reception for
patrons and benefactors, hosted
by Dr. and Mrs. Allan Schien-
hlum of Emerald Hills on March
9.
Co-chairwomen Mrs. Knee and
Mrs. Sonkin report that advance
ticket sales for the Race For Life
are proceeding at a rapid rate,
surpassing last year.
"IT IS likely that we will be
sold out in the near future, and
we urge everyone to make their
purchases now," they said.
Race For Life also produces a
fund-raising ad book which is
now in production.
"The book promises to be lar-
ger than ever before," Weisberg
said, "so we urge local businesses
and subscribers to reserve their
spaces now"
dramatically changed the
situation. He took serious risks.
He has put two governments on
the spot namely the United
States and Israel. Both now have
to do things the U.S. in a
passive role of encouraging the
Israelis to reaction in kind to
Sadat's gestures. The Israelis
now have a choice of recip-
rocating or not. The only
responsible Israeli act is to recip-
rocate or cut Sadat adrift."
RICHARD SHADYAC, a
Washington lawyer who is a
former NAAA president and a
founder of the organization which
is the largest among Arab
Americans, said he had "grave
concern" over the Sadat
initiatives. "I question whether
this action on Sadat's part on
behalf of Arab countries will bear
fruit" since he thinks "any nego-
tiations" such as the Cairo
meeting "without Syria's parti-
cipation and the Palestinians
properly represented through
their legitimate representatives
the PLO will succeed."
Shadyac added, however, that
"as an American I am greatly
encouraged by the humanistic
approach that is developing in
the Middle East and the state-
ments both by Egypt and Israel
pledging no more war to be very
favorable in terms of climate."
A WASHINGTON repre-
sentative of the Association of
Arab American University Grad-
uates which issues numerous
pamphlets and books hostile
towards Israel and Zionism, said
his organization is "an education
group" and "non-political" and
therefore "may not take a
position."
The Honi Abudazzeh, who is
secretary of the Washington
chapter, said that the
organization's president is
Michael Salamon of Kansas State
University.
Understanding taxes and being able to explain them while soli-
citing for the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
was the topic of seminar conducted by Tax Attorney and Na-
tional UJA Associate Campaign Chairman Norman Lipoff
(standing right). Participants in the seminar included (seated
from left) Florence Goodman, CJA-IEF vice chairman of Holly-
wood Beach: Robert Gay nor, CJA-IEF Metropolitan division
campaign cabinet member; (standing left) Ben Salter, chairman
of the Jewish Federation of South Broward's Legacy and En-
dowment program.
Dr. Stan Spntz (left) of the B'nai B'rith Chai Lodge presents a
plaque which establishes an annual award in honor of the
Hollywood Fire Department's Fireman of the Year. The first
selection will be made this year. Accepting are (from left) Divi-
sion Chief William Shulby and Don Anderson.
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 16,1977
Tay-Sachs Letter Misleading
EDITOR: The Jewish Floridian: '
I would like to respond to a
letter that appeared in The
Jewish Floridian on Nov. 25,
1977, signed by Rabbi Weber-
man. The learned rabbi made
several misleading and false
accusations concerning the Tay-
Sachs Prevention Program of
Miami which must be corrected.
The primary mistake he made
is that abortion is recommended
for fetuses affected with Tay-
Sachs disease. This is not true.
The program does not recom-
mend abortion. It does not offer
abortion. It does not perform
abortions.
THE PROGRAM only offers
information to Jews about their
own bodies, i.e., if they are
carriers of the Tay-Sachs gene
(one of every 28 Jews in Miami is
a carrier).
Carriers married to carriers
(one of 800 Jewish couples) are
told there are several alternatives
they may choose, including
taking their chances of having a
child with Tay-Sachs (one in four
with each pregnancy), adoption,
artificial insemination, having no
children at all, or getting an
abortion.
Some persons found to be
carriers of the disease do not like
any of those alternatives, but use
the information for selecting only
mates that are not carriers of the
disease.
I AM NOT qualified to debate
Rabbi Weberman on the
Halacha, though I do know that
there are conditions and
situations when abortions are
allowed under Halacha. Some
Hasidic rabbis have interpreted
this such that some women were
allowed to abort Tay-Sachs
fetuses. None of the Orthodox
rabbis and even some con-
OUR
Reaoeas
WRite
"Lei Thy Words Be Brief"
Koheleth (Ecclesiastesl
servative ones that I have dis-
cussed this with would ever give
blanket approval for this action,
but most said they would decide
on an individual basis each time,
commandment to "Be fruitful
and multiply."
Besides being personally of-
fended, I think it is odd that
Rabbi Weberman uses such
phrases as "Hitlerian phil-
osophy," "warped sense of
values," "aborting fetuses of the
wrong sex," and "replacing
physicians with executioners,"
even though this stems from his
false premise that we recommend
abortion.
I WAS taught that it is the
duty of a rabbi to convince his
congregation to live morally by
intelligent argument and not to
inflame and frighten them with
rhetoric.
The Jewish community can
best be served by reasoned dis-
cussion of such problems by
people who have as many facts as
they can muster. I invite Rabbi
Weberman to join me when I
discuss this and other moral and
ethical problems with third-year
medical students. We may all
til ice cream made Iresti dally in premises
3 *l.AVO*-OVA"teTtf ft
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PAUL M. TOCCI, Ph J).
Director, Tay-Sachs
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South Florida
Egypt Welcomes
Israeli Newsmen
Continued from Page 1
driver provided by the Ministry
of Information. He was told that
since his arrival, he received so
much publicity, "we have to pro-
tect you from subversive
elements."
SO FAR, the only protection
needed seems to be from souvenir
hunters. Anything of Israeli
origin is suddenly in great
demand in Cairo. Israel-made
cigarettes and Israeli coins are]
the most desired items. Israeli
journalists draw crowds wherever
they are recognized, but it is a
friendly curiosity.
Knopp reported a chance
meeting with an Egyptian gen-
eral at an airline office. The
general asked him to convey
regards to Israeli Defense Minis-
ter Ezer Weizman who he said he
regarded as one of the best air
force officers in the world. Weiz-
man formerly commanded Is-
rael's Air Force.
Strauch, who has been meeting
with Egyptian editors, reported
that political circles in Cairo
regard the Syrian and Palestine
Liberation Organization rejection
of President Anwar Sadat's peace
initiatives as a blessing.
The absence of those elements
from the Cairo conference will
allow negotiations to proceed
without the threat of a crisis in
the initial stages, they say.

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Friday, December 16,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
'Carter Gives His Full Support

By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Carter is giving his full
support to the Cairo conference
initiated by Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat, and he has in-
timated that if Syria, Jordan and
I.ebonan, which have rejected
Sadat's invitation, do not also
open face-to-face talks with Israel
ther individually or as a group,
_.ien Egypt and Israel could enter
into a bilateral agreement.
The President, revealing that
Assistant Secretary of State Al-
fred L. Atherton will represent
heim approach as a way-station
on the road to a "comprehensive"
settlement at Geneva. He noted
Israel has already rejected Wald-
heim's proposal and then said
that the U.S. has not decided
whether it would attend the UN
session.
Israel's rejection amounts to a
veto of the Waldheim proposal
which was widely believed to
have been approved in advance
by both Washington and Mos-
cow. But the President's views
indicated he does not favor it.
Saying the U.S. looks on the
ON CAPITOL HILL
the United States at the Cairo
meeting which he said will begin
about Dec. 13, indicated marked
j^olness both towards the Soviet
Union's Middle East activities
and the proposal Nov. 29 by
United Nations Secretary Gen-
eral Kurt Waldheim for a
separate meeting after Cairo at
the UN.
IN HIS long discussions at a
press conference about Middle
East proceedings now taking
place, Carter omitted the Wald-
Begin Calls Talks
Only a Beginning
LONDON Prime Minister
Menachem Begin said Monday in
an interview with Yediot
Aharonot here that if President
"vnwar Sadat goes back on some
of the statements he previously
made regarding the peace process
in the area, he Begin would
be very disappointed.
Begin further told Yediot
correspondent in London that the
talks in Cairo are the beginning
of a long way "and not an easy
way," but that he is full of faith
and belief. "Sadat's statements
in public, and things he said in
' private talks convinced me of his
candid intentions to reach a peace
agreement," Begin said.
"I BELIEVE that President
Sadat and I found a common
language which will help us get
on the road to peace," Begin is
quoted to have said.
Israel Tour Offered
Cairo meeting as "a very con-
structive step," Carter added,
"The road toward peace which
has already led through Jeru-
salem will now go through Cairo
and ultimately we believe to a
comprehensive consultation at
Geneva."
PRAISING Sadat's and Is-
raeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin's "true leadership quali-
ties," the President indicated
that while he and they think a
separate Israeli-Egyptian peace
"is not desirable," it could evolve
if no other way for settlement
showed promise of success. He
observed that the U.S. and
Israel, the only governments now
going to Cairo, and Egypt have
said privately and publicly that
they have "the very viable hope
that a comprehensive settlement
can be reached among all the
parties involved."
But. Carter added, "If at some
RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
A guided tour of Israel is
scheduled to depart on Monday,
Jan. 30, 1978, announced Dr.
Morton Malavsky, rabbi of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom in Hollywood.
Travelers may remain with the
tour for either 11 days or two
weeks. Nick Fliakos, president of
Trans-Olympia Tours /Shalom
Tours, will accompany Rabbi
Malavsky on the tour.
The tour will include sight-
seeing and visits to government
Officials, as well as strategic
geographical areas.
Contact Rabbi Malavsky for
further information.
later date it becomes obvious"
that Jordan, Syria or Lebanon do
"not want peace in a settlement
with Israel, then an alternative
might have to be pursued. But we
certainly have not reached that
point yet."
Carter noted, "Obviously the
leaders in Syria, even Jordan,
certainly the PLO, have not
recognized that Egypt is
speaking for them adequately."
But Sadat in his speech in
Knesset "evoked very clearly
the basic Arab position that I
have understood in my private
conversations" with Syrian
President Hafez Assad and King
Hussein of Jordan, Carter said.
THE REFUSAL of Jordan
and Syria to go to Cairo, Carter
said, has not "dampened Sadat's
commitment or enthusiasm at
all." He said that "to the best of
his ability. President Sadat is
speaking for the Arab world."
Carter said that "at the time we
discovered" Sadat was going to
visit Jerusalem, "we immediately
began to use whatever influence
we had available to us to en-
courage the other nations not to
condemn President Sadat. This
particularly applied to Saudi
Arabia, to Jordan, to the Euro-
pean countries, to the Soviet
Union and to Syria. In some in-
stances, either they decided not
to condemn him or our influence
was successful."
Saying that Begin and Sadat
"have not rejected the concept
that there must be a comprehen-
sive settlement," the President
noted that "in the meantime, we
don't see anything wrong; in
fact, we look with great favor on
the bilateral negotiations bet-
ween Israel and Egypt. In the
meantime, we are trying to in-
duce the Syrians, the Lebanese,
the Jordanians and, as I say
again, in a supportive role, the
Saudis and others, to support
both the ongoing negotiations
that will continue from Jerusalem
into Cairo and also to avoid any
condemnation of Sadat that
might disrupt his influence and
put an obstacle to peace in the
future."
"THAT IS about all we can
do," he continued. "We have no
control over any nation in the
Middle East. When we find the
progress in the Middle East
being stopped, we use all the
initiatives that we can.
"I think this is a major step in
the right direction. We hope later
that Jordan and Syria and
Lebanon will join these discus-
sions either individually or as a
comprehensive group dealing
with Israel directly."
About the Soviet Union, which
has been hostile toward the Sadat
initiative and is cooperating with
anti-Castro Arab governments
and the PLO, the President said
he wished the Soviets had
decided to go to Cairo, "but we
will make as much progress as we
can, following the leadership of
Sadat and Begin."
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 16,1977


Artist Marc Chagall Receives Award
Artist Marc Chagall was
awarded an Honorary Doctorate
from the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, it was announced by
Otto Stieber, president of Holly-
wood-Hallandale Chapter of the
American Friends of the Hebrew
University.
"For us, the Jews of today,
the miracle is the State of Israel,"
Chagall said in Jerusalem. He
spoke at the president's residence
(Beit Hanasi) at a ceremony
where he also received the Jeru-
salem Municipality's "Honored
Citizen" award, before an
audience of 250, including Israeli
artists and representatives of the
Foreign Ministry, the Munici-
pality and the Hebrew Univer-
sity.
Rabbis to Help UJA
NEW YORK A new na-
tional project designed to in-
crease the level of rabbinic parti-
cipation in UJA Federation
fund-raising campaigns as
solicitors and contributors as well
as spiritual guides, was an-
nounced here by Rabbi Joseph H.
Lookstein. chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal Rabbinical
Advisory Council.
The basic elements are a
solicitor training program to be
known as RAC Operation Up-
grade and a pacesetters group of
rabbis contributing gifts of
SI,800 or over to the annual
campaigns. RAC Operation Up-
grade will be chaired by Rabbi
Joseph H. Rubinstein of Temple
Shalom in Levittown. Pa.
"IT IS through our campaign
efforts on behalf of local overseas
needs," said Rabbi Lookstein.
that the American rabbinic
community demonstrates
tzedakah in action. The RAC
Operation Upgrade program,
while providing participating
rabbis with a pragmatic approach
to effective solicitation, will have
a deep spiritual element to
strengthen and enrich it. This
blend of the practical and the
spiritual will aid concerned rabbis
in their efforts to infuse com-
munity campaigns with deeper
meaning."
The RAC program will be
modeled on UJA's Operation Up-
grade, a solicitor training pro-
-am.
SOUth a^RICA
View of U.S.
Chagall was to have received
the Honorary Degree in 1975 at
the celebration of the Univer-
sity's fiftieth anniversary but
was unable to come to Israel at
the time.
Speaking at the ceremony were
President Ephraim Katzir, Rec-
tor Czapski and Jacob Tsur, for-
mer Israel Ambassador to France
and chairman of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund's Board of Directors.
Responding, Chagall said, in
Yiddish, "I never believed that I,
Liberty
D. Vade'-ar,
a Jew from the Diaspora, would
stand in Beit Hanasi and be hon-
ored by the Hebrew University
and the Jerusalem Municipality.
When I was a small boy in
Vitebsk and went home from
heder every night carrying a lan-
tern, as the streets were dark, I
used to search the heavens for a
miracle. Since then, I have tried
to find the miracle through my
art. For us, the Jews of Today,
the miracle is Israel. I wish her
and all the people, happiness and
peace."
DR. RONALD WELLIKOFF
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS
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...'.


Ly, December 16,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Begin, Callaghan Discuss Mideast
IAURICE SAMUELSON
|NDON (JTA) Israeli
Minister Menachem Begin
confidence here that
ation will eventually sign
l treaties with all of its Arab
on. "It will take some
[but we are already on the
'toward peace," he declared
iinner given in his honor by
Minister James Callaghan
5.10 Downing St.
was responding to
lan who said that from his
France has shown some reser-
vations about the forthcoming
Cairo conference and there are
lingering anxieties among British
officials as well.
Begin delcared at a dinner here
that the contacts between Israel
and Egypt were not a public
relations exercise but were aimed
at an agreement that both he and
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
hoped would be endorsed by all
other parties to the Middle East
conflict before the Geneva con-
ference is reconvened.
IN BRITAIN
long private talk with Begin
the dinner he gained the
on that Israel would
'every muscle" in the
at bid for peace and that a
era" would open for the
He East.
pGIN AND Callaghan con-
their talks at the Prime
kter's official residence
Jay.
,_i's visit is expected to
in an appeal by Britain to
tners in the European Eco-
Community (EEC) for a
Mied positive attitude
the Egyptian-Israeli
i initiatives.
HE SAID the "positive voice"
heard in Jerusalem and Cairo
would prevail over the "negative
voice" at the Arab opposition
conference in Tripoli, Libya last
week.
Begins talks with Callaghan
were described as warm and
informal and wide-ranging and
full of substance. Callaghan was
quoted as saying that the Sadat-
Begin meeting in Jerusalem gave
new hope to the Middle East and
Begin replied that he would take
advantage of the new situation
with vigor.
ADL Registers Protest
Of Argentine Jails
tSHINGTON (JTA) -
gorous protest against anti-
fism in Argentine jails and
ent decree against Jacobo
lan, one of the most prom-
Jews in Argentina, were
ered at the Argentine Em-
several days ago by repre-
Itives of the Anti-
Imation League of
Brith.
\. Norman M. Wall, chairman
ADL's Latin American
rs Committee, asked that
(Argentine government in-
|gate and bring an end to
ocal abuse of Jews under
jtion and the use of Nazi
>ls and recordings in
rity installations.
IE ADL delegation, which
ided the committee's vice
lan, Gerald Quiat, and
Jhi Morton M. Rosenthal,
rgnl that the decree against
erman, former editor-pub-
Br of La Opinion, made him a
^ical prisoner and called for
elease.
Hmerman was arrested in
pi, 1977 for alleged subversive
and economic crimes. When
Jernment investigations
t>duced no basis for preferring
*w against him, a decree was
Kiln Nov. 11 which stripped
Herman of his civil rights and
lered his indefinite detention,
thout charges.
I is property has been placed
custody of the state and his
vspaper is now controlled by
sarmy.
I IN A REPORT to the 64th
annual meeting of the ADL's
national commission, Rosenthal,
director of the ADL's Latin
American Affairs Department,
said that negative trends have
offset positive developments in
matters affecting the Argentine
Jewish community during the
past year.
One disturbing trend, he said,
is the intimidation of Jewish
leadership, as indicated by the
Timerman case, and the kid-
napping of the son of Dr. Ne-
hemias Resnizky, president of
the DAIA, the representative
body of Argentine Jewry.
It took three days to secure the
sons release, after which he left
the country.
ANOTHER disturbing factor,
Rosenthal reported, is the
prevalence of anti-Semitism
within the penal-security system.
A third factor, affecting all
Argentine citizens, is the
prevailing repressive conditions
in the country.
"So long as the Argentine
government, as a matter of
policy, permits security agents
dressed in civilian clothing to
routinely kidnap individuals and
hold them indefinitely without
acknowledging that they are
prisoners, the security of all Ar-
gentine citizens will be tenuous,"
Kosenthal said.
"Jews will be in greater peril
because of the prevalence of anti-
Semitic sentiment among
members of the security ser-
vices."
Swiss Cfeane/is
,4(dfWs no substitute jo/i quality"
JkQiQhaiiom ^RepaiAs
9foudied S&umci/tij fieMce
5904 gjafcye ^eacd 791-0121
Both agreed on the need to aim
for a comprehensive Middle East
settlement and not one limited to
Israel and Egypt.
BRITISH sources said there
was no argument on the issue of a
"Palestinian homeland," British
support of which has drawn
criticism from Israel. The sources
said that Begin recognized that
there was a Palestinian problem
that had to be solved.
One issue on which dis-
agreement was openly admitted
was the Arab boycott of Israel.
Despite frequent Israeli com-
plaints, the Foreign Office will
not change its practice of authen-
ticating certificates of "non-
Israeli origin" of goods imported
by Arab countries from British
firms.
Begin's visit here has aroused
intense interest, not only because
he is the first Israeli Prime Min-
ister to come to Britain officially
as the guest of the government
but because 30 years ago, as
leader of the underground Irgun,
he headed the British "wanted"
list in Palestine.
CALLAGHAN referred to that
past era when he paid tribute to
Begin's "determination and
decisiveness in the days when we
were hunting you." He said it
was those same qualities that
would enable the Israeli leader to
surmount the obstacles on the
road to peace with the Arabs.
Begin, accompanied by his
wife, Aliza, arrived at Heathrow
Airport Friday morning where he
was greeted by Dr. David Owen,
the British Foreign Secretary,
David Kidron, Israel's
Ambassador and leaders of the
Anglo-Jewish community.
Addressing a large crowd of
dignitaries and journalists as he
stepped from his plane, he
declared, "I bring from Jeru-
salem a suggestion to renew
the covenant signed by the
Jewish people and the British
people 60 years ago on that
unforgettable day, Nov. 2,1917."
He was referring to the Balfour
Declaration.
The warm welcome accorded
Begin was marred by protests by
Palestinian and pro-Palestinian
groups. About 500 people, in-
cluding many Palestinian
students, marched through
London denouncing Israel and
Sadat's peace initiative.
The Israel Solidarity Award
will be presented to Sumner
Stopnik at a Salute to Israel
Breakfast on Sunday, Dec. 18,
at 11:30 a.m. in the social hall
of the AUington Towers, an-
nounced Charles Goldin and
Jack Rosenblatt, heads of the
AUington Towers Israel Bond
Committee. Featured enter-
tainer will be Larry Dora,
television, stage and dinner
club humorist.
THE SHELF MAN
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* **" "'I.'"


I
Pgel2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 16,1977
Berkowitz Elected
JNFNational President
NEW YORK Rabbi William
Berkowitz, spiritual leader of
Congregation R'nai Jeshurun
here, noted author and lecturer,
was elected national president of
the Jewish National Fund of
America at the recent biennial
meeting of the JNF Board of
Directors held at JNF House
here.
Elected to serve with Rabbi
Berkowitz as national officers of
the JNF of America are Dr. Israel
Goldstein, Emanuel Neumann,
Meyer Pesin, Herman L. Weis-
man. honorary presidents; Mrs.
D. Leonard Cohen. Morris Giloni,
Jacob Goodman. Mrs. Charlotte
Stein. Mrs. Harry Weisenfeld,
vice presidents: Mrs. Henry
Goldman, secretary, Jack Lef-
kowitz. treasurer: Jesse Eisen
and I. K. Goldstein, associate
treasurers: and Leon Rubinstein,
honorary secretary.
RABBI Berkowitz. who suc-
ceeds Meyer Pesin as head of the
Fund, previously served as a
JNF honorary vice president and
has been a member of its Board
for several years. He has oc-
cupied many important posts in
American Jewish life, currently
serving also as national president
of B*nai Zion. the oldest Ameri-
can fraternal Zionist organiza-
tion, and chairman of the Execu-
tive Committee of the New York
Board of Rabbis.
The congregation which he
leads is the second oldest Jewish
congregation in New York and a
founding synagogue of the Con-
servative movement.
Born in Philadelphia in 1924.
Rabbi Berkowitz is a graduate of
Temple University and of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America. He was designated a
Doctor of Hebrew Letters by the
Spertus College of Judaica in
1972 and a Doctor of Divinity by
the Jewish Theological Seminary
in 1977.
Rabbi Berkowitz has published
several books on religious and
social issues, and his articles
have appeared in prominent na-
tional publications.
Hadassah Meeting Set
The next regular meeting of
Hemispheres Hadassah will be
held in the Hemispheres Ball-
room on Dec. 20 at noon. Guest
speaker Prof. Rachel Abramowitz
will give a talk called "Let My
People Go Where To?"
The Youth Aliyah luncheon
will be held on Jan. 10 at the
Diplomat Hotel. Contact Youth
Aliyah Chairman Libby Raffeld
for more information.
RABBI BERKOWITZ
HE HAS completed 15 years of
broadcasting weekly pre-taped
Sabbath Services and special
High Holy Day Services on radio
station WEVD in New York City.
He is the founder, director and
moderator of the Institute of
Adult Jewish Studies, a na-
tionally prominent dialogue lec-
ture series founded in 1951. as
well as the acclaimed New School
for Adults of the Institute of
Adult Jewish Studies.
7 Adventure-Filled Camps
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Parents. Campers & Staff are
cordially invited to BLUE STAR'S
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Hallandale residents prepare to depart on a
tour of three constituent agencies of the Jew-
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cies visited included the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gar-
dens, the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center and the Hillel Community
I >;i\ School.
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For prospectus and Israel Bonds write or call
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William Liftman, Chairman
Broward County Board of Governors
Milton M. Parson
$


ly, December 16,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
tow Dare They Make Peace?
ontinued from Page 4
aces in their part of the
as a quid pro quo in-
which once were ad-
Jly colonial, influences
iisly now no longer so, but
they continue for the sake
jitical advantage to brand as
calling them "Zionist,"
list," "racist."
are highly emotional
for at-home African and
consumption largely
to justify their one-
|relationship to us and to
govern home," as Shake-
put it, but they are
agless in terms of today's
Mk.
IE specific, they are self-
lies. In the case of the
Sgypt peace initiative,
Libya last week they
ched as if it were the
plague, this is the first
ly indigenous movement
has known since the
the Israel-Arab impasse
fears ago.
juld be nice to dismiss this
paradox as a Middle
kfrican problem ex
Unfortunately, that,
nld be a self-serving lie,
i in our behalf, designed to
! the kind of greed that is
eristic of the nouveaux
enerally, which certainly
never managed to avoid
*' hy should we expect the
the Africans to avoid
hat it is their turn at bat?
the way in which the
[ its "allies," for example
have reacted to the
igypt initiative dis-
us from claiming it as a
initiative under any
nances and makes the
?frican determination to
lai all the more absurd.
i understand the Russian
t toward the peace
The Russians are as
ent as any other schizo-
But last week,
em Begin was in London
lly begging Prime Min-
"aghan to appreciate the
of events as a possible
future generations, and
(ly failed.
all, Callaghan demanded
what if the other Arabs,
to say those who met in
, turn the oil faucet off
What if Qadaffi and
prevail and not, say,
How could Callaghan
appreciate peace at the
of Britain's comfort?
was Whitehall, the
ll of the Mandate era, in a
how that ignorance is
on, that history teaches
that the capacity to
fiends for past sins is not
experience governments
TAKE President Carter,
I, the prophet of peanuts,
ranted to be the Mideast
all on his own, and who
dw been cast aside so
for all the Sadat-Begin
to the contrary, by the
^8 a ries-suddenly-turned-
Carter's resentment has
i than skilfully disguised,
[the least.
the Americans, French,
us, .el al. 'inderstand best
iition by division. Fight a
nen resolve the ideological
to Israel Offered
family missions to Is-
[sponsored by the United
Appeal, will be offered
[ the summer of 1978. Trips
ael are scheduled for June
and July 17-31. Another
scheduled for Aug. 6-23 to
| Poland and Rumania.
her information can be ob-
frorn the Jewish Federa-
ls South Broward.
struggle that no military
maneuver can resolve, which is to
say, create two new independent
fountainheads of the unresolved
problem, the allegedly Com-
munist (east-dominated) entity
ultimately to gobble up the
allegedly democratic (west-dom-
inated) entity by tacit agreement
between the warring parties, the
west perfectly willing to accept
the suicidal arrangement
because, until their Armageddon,
they can exploit the arrangement
economically.
What it looks like objectively
is this: the west and the west-
dominated entity, like an ostrich,
bury their heads in the sand as if
past experience has taught them
nothing, preferring instead to see
the resolution as an end; the east
and the east-dominated entity see
the division merely as another
stage in the final war.
For example: two Koreas, two
Vietnams, two Chinas, two
Germany s.
WHAT Jimmy Carter and,
presumably Jimmy Callaghan,
are preaching increasingly these
days is two Palestines, joining
the Arabs in this absurdity in
order to ignore the fact that the
original Palestine partition plan
of Nov. 30, 1947 established one
Palestine and one Israel.
In the 1948 war, Jordan an-
nexed the first Palestine to make
it her West Bank, now occupied
by Israel. Why, then, a second
Palestine? To which western
opportunism can only respond:
why not?
Ashraf Ghorbal's appearance
before the Synagogue Council of
America is as profound an answer
to this question couched in
Egypt's own fear of a second
Palestine entity as was Anwar
Sadat's appearance before the
Knesset in Jerusalem.
It is, despite the western
concern that things are getting
out of hand their hand a
prophecy of a separate Israel-
Egypt peace, however much
Washington, London and
Moscow resent it, and however
much the other Arab nations
insist they will not tolerate it.
THE Israel-Egypt peace initi-
ative shows what liars we are,
much like the Arabs themselves,
in our high falutin' idealism.
Unless there's profit we can see
to turn in it, we don't give a fig
for peace.
What a delight, therefore, at
least for the moment, that Jeru-
salem and Cairo have both waved
the umpires off the field.
The Arab enemy is trans-
parent. But us? We need our self-
exaltation as minions of human-
ism deflated. How sweet it is that
when Ghorbal appeared before
the Synagogue Council, he didn't
first ask for Jimmy Carter's
okay.
I never thought I would quote
Gamal Abdel Nasser in this
context. But if the time for peace
is near, and we don't like it
because it doesn't profit us, let
the extremists, both Arab and
western, "choke on their fury" as
Egypt and Israel attempt to
negotiate that goal.
William B. King. M D.
Robert F. Ragona, M D
Leonard Rosendorf, M.D.
Stanley I. Margulies, M.D.
Michael J. Borushok, M.D.
Stephen W. Schoenbaum.M.D.
Sheldon Z.Majel, M.D.
Herbert E.Brliel, M.D.
Peter A. Livingston, M.D.
HughM. Eisen. M.D.
Edward V. Grayson, M.D.
R ad io logy At social** of Hollywood, P.A.
Take Pleasure In Announcing the Association of
Robert I. Appelman, M.D.
Radiology and Cardiovascular Radiology
David A. Epstein, M.D.
Radiology and Nuclear Medicine
Lester R. Goldberg, M.D.
Radiology and Nuclear Medicine
Robert S. Heller, M.D.
Radiation Therapy
Nell f, Kappelman, M.D.
Radiology and Diagnostic Ultrasound
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Hollywood, Florida 33021
Telephone 9(3-3976
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It's our way of celebrating. Also a way of saying,
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Page 14
uii **--
* _. r r i
Dm
.9 tar
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 16,1977
CAN YOU AFFORD
A FREE EDUCATION?
FREE TUITION IN ISRAEL
The Gilt ol Education Plan is a unique opportunity. It offers a
bonus of free tuition for one or two years of study in Israel.
Choose from 140 Universities, Technical schools, and Yeshivot.
Start saving now and enjoy free-tuition study in Israel as early
as the Fall of 1979.
The Plan is sponsored by B'nai B'rith Youth Organization. The
American Zionist Federation, Inc.. Women's American ORT,
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tot MORE DETAILED INFORMATION WITHOUT OBLIGATION MAIL TO:
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L,
Dr. Joseph Weil,
UF Dean; Dies
Dr. Joseph Weil, a pioneer in
the radar tracking of hurricanes
and long-time former dean of the
University of Florida College of
Engineering, died Tuesday of a
heart attack while in New York
visiting friends. He was 80 years
old.
Weil served as dean of the
University of Florida engineering
college for 26 years.
He was born in Baltimore in
1897, and earned a bachelors of
science degree from Johns Hop-
kins University, and later earned
a masters degree from the
University of Pittsburgh. He
received honorary doctor of
science degrees from Jacksonville
University in 1960 and the
University of Florida in 1976.
He joined the University of
Florida engineering faculty in
1921 and rose to the position of
dean in 1937. He held the position
until his retirement from ad-
ministrative duties in 1963.
He is survived by his wife
Cyrille and one son. Dr. Marvin
Lee Weil of Rancho Palos Verde,
Calif.
Members of the Interfaith Council of South Broward reviewing
their by-laws are (seated from left) Elaine Pittell, chairman of
the Soviet Jewry Committee of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Community Relations Committee; Rev. Israel Hep-
burn, spiritual leader of the Star of Bethlehem Church; and
Rev. Claude Tucker, Interfaith Council co-chairman and
spiritual leader of the Miramar Presbyterian Church; (standing
from left) Hollywood Mayor David Keating; and Rabbi Robert
Frazin, Interfaith Council co-chairman and spiritual leader of
Temple Sold.
/f
In the World Zionist Congress Elections:
VOTE FOR THE
BUILDERS OF ISRAEL!
VOTE LABOR ZIONIST
VOTE SLATE 2
THE 29TH WORLD ZIONIST CONGRESS WILL
DETERMINE THE CHARACTER AND DIREC-
TION OF THE WORLD ZIONIST MOVEMENT.
WE MUST THEREFORE REASSERT THE
VITALITY OF THE LABOR ZIONIST IDEA FOR
THE LEADERSHIP OF THE WORLD ZIONIST
ORGANIZATION AND FOR THE SOCIETY
OF ISRAEL.__________________________________
LABOR ZIONISM FIRED THE IMAGINATION
OF MANKIND.
* It rebuilt a desolate land.
* It instituted the advanced social forms of
of the Kibbutz and the Moshav.
* It built and supports a great labor move-
mentthe Histadrut and its sister
movement, Na'amat.
IN THE DIASPORA.
LABOR ZIONISM IS FIRMLY COMMITTED TO
THE CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF
ISRAEL, ENSURING SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR
ALL ITS CITIZENS.
* Through urban and agricultural
cooperatives.
* Through an enlightened labor movement.
* Through the support of religious pluralism.
OUR BONDS WITH THE AMERICAN LABOR
MOVEMENT AND OUR FRIENDSHIP WITH
TRUE PROGRESSIVE ELEMENTS EVERY-
WHERE DEPEND ON THE FORCE OF THIS
COMMITMENT.
^
^
We support the Jerusalem Program.
We call for democracy in the conduct of
Jewish communal affairs.
We fight for the protection of Jewish
rights everywhere.
We continue our practical support for
Jewish education and culture.
THE LABOR ZIONIST MOVEMENT PLEDGES
FULL SUPPORT TO THE DEMOCRATICALLY
ELECTED GOVERNMENT OF ISRAEL, PAR-
TICULARLY AS THAT GOVERNMENT SEEKS
THE PEACE WHICH ISRAEL SO RICHLY
DE8ERVE8._________________________
For dynamic leadership in the
World Zionist Movement:
VOTE FOR THE
BUILDERS OF ISRAEL!
VOTE LABOR ZIONIST
VOTE SLATE 2
Labor Zionist Alliance, Pioneer Women,
Friends ol Labor Israel,
Friends ol Pioneer Women, Habonim/Dror
J>
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Abbb;.,


'. '-'.'
Iday, December 16,1977
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
>k Abe
By Abe Halpera
jest ion: What is the origin
the significance of the
ezuzah?
Henry Eisenberg
Hollywood
Answer: Mezuzah is a Hebrew
whose literal meaning is
orpost. It has become the
signation for a tiny parchment
toll affixed to the doorposts in
Jwish homes. The origin of the
uzah is based on a passage in
euteronomy: "Hear, O Israel:
Lord our God, the Lord is
fie! You shall love the Lord your
with all your heart, with all
t>ur soul, with all your might,
et these words, which I corn-
land you this day, upon your
part. Teach them faithfully to
jr own children; speak of them
your home and on your way,
|hen you lie down and when you
up. Bind them as a sign upon
iur hand; let them be a symbol
?fore your eyes; inscribe them
the doorposts of your house,
\nd on your gates." (Deut. 6:4-9)
This parchment made from the
inscribed the paragraphs of
lie Shetna is usually rolled up
inserted in a case with a
nail opening. On the back of the
barchment the word Shaddai is
Written and the parchment is
tiserted into the case so that this
vord is visible through the
Opening.
The word Shaddai which is a
)ame for God, translated as
Umighty, consists of three
etters: Shin. Doled. Yud. Some
ommentators say this word is
lalso an acronym for three Hebrew
[words meaning Guardian of the
\l)oors of Israel.
"The Mezuzah must be affixed
to the entrance of every home and
to the door of every living room
of a house, thus excluding store-
rooms, stables, lavatories, and
bathrooms, and must be in-
[Religious Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
A.Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform M4)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44-A)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazln.
Cantor Abraham Kester. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
|TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9139 Taft St.
Conservative. Rabbi Bernard I.
Shoter. (63)
plantation
Plantation jewish congrega-
tion. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi
SheON J.Harr. (64)
ECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (69)
HALLANDALE
(ALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
ziger. (12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
|INAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
1 Ralph P. Kongsley Cantor Irving
I Shulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
lETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
1 Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max Land-
man. (47B)
lETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
1 Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assis
Itant Rabbi Jonathan Won. (45)
=TH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Arthur
1st. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
IMalavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
|NAl TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul M. Katz,
iRabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
ICantor Yehuda Heilbraun. (65)
EMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.,
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin
Cantor Bruce Malin. (47C)
JUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
B291 Stirling Road, Oaks Condomini-
um. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe Bomzer
152)
spected periodically (twice in
seven years) to ensure that the
writing is still readable. The
custom has become widespread
and almost universal at the
present day to affix the Mezuzah
to the entrance to public
buildings (including all govern-
ment offices in Israel) and syna-
gogues." (Encyclopaedia
Judaica, vol. 11, p. 1476)
The Mezuzah is nailed on the
upper third of the height of the
door on the right side of the
entrance. The top of the Mezuzah
should be in a sloping position
towards the house.
Before affixing the Mezuzah
the following blessing should be
said. "Blessed are You, O Lord
our God, King of the Universe,
who has sanctified us by Your
commandments and commanded
us to affix the Mezuzah. "
Exactly when the affixing of
the Mezuzah began is not known,
but there is archaeological
evidence found in the Qumran
Caves in which the fulfillment of
this commandment is apparently
dated from the Second Temple
period.
The Talmud enumerates the
Mezuzah as one of the seven
precepts with which God
surrounded the people of Israel
because of his love for them. Its
purpose has been described as the
sanctification of the home by the
continual reminder of Divine
Omnipresence. The Rabbis
taught that the moral purpose of
the Mezuzah is to teach that all
man's material possessions are
the gift of heaven. It is one of the
r&ti
acs
se^s
RW?
SVSj
Silver Mezuzah, Russia, 19th
century, decorated with an
Ark with hinged doors and en-
graved foliage.
most widely observed ceremonial
commandments of the people of
Israel.
The Mezuzah "enshrines the
fundamental dogma (mono-
theism), the fundamental duty
(love), the fundamental discipline
(study of the law), and the funda-
mental method (union of 'letter'
and spirit') of the Jewish
Religion." (The Soncino Edition
of the Pentateuch and Haftorahs
edited by Dr. J. H. Hertz, p.771)
It is customary among the
pious on entering or leaving the
house to kiss the Mezuzah or
touch it and kiss the fingers.
Some of the cases in which
Mezuzot (pi.) are enclosed are
choice examples of Jewish art. In
modern Israel the artistic
Mezuzah case has been developed
to a considerable extent.
One of the most interesting
comments about the significance
of the Mezuzah was made by
Reave M. Rosenthal. a dear
friend of long standing, who told
us "During a class on 'The Bible,'
Rabbi Jaffe asked one day. 'What
did you do today, what do you do
every day, that you would not
have done if you were not a Jew?'
"I thought about the question
several times on the way home
and as I turned the corner of the
corridor, I glanced at my door
jamb and admired our Mezuzah
a 'New House' gift from my
sister and her husband.
"But of course! I said to
myself. Every day, sometime,
several times a day, I look at our
doorpost and know I am a Jew."
Editor's note: Please send all
questions to:
ASK ABE
c o Jewish Federation of
South Broward
2838 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florida 33020
Bar Mitzvah Held
At Sabbath Services held Dec.
2 at Temple Beth El, Dr. and
Mrs. Philip R. Gould celebrated
their son's Bar Mitzvah. Mrs.
Gould blessed the Shabbat
tapers. An Oneg Shabbat was
sponsored by the Goulds.
Roger Stephen Gould attends
University School of Nova where
he is a student in the eighth
grade. His activities include ten-
nis, basketball and baseball. He
is a member of Temple Beth El's
Junior Youth Group.
Guests who were to attend are
maternal grandmother. Lillian
Gilmore: Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence
Peizer; Sanford Halpert: Rose
Arnold of Cleveland, Ohio; pater-
nal grandparent. Harry Gold of
Los Angles. Calif.: Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Gilmore of Seattle,
Wash.; and Robert Gould of
Columbus, Ohio.
I
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
5:14
6 TEVETH-5738
IEVITT
memorial chapels
1921 Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood, Fla.
S24-M97
Sonny Levitt, F.D.
13JA5W Dixie Hwy
North Miami, Fla.
?49-6315
Bonds Committees Honor Workers
The State of Israel Bonds
Committees will honor Jewish
community workers at their
receptions for Israel.
Sophie and Martin Block,
active in B'nai B'rith, Temple
Sinai of Hollywood, Israel Bonds
and the Florida Home for the
Aged, will receive the Israel Sol-
idarity Award at a Salute to
Israel Breakfast scheduled by the
Imperial Towers Bond Com-
mittee for Sunday, Dec. 18 at 10
a.m. in the Imperial Towers
North Social Hall.
Heading preparations for the
event are Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Gartner, general chairmen; Mr.
and Mrs. Herbert Guild, chair-
men; and Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Rubin, breakfast chairmen.
The B'nai B'rith Ben Gurion
Lodge and Golda Meir Hadassah
Group will co-sponsor a Night in
AJC Chapter to Meet
The American Jewish Con-
gress, Hollydale Chapter, will
hold its next meeting on Monday,
Dec. 19. at Galahad South at
noon.
The topic, "Positive Thinking
on Later Year Living." will be
discussed by Dr. Muriel Ober-
leder. director of Douglas Gar-
dens Outpatient Health Center,
and Emanuel Borenstein. consul-
tant to Home Health Agencies
under Medicare.
(Obituaries
GREENBERG. Sophie G.. of
Hallandale. on Dec. 1. River-
side.
ACKERMAN, Leon (Tiny). 63, of
Hollywood, on Dec. 1. River-
side.
TROY. Irving, 77. of Hollywood.
Gordon.
TURIN, Alan A.. 84. of Holly-
wood, on Nov. 23. Riverside.
LEVINE, Herman Jack. 84. of
Hallandale. on Dec. 4. Levitt.
Interment Mt. Nebo.
GOLDBERG. Meyer, 76. of
Hallandale, on Dec. 5. River-
side. Interment Beth El.
WARMUND. Dr. Samule. 74, of
Hallandale. Gordon.
ZAITLIN. Benjamin, of Holly-
wood, on Nov. 30. Levitt.
BOSKOFF. Barbara L. 47, of
Hallandale. on Nov 19. River-
side. Interment Lakeside.
BOSKOFF, Leslie M.. 88, of
Hallandale. on Nov. IB. River-
side. Interment Lakeside.
LITMAN, Merle, 51. of Holly-
wood, on Nov. 24. Riverside.
f:m. ::.-.:.-::':" i-v^iS!-*S
BOII.KX \KI> CHAPELS
100 SOUTH OIXII HIGHWAY
Jul 0 MolUnrfl > '*
HALLANDALE. FLOBIDA 33009
Tht Only Family Owned
Jewish Funeral Home in
Broward County.
We observe the complete
tradition of
Chevrm Kavod Harriet
TEL: 3054S4-WW
Doualaa Laaarua. L.F.D.
Israel meeting on Dec. 21 at 8
p.m. in the Cascade Room of the
Aquarius, announced Julius
Freilich, chairman of the event.
Entertainer Milt Moss is the
special guest.
Max and Ann Coffman will
receive the Israel Solidarity
Award at the event. Coffman is
vice president of the Board of
Fellows at Brandeis University
and was awarded the Community
Service Award by Brandeis in
1976.
Other chairmen include Rose
Kern, Nettie Sherman. Paul
Weinger and Sam Wiletsky.
The Israel Solidarity Award
will be presented to the residents
of the Golden Surf on Sunday.
Dec. 18 at 8 p.m. at a Night for
Israel, sponsored by the Golden
Surf Israel Bonds Committee,
announced Irving Schwartz,
chairman.
Murray Green and Sam
Weissberg will assist with the
arrangements. Humorist Joey
Russell will be the featured
entertainer.
The residents of Guildford
Plaza will be honored at a Night
in Israel, sponsored by the Guild-
ford Plaza Israel Bond Com-
mittee, on Wednesday. Dec. 21 at
8 p.m. in the building's recreation
hall.
Heading the committee are Mr.
and Mrs. Frank Rashbaum and
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Pasik. co-
chairmen.
Jewish humorist Mickey
Freeman will be featured.
JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES, INC.
DIRECTORS
kvri.i Jetter MedwinJetter AlvinJetfer
INMEWrOMt.
188-11 MUSIDE AVE H01US. II. NY
1283 CONEY ISLAND AVE BKIYN, NY
212/776-8100
IN FLORIDA
DA0E COUNTY 13385 BXIE MWY
947-11 85 Ren by Soon* Levrtt FO
BROWARD COUNTY 192I PEMBROKE RB
925-2743 Reo bv Sonny Levrtl.FO
PALM BEACH COUNTY 625 S OLIVE AVE
1-925-2743 Rep DyPWroiem FO
Services available in all com
munmes in New York and throughout
the dealer Miami area j
-^s^-^lit-.i

.**-i.r^
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
A
0.0
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan,
L.F.D.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Jmpte 3etki
Wemotlat
(jazdeits
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or write:
~ TEMPLE BETHEL~ &J%&&
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Pleat*ttnd m* literature on tne abova.
NAME: ,
AODRESS:
FttONE:


Page 14
Pag*16
T*.- T-----._ i m ...
n---------1^_#
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, December 16,1977

'
QUICK FROZEN
FARMER GRAY
Ducklings
QUICK FROZEN
FARMER GRAY BASTED
Young Turkeys
GRADE
"A*
cPtide
PRICES EFFECTIVE SUNDAY.
DEC. 11 THRU SAT.. D6C. 17 AT
All PANTtV PRIDES FROM
FT. PIERCE TO KEY WEST
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE BEEF BLADE 0mf d~\ f
Chuck Roast /""
HUM VAUI! U.S. CHOKI
II' CHUCK
IIISH Vllll U S CMOICI Mil CHUCK
UNDII11ADI
7-Bone Steak ,. 89* Pot Roast u*l
IIISM MMUI U.S. CHOKI IIISH VAUIT US CHOICI MM IOUN0
Tip Steak.....,N lt*1" Btm. Round Steak $V.9
FRESH VALLEY U.S. CHOICE BEEF CHUCK q-m q
Shldr. Steak Bnls......i.. 1 V
8J39
99c
Beef Liver...................n59c
FLA. OR SHIPPED PRIIHIUM FtlSH ^
Fryer Quarters...................... OV
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH GRADE A
Fryer Parts ~ ~ o9c
FRESH VAllEY U.S. CHOICE BtEF CHUCK BNIS.
Shoulder Pot Roast ......
FRESH
Ground Beef Chuck...........u.
SLICED
DAIRY DEPARTMENT
SEALTEST SMALL CURD ALL FLAVORS mm _.
Cottage Cheese ? 55
*K* fOUl OWM 'ROM A LOOll OliPlA'
CAIDIN PtllH TINOIt SNAPP
Ul MO 1 INDIAN Rivll FtNKMIAT
Grapefruit U*S'.
'!"! M INNID SWIIT I AUNG UOtlDA
-^ I.' '
SAVE 60*
ON l*0 AGS
REG .ELECTRIC PERK. ADC
^Pantry Pride
m ""/ft Coffee
w 'UlCMAmO' *' OIMOII
CAIDIN IIISH TINDIt IH> .
Green Boom 3ml
5-'l
______Mi "lOIIDA
Tangelos 10 99*
TO* QUAIHY CAlWOINIA SUNK I SI
Lemons 10 Z 79'
oaimn HiSH ctisr no _. .
Radishes 2X21*25*
GAIDIN IIISH iiuiid* OIOWN
Escarole <. -.> 29*
SW1IT IATING IMIDIUM ISO SIM 0 ANiOU
Pears 10 .o. 89*
'IM *! SAIAO Nil
Tomatoes 6
INS PUtl UNIIVIITINIO
Orange Juice
USfANCV INIII lAIINGI'AITAN Oft _
Red ocuckhjs appiis......l 3t
PiC" TOUI OWN f ROM A lOOSI OfStA
IN THE BAKERY DEPT.
UGHf ft LIVIIT All fLAVORS
M QO Yogurts A'.?-'99*
.............NW *t owii ee-
r'"."0"":'......". .0, cqc Low Fat Milk $169
Salad Dressing ... Ot
OMAI WITH STIAR INOW WMT
Mushrooms
MIAIIIOMIt All VAIIirm
MM snaioaiini _
Spread 2%. 99*
OIDIN S AMIIICAN SING1IS ,
Cheese Food.."?.1 $1M
14 01
' GlAIS MS
I Mill 1 AC* ll*SI *
UlCHAilS O' I' OS MORI
, IRCIUOWG CKSfttf nil
Wheat Bread
'Nil' IIIOI Slut TO* Ol 100 WMOll
i*oi 10<
ioai w r
MITIt S INGUSH MUIIINS Ol IANTIV IIIOI
win DOUGH
Muffins 3 '.s$l
GOlMN TO* pii
Turnovers
3 o.
r.79*
Topping S8. 79*
WIlCHI WATCHIIS
Cheese Slices ^69*
49*
35*
'IN'
CONT
Ol
PKG
Elfwich Cookies v^z""
MING SOU!
Dressing
KING SMOOTHU LOW AI
Cream Cheese-
OIDIN CHUN- CHUM
Longhorn ml $1
fit Ml I M NIW PANTK FIIOI 01 '"OS
Crescent Rolls 3/$l
II) Ml I M NIW* MNIH MIDI l01 CAW
Cinnamon Rolls 39
IN THE DELI DEPT.
PANTRY PRIDE MIDGET
Liverwurst
49c
8 or
Chub
flOIIDA PtllM OIADI A IMAll
SIKIU CHUNK CIUSHIO
OOlI JUKI PACK
BUY 1,
GET 1
FREE!
Eggs....................ooi 49*
DOU JUKI PACK SI ASmOII S l ONG Cut
Pineapple W, 35* Sauerkraut T." 79*
MMM MMH RAM niii MM SIKIO MM O* *-.
Coconut ;.0' 78' Beef Bologna. iiS 99'
si n
OSCAI MATH
TOU WAT KIKMU ONI Ot All SIAIIID
ITIUS WITH A (7.M
oaoti Of oihii itims ixciuomcciCAMTTis
HALF GALLON ALL FLAVORS
Pantry Pride
Ice Cream
* LIMIT ONE FREE DEAL WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF S7 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
t
Bath Tissue g$149 Beef Franks _JS $1
US DIG! IQMll
_ ,f.e, m no LANDO MMI SIKIO SMOVIO
Trash Bags _5S M09 M#. o JO'Q5
is Ml oici.DAni ouioooi meatS MM X gs ?rf
Illill AN.li A **
Wafers ^'65* """"""" ,,4tJ%
,., Franks or Knocks*!
Will"
Grape Jelly ".?' $ 1 J"*""UK,D" *"*' S1
iohg mm Bologna no
Mahatma Hco.'X'l6' ""<-... M, 7Q.
Breast Slices S3 #"
lint CICKMI hick Mil oi
JfNO % 'HZ* lOil
19
IHO.Nn* ion
Snack Tray '." *1
JfNOteilZA
Snack Tray %.S' $1*
69'
MINUTI Ml*
--- will
Fish Crackers 8 65*
NAftlSCO
Nilla Wafers Vo.'69'
AOttS
Apple Juice _5ff 65*
Mm
Apple Sauce V.r 69'
PANTRY PRIDE
Fruit Cocktail
M MMM THI MSHt TO IIWIT QOAMTITHS NOW SOlO IO MAIMS NOI MSIONSlIU >CM tOCAICAl IMOB
*!' i^v i iin mil urn "^ ^ ^p M ^^"" ^
Pie Crust Mix Off 39* """fctwm*' -
Loaf ,% ot
>IltlOGI IAIN GOIO
Orange Juice3S 93'
PET RITZ FROZEN
Pie Shells
2ss89e
OMAN M|A1 IIOIIN
Waffles
Ml HA
Tater Tots 2A 99*
THOMAS INGUJH
Muffins 2:.V~ $1
BIROS EYE CAULIFLOWER OR
Broccoli cSS.
FROZEN __^-v SAUCE
SERVICE APPHIZERS
All Ml A IS ft CXItlS SIKIO 10 0*01*
AVAKAfttlOWV At MCHMSHAviHGCCHjN't">
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Turkey Roll -. 99'
SW.II S ANIUN ,_
Hard Salami "'.' 69*
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HAN
10-OZ
PKG
79
Pastrami T 69'
wlvlt S CHICIIN .,
Bologna............ T 69'
IIIUHI HIM MAI
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M^
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