Citation
GROWjacksonville : temporary urbanism & urban agriculture : revitalization of the LaVilla District

Material Information

Title:
GROWjacksonville : temporary urbanism & urban agriculture : revitalization of the LaVilla District
Creator:
Elison, Kelly
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publisher:
School of Landscape Architecture and Planning, College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
revitilization
temporary urbanism
urban agriculture
City of Jacksonville ( local )
Jacksonville metropolitan area ( local )
Parking ( jstor )
City centers ( jstor )
Agriculture ( jstor )

Notes

Abstract:
In response to Jacksonville’s need for filling in the gaps, I have chosen to pursue economical and sustainable methods for growth in downtown Jacksonville. The LaVilla District offers the most opportune spaces for fulfilling Jacksonville’s need for infi ll, connection, and green space. Through temporary urbanism techniques such as pocket park design, vacant building reuse, and temporary structure infill, the LaVilla district will become a destination for the city, but most importantly become a welcoming home for the urbanites that live and work in and around Jacksonville’s urban core. Focusing on the communities’ basic needs, such as a grocery store, pharmacies, simple commercial amenities, and green spaces, the LaVilla district can make those changes in a few easy steps. By planning out guidelines for infi ll, reuse of buildings, and pocket parks, the possibilities of changing the area become more realistic as the guidelines prove the simplicity of the projects. Urban farming techniques can be used to fi ll many of the vacant lots and actually produce revenue as well as a sustainable and healthy product. Instead of leaving fallow fi elds, fi lling them with productive crops would be more benefi cial to the surrounding businesses, like grocery stores, restaurants, the missions, and most importantly the community. Aesthetically the area will improve. The outlook and perception of the area would also take a turn for the better. Jobs would be provided through the growth of farms. And a wealth of educational opportunities arises with the multiple types of participatory farms, ranging from composting, aquaculture, vermiculture, phytoremediation, medicinal and herb gardens, and a “pickin’ patch” for children. Overall, the program elements of the project have the utmost importance of keeping the immediate urban community in mind. By improving the health, safety, and welfare of the LaVilla area, the view of the entire urban core could improve.
General Note:
Landscape Architecture capstone project

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University of Florida Institutional Repository
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University of Florida
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All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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GROWjacksonvilleTemporary Urbanism & Urban Agriculture Revitalization of the LaVilla District

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Dedication First and foremost I would like to thank Mom & Dad for all of their love and support. They are truly my biggest fans. A special thanks to my sisters for always being there when I needed a break to talk or just needed a laugh. Molly and Gracie, you will always be my best friends, Love you Michael, they all called it second year! And we’re nally getting married. I have loved all the memories we made in this program and can’t wait to make many more. You are a talented designer and know you’ll be successful. Brittany, when we had our doubts about pinup and even had a back upplan that included a Bagel Garden Bakery I would never have thought I’d be writing you a thank you in my capstone book for all your help and friendship through the past 4 years. Caeli, your encouragement and friendship has meant so much to me, thanks for being a wonderful classmate and friend since the beginning of this awesome journey. We passed D1 and now we’re graduating! Studiomates, what can I say, but thanks for all the wonderful memories and great times. You all are de nitely my family, I love you all. Thank you to all the Landscape Architecture staff for the knowledge you’ve shared with me. Kay Williams, thanks for all of your time, advice, and insight for my capstone project. It has been a pleasure being able to see this project through with you and wouldn’t have had it any other way. I’ve nally learned to gure out the “So What!” My Savior has brought me so far through life and all of this would be for naught if it wasn’t for His mercy and strength to see me through. If I leave nothing behind except for this it would be Ephesians 2:8-10 “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God not by works, so that no one can boast. For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.”2GROWjacksonville: Temporary Urbanism & Urban Agriculture Revitalization of the LaVilla DistrictKelly Elison 2012 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture Faculty Advisor: Kay Williams

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table of contents5.......Introduction 7.....Geographic Location 8.....Fallow Ground 9.....History 12...The Issues 13...The Solutions: Temporary Urbanism 17...The Issues 19...The Solutions: Urban Agriculture26.....Analysis 27...Context Analysis 35...Circulation 37...Walkability 38...Runoff Perception 39...Microclimate 40...Future Development43.....Synthesis 45.....Program Development 45...Users & Programatic Elements 46...Goals & Objectives47.....Concept Development 47...Concept 1 48...Concept 2 49...Concept 350.....Master Plan 53...Tabulation Diagrams 55...Farm Layout Diagrams57.....Guidelines Through Design Temporary Urbanism 59...Vacant Building Reuse 67...Shipping Container In ll 71...Pocket Parks 75...FarmerÂ’s Market Urban Agriculture 79...Urban Tree Nursery 83...Water Harvesting 85...Bioremediation Farms 89...ChildrenÂ’s Garden 91...Vermiculture 93...Compost Block 95...Work & Volunteer Programs 96...Kit of Parts 97...Planting List 99...Conclusion101...Bibliography4

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introduction6In response to Jacksonville’s need for lling in the gaps, I have chosen to pursue economical and sustainable methods for growth in downtown Jacksonville. The LaVilla District offers the most opportune spaces for ful lling Jacksonville’s need for in ll, connection, and green space. Through temporary urbanism techniques such as pocket park design, vacant building reuse, and temporary structure in ll, the LaVilla district will become a destination for the city, but most importantly become a welcoming home for the urbanites that live and work in and around Jacksonville’s urban core. Focusing on the communities’ basic needs, such as a grocery store, pharmacies, simple commercial amenities, and green spaces, the LaVilla district can make those changes in a few easy steps. By planning out guidelines for in ll, reuse of buildings, and pocket parks, the possibilities of changing the area become more realistic as the guidelines prove the simplicity of the projects. Urban farming techniques can be used to ll many of the vacant lots and actually produce revenue as well as a sustainable and healthy product. Instead of leaving fallow elds, lling them with productive crops would be more bene cial to the surrounding businesses, like grocery stores, restaurants, the missions, and most importantly the community. Aesthetically the area will improve. The outlook and perception of the area would also take a turn for the better. Jobs would be provided through the growth of farms. And a wealth of educational opportunities arises with the multiple types of participatory farms, ranging from composting, aquaculture, vermiculture, phytoremediation, medicinal and herb gardens, and a “pickin’ patch” for children. Overall, the program elements of the project have the utmost importance of keeping the immediate urban community in mind. By improving the health, safety, and welfare of the LaVilla area, the view of the entire urban core could improve.Narrative

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“Currently, almost 200 acres of land in downtown is devoted to parking, including 168 small surface lots of under 100 spaces that negatively impact its aesthetics and urban form. Furthermore, according to the Downtown Jacksonville Master Plan produced in 1999, there were 41,576 spaces in downtown. Since then, several new garages have been added in the area. However, as the number of parking spaces have increased, the downtown employment base continues to decline and has fallen to 18,000 in the Northbank core. “ -Ennis Davis Geographic Location Jacksonville, part of Duval County, is located in Northeast Fl. The urban core of Jacksonville is a struggling part of the city due to the lack of interest in the area. The largest contributing factor to Jacksonville’s lack of interest is the amount of land that lies fallow in the urban core. Almost 200 acres of the core is used as surface parking. This amount does not include the vacant properties that are not used as parking; rather the city is saving them as a “land bank” for development when the city has the funds to develop these areas. With the current economic downturn, the core of Jacksonville remains silent except for the central business district which remains somewhat urban during business hours. Jacksonville is striving to get back on its feet. Through the exploration and application of current urban trends such as urban farms, and temporary urbanism, Jacksonville could dismiss the current perception and begin heading towards creating a real urban experience.Fallow Ground 8

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History Civil War: campsite of Second Florida Infantry City of 3,000 residents incorporated into Jacksonville in 1887 Starting point of Jacksonville’s Great Fire of 1901 First black urban neighborhood The 1920’s: “Great Black Way” Ashley Street was home to entertainment and establishments for the African-American Community. Performers such as Louis Armstrong, Ray Charles, and Billie Holliday performed in the area. In the early 1990s Jacksonville demolished most historic and rundown structures of the neighborhood to make way for an urban renewal project which was never implemented. In place, surface parking and dilapidated buildings remain in this special and unique part of Jacksonville which was at one point a great entertainment district and home to many urban residence of historic Jacksonville.Strategic location deemed it the city’s main railroad terminal, today it is the Prime Osborn Convention CenterTHEN NOW 10

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The Issues12Decreasing Urban Population Too many surface parking lots Struggling Economy Poor Planning in the past

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The Solution14

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Case Studies Temporary urbanism changes the dysfunctionality of an unused space by renewing the uses of the area. Interim uses cause an unnoticeable community to draw attention due to the changing and evolving landscape, thus growing the area. Intentions of temporary urbanism are to motivate an area into improving and prospering economically and socially. Interim uses engage a sense of play and whimsy because of the eclectic process for planning and mix of uses. Temporary urbanism proves to be very cost effective. Changes which promote walkability and creating outdoor spaces are fairly inexpensive. Adding vegetation, outdoor seating, reducing traf c lanes, and simple attractive sight features such as lighting and signage can be added with very little cost. The return from temporary urbanism economically is worth the effort. By lling vacant lots and buildings with attractions and amenities, locals and visitors are more likely to spend time in an area. Temporary urbanism is bene cial for city planning because it is exible to change. Cities are able to use temporary urbanism as a test for land uses. Even during economic downturns, cities strive to improve, gorw and just maintain an urban environment. Temporary urbanism allows for continued urban growth because of its affordability and trasistory status.TEMPORARY.URBANISM16

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Who said farms had to be rural? How far does your food travel?The Issues18

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The Solution20

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Case Studies Greensgrow Farm is a nursery in downtown Philadelphia. The site is just over a block and grows produce, ornamentals, and trees. The site was in poor condition before, as it was previously home to Boyles Galvanized Steel company. Not only was the site revitalized, but the surrounding neighborhood as well. The nursery provides invaluable services to the community by offering events such as movie nights, educational gardening, and cooking classes. URBAN.AGRICULTURE One of the most urban cities in the world, NYC, has become proactive in urban agriculture. New York Cty doesnÂ’t necessarily have large plots of vacant land, so designers must get creative. Plant nurseries have begun to spring up in half built vacant buildings. Also, temporary artistic spaces highlighting agriculture have been constructed. New York teaches designers, agriculture can go anywhere. Urban agriculture is inspiring new technologies for growth. Shipping containers have been recognized as an alternative to permanent structures and are transitioning their way to new uses. One use is for agricultural growth and research. They provide a sterile and consistent environment for plants. No matter the season it is possible to be growing something in the containers. Hantz Farms in Detroit is currently in the beginning phases of becoming the largest urban farm in the world. Detroit is perpetually a food desert. With many jobs having been eliminated through the years there are many without work, as well as, many vacant spaces. Soon Detroit will provide thousands of jobs for its residence and a cleaner, greener environment. The desolate vacant spaces of Detroit will be transformed and restored to a vibrant farming community.22Greensgrow Farm PA Hantz Farms MI

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jacksonville ScaryDANGEROUS D A N G E R O U S BORINGNothing To DoUGLYPOOR jacksonville DIRTYbeautiful LIVELYFUNENTERTAINMENTeventfulTRENDYCutting EdgeSAFEPresent Adjectives Future Adjectives 24

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analysis26

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Context Analysis Districts of Downtown Jacksonville The context of downtown Jacksonville is able to be divided into several districts. The project site is within the historic LaVilla district. The Cathedral District, HoganÂ’s Creek Neighborhood, and Spring eld Historic District are all historic urban neighborhoods of Jacksonville. LaVilla lies adjacent to the I-95 corridor and also to the Central Business District. The St. JohnÂ’s River is within a close proximity to LaVilla, but does not pose a threat of ooding the area. The Acosta Bridge Junction to the south of the site brings a lot of traf c to and from the area across the river. 28

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Art & Entertainment Education Institutional Dining Government Parks &Open Space Vacant lots &Parking Commercial Parking Structures Vacant Structures Residential Night LifeThe land uses of downtown vary greatly because of the inconsistency to keep a business successful in the downtown area. Much of the planning comes and goes because of its unsuccessfulness. Most of the successful businesses are within the central business district. Lavilla contains only a handful of commercial and industrial businesses. There are several educational opportunities on site and in the surrounding areas with various schools, churches, and missions.30 Context Analysis

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Residential Institutional Government 32 Commercial Context Analysis Context Analysis

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34 Vacant Structures and Lots Art & Entertainment Context Analysis Context Analysis

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Circulation Circulation Direction of Traf c Amount of Traf c36

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Runoff Walkability 38

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Weather Seasonal Winds and Average Temperature Average Temperature Without Urban Heat Island Affect January 57 February 57 March 66 April 73 June 78 July 84 August 86 September 82 October 73 November 66 December 60 Average Temperature With Urban Heat Island Affect January 67 February 67 March 76 April 83 June 88 July 94 August 96 September 92 October 83 November 76 December 70Microclimate in an urban area can be vastly different from a rural area in the same city. This is called urban heat island affect. The change within an urban area is based off of the albedo, which is re ected sunlight and wind channeled through buildings. These factors can make a dense urban area signi cantly warmer than the surrounding areas in the same city. Downtown areas can use this affect to their advantage for urban agriculture. The LaVilla area may not be a dense urban area with a high urban heat island affect, but there are several smaller spaces on site which may contribute a small difference in climate to help grow some types of agriculture which may be dif cult to grow elsewhere in this climate zone, such as citrus. Future Development Seasonal Winds in Jacksonville, Fl The City of Jacksonville has planned to build a $180 million Jacksonville Regional Transportation Center within the intended project site. The size of the transportation center expands over 5 blocks. The mayor has recently questioned the necessary budget and size of the new transportation center and put the project on hold until the Jacksonville Transportation Authority can lower the cost and decrease the size of the center. This affects this area of the project site by having future plans. Although these future plans may be on hold, once a price and size is agreed upon the center will begin construction on site.Above: Alternative plans of the Jacksonville Regional Transportation Center Left: The area of the transportation center in comparison to the transportation hub in Charlotte, NC 40

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Figure Ground of Existing Structures Figure Ground Ratio Figure Ground Ratio Figure Ground of Vacant Lots and Surface Parking42

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Site Synthesis 44

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Goals&Objectives 46 PROGRAMUsers ActivitiesEdible Agriculture Non Edible NurseryHousing Education Entertainment CommercialTemporaray vs. Permanent Educational Pro t/Commercial Beauti cation Pro t Temporary Open Space Over ow Parking New Employees Future Growth For School Residents Visitors Research Arts Entertainment space for crowds FarmerÂ’s Market Concerts Residentially Designated Restaraunts Nightlife Retail Visitor Oriented Local Vendors Gardens Parks and Open Space Commercial Generators Entertainment Education Commuters Business Homeless Schools Churches Residential CBD NewTourists Farmers Business Employees Park and Ride Community Suburban Visitors Sunday Commuters New Existing Stay or Go Partnerships with local missions Tactile learning Field Trips Education Sponsorship opportunities Sunday Commuters WalkabilityReduce Vehicular Traf c Increase Pedestrian Activity Future Growth Present Communities: LaVilla, Spring eld, HoganÂ’s Creek Employees Visitors Event AttendeesGOALS & OBJECTIVESProvide Downtown Jacksonville with a destination to enliven, grow, and improve the urban core. ENLIVEN: Functionality-Replacing negative space with multifunctional uses to attract multiple user groups through temporary urbanism -Creating a destination in downtown Jacksonville, that is unlike any other in the city. -Diversity of users and functions -Using urban agriculture as a commercial and educational oppportunity and enticing featureGROW: Economics-Establishing temporary uses that work with the existing context gives way to what could be permanent in the future. -Creating a site speci c place in the Lavilla area west of the CBD and connecting it will enhance the boundaries of the urban core -The temporary urban and agriculture installations will also improve the commercial economy of Jacksonville. These amenities will not only provide jobs, but also stimulate economic growth in the area.IMPROVE: Quality of Life and Image-Improving downtown JacksonvilleÂ’s image as a safe and lively urban area by bringing the public to a destination in JacksonvilleÂ’s downtown -Using outdoor spaces as recreation such as the agricultural gardens improve health and quality of life, doubling as a learning experience. -The health safety and wellfare of the community will improve with the lively and sustainable additions.

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CONCEPT.1 CONCEPT.2 Improved viewshed of I-95-Concentration of uses in designated areas. -Commercial in ll is located on the North and East side of the site: Closest to residents Close to the future Courthouse -The tree farm placed along the I-95 corridor and South end of the site along the people mover station: Enhance the viewshed towards downtown Create a unique transitional experience from I-95 Reduce the amount of over ow parking in the area Act as a natural buffer for the edible agriculture -Edible agricultre is primarily the center anchor for the site. Research facilities Kitchen and demonstration gardens Educational gardens Commercial crop production -Designated Open Space used to stitch together commercial and agriculture A AÂ’ AÂ’ A Functional tree nursery: Park Space, over ow parking, commercial nursery A AÂ’ A AÂ’ -Concentration of uses divided through the site -Commercial in ll located to the North: Closest to residents Designated for residential needs: grocery, pharmaceutical, etc. -Commercial in ll located to the South: Creates a boulevard for employees in the CBD and people mover commuters Accessible for visitors from the Brooklyn and Riverside communities Easily accessible from the Courthouse -The tree farm placed along the I-95 corridor and South end of the site along the people mover station: Enhance the viewshed towards downtown Create a unique transitional experience from I-95 Reduce the amount of over ow parking in the area Act as a natural buffer for the edible agriculture -Edible agricultre is primarily the center anchor for the site. Research facilities Kitchen and demonstration gardens Educational gardens Commercial crop production Provides a unique edge towards the CBD -Pocket Parks located primarily along the commercial boulevard and edge of edible gardens Concepts Concepts 48

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CONCEPT.3 Restored vacant building to compliment communitiesÂ’ needs. A AÂ’ A AÂ’ -Concentration of uses divided through the site -Commercial in ll generates connection along the edge of the site towards the CBD Residential commercial located towards the North of the site: Designated for residential needs: grocery, pharmaceutical, etc. Accessible for visitors from the Brooklyn and Riverside communities Easily accessible from the Courthouse -The tree farm placed along the I-95 corridor and South end of the site along the people mover station: Enhance the viewshed towards downtown Create a unique transitional experience from I-95 Reduce the amount of over ow parking in the area Act as a natural buffer for the edible agriculture -Edible agricultre is primarily the center anchor for the site. Research facilities Kitchen and demonstration gardens Educational gardens Commercial crop production Provides a unique edge towards the CBD -Pocket Parks located through the commercial area to draw residents from the North and employees from the CBD master plan Concepts 50

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Tree Nursery Parking Kept Farms Pocket Parks Adaptive Reuse & In ll The master plan was created by noting the most important aspects from the three initial concepts. The Tree Nursery remained consistent through the concepts and therefore was the anchor for the master plan. The farms in the concepts showed that the entire site had potential for having successful farms, each being noteworthy in its place. Finally, the commercial in ll was the largest change from the concepts. Filling the site with more development is not what Jacksonville needs and is not a part of the initial program. Any development would not be bene cial for the area and would fail like many previous attempts. I decided to only ll the 27 vacant buildings with temporary uses. These temporary uses follow a set of guidelines which I have laid out. I have also spread several shipping container parks as extra in ll through the site as part of the temporary urbanism guidelines. These sites keep the commercial activity uid through the site from the north to south end. These shipping containers will be very temporary uses. N 0Â’300Â’1000Â’52 Master Plan

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In ll:27 Adaptive Reuse Buildings 25 Shipping Containers Farms and Gardens:32 acresTree Nursery:60 acresParking Retained:66 acresPocket Parks:2 Acres54 Tabulations

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The farm diagram shows farm types and how they can be implemented based on the site conditions. Although each farm type does not include a set of guidelines, these are applicable suggestions the City of Jacksonville would bene t from incorporating into their city fabric.56 Farm Types

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guidelines through design Temporary UrbanismVacant Building Reuse Shipping Container In ll Pocket Parks FarmerÂ’s MarketUrban AgricultureUrban Tree Farm Water Harvesting Bioremediation Farms ChildrenÂ’s Garden Vermiculture Compost Work & Volunteer Programs Kit of Parts Recommended Planting List 58

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Possible toxins left in the ground Old vacant gas station Parking in empty lot promotes toxic runoff Funeral Home Vacant Building Reuse Outdoor Cafe Seating Outdoor Kitchen Container Kitchen GardenTEMPORARY.URBANISM60

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Application: Vacant Gas StationThis vacant structure has been turned into an agriculturally based mini market complimented with an outdoor cafe and kitchen garden. The new use does not require the structure to change the layout or foundation. The minimum requirements for this structure would be a new paint job, lot clean up, and all appliances in working order. The outdoor cafe is a compliment to the structure as an amenity. The site furnishings are all modular and the outdoor kitchen is constructed to be temporary to the site. Kitchen gardenOutdoor kitchen and cafe Guidelines: Keep Costs Low & To A Minimum By: -The buildingsÂ’ original frame and structure should not be altered.Improvements should consist of: The addition of paint (should blend well with the surrounding context. However, there can be applicable creativity added such as murals or logos.) Adding street signage for pedestrians and facade aesthetics Fix glass, doors, and appliances, so the building meets code and is in working order. Temporary in ll should make sure it can work with the original layout and appliances of the building. Permanent in ll is allowed to make changes to the layout of the building, but not encouraged to unless they can follow through with the cost effects. All costs are the ownerÂ’s responsibility. The effectively low cost for in ll in these vacant locations is a drawing point for small and local business owners that may not have the means to get started in a more permanent or competitive area. Vacant Building Reuse TEMPORARY.URBANISM62

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Intended to be a restaraunt Mixed use: First oor commercial retail. Second and third oors of ce or studio space These historic homes could become livable again if restoredThis building offers prime of ce or retail space just 1 block from City Hall These warehouses offer unique spaces for a variety of businesses. Club Kartouche occupies part of an historic warehouse on site. Although the current landuse is not one that bene ts the community currently, as the area grows and becomes more successful, the current owners could be offereed incentives to move so that the space could be occupied by a better suited use to bene t the area. The project site currently holds 27 vacant buildings. Suggested future uses for a few of these are as follows. Vacant Building Reuse TEMPORARY.URBANISM64

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Right: The Masonic Temple was built in the early 1900’s and is on the National Register of Historic Spaces. The building is still used for the Masons but has space for non af liated businesses such as retail and of ces. Below: DeLoach Furniture is located on the bottom oor of an historic hotel. The second and third oor are currently boarded up. These oors could once again become hotel space or even downtown apartment living. These two historic warehouses are approximately one hundred years old. The remaining representative historic structures left in the LaVilla area are approximately the same age. Although the upkeep and restoration of some of these buildings can be somewhat costly, it is more sustainable to keep what is existing and more cost ef cient than building completely new structures. What little is left of the historic integrity of the area can also be preserved from what is left if taken care of and used correctly in the future. The lessons from the past demolition can remain through the remnants of historic LaVilla. This historic hospital has been restored from its previous dilapidated condition; however, it still remains vacant. This building could easily become housing for some of the green collar workers in partnership with the churches and missions which offer this program. The housing here would strictly be for those workers who are in the program and working on the farms in the area. See “Jobs” guidelines66 Vacant Building Reuse TEMPORARY.URBANISM

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68 Shipping Container In ll TEMPORARY.URBANISM

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Guidelines: Being an integral part to the commercial in ll and temporary urbanism of the project, the shipping container in ll should complement the area and continue the ow of commercial in ll. -The containers should be set on a good foundation such as a surface parking lot. -The target in ll for these eclectic boxes are local artists and designers. -These spaces would be more cost effecient for the artists -The local businesses in the spaces would provide a pride and branding for the area: “Made in Jacksonville” -Shipping containers are able to be moved and assembled easily -These box complexes can be borrowed, recycled, and come prefabricated. City HallApplication: Surface Parking LotThis in ll project on the north edge of the site takes the opportunity to continue the commercial ow. Because of the location of the in ll the target users should be the residents of the neighborhoods to the north. The in ll is alongside a vacant building which was adapted as a grocery store for the area. The shipping container park creates small outdoor spaces with the architectural combination of the boxes. Eclectic and useful features such as a green wall can easily be added to the containers. These containers are able to be recycled, as well as, all of the site furnishings and amenities, such as the green wall, to meet the standards of the in ll. The shipping containers are easily constructed to create unique architectural spaces. All site furnishings and amenities are modular and recyclable.N 70 Shipping Container In ll TEMPORARY.URBANISM

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City Hall N Guidelines: -The pocket parks should use the most temporary systems and amenities as possible. -Site furnishings should be recycled, custom made, modular, and able to be used elsewhere. -The pocket parks should occupy spaces in which nothing else possibly could. -These spaces should also be a compliment to the surrounding land uses. An appropriate space for a park would be outside a lar ge of ce complex or beside a restaurant to create an outdoor eating area. -This temporary system provides much needed outdoor spaces for the users of the LaVilla area and surrounding areas. -The need for pocket parks and open spaces in the area will grow with the new developments. -The parks should be fun spaces and provide a variety of activities throughout the site. -These spaces should rst and foremost serve their purpose as an open space. -Secondly, the pocket parks should be community oriented in what they offer the community they target.Application: Alley-The alley between the vacant WormanÂ’s Bakery & Deli and the multi of ce building is a prime location for a pocket park because of its immediate adjacency to the new City Hall. -By in lling the vacant restaurant space with another eatery the alley could become an outdoor cafe for the restaurant and those from City Hall to bring their lunch to. -Modular site furnishings like potted plants, cafe seating, a shade structure, and strings of lights makes the space more inviting from the street. -Other amenities, such as food trucks selling fresh produce would also be a drawing factor for users. Existing buildings and alley space. Combination of site amenities in the space, makes it more interesting and welcoming. The needs of several user groups are met by providing a shaded eating area and also a unique shopping experience. Pocket Parks TEMPORARY.URBANISM72Pocket Parks should be fun and lively for the area. Some other ideas for a park to explore would be: -Putt-putt park -A chalk wall park -Movie Night with movies projected on a wall.

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City Hall N Application: Warehouse LotThe pocket behind the abandoned Lee and CateÂ’s Glass warehouse has collected weeds and debris on the lot since the company moved across the street. Other than the cleanup of the surface of the lot the foundation is stable enough for a park. The cleanup of the building would be left up to the new owners of the building. This area holds a few industrial buildings that workers could use an open space for lunch or to relax in outdoors. Plenty of shade would be needed because of albedo from the ground and buildings. All furniture shown in the park is modular and custom made. Communal space is provided around the picnic area by a one of a kind table. Custom designed furnishings makes the space site speci c and also provides jobs for local designers and artists. Pocket Parks TEMPORARY.URBANISM74

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Guidelines: Daily FarmerÂ’s MarketBecause of the areas strong agriculture base it is important to promote the goods and services in the area and keep an emphasis on locally based agriculture.-The location of the daily farmerÂ’s market is centrally located within the site. This is helpful to both the producers and patrons. The market is promoted by its ability to keep all its goods and services locally grown and made. Farmers and local food vendors which are able to make preserves and other naturally grown products other than raw produce can all partake in the daily market where they can own their own booth or space for a contracted term. The building which holds the market is an historic landmark to the area. The bottom of the building is exposed on two sides. This provides a nice open air market with the vendors exposed to the public. The second oor of the building is intended to be a local cultural museum. It can also educate the public of the unwise choice the city made in the 1990Â’s to demolish the area and to inform about the changes it is presently undergoing. City Hall N FarmerÂ’s Market TEMPORARY.URBANISM76

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Guidelines: Saturday MarketThere may be a daily market more suited for the locals and other users in the area, but to give LaVilla more exposure and support, larger Saturday markets could occur seasonally. -The Market -The market would be a progressive walk in the street which would be closed off to automobile traf c. -The large parking lot between W. Monroe and W. AdamÂ’s Street will add extra space for the event and transform itself from an empty lot on the weekends into a busy event space. -Play Streets -Play streets are streets that are closed from automobile traf c and open only for pedestrians. -Play streets can have many different activities held on them. Other than the farmerÂ’s market, playgrounds, performances, and entertainment spaces could be created in the right of way space. -Parking -Parking for this large event can take place on the streets which have on street parking. -The parking lots which have been transformed into the tree nursery still have plenty holding capacity for any size crowd expected at the Saturday market. City HallProgressive market path and parking lot with event tents. FarmerÂ’s Market TEMPORARY.URBANISM78

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Guidelines: The tree nursery is a multi purpose farm composed of many different layers and could also be considered a park of sorts. -The tree nursery is rst and foremost a commercial tree nursery. -It is proposed that the city of Jacksonville partner with the nursery as the city might undergo beauti cation projects and need a source for trees and plants. -The tree nursery also functions in retaining some of the surface parking on the lots which the nursery is built on. -The tree nursery could also function as a public open space. As it provides a large amount of shade with pleasing and interesting views a walk through the space could feel like a stroll through a park. Educational signage for different tree a nd shrub varieties should be added for educational purposes. -There are possible opportunities for creating many green collar jobs in the care, upkeep, and management of the nursery. -The trees and large shrubs the nursery grows can be above ground or planted in ground. This is determined by a few steps. The location of the trees : -The lots to the south of the site which are currently used as surface parking should be set as above ground container trees and shrubs. This allows for parking to remain in between the trees. And also is easier for removal if sold. -Along the interstate and lots which are not surfaced or used for parking the tree and shrub varieties are able to be larger and planted in ground, because there is no threat of hurting the trees by compacting the root system or injuring the trunk with a car. The removal of these trees and shrubs would also be easier to use large equipment with since there would not be too much public activity there. The types of trees : -The tree and shrub variety should be of the Florida Friendly plant collection. This ensures the trees will grow and be successful in the area. Also the care, upkeep, and watering of the plants would be easier. Watering : -Watering the nursery is a design itself. There should be a series of cisterns which pull water from buildings and storm water ltering systems. The cisterns can be above ground or below ground depending on permanency. -Underground cisterns should be used in more permanent spaces of the tree nursery. -The trees would be watered through a drip system from these cisterns. -The Prime Osborne Center is an example of where a few cisterns should be placed. It would be a good source for collecting an adequate amount of rain water from the roof. In ground plantings off of I-95 I-95 Large farm equipment URBAN.AGRICULTURE Tree Nursery 80

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URBAN.AGRICULTURE Tree NurseryTree Nursery: Before Tree Nursery: After People Mover Informal Surface Parking Above Ground Trees and Shrubs Above Ground Cistern for temporary site 82

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0Â’5Â’ City Hall N Guidelines: The rain garden or bioswales surrounding the farms are multifunctional amenities for the farms.-They provide a ltering system for the runoff: -Phytoremediation plants such as cat tails are used in the bioswales to lter the water as it seeps into an underground perforated pipe. -The ltered water then collects in a cistern on site which is used to water the plants. -The rain gardens also act as a natural buffer to pedestrians. They encourage people to stay on the path and not wander into the farm. -The cisterns should be laid in ground as the water ows from an in ground pipe. -Basic perforated pvc pipes should be laid between rows for watering purposes. -The cisterns should be connected to public utilities as well, in case they have not stored enough to be self sustaining. -Cisterns should be located at an easy access point or close to a building so they could collect roof runoff as well. -On this site the cistern would be located underground by the restaurant and parking lot in the rain garden. Farm surrounded by bioswale with equipment shedSection of bioswale lter and pipeURBAN.AGRICULTURE Water Harvesting 84 Perforated pipes for watering Filtering bioswale which drains to cistern

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Surface Parking creates toxic runoff in the soil Equipment Shed Sun owers used for phytoremediation Street closed and lled with container gardensURBAN.AGRICULTURE Bioremediation 86

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Application: Vacant Lot ParkingCurrently the two blocks between W. Adams St. and W. Forsyth Street are used as over ow parking. How ever, the lots are sparsly scattered with cars that can be parked elsewhere. The lots are not paved, but have compacted soil which may have a gravel base. Because of soil compaction and toxic auto pollution, the soil must be ammended before they can produce edible agriculture. In this bioremediation process, the application of sun ower elds is being used. Guidelines: Use When: -Space will have in ground edible agricultureWhat to use for bioremediation: -Sun owers are best because; -They absorb lead, arsenic, zinc, chromium, copper, and manganese, uranium, and strontium-90 -Easy to grow and manage -Aesthetically pleasing -Cheap/economical -Harvest owers and dispose of safely in a land ll or they can be harvested to recover metals for research -Less invasive than soil excavation -Must have bioremediation eld fenced off from publicEducational Bene ts -Educates public on Phytoremediation and the changing landscape as it is a process -Educational signage and tours should be used -Provides “green collar” jobs (see job guildelines)Above: Sun owers improve views and are aesthetically pleasing. Left: Public education through informational signage and saftey through fence closure City Hall N URBAN.AGRICULTURE Bioremediation 88

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ChildrenÂ’s Garden Guidelines: In keeping with the temporary urbanism techniques the site should not undergo any major construction efforts. All vegetation on site should remain unless deemed unsafe. Spaces: -ChildrenÂ’s Area The childrenÂ’s area is an open play area with naturally designed play equipment. The space offers opportunities for children to be more free in their activities rather than prescribed with equipment systems. -Teen Area This space should also remain mostly open for teens to play freely and openly in. The site furnishings in the teen area are mostly recycled crates. These crates provide movable surfaces for the teens to play or work on. -Picnic Area -The picnic area is located under one of the existing shade areas. The area provides good views to both the children and teen areas for parents.Educational Bene ts -The childrenÂ’s garden provides an opportunity to learn through a butter y garden. -Tires are used as containers in the garden. These temporary containers can hold berry plants such as strawberries and blueberries. This provides an opportunity for children to learn about plant growth, fruits, and health. TeenÂ’s movable site furnishings Tire container garden. Existing billboard used as advertising and recreation. Playful fence surrounding the garden ChildrenÂ’s open play area with natural play equipment City Hall N 90URBAN.AGRICULTURE

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Vermiculture Guidelines: -The vermiculture method used will be through the raised bed system. -Species such as the Red Wiggler, European night crawler, and Common earthworms will be used. -The fertilizer produced improves typical soil structure, attracts present earthworms in an area, provides the soil with microorganisms which in turn can enhance plant germination. -The care and keeping of the vermiculture will be left to the staff of the vermiculture farm. This will be one of the green collar jobs created through the missions. -Educational tours of the vermiculture farm will be given upon request and schedule. -This farm also provides opportunities for educational workshops for the public.How to work the beds: -The worm boxes should be lled with half decomposed compost and worms. -The worms eat and re ne the compost. -In order to separate the worms from the re ned fertilizer a screen with more half decomposed compost should be placed on top of the box. The worms naturally surface to the new food and the fertilizer boxes can be harvested. Above: Vermiculture Farm Hoophouses Above Right: Educational signage Right: Example of worm beds Location: Adjacent to Sikes & Stowe Downtown Collision City Hall N 92URBAN.AGRICULTURE

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Compost Guidelines: -The compost site will be for “green waste materials” only. Acceptable materials are: -Food scraps: bread, grains, pasta, coffee grounds with paper lter, dairy, egg shells and eggs, fruit (all parts), leftovers and spoiled food, meat and the bones, seafood, tea, and tea bags, vegetables -Food soiled paper: coffee lters, pizza boxes, paper cups and plates, paper ice cream cartons, paper bags, napkins, tissues, towels, paper take-out boxes, tissues, milk and juice cartons (even waxy ones) -Plants: branches and brush, owers, oral trimmings, grasses, weeds, leaves, tree trimmings -Other: cotton balls and swabs, hair, fur, feathers, vegetable wood crates, waxed cardboard and paper, small lumber or sawdust (no ply wood, painted, stained or treated), wood chop sticks Methods: -The compost should be pre sorted by those using the compost system and dropped off in the correct drop off areas. -The compost should be looked after daily by workers and maintained accordingly to assure there is no foul odor. -In order to assure this the following methods should be followed: -The piles should be turned regularly. -The compost should have equal parts brown to green material. -To insure odorless compost, the heaps should be covered with tarps to keep from getting too moist. Compost Shop City Hall N 94URBAN.AGRICULTURE Compost Block Drop off and Layout Example Compost Pile

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Work & Volunteer Programs Kit of Parts Trinity Rescue Mission Clara White Mission The Salvation Army Guidelines: -There are three missions on site which include The Salvation Army, Clara White Mission, and The Trinity Rescue Mission. -These three missions provide an opportunity to offer green collar jobs to the poor and homeless. -The work programs offered would include training, housing, and guidance to become independent for the workers. -The programs would be rotational for participants from the missions. After the allotted amount of time the participants would be assisted in nding a more permanent position for which they were trained and another rotation of workers would be trained. -The green collar jobs could also become educational volunteer opportunities for students in the area needing to meet community service hours. -By partnering with the local schools, the farms could begin summer assistantships and volunteer programs. -The volunteer related activity would be programmed to be age appropriate 96 1.) Materials such as CMUÂ’s or easily constructed wood boxes from are low cost and temporary methods for creating creative above ground planting beds. 2.) Trash cans are interesting planters for herbs in a garden or pocket park. 3.) Rotational compost bins in parks and farms can be interactive and educational. 1. 2.3. A putt-putt course that is modular can be easily set up in play streets or pocket parks Food trucks are easy to construct and maintain. By placing these throughout the city it makes buying vegetables so much more convenient. Mobile chicken coops help fertilize an area, provide fresh eggs, and are an opportunity to learn.

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Recommended Agriculture for Florida 98 http://www. ickr.com/photos/nelliemc/5352212562/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/poppy-inprovence/2403179185/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/9817122@ N05/3873296470/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/weepeng/3239223056/

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100 conclusion In conclusion Jacksonville would bene t from implementing many if not all of the principals the plan offers. Giving LaVilla a start to transform itself from a desolate area into a self sustaining and healthy community can be achieved by implementing just a few of the prescribed methods. The methods recommended to implement rst are based off of: Importance, Feasibility, & Direct Effectiveness to the communityFarms: The implementation of the farms would be a step in the right direction because of their many bene ts, one being the creation of jobs in the area. They are also easily constructed and would begin producing crops and revenue for the area almost immediately. The farms would also begin creating public awareness for the area and bring users in for the next phases.Vacant Building Reuse: The reuse of the vacant buildings on site is important for commercial exposure in the area. By lling what is existing with temporary and permanent mixed uses a new user will emerge in the area. As the new land uses in ll the existing buildings more users who are looking to shop, eat, work, or play in the area will nd new and unique opportunities to do so. The unique branding of the local community will be a drawing factor in making the area unique from any other destination in the city.Temporary Pocket Parks: The packet parks are simply constructed and are a quickly added amenity for the community. The community bene ts from these pocket parks by having more much needed active open space. These parks also create a ow of multipurpose nodes along the eastern edge of the project site which helps move pedestrian ow throughout the site.

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Page 8: -Davis, Ennis. Vibrancy Killer, et al. 2011. Metro Jacksonville. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-julsurface-parking-lots-a-downtown-vibrancy-killer [accessed September 23, 2011] -Aerial from Google Earth Page 9: -Museum. Ritz Jacksonville. http://www.ritzjacksonville.com/museum/permanent-exhibit/ [accessed February 15, 2012] -LaVilla: JacksonvilleÂ’s First Incorporated Suburb, et al. August 3, 2006. Metro Jacksonville. http://www.metrojacksonville.co m/article/2006-auglavilla-jacksonvilles rst-incorporated-suburb [accessed February 15, 2012] Page 11: -Foster, John Bellamy and Hannah Holleman, et al May 1, 2010, http://monthlyreview.org/2010/05/01/the nancial-power-elite [accessed April 19 2012] -Et al June 18, 2011, http://paulin8.blogspot.com/2011/06/sprawl-repair-manual.html [accessed April 19, 2012] -http://www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html [accessed April 19, 2012] Page 15: -Bartman, Lydon, Khawarzad, Woudstra. Tactical Urbanism. alhttp://www.scribd.com/khawarzad/d/51354266-Tactical-Urbanism-Volume1 [accessed November 5, 2011] -Haydn, Florian, and Robert Temel. Temporary Urban Spaces: Concepts for the Use of City Spaces. Basel: Birkh user, 2006. Print. Page 16: -Roy, Rebekah. Et al. December 2, 2011 Boxpark. http://www.fashion-stylist.net/blog/2011/12/02/boxpark-shoreditch-opens-saturda y-december-3/ [accessed December 10, 2011] Page 17: -Aerial Photos from Google Earth Page 18: Greenway, Twilight, et al March 2, 2012, http://www.good.is/post/your-taco-deconstructed/ [accessed April 19, 2012] Page 21: http://www.greensgrow.org/farm/modules/extgallery/ [accessed January 20, 2012] Page 22: Barr, Meghan. Et al. December 4, 2011 Associate Press. http://www.cityfarmer.info/2011/12/06/stalled-construction-sites-beco me-green-haven/ [accessed December 10, 2011] -De Boer, Joop. Et al. January 23, 2009. Public Farming. http://popupcity.net/2009/01/public-farming-in-new-york-city/ [access ed December 10, 2011] -Saenz, Aaron. Et al. August 30, 2011. Podponics. http://singularityhub.com/2011/08/30/transforming-shipping-containers-int o-local-farms-podponics-brings-produce-to-the-city/ [accessed December 10, 2011] Page 32: -Davis, Ennis. Et al. January 12, 2011. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-jan-courthouse-asphalt-or-green-space-the -choice-isyours [accessed February 15, 2012] Page 33: -http://www.destination360.com/north-america/us/ orida/jacksonville/jacksonville-landing [accessed April 21, 2012] Page 39: http://www.wind nder.com/windstats/windstatistic_jacksonville.htm [accessed February 8, 2012] Page 40: -Davis, Ennis. Et al. July 15, 2011. Metro Jacksonville. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-jul-mayor-questions-va lidity-of-jtas-transportation-center [accessed March 5, 2012] -Davis, Ennis. Et al. September 18, 2009. Metro Jacksonville. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2009-sep-a-vision-for-tr ansit-in-jacksonville [accessed March 5, 2012] Page 85-88: -Dare, Stephen & Price, Janice. Et al. August 18, 2011. Metro Jacksonville. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-jun-s un owers-forlead-spider-plants-for-arsenic [accessed January 8, 2012] Page 90: -Et al. September 13, 2009. http://playgrounddesigns.blogspot.com/2009/09/cowley-teenage-space-brixton-london.html [accessed Ma rch 13, 2012] Page 91-92: -Vermicompost. http://www.growingpower.org/worms.htm [accessed January 8, 2012] -Foster, Bethany. http://www.ehow.com/about_5444156_vermiculture-technology.html [accessed April 9, 2012] Pages 93-94: -Brady, Angela. Green Living. http://greenliving.nationalgeographic.com/create-compost-heap-2181.html [accessed April 9, 2012] -Compost Collection. http://sunsetscavenger.com/residentialCompost.htm [accessed April 9, 2012] Page 96: -Compost Bin. http://www.bluegrassgardens.com/best-outdoor-compost-bins.htm [accessed April 20, 2012] -Truck Farm. http://www.truckfarm.org/#/A%20Wicked%20Delicate%20Film%20and%20Food%20Project [accessed December 7, 2011] Chicken Coop. http://chickenbreedslist.com/Considering-a-Movable-Chicken-Coop.html [accessed March 23, 2012] Page 97-98: Plant List. http://slowfood rstcoast.com/documents/Growing%20Season.pdf [accessed April 15, 2012] References 102

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Overall Research Metro Jacksonville Articles: -Davis, Ennis. Et al. July 15, 2011. Metro Jacksonville. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-jul-mayor-questions-va lidity-of-jtas-transportation-center [accessed March 5, 2012] -Davis, Ennis. Et al. September 18, 2009. Metro Jacksonville. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2009-sep-a-vision-for-tr ansit-in-jacksonville [accessed March 5, 2012] -Davis, Ennis. Vibrancy Killer, et al. 2011. Metro Jacksonville. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-julsurface-parking-lots-a-downtown-vibrancy-killer [accessed September 23, 2011] -Dare, Stephen & Price, Janice. Et al. August 18, 2011. Metro Jacksonville. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-jun-s un owers-for-leadspider-plants-for-arsenic [accessed January 8, 2012] -Davis, Ennis. Et al. April 12, 2012. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2012-apr-the-premature-destruction-of-downtown-j acksonville/page/1 [accessed March 10, 2012] -Et al. August 3, 2006. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2006-aug-lavilla-jacksonvilles rst-incorporated-suburb [accessed April 2, 2012] -Dare, Stephen. Et al. March 15, 2012. http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2012-mar-reinventing-spring eld-urban-ag-and-sustainability [Accessed March 20, 2012] -Nugent, Rachel. The Impact of Urban Agriculture on The Household and Local Economies. http://www.ruaf.org/sites/default/ les/Theme3.PDF [accessed October 25, 2011] -Greensgrow Nursery. http://www.greensgrow.org/farm/index.php [accessed November 15, 2011] -About Urban Farming. http://www.urbanfarming.org/about.html [accessed October 25, 2011] -LondonÂ’s BoxPark. Et al. September 12, 2011. http://www.tisztajovo.hu/zold-epiteszet/boxpark-london-elso-hajokontenerekbol-epi tett-bevasarlokozpontja/2011/12/09 [accessed November 30, 2011] -CNN video, Mexico Agriculture. http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2011/01/27/qmb.fc.mexico.agriculture.cnn [accessed March 10, 2012] -Bartman, Dan. Lydon, Mike. Khawarzad, Aurash. Woudstrra, Ronald. Tactical Urbanism: Volume 1. http://patterncities.com/archive s/175 [accessed January 8, 2011] -Build a Better Block Program. http://betterblock.org/# [accessed March 10; 2012] -BrooklynÂ’s DeKalb Shipping Container Park. http://inhabitat.com/nyc/brooklyns-new-dekalb-market-is-made-from-22-salvaged-shipp ing-containersexclusive-photos/dekalb-market-containers-07/?extend=1 [accessed March 1, 2012] Special thanks to: Mickie Swisher of the University of Florida for helping with the beginning processes of this project Amanda Searle of Sustainable Spring eld 104

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GROWjacksonvill e Kelly Elison LAA 2012 Temporary Urbanism & Urban Agricultur e Revitalization of the La V illa District

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION

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“Currently, almost 200 acres of land in downtown is devoted to parking, including 168 small surface lots of under 100 spaces that negatively impact its aesthetics and urban form. Furthermore, according to the Downtown Jacksonville Master Plan produced in 1999, there were 41,576 spaces in downtown. Since then, several new garages have been added in the area. However, as the number of parking spaces have increased, the downtown employment base continues to decline and has fallen to 18,000 in the Northbank core. “ -Ennis Davis CURRENT CONDITIONS

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Figure Ground of Existing Structures Figure Ground of Vacant Lots and Surface ParkingDecreasing Urban Population Too many surface parking lots Struggling Economy Poor Planning in the past

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HISTORY Civil War: campsite of Second Florida Infantry City of 3,000 residents incorporated into Jacksonville in 1887 First black urban neighborhood The 1920’s: “Great Black Way” Ashley Street was home to entertainment and establishments for the African-American Community. Performers such as Louis Armstrong, Ray Charles, and Billie Holliday performed in the area. In the early 1990s Jacksonville demolished most historic and rundown structures of the neighborhood to make way for an urban renewal project which was never implemented. In place, surface parking and delapidated buildings remain in this special and unique part of Jacksonville which was at one point a great entertainment district and home to many urban residence of historic Jacksonville. Strategic location deemed it the city’s main railroad terminal, today it is the Prime Osborn Convention Center

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GOALS & OBJECTIVESProvide Downtown Jacksonville with a destination to enliven, grow, and improve the urban core. ENLIVEN: Functionality-Replacing negative space with multifunctional uses to attract multiple user groups through temporary urbanism -Creating a destination in downtown Jacksonville, that is unlike any other in the city. -Diversity of users and functions -Using urban agriculture as a commercial and educational oppportunity and enticing featureGROW: Economics-Establishing temporary uses that work with the existing context gives way to what could be permanent in the future. -Creating a site speci c place in the Lavilla area west of the CBD and connecting it will enhance the boundaries of the urban core -The temporary urban and agriculture installations will also improve the commercial economy of Jacksonville. These amenities will not only provide jobs, but also stimulate economic growth in the area.IMPROVE: Quality of Life and Image-Improving downtown JacksonvilleÂ’s image as a safe and lively urban area by bringing the public to a destination in JacksonvilleÂ’s downtown -Using outdoor spaces as recreation such as the agricultural gardens improve health and quality of life, doubling as a learning experience. -The health safety and wellfare of the community will improve with the lively and sustainable additions.

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N 0Â’300Â’1000Â’ Tree Nursery Parking Kept Farms Pocket Parks Adaptive Reuse & In ll

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Farms and Gardens:32 acres

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Tree Nursery:60 acres

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Parking Retained:66 acres

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In ll:27 Adaptive Reuse Buildings 25 Shipping Containers

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Pocket Parks:2 Acres

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Farm Diagrams

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Temporary UrbanismVacant Building Reuse Shipping Container In ll Pocket Parks FarmerÂ’s MarketUrban AgricultureUrban Tree Farm Water Harvesting Bioremediation Farms ChildrenÂ’s Garden Vermiculture Compost Work & Volunteer Programs Kit of Parts Recommended Planting List Guidelines Through Design

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Vacant Building ReuseTEMPORARY URBANISM

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Possible toxins left in the ground Old vacant gas station Parking in empty lot promotes toxic runoff Funeral Home

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Outdoor Cafe Seating Outdoor Kitchen Container Kitchen Garden

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-Must have a solid foundation -Appropriate land uses for area -Target renters are local businesses -Must have a solid foundation -Appropriate land uses for area -Target renters are local businesses City HallN

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Shipping Container In ll TEMPORARY URBANISM

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City HallN -Must have a solid foundation -Appropriate land uses for area -Target renters are local businesses -Controlled rent and contracts of spaces -Provide unique spaces to work and visit -Maintain an aesthetically pleasing area

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City Hall N -Very temporary features -Appropriate site foundation -Variety of spaces through the site -Spaces should be multi-funtional meeting different user groups. -Site speci c design -Community oriented amenities

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Urban Tree NurseryUrban Agriculture

PAGE 92

People Mover Informal Surface Parking

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Above Ground Trees and Shrubs Above Ground Cistern for temporary site

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I-95 Large farm equipment Large tree variety, planted in ground -Partnership with City of Jacksonville -Foundation determines above or below ground planting -Multi-functional spaces -Green collar jobs -Educational signage in “park space” -Florida Friendly Palette -In ground or above ground determines type and size of tree -Keep Parking -Water harvesting used to water plants

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BioremediationUrban Agriculture

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Surface Parking creates toxic runoff in the soil

PAGE 98

Equipment Shed Sun owers used for phytoremediation Street closed and lled with container gardens

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City Hall N -Use before site will grow edible agriculture in ground -Harvest all materials and dispose of properly in a land ll -Guard site with a fence to keep public out. -Provide green collar jobs -Educational opportunities -Educational Signage -Evolving site: changes over time to edible agriculture

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Kit of Parts

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Educational ChildrenÂ’s Garden Vermiculture Education

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Daily FarmerÂ’s Market Food Trucks Mobile Chicken CoopCompost Block W ater Harvesting DiagramAdditional Site Features

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Conclusion The methods recommended to implement rst are based off of: Importance, Feasibility, & Direct Effectiveness to the communityFarms: The implementation of the farms would be a step in the right direction because of their many bene ts, one being the creation of jobs in the area. They are also easily constructed and would begin producing crops and revenue for the area almost immediately. The farms would also begin creating public awareness for the area and bring users in for the next phases.Vacant Building Reuse: The reuse of the vacant buildings on site is important for commercial exposure in the area. By lling what is existing with temporary and permanent mixed uses a new user will emerge in the area. As the new land uses in ll the existing buildings more users who are looking to shop, eat, work, or play in the area will nd new and unique opportunities to do so. The unique branding of the local community will be a drawing factor in making the area unique from any other destination in the city.Temporary Pocket Parks: The packet parks are simply constructed and are a quickly added amenity for the community. The community bene ts from these pocket parks by having more much needed active open space. These parks also create a ow of multipurpose nodes along the eastern edge of the project site which helps move pedestrian ow throughout the site.

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THANK YOU:Questions & Comments