Citation
All around the moon

Material Information

Title:
All around the moon
Uniform Title:
De la terre à la lune
Creator:
Verne, Jules, 1828-1905
Roth, Edward, 1826-1911
Hildibrand, Henri Théophile
Bayard, Émile Antoine, 1837-1891
Locke, Richard Adams, 1800-1871
Catholic Publication Society
King & Baird
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Catholic Publication Society
Manufacturer:
King & Baird, Printers and Stereotypers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
484 p., 24 leaves of plates : ill., maps ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Astronomy -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Calculus -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Moon ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1876
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved by Hildibrand after Bayard.
Statement of Responsibility:
from the French of Jules Verne ; freely translated by Edward Roth ; with a map of the moon constructed and engraved for this edition, and also with an appendix containing the Famous Moon Hoax by Adams Locke.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027005399 ( ALEPH )
ALH9756 ( NOTIS )
18070313 ( OCLC )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
University of Florida
Jules Verne

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
EEL

|
/

tyj4

LL

Yes

Ze
YE





The Baldwin Library

University
KNB sc
Florida





















BEE GA SS

EF; Pee Ss
EL a
vad &S
é CC
A

BI TE SSS =. 80
A 5 Mi

TREE RRS
pep RHO
A COLLECT Ne









inne 2
Serenytalie







E







Engraved by Edw. Busch. T IF BE M @ INE Drawn by Jos. S.Ward.

Ce opyright secured by Et dward Roth. =









ALL

Arounp tut Moon

FROM THE FRENCH OF

JULES VERNE

FREELY TRANSLATED BY

EDWARD ROTH

(AUTOUR DE LA LUNE)
ok *

‘With a Mav of the Moon constructed and engraved for this edition,
and also with an Appendix containing the Famous
Moon Hoax by R. Adams Locke

New York:

THE CATHOLIC PUBLICATION SOCIETY
No. 9 WARREN STREET,

1876.





Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1876, by
EDWARD ROTH,

In the Office of the Librarian at Washington.



Kine & Barro, Printers AND STEREOTYPERS,
Nos. 607 and 609 Sansom Street,
PHILADELPHIA.



PREFACE,

The following is taken mainly from the first volume of
my contemplated translation of Jules Verne’s most impore
tant works t— ‘

I resolved to tnake the best translatioti I could of works
so undeniably meritorious, a translation which, whilst
strictly following the spirit of the author and tfying to
make the most of his strong points, would thtow his weak
ones into shade, soften off his extravagances, give his names
a familiar sound, correct palpable errors—unless where
radical, and then say nothing about them—simplify crabbed
science; explain difficulties, amplify and naturalize local
coloring, clear up strange allusions, omit blunders, put a
little blood and heart into the dramatis personae—in short,
a translation which should aim as near as possible at that
natural, clear, familiar idiomatic but rather exaggerated
style which Verne himself would have used if addressing
himself in English to an American audience.

Such services rendered to those famous stories, if only
done honestly, unobtrusively, and with even tolerable suc«
cess, could hardly fail to be of advantage to the American

public,
(3)



é PREFACE.

The present volume is my second instalment. In it the
Reader has the famous Moon Story done for the first time
into real English, corrected, edited, revised, annotated, col-
laborated—

Improved?

I should like my Readers to sincerely think so,

To assist the reader in appreciating what is really the
most interesting portion of the narrative, a careful reduc-
tion of Beer and Maedler’s famous Map of the Moon has
been prepared expressly for this work. It is the only thing
of the kind that I know of existing in English, the places
being named instead of numbered, and represented direct
as they appear to the eye, not inverted as seen in the teles-
cope. It is the creditable work of a promising . young
scientific student, Mr. Josepa S. Warp, a former Pupil.

The Moon Hoax is reprinted as a curiosity which
many think well worth preserving,

E. R.

January 1, 1876



Cuar.

CONTENTS.



PRELIMINARY, +» 66 + + + »

I.
II,
il,

iv,
Vv.
VI

VIL
VILL.
IX.
x.
XI.
XII.

XIII.
XIV.
XV,

From 10 P. M. TO 10. 46’ 40”

Tue Firsr Hatr Hour, .

‘THEY MAKE THEMSELVES AT FlomEr

QUITE COMFORTABLE, . .
For THE CorRNELL GIRLS, .

Tue Cops oF SPACE, . .

InstrRucTIVE CONVERSATION,

A Hiegu Oup TimE,. » .
Tue NEUTRAL PoINT, . .

A LITTLE OFF THE TRACK,

THE OBSERVERS OF THE Moon,

Fact AND Fancy, . ~. .

.

.

.

A Birp’s Eve View oF THE Lunar Moun-

TAINS. » © © _
Lunar LANDSCAPES,. . «
A Nicut or FIFTEEN Days,

IMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE
GLimpseEs HE I ,

Paar.

9
15

24

Ior

175

187
206
226

250



6 CONTENTS.

CHAP.

XVI, THe SOUTHERN FIEMISPHERE, . « 6 « «

XVII Tycno,. . 2. 2. 1 6 © ws ew ew
XVIII. Puzzrinc Questions, ‘ ee
XIX, In EVERY Ficut, THE Impossis.e Wins,
XX, Orr THE Paciric Coast,. . . ....
XXI, News ror Marsron!. . ......
XXII. On THE Wincs oF THE WIND,. «4 . 6

XXII. Tue CLusB MENGOAFIsHING,. . . .

XXIV. FAREWELL FO THE BALTIMORE GuN CLUB,

APPENDIX:

Tue Moon Hoax, sy R. Apams Locke, .

431



. Tuer OxyGen! RE CRIED, 2.

. A croup @la Jardin Mabiile,

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Pacz
Map or THE Moon . . 4... ©) Frentispiece.

Hus rrrst CARE Was TO TURN ON THE GAS, . .
Diana AND SATELLITE, ©. 1. 6 2 ee ee
HE COXTRIVED TO GET ON HIS FEET, . 2. .
He HELPED ARDAN TO LirT Barpican, . .
MORE HUNGRY THAN EITHER, soe eee
THEY DRANK TO THE SPEEDY UNION OF THE

Eartru AND HER SATELLITE, . 2...
Tle PASSED A CAREFUL HAND THROUGH CERTAIN

MYSTERIOUS EOXES, . 2°. «ee we ee
Don’r I ‘rHoucH? My uead 1s sPLirrinc

WirHir!, 2. 2. 2. 1 ee ee

Poor SaTELLITE WAS DROPPED OUT, . . 2.
THE BODY OF THE DOG THROWN OUT YESTER-
DAY, 2 «© 6 «© © © © «

A DEMONIACAL HULLABALOO,. . . 4

AN IMMENSE BATTIE FIELD PILED WITH BLEACH-

ING BONES, 2 6 2 6 6

+ © © 9 ©

16
20
27
29
55.

79

100

144

199



& LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

‘ Pacr.
15. NEVERTHELESS THE SOLUTION ESCAPED HiM, . . 216

16, THEY COULD UTTER NO WORD, THEY COULD

BREATHE NO PRAYER, » « 6 6 2 «© «© « 2 269
17. THE TERRIBLE FIRE BALL BURST LIKE ASHELL, . 271
18. THEY SEEMED HALF ASLEEP IN HIS VITALIZING

BEAMS,. 2 + + 2 + 6 6 © 8 «© © oe © 290
19. THESE ARCHES EVIDENTLY ONCE BORE THE PIPES

OF AN AQUEDUCT, . 2. 2. 6 2 1 2 ee + 298
20, ARDAN GAZED AT THE PAIR FOR A FEW MINUTES, 341
21. OLD Mac DISCOVERED TAKING OBSERVATIONS, . 356
22. For A SECOND ONLY DID THEY CATCH ITS FLASH, 361
23. How Is THAT FOR HIGH? . 2. 2 6 6 © 6 6 4I4
24. EVERYWHERE THEIR DEPARTURE WAS ACCOMPaA-

NIED WITH THE MOST TOUCHING SYMPATHY, 425



PRELIMINARY CHAPTER,

RESUMING THE FIRST PART OF THE WORK AND SERVING
AS AN INTRODUCTION TO THE SECOND,

A few years ago the world was suddenly astounded by
hearing of an experiment of a most novel and daring nature,
altogether unprecedented in the annals of science, The
Battimore Gun Cuus, a society of artillerymen started in
America during the great Civil War, had conceived the idea
of nothing less than establishing direct communcation with
the Moon by means of a projectile! President Barbican, the
originator of the enterprise, was strongly encouraged in its
feasibility by the astronomers of Cambridge Observatory,
and took upon himself to provide all the means necessary to

ecure its success. Having realized by means of a public
subscription the sum of nearly five and a half millions of
dollars, he immediately set himself to work at the necessary
gigantic labors.

In accordance with the Cambridge men’s note, the can-
non intended to discharge the projectile was to be planted
in some country not further than 28° north or south from
the equator, so that it might be aimed vertically at the Moon
in the zenith. ‘The bullet was to be animated with an
initial velocity of 12,000 yards to the second. It was to be
fired off on the night of December rst, at thirteen minutes
and twenty seconds before eleven o’clock, precisely. Four
days afterwards it was to hit the Moon, at the very moment
that she reached her perigee, that is to say, her nearest point
to the Earth, about 228,000 miles distant.

The leading members of the Club, namely President
Barbican, Secretary Marston, Major Elphinstone and Gen-

(9)



ZO ALL AROUND THE MOON.

eral Morgan, forming the executive committee, held several
meetings to discuss the shape and material of the bullet, the
nature and position of the cannon, and the quantity and
quality of the powder. The decision soon arrived at was
as follows: rst—The bullet was to be a hollow aluminium
shell, its diameter nine feet, its walls a foot in thickness,
and its weight 19,250: pounds; 2d—The cannon was to be
a columbiad goo feet in length, a well of that depth form-
ing the vertical mould in which it was to be cast ; and 3d—
The powder was to be 400 thousand pounds of gun cotton,
which, by developing more than 209 thousand millions of
cubic feet of gas under the projectile, would easily send it
as far as our satellite.

These questions settled, Barbican, aided by Murphy, the
Chief Engineer of the Cold Spring Iron Works, selected a
spot in Florida, near the 27th degree north latitude, called
Stony Hill, where, after the performance of many wonderful
feats in mining engineering, the Columbiad was successfully
cast.

Things had reached this state when an incident occurred
which excited the general interest a hundred fold.

A Frenchman from Paris, Michel Ardan by name, eccen-
tric, but keen and shrewd as well as daring, demanded, by the
Atlantic telegraph, permission to be enclosed in the bullet
so that he might be carried to the Moon, where he was
curious to make certain investigations, Received in America
with great enthusiasm, Ardan held a great meeting, tri-
umphantly carried his point, reconciled Barbican to his
mortal foe, a certain Captain M’Nicholl, and even, by way
of clinching the reconciliation, induced both the newly made
friends to join him in his contemplated trip to the Moon.

The bullet, so modified as to become a hollow conical
cylinder with plenty of room inside, was further provided
with powerful water-springs and readily-ruptured partitions



PRELIMINARY CHAPTER. if

below the floor, intended to deaden the dreadful ‘concussion
sure to accompany the start. It was supplied with provi-
sions for a year, water for a few months, and gas for nearly
two weeks. A selfacting apparatus, of ingenious construc-
tion, kept the confined atmosphere sweet and healthy by
manufacturing pure oxygen and absorbing carbonic acid.
Finally, the Gun Club had constructed, at enormous ex-
pense, a gigantic telescope, which, from the summit of
Long’s Peak, could pursue the Projectile as it winged its
way through the regions of space. Everything at last was
ready.

On December 1st, at the appointed moment, in the midst

fan immense concourse of spectators, the departure took
place, and,. for the first time in the world’s history, three
human beings quitted our terrestrial globe with some pos-
sibility in their favor of finally reaching a point of destina-
tion in the inter-planetary spaces. They expected to accom-
plish their journey in 97 hours, 13 minutes and 20 ‘seconds,
consequently reaching the Lunar surface precisely at mid-
night on December 5-6, the exact moment when the Mcon
would be full.

Unfortunately, the instantaneous explosion of such a vast
quantity of gun-cotton, by giving rise to a violent commo-
tion in the atmosphere,. generated so much vapor and mist
as to render the Moon invisible for several nights to the
innumerable watchers in the Western Hemisphere, who
vainly tried to catch sight of her.

In the meantime, J.T. Marston, the Secretary of the
Gun Club, anda most devoted friend of Barbican’s, had
started for Long’s Peak, Colorado, on the summit of which
the immense telescope, already alluded to, had been
erected ; it was of the reflecting kind, and possessed power
sufficient to bring the Moon within a distance. of five miles.
While Marston was prosecuting his long journey with all



I2 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

possible speed, Professor Belfast, who had charge of the
telescope, was endeavoring to catch a glimpse of the Pro-
jectile, but for a long time with no success. The hazy,
cloudy weather lasted for more than a week, to the great dis
gust of the public at large. People even began to fear that
further observation would have to be deferred to the 3d
of the following month, January, as during the latter half
of December the waning Moon could not possibly give
light enough to render the Projectile visible.

At last, however, to the unbounded satisfaction of all, a
violent tempest suddenly cleared the sky, and on the 13th
of December, shortly after midnight, the Moon, verging
towards her last quarter, revealed herself sharp and bright
on the dark background of the starry firmament.

That same morning, a few hours before Marston’s arrival
at the summit of Long’s Peak, a very remarkable telegram
had been dispatched by Professor Belfast to the Smithsonian
Institute, Washington, It announced:

That on December 13th, at 2 o’clock in the morning,
the Projectile shot from Stony Hill had been perceived by
Professor Belfast and his assistants; that, deflected a little
from its course by some unknown cause, it had not reached
its mark, though it had approached near enough to be
affected by the Lunar attraction ; and that, its rectilineal
motion having become circular, it should henceforth con-
tinue to describe a regular orbit around the Moon, of which
in fact it had become the Satellite. The dispatch went on
further to state:

That the elements of the new heavenly body had not yet
been calculated, as at least three different observations, taken
at different times, were necessary to determine them. ‘The
distance of the Projectile from the Lunar surface, however,
might be set down roughly at 2833 miles,

The dispatch concluded with the following hypotheses,



PRELIMINARY CHAPTER, I?

positively pronounced to be the only two possible: Either,
1, The Lunar attraction would finally prevail, in which
case the travellers would reach their destination; or 2,
The Projectile, kept whirling forever in an immutable
orbit, would go on revolving around the Moon till time
should be no more,

In either alternative, what should be the Jot of the daring
adventurers? They had, it is true, abundant provisions to
last them for some time, but even supposing that they did
reach the Moon and thereby completely establish the prac-
ticability of their daring enterprise, how were they ever to
get back? Could they ever get back ? or ever even be heard
from? Questions of this nature, freely discussed by the
ablest pens of the day, kept the public mind in a very rest-
less and excited condition,

We must be pardoned here for making a little remark
which, however, astronomers and other scientific men of
sanguine temperament would do well to ponder over, An
observer cannot be too cautious in announcing to the pub-
lic his discovery when it is of a nature purely speculative.
Nobody is obliged to discover a planet, or a comet, or even
a satellite, but, before announcing to the world that you
have made such a discovery, first make sure that such is
really the fact.. Because, you know, should it afterwards
come out that you have done nothing of the kind, you
make yourself a butt for the stupid jokes of the lowest news-
paper scribblers, Belfast had never thought of this. Im-
pelled by his irrepressible rage for discovery—the furor in-
veniendi ascribed to all astronomers by Aurelius Priscus—
he had therefore been guilty of an indiscretion highly un-
scientific when his famous telegram, launched to the world at
large from the summit of the Rocky Mountains, pronounced
so dogmatically on the only possible issues of the great-en-
terprise. .



ig ALL AROUND 7HE MOON.

7

The truth was that his telegram contained fqva very im-
portant errors: 1. Error of observation, as facts afterwards
proved; the Projectile was not seen on the 13th and could
not have been on that day, so that the little black spot
which Belfast professed to have seen was most certainly not
the Projectile; 2. Error of t#eory regarding the final fate of
the Projectile, since to make it become the Moon’s satellite
was flying in the face of one of the great fundamental laws
of Theoretical Mechanics. -

Only one, therefore, the first,of the hypotheses so posi-
tively announced, was capable of realization, ‘The travel-
lers—that is to say if they still lived—might so combine
and unite their own efforts with those of the Lunar attrac-
tion as actually to succeed at last in reaching the Moon’s
surface,

Now the travellers, those daring but cool-headed men
who knew very well what they were about, did still live,
they Aad survived the frightful concussion of the start, and
it is to the faithful record of their wonderful trip in the bul-
let-car, with all its singular and dramatic details, that the
present volume is devoted. ‘The story may destroy many
illusions, prejudices and conjectures; but it will at least
give correct ideas of the strange incidents to which such an
enterprise is exposed, and it will certainly bring out in
strong colors the effects of Barbican’s scientific conceptions,
M’Nicholl’s mechanical resources, and Ardan’s daring,
eccentric, but brilliant and effective combinations.

Besides, it will show that J. T. Marston, their faithful
friend and a man every way worthy of the friendship of
such men, was only losing his time while mirroring the
Moon in the speculum of the gigantic telescope on the lofty
peak of the mountains,



CHAPTER I. ‘*
FROM Io P.M. TO 10 46! qo’.

THE moment that the great clock belonging to
the works at Stony Hill had struck ten, Barbican,
Ardan and M’Nicholl began to take their last fare-
wells of the numerous friends surrounding them.
The two dogs intended to accompany them had
been already deposited in the Projectile. The
three travellers approached the mouth of the enor-
mous cannon, seated themselves in the flying car,
and once more took leave for the last time of the
vast throng standing in silence around them. The
windlass creaked, the car started, and the three
daring men disappeared in the yawning gulf.

The trap-hole giving them ready access to the in-
terior of the Projectile, the car soon came back
empty; the great windlass was presently rolled
away; the tackle and scaffolding were removed,
and in a short space of time the great mouth of
the Columbiad was completely rid of all obstruc-
tions.

M’Nicholl took upon himself to fasten the door
of the trap on the inside by means of a powerful
combination of screws and bolts of his own inven-
tion, He also covered up very carefully the glass
lights with strong iron plates of extreme solidity
and tightly fitting joints.

{25}



r6 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Ardan’s first care was to turn on the gas, which
he found burning rather low; but he lit no more
than one burfier, being desirous to economize as
much as possible their store of light and heat,
which, as he well knew, could not at the very
utmost last them longer than a few weeks.

Under the ‘cheerful blaze, the interior of the
Projectile looked like a comfortable little chamber,
with its circular sofa,’ nicely padded walls, and
dome shaped ceiling.

All the articles that it contained, arms, instru-
ments, utensils, etc., were solidly fastened to the
projections of the wadding, so as to sustain . the
least injury possible from the first terrible shock.
Tn fact, all precautions possible, humanly. speak-
‘ing, had been taken to counteract this, the first,
and: possibly ‘one of the very greatest dangers to
which the courageous adventurers would ‘be exposed.

‘Ardan expressed himself to be quite pleased with
the appeatance of things in general.

‘¢Tt’s a prison, to be sure,’’ said he ‘ but not one
of your ordinary prisons that always keep in the one
spot. For my part, as long as I can have the privi-
lege of looking out of the window, I am willing to
lease it for a hundred years. Ah! Barbican, that
brings out one of your stony smiles. You think
our lease may last longer than that! Our tene-
ment may become our coffin, eh? Be it so.
I prefer it anyway to Mahomet’s; it may indeed
float in the air, but it won’t be motionless as a
milestone !”









FROM ro P. MM. TO 16 46’ 4a". i7

- Barbican, having made sure by personal inspec-
tion that everything was in perfect order, consulted
his chronometer, which he had carefully set a short
time before with Chief Engineer Murphy’s, who had
been charged to fire off the Projectile.

‘¢Friends,’’ he said, *‘it is now twenty minutes
past ten. At 10 46’ 40”, precisely, Murphy will
send the electric current into the guns«cotton. We
have, therefore, twenty-six minutes more to remain
on earth.’’

‘“« Twenty-six minutes and twenty seconds,’’ ob-
served Captain M’Nicholl, who always aimed at
mathematical precision. _

“¢ Twenty-six minutes! ’’ cried Ardan, gaily. “An
age, a cycle, according to the use you make of them.
In twenty-six minutes how much can be done! The
weightiest questions of warfare, politics, morality,
can be discussed, even decided, in twenty-six min-
utes. Twenty-six minutes well spent are infinitely
more valuable than twenty-six lifetimes wasted! A
few seconds even, employed by a Pascal, or a New-
ton, or a Barbican, or any other profoundly intellec-
tual being ,
Whose thoughts wander through ¢eternity—— ’?

‘¢As mad as Marston! Every bit!’? muttered the
Captain, half audibly.

‘What do you conclude from this rigmarole of
yours?’’ interrupted Barbican.

**T conclude that we have twenty-six good min-
utes still left——’’



rsé ALL AROUND THE AtOON:

** inter-

‘© Only twenty-four minutes, ten seconds,
rupted the Captain, watch in hand.

‘¢ Well, twenty-four minutes, Captain,’? Ardan
went on; ‘*now even in twenty-four a I

maintain——”’

‘‘Ardan,’’ interrupted Barbican, ‘after a very
little while we shall have plenty of time for philo-
sophical disputations. Just new let us think of
something far more pressing.’

‘“‘More pressing! what do you mean? are we
not fully prepared ?’’

‘Ves, fully prepared, as far at least as we have
been able to foresee. But we may still, I think,
possibly increase the number of precautions to be
taken against thé terrible shock that we are so soon
to experience.”’

‘*What? Have you any doubts whatever of the
effectiveness of your brilliant and extremely original
idea? Don’t you think that the layers of water,
regularly disposed in easily-ruptured partitions be-
neath this floor, will afford us sufficient nes
by their elasticity ? ’’

‘‘T hope so, indeed, my dear friend, but a am by
no means confident.”

‘‘He hopes! He is by no means confident! Lis-
ten to that, Mac! aay. time to tell us so! Let me
out of here!’’

“Too late!” observed the Captain quietly.
“‘The trap-hole ae would take ten or fifteen
minutes to open.”’

‘¢Oh then I suppose I must make the best of it,’’



FROM 10 P. M. TO 10 36! go". I9

said Ardan, laughing. ‘‘ All aboard, gentlemen !
The train starts in twenty minutes!”

‘ said the Captain, who never took his eye off the
chronometer.

The three travellers looked at each other for a
little while, during which even Ardan appeared to
become serious. After another careful glance at the
several objects lying around them, Barbican said,
quietly :

‘Everything is in its place, except ourselves.
What we have now to do is to decide on the posi-
tion we must take in order to neutralize the shock
as much as possible. We must be particularly care-
ful to guard against a rush of blood to the head.’’

“* Correct !’’ said the Captain.

‘Suppose we stood on our heads, like the circus
tumblers !’’ cried Ardan, ready to suit the action to
the word.

‘* Better than that,’’ said Barbican; ‘* we can lie
on our side. Keep clearly. in mind, dear friends,
that at the instant of departure it makes very little
difference to us whether we are inside the bullet or
in front of it, There is, no doubt, some difference,’’
he added, seeing the great eyes made by his friends,
‘*but it is exceedingly little.’’

‘‘Thank heaven for the somes”? interrupted
Ardan, fervently.

“Don’t you approve of my suggestion, Captain?”
asked Barbican,

‘*Certainly,’’ was the hasty reply. ‘That is to



20. ALL AROUND .THE MOON.

say, absolutely. Seventeen minutes twenty-seven
seconds !’’

¢¢ Mac isn’t a human being at all! ’’ cried Ardan,
admiringly. ‘‘ He is a repeating chronometer, hori-
zontal escapement, London-made lever, capped, jew-

2?



elled,

His companions let him run.on while they busied
themselves in making their last arrangements, with
the greatest coolness and most systematic method.
In fact, I don’t think, of anything just now to com-
pare them to.except a couple of old travellers who,
having to pass the night in the train, are trying to
make themselves. as comfortable as possible for their
long journey. In your profound astonishment, you
may. naturally ask me of what strange material can
the hearts of these Americans be made, who can
view without the slightest semblance of a flutter the
approach of the most appalling dangers? In your
curiosity I fully participate, but, I’m sorry to say, I
can’t gratify it. It is one of those things that I
could: never find out. :

Three mattresses, thick and well wadded, spread
on the disc forming the false bottom. of the Projec-
tile, were arranged in lines whose parallelism was
simply perfect.. But Ardan would never think of
occupying his until the very last moment. Walking
up and down, with the restless nervousness of a wild
beast in a cage, he kept up a continuous fire of talk;
at one moment with his friends, at another. with the
dogs, addressing the latter by the euphonious and
suggestive names of Diana and Satellite.









































































FROM 10 P. AL TO 790 gd 42". az

«Ho, pets!’’ he would exclaim as he patted them
gently, ‘you must not forget the noble part you ‘are
to play up there. You must be models of canine de-
portment. The eyes of the whole Selenitic world will
be upon you, You are the standard bearers of your
race. From you they will receive their first impres-
sion regarding its merits. Let it be a favorable one.
Compel those Selenites to acknowledge, in spite of
themselves, that the terrestrial race of canines is far
superior to that of the very best Moon dog among
them !7?

“Dogs in the Moon!”’ sneered M’Nicholl, I
like that !”’

“*Plenty of dogs!’’ cried Ardan, ‘and horses too,
and cows, and sheep, and no end of chickens! ’”’

‘“*A hundred dollars to one there isn’t a single
chicken within the whole Lunar realm, not exclu-
ding even the invisible side!’’ cried the Captain, in
an authoritative tone, but never taking his eye off
the chronometer.

“‘T take that bet, my son,’’ coolly replied Ardan,
shaking the Captain’s hand by way of ratifying the
wager; ‘‘and this reminds me, by the way, Mac,
that you have lost three bets already, to the pretty
little tune of six thousand dollars.”’

‘‘And paid them, too!’’ cried the captain, mo-
notonously; ‘ten, thirty-six, six !’’

‘Yes, and in a quarter of an hour you will have
to pay nine thousand dollars more; four thousand
because the Columbiad will not burst, and five thou-
sand because the Projectile will rise more than six
miles from the Earth.”



22 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“*T have the money ready,’’ answered the Captain,
touching his breeches pocket. ‘‘ When I lose I pay.
Not sooner. Ten, thirty-eight, ten!’’

‘* Captain, you’re a man of method, if there evér
was one. I think, however, that you made a mis-
take in your wagers.””

‘* How so?’’ asked the Captain listlessly, his eye
still on the dial.

“* Because, by Jove, if you win there will be no
more of you left to take the money than will
be of Barbican to pay it!’’

‘¢ Friend Ardan,’’ quietly observed Barbican,
“my stakes are deposited in the Wall Street
Bank, of New York, with orders to pay them
over to the Captain’s heirs, in case the Captain
himself should fail to put in an appearance at the
proper time.’”

‘“©Oh! you rhinoceroses, you pachyderms, you
granite men!’’ ‘cried Ardan, ‘gasping with = sur-
prise; ‘* you machines with iron heads, and iron
hearts! I may admire you, but I’m blessed if I
understand you!”

‘Ten, forty-two, ten!’’ repeated M’Nicholl, as
mechanically as if it was the chronometer itself that
spoke.

‘« Four minutes and a half more,’’ said Barbican.

‘*Oh! four and a half little minutes!’’ went on
Ardan. ‘Only think of it! Weare shut up ina
bullet that lies in the chamber of a cannon nine hun-
dred feet long. Underneath this bullet is piled a
charge of 400 thousand pounds of gun-cotton, equiv-



FROM 10 P. M. TO io 4b! go”. 23

alent to 1600 thousand pounds of ordinary gun-
powder! And at this very instant our friend Mur-
phy, chronometer in hand, eye on dial, finger on
discharger, is counting the last seconds and getting
ready to launch us into the limitless regions of plane-

a9

tary

‘¢ Ardan, dear friend,’’ interrupted Barbican, in a
grave tone, ‘a serious moment is now at hand. Let
us meet it with some interior recollection. Give me
your hands, my dear friends.”’

“¢ Certainly,’’ said Ardan, with tears in his voice,
and already at the other extreme of his apparent
levity.

The three brave men united in one last, silent,
but warm and impulsively affectionate pressure.’

‘‘ And now, great God, our Creator, protect us!
In Thee we trust !’’ prayed Barbican, the others join-
ing him with folded hands and bowed heads.’

“Ten, forty-six !’’ whispered the Captain, as he
and Ardan quietly took their places on the mat-
tresses.

Only forty seconds more !

Barbican rapidly extinguishes the gas and lies
down beside his companions.

The deathlike silence now reigning in the Projec-
tile is interrupted only by the sharp ticking of the
chronometer as it beats the seconds.

Suddenly, a dreadful shock is felt, and the Projec-
tile, shot up by the instantaneous development ot
200,000 millions of cubic feet of gas, is flying into
space with inconceivable rapidity!





CHAPTER II.
THE FIRST HALF HOUR.

Wuat had taken place within the Projectile?
What effect had been produced by the frightful
concussion? Had Barbican’s ingenuity been at-
tended with a fortunate result? Had the shock
been sufficiently deadened by the springs, the buffers,
the water layers, and the partitions so readily rup-
tured? Had their combined effect succeeded in
counteracting the tremendous violence of a velocity
of 12,000 yards a second, actually sufficient to carry
them from London to New York in six minutes?
These, and a hundred other questions of a similar
nature were asked that night by the millions who
had been watching the explosion from the base of
Stony Hill. Themselves they forgot altogether for
the moment ; they forgot eveything in their absorb-
ing anxiety regarding the fate of the daring travel-
lers. Had one among them, our friend Marston,
for instance, been favored with a glimpse at the in-
terior of the projectile, what would he have seen ?

Nothing at all at first, on account of the dark-
ness; except that the walls had solidly resisted the
frightful shock. Not acrack, nor a bend, nor adint
could be perceived; not even the slightest injury
had the admirably constructed piece of mechanical
workmanship endured. It had not yielded an inch

(24)



THE FIRST HALF HOUR. 25

to the enormous pressure, and, far from melting and
falling back to earth, as had been so seriously appre-
hended, in showers of blazing aluminium, it was still
as strong in every respect as it had been on the very
day that it left the Cold Spring Iron Works, glitter-
ing like a silver dollar,

Of real damage there was actually none, and even
the disorder into which things had been thrown in
the interior by the violent shock was comparatively
slight. A few small objects lying around loose had
been furiously hurled against the ceiling, but the
others appeared not to have suffered the slightest
injury. The straps that fastened them up were un-
frayed, and the fixtures that held them down were
uncracked.

The partitions beneath the disc having been rup-
tured, and the water having escaped, the false floor
had been dashed with tremendous violence against
the bottom of the Projectile, and on this disc at this
moment three human bodies could be seen lying
perfectly still and motionless.

Were they three corpses? Had the Projectile
suddenly become a great metallic coffin bearing its
ghastly contents through the air with the rapidity of
a lightning flash ?

In a very few minutes after the shock, one of the
bodies stirred a little, the arms moved, the eyes
opened, the head rose and tried to look around;
finally, with some difficulty, the body managed to
get on its knees. It wasthe Frenchman! He held
his head tightly squeezed between his hands for some



26 ALL. AROUND THE MOON.

time as if to keep it from splitting. .Then he felt
himself rapidly all over, cleared his throat with a
vigorous ‘‘hem!’’ listened to the sound critically
for an instant, and then said to himself in a relieved
tone, but in his native tongue:

“One man all right! Call the roll for the
others!”

He tried to rise, but the effort was too great for
his strength. He fell back again, his brain swim-
ming, his eyes bursting, his head splitting. His
state very much resembled that of a young man
waking up in the morning after his first tremendous
“«spree.’’

‘* Br—rr!’’? he muttered to himself, still talking
French; ‘this reminds me of one of my wild
nights long ago in the Quartier Latin, only de-
cidedly more so! ”’

Lying quietly on his-back for a while, he could
soon feel that the circulation of his blood, so sud-
denly and violently arrested by the terrific shock,
was gradually recovering its regular flow; his heart
grew more normal in its action; his head became
clearer, and the pain less distracting.

‘¢Time to call that roll,’’ he at last exclaimed in
a voice with some pretentions to firmness; ‘‘Barbi-
can! MacNicholl!’’

He listens anxiously for a reply. None comes.
A’snow-wrapt grave at midnight is not more silent.
In vain does he try to catch even the faintest sound
of breathing, though he listens intently enough to







THE FIRST HALF HOUR, 27,

hear the beating of their hearts; but he hears only
his own.

“Call that roll again !’’ he mutters in a voice far
less assured than before; ‘‘ Barbican! MacNicholl!’’

The same fearful unearthly stillness.

“The thing is getting decidedly monotonous! ’’
he exclaimed, still speaking French. Then rapidly
recovering his consciousness as the full horror of the
situation began to break on his mind, he went on
muttering audibly: ‘* Have they really hopped the
twig? Bah! Fudge! what has not been able to
knock the life out of one little Frenchman can’t
have killed two Americans! They’re all right! But
first and foremost, let us enlighten the situation !’’

So saying, he contrived without much difficulty to
get on his feet. Balancing himself then for a mo-
ment, he began groping about for the gas. “But he
stopped suddenly. / .

“¢ Hold on a minute!’’ he cried; ‘’ before light-
ing this match, let us see if the gas has been escaping.
Setting fire to a mixture of air and hydrogen
would make a pretty how-do-you-do! Such an ex-
plosion would infallibly burst the Projectile, which
so far seems all right, though I’m blest if I can tell
whether we’re moving or not.’ -

He began sniffing and ‘smelling to discover if pas-
sible the odor of escaped gas: He could not detect
the slightest sign of anything of.the kind. ‘This
gave him great courage. He knew of course that
his senses were not yet in good. order, still he
thought he might trust them so far as to be certain



28 ALL AROUND THE MOON. :

that the gas had not escaped and that consequently
all the other receptacles were uninjured.

At the touch of the match, the gas burst into light
and burned with a steady flame. Ardan immedi-
ately bent anxiously over the prostrate bodies of his
friends. They lay on each other like inert masses,
M’ Nicholl stretched across Barbican.

Ardan first lifted up the Captain, laid him on the
sofa, opened his clenched hands, rubbed them, and
slapped the palms vigorously. Then he went all over
the body carefully, kneading it, rubbing it, and
gently patting it. In such intelligent efforts to re-
store suspended circulation, he seemed perfectly at
home, and after a few minutes his patience was re-
warded by seeing the Captain’s pallid face gradually
recover its natural color, and by feeling his heart
gradually beat with a firm pulsation.

At last M’Nicholl opened his eyes, stared at
Ardan for an instant, pressed his hand, looked
around searchingly and anxiously, and at last whis-
pered ina faint voice:

‘¢ How’s Barbican ?”’ te

‘¢ Barbican is all right, Captain,’’? answered Ardan
quietly, but still speaking French. ‘‘ Tl attend to
him in a jiffy. He had to wait for his turn. I be-
gan with you because you were the top man. We'll
see in a minute what we can do for dear old Barby
(ce cher Barbican) \""

In less than thirty seconds more, the Captain not
only was able to sit up himself, but he even insisted









THE FIRST HALF HOUR. 29

on helping Ardan to lift Barbican, and deposit him
gently on the sofa.

The poor President had evidently suffered more
from the concussion than either of his companions.
As they took off his coat they were at first terribly
shocked at the sight of a great patch of blood stain-
ing his shirt bosom, but they were inexpressibly re-
lieved at finding that it proceeded froma slight con-
tusion of the shoulder, little more than skin deep.

Every approved operation that Ardan had per-
formed for the Captain, both now repeated ‘for Bar-
bican, but for a long time with nothing like a favor-
able result. .

Ardan at first tried to encourage the Captain by
whispers of a lively and hopeful nature, but not yet
understanding why M’Nicholl did not deign to
make a single reply, he grew reserved by degrees
and at last would not speaka single word. He
worked at Barbican, however, just as before.

M’Nicholl interrupted himself every moment to
lay his ear on the breast of the unconscious man.
At first he had shaken his head quite despondingly,
but by degrees he found himself more and more en-
couraged to persist. ~

&* He breathes! ’’ he shicpered at last.

“Ves, he has been breathing for some time,’’ re-
plied Ardan, quietly, still unconsciously speaking
French. ‘A little more rubbing and pulling and
pennding will make him as spry as a young grass-
hopper.’’ :

They worked at him, in fact, so vigorously, intel-



jo ALL AROUND THE MOON.

ligently and perseveringly, that, after what they con-
sidered a long hour’s labor, they had the delight of
seeing the pale face assume a healthy hue, the inert
limbs give signs of returning animation, and the
breathing become strong and regular.

At last, Barbican suddenly opened his eyes,
started into an upright position on the sofa, took
his friends by the hands, and, in a voice showing
complete consciousness, demanded eagerly:

“‘Ardan, M’Nicholl, are we moving ?”’

His friends looked at each other, a little amused,
but. more perplexed. In their anxiety regarding
their own and their friend’s recovery, they had
never thought of asking such ‘a question. His
words recalled them at once toa full sense of their
situation.

“‘ Moving? Blessed ve I can tell!’’ said Ardan,
still speaking French. ,

‘*We may be lying fifty feet deep in a Florida
marsh, for all I know,’’ observed M’ Nicholl.

“Or, likely as not, in the bottom of the Gulf of
Mexico,’’ suggested Ardan, still in French.”

“¢ Suppose we find out,’? observed Barbican,
jumping up to try, his voice as clear and his step
as firm as ever.

But trying is one thing, and finding out another.
Having no means of comparing themselves-with ex-
ternal objects, they could not possibly tell whether
they were moving, or at an absolute stand-still.
Though our Earth is whirling us continually around
the Sun at the tremendous speed of 500 miles a min-



THE FIRST HALF HOOR. or

ute, its inhabitants are totally unconscious of the
slightest motion. It was the same with oyr travel-
lers. Through their own personal consciousness
they could tell absolutely nothing. Were they
shooting through space like a meteor? They could
not tell. Had they fallen back and buried them-
selves deep in the sandy soil of Florida, or, still
more likely, hundreds of fathoms deep beneath the
waters of the Gulf of Mexico? They could not
form the slightest idea,

Listening evidently could dono good. The pro-
found silence proved nothing. The padded walls
of the Projectile were too thick to admit’ any sound
whether of wind, water, or human beings. Barbi-
can, however, was soon struck forciby by one cir-
cumstance. He felt himself to be very uncomfort-
ably warm, and his friend’s faces looked very hot
and flushed. Hastily removing the cover that pro-
tected the thermometer, he closely inspected it, and
in an instant uttered a joyous exclamation.

“‘Hurrah!’’ he cried. ‘* We’re moving! There’s
no mistake about it. ‘The thermometer marks 113
degrees Fahrenheit. Such a stifling heat could not
come from the gas. It comes from the. exterior
walls of our projectile, which atmospheric friction
must have made almost red hot. But this heat
must soon diminish, because we are already far be-
yond the regions of the atmosphere, so that instead
of smothering we shall be shortly in danger of
freezing.”’

‘What?’? asked Ardan, much bewildered. ‘We



JS? ALL AROUND THE MOON.

are already far beyond the limits of the terrestrial
atmosphere! Why do you think so?’”’

M’ Nicholl was still too much flustered to venture
a word.

“If you want me to answer your question satisfac-
torily, my dear Ardan,’’ replied Barbican, with a
quiet smile, ‘you will have the kindness to put your
questions in English.”

“¢ What do you mean, Barbican!’’ asked Ardan,
hardly believing his ears.

‘¢ Hurrah!’’ cried M’Nicholl, in the tone of a
man who has suddenly made a welcome but most
unexpected discovery. a

**T don’t know exactly how it is with the Cap-
tain,’’ continued Barbican, with the utmost tranquil-
lity, ‘‘ but for my part the study of the languages
never was my strong point, and though I always ad-
mired the French, and even understood it pretty
well, I never could converse in it without giving
myself more trouble than I always find it conve-
nient to assume.’’

“* You don’t mean to say that I have been talking
French to you all this time !’’ cried Ardan, horror-
stricken.

‘¢The most elegant French I ever heard, backed
by the purest Parisian accent,’’ replied Barbican,
highly amused; “‘Don’t you think so, Captain ?’’
he added, turning to M’ Nicholl, whose countenance
still showed the most comical traces of bewilder-
ment.

‘* Well, I swan to man!’’ cried the Captain,



THE FIRST HALF HOUR, So?

who always swore a little when his feelings got be-
yond his control; ‘‘Ardan, the Boss has got the
rig on both of us this time, but rough as it is on you
it isa darned sight more soon me. Be hanged if I
did not think you were talking English the whole
time, and I put the whole blame for not understand-
ing you on the disordered state of my brain! ”’

Ardan only stared, and scratched his head, but
Barbican actually—no, not Jaughed, that serene na-
ture could not /augh. His cast-iron features puck-
ered into a smile of the richest drollery, and his
eyes twinkled with the wickedest fun ; but no un-
dignified giggle escaped the portal of those majestic
lips. ;
“It sounds like French, I’d say to myself,’’? con-
tinued the Captain, ‘‘ but I 4zcw it’s English, and
by and by, when this whirring goes out of my head,
I shall easily understand it.’’

Ardan now looked as if he was beginning to see
the joke.

“‘The most puzzling part of the thing to me,”’
went on M’Nicholl, giving his experience with the
utmost gravity, ‘was why English sounded ‘so like
french. Jf it was simple incomprehensible gibber-
ish, I-could readily blame the state of my ears for
it. But the idea that my bothered ears could turn
a mere confused, muzzled, buzzing reverberation
into a sweet, harmonious, articulate, though unin-
telligible, human language, made me sure that I was
fast becoming crazy, if I was not so already.’’

“‘Hia! ha! ha!’ roared Ardan, laughing till the
3



SF ALL AROUND THE MOON,

tears,came. ‘¢ Now I understand why the poor Cap-
tain made me no reply all the time, and looked at
me with such a hapless woe-begone expression of
countenance. The fact is, Barbican, that shock
was too much both for M’Nicholl and myself. You
are the only man among us whose head is fire-proof,
blast-proof, and powder-proof. I really believe a
burglar would have greater difficulty in blowing
your head-piece open than in bursting one of those
famous American safes your papers make such a fuss
about. . A wonderful head, the Boss’s, isn’t it
M’ Nicholl? ”’

“* Yes,’’ said the Captain, as slowly as if every
word were a gem of the profoundest thought, ‘ thé
Boss has a fearful and a wonderful head !”’

‘But now to business!’’ cried the versatile
Ardan, ‘‘Why do you think, Barbican, that we
are at present beyond the limits of the terrestrial
atmosphere ?”’ ‘ .

‘¢ For avery simple reason,’’ said Barbican, point-
ing to the chronometer; ‘‘it isnow more than seven
minutes after 11. We must, therefore, have been
in motion more than twenty minutes. Consequently,
unless our initial velocity has been very much di-
minished by the friction, we must have long before
this completely cleared the fifty miles of atmosphere
enveloping the earth.”’

**Correct,’’ said the Captain, cool as a cucum-
ber, because once more in complete possession of all
his senses; *‘ but how much do you think the initial
velocity to have been diminished by the friction?”



THE FIRST HALF HOUR. OF

‘*By a third, according to my calculations,’’ re-
plied Barbican, ‘‘ which I think are right. Suppo-
sing our initial velocity, therefore, to have been
12,000 yards per second, by the time we quitted
the atmosphere it must have been reduced to 8,000
yards per second. At that rate, we must have gone
by this time ea

“Then, Mac, my boy, you’ve lost your two
bets!’’ interrupted Ardan. ‘¢The Columbiad has
not burst, four thousand dollars; the Projectile has
risen at least six miles, five thousand dollars; come,
Captain, bleed! ”’

“Let me first be sure we’re right,’’ said the Cap-
tain, quietly. ‘‘I don’t deny, you see, that friend
Barbican’s arguments are quite right, and, therefore,
that I have lost my nine thousand dollars. But
there is another view of the case poses which
might annul the bet.”’

‘¢What other view?’’ asked Barbican, quickly.

‘¢ Suppose,’’ said the Captain, very drily, ‘that
the powder had not caught, and that we were still
lying quietly at the bottom of the Columbiad !”

“By Jove!’ laughed Ardan, ‘‘ there’s an idea
truly worthy of my own nondescript brain! We
must surely have changed heads during that concus-
sion! No matter, there is some sense left in us yet.
Come now, Captain, consider a little, if you can.
Weren’t we both half-killed by the shock? Didn’t
I rescue you from certain death with these two
hands? Don’t you see Barbican’s shoulder still
bleeding by the violence of the shock?’’





36 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

«Correct, friend Michael, correct in ‘every par-
ticular,’’ replied the Captain. ‘‘ But one little ques-
tion.”’

“Out with it!’

“¢ Friend Michael, you say we’re moving ?”’

“© Yes.”?

. Tn consequence of the explosion? ’’

“¢ Certainly !’’

‘¢Which must have been attended with a tremen-
dous report? ’”’ ;

“© Of course!’

‘* Did you hear that report, friend Michael ?’’

«¢N—o,’’ replied Ardan, a little disconcerted at
the question. ‘Well, no; I can’t say that I did
hear any report.’’

‘¢Did you, friend Barbican ?”’

‘*No,’’ replied Barbican, promptly. ‘I heard
no report whatever.”’

His answer was ready, but his look was quite as
disconcerted as Ardan’s.

‘¢Well, friend Barbican and friend Michael,’’ said
the Captain, very drily as he leered wickedly at both,
‘*put that and that together and tell me what you
make of it.’’

“It’s a-fact!’’ exclaimed Barbican, puzzled, but
not bewildered. <‘‘Why did we not hear that re-
port P’’

“‘Too hard for me,’’ said Ardan. ‘‘Give it up!”’

The three friends gazed at each other for a while
with countenances expressive of much perplexity.
Barbican appeared to be the least self-possessed of



THE FIRST HALF HOUR. 37

the party. It was a complete turning of the tables
from the state of things a few moments ago. The
problem was certainly simple enough, but for that
very reason the more inexplicable. If they were
moving the explosion must have taken place ; but if
the explosion had taken place, why had they not
heard the report ?

Barbican’s decision soon put an end to specula-
tion. ,

‘‘Conjecture being useless,’’ said he, ‘let us
have recourse to facts. First, let us see where we
are. Drop the deadlights !’’

' This operation, simple enough in itself and being
immediately undertaken by the whole three, was
easily accomplished. The screws fastening the bolts
by which the external plates of the deadlights were
solidly pinned, readily yielded to the pressure of a
powerful wrench. ‘The bolts were then driven out-
wards, and the holes which had contained them
were immediately filled with solid plugs of India
rubber. The bolts once driven out, the external
plates dropped by their own weight, turning on a
hinge, like portholes, and thestrong plate-glass form-
ing the light immediately showed itself. A second
light exactly similar, could be cleared away on the
opposite side of the Projectile; a third, on the sum-
mit of the dome, and a fourth, in the centre of the
bottom. The travellers could thus take observations
in four different directions, having an opportunity
of gazing at the firmament through the side lights,



38 ALL AROUND THE MOON.-

and at the Earth and the Moon through the lower
and the upper lights of the Projectile.

Ardan and the Captain had commenced examin-
ing the floor, previous to operating on the bottom
light. But Barbican was the first to get through his
work at one of the side lights, and M’Nicholl and
Ardan soon heard him shouting:

‘“*No, my friends!’’ he exclaimed, in tones of
decided emotion;. ‘*we have wzof¢ fallen back to
Earth ; ‘nor are we lying in the bottom of the Gulf
of Mexico. No! We are driving through space!
Look at the stars, glittering all around! Brighter,
but smaller than we have ever seen them before!
We have left the Earth and the Earth’s atmosphere
far behind us!” ‘

‘¢Hurrah! Hurrah!’ cried M’Nicholl and Ardan,
feeling as if electric shocks were coursing through
them, though they could see nothing, looking down
from the side light, but the blackest and profound-
est obscurity. *

Barbican soon convinced them that this pitchy
blackness proved that they were not, and could not
be, reposing on the surface of the Earth, where at
that moment, everything was illuminated by the
bright moonlight; also that they had passed the
different layers of the atmosphere, where the dif-
fused and refracted rays would be also sure to re-
veal themselves through the lights of the Projectile.
‘They were, therefore, certainly moving. No doubt
was longer possible. :



THE FIRST HALF HOUR, 39

“It’s a fact!’’ observed the Captain, now quite
convinced. ‘Then I’ve lost!’’

‘‘Let me congratulate you!’ cried Ardan,. sha-
king his hand.

‘Here is your nine thousand dollars, friend Bar-
bican,’’ said the Captain, taking a roll of green-
backs of high denomination out of his porte-mon-
naie.

““You want a receipt, don’t you, Captain ?”’
asked Barbican, counting the money.

*¢ Yes, I should prefer one, if it is not too much
trouble,’? answered M’Nicholl; ‘it saves dispute.”’

Coolly and mechanically, as if seated at his desk,
in his office, Barbican opened his memorandum
book, wrote a receipt on a blank page, dated,
signed and sealed it, and then handed it to the
Captain, who put it away carefully among the other
papers of his portfolio.

Ardan, taking off his hat, made a profound bow
to both of his companions, without saying a word.
Such formality, under such extraordinary circum-
stances, actually paralysed his tongue for the mo-
ment. No wonder that he could not understand
those Americans. Even Indians would have sur-
prised him by an exhibition of such stoicism. After
indulging in silent wonder for a minute or two, he
joined his companions who were now busy looking
out at the starry sky.

‘¢Where is the Moon?’ he aked, “* How is it
that we cannot see her? ’’

«¢ The fact of our not seeing her,

22

answered Bar-



4o ALL AROUND THE MOON.

bican, ‘*gives me very great satisfaction in one re-
spect; it shows that our Projectile was shot so
rapidly out of the Columbiad that it had not time
to be impressed with the slightest revolving motion
—for us a most fortunate matter. As for the rest—
see, there is Casséopeia, a little to the left is Andro-
meda, further down is the great square of Pega-
sus, and to the southwest /oma/haut can be easily
seen swallowing the Cascade. All this shows we are
looking west and consequently cannot see the Moon,
which is approaching the zenith from the east.
Open the other light—But hold on! Look here !
What can this be? ’”’

The three travellers, looking westwardly in the di-
rection of Adpherat, saw a brilliant object rapidly
approaching them, At a distance, it looked like a
dusky moon, but the side turned towards the Earth
blazed with a bright light, which every moment be-
came more intense. It ‘came towards them with
prodigious velocity and, what was worse, its path lay
so directly in the course of the Projectile that a col-
lision seemed inevitable. As it moved onward,
from west to east, they could easily see that it ro-
tated on its axis, like all heavenly bodies; in fact, it
somewhat resembled a Moon on a small scale, de-
scribing its regular orbit around the Earth.

“¢ Mille tonerres /’’ cried Ardan, greatly excited ;
‘what is that? Can it be another projectile ?’’
M’ Nicholl, wiping his spectacles, looked again, but
made no’ reply. Barbican looked puzzled and un-
easy. Accollision was quite possible, and the results,



THE FIRST HALF HOUR. GI

even if not frightful in the highest degree, must be
extremely deplorable. The Projectile, if not abso-
lutely dashed to pieces, would be diverted from its
own course and dragged along in a new one in obe-
dience to the irresistible attraction of this furious
asteroid,

Barbican fully realized that either alternative in-
volved the complete failure of their enterprise. He
kept perfectly still, but, never losing his presence of
mind, he curiously looked on the approaching object
with a gladiatorial eye, as if seeking to detect some
unguarded point in his terrible adversary. The Cap-
tain was equally silent ; he looked like a man who
had fully made up his mind to regard every possible
contingency with the most stoical indifference. But
Ardan’s tongue, more fluent than ever, rattled away
incessantly. _-

‘Look ! Look! ’’ he exclaimed, in tones so per-
fectly expressive of his rapidly alternating feelings as
to render the medium of words totally unnecessary.
“* How rapidly the cursed thing is nearing us! Plague
take your ugly phiz, the more I know you, the less
I like you! Every second she doubles in size!
Come, Madame Projectile! Stir your stumps a
little livelier, old lady! He’s making for you as
straight as an arrow! We’re going right in his way,
or he’s coming in ours, I can’t say which. It’s
taking a mean advantage of us either way. As for
ourselves—what can we do! Before such a monster
as that we are as helpless as three men in a little



g2 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

skiff shooting down the rapids to Bue brink of
Niagara! Now “for it!”

Nearer and nearer it came, but without noise,
without sparks, without a trail, though its lower
part was brighter than ever. Its path lying little
above them, the nearer it came the more the collis-
ion seemed inevitable. Imagine yourself caught on
a narrow railroad bridge at midnight with an express
train approaching at full speed, its reflector already
dazzling you with its light, the roar of the cars rat-
tling in your ears, and you may conceive the feel-
ings of the travellers. At last it was so near that
the travellers started back in affright, with eyes
shut, hair on end, and fully believing their last
hour had come. Even then Ardan had his mot.

‘¢ We can neither switch off, down brakes, nor clap
on more steam! Hard luck!’”’

In an instant-all was over. The velocity of the
Projectile was fortunately great enough to carry it
barely above the dangerous point; and in a flash
the terrible bolide disappeared rapidly several hun-
dred yards beneath the affrighted travellers.

**Good bye! And may you never come back!”’
cried Ardan, hardly able tobreathe. ‘It’s perfectly
outrageous! Not room enough in infinite space to
let an unpretending bullet like ours move*about a
little without incurring the risk of being run over by
such a monster as that! What isit anyhow? Do
you know, Barbican ?’’

‘‘T do,’’ was the reply.



‘THE FIRST HALF HOUR, 43

**Of course, you do! What is it that he don’t
know? Eh, Captain? ’”’ ©

“Tt is a simple bolide, but one of such enormous
dimensions that the Earth’s attraction has made it a
satellite.’’

‘¢What!’’ cried Ardan, ‘‘another satellite be-
sides the. Moon? I hope there are no more of
them!”

‘«They are pretty numerous,’’ replied Barbican :
‘* but they are so small and they move with such
enormous velocity that they are very seldom seen.
Petit, the Director of the Observatory of Toulouse,
who these last years has devoted much time and
care to the observation of bolides, has calculated
that the very one we have just encountered moves
with such astonishing swiftness that it accomplishes
its revolution around the Earth in about 3 hours and
20 minutes !”’

*¢Whew!’’ whistled Ardan, “where should we
be now if it had struck us! ’”’

‘“*You don’t mean to say, Barbican,’’ observed
M’ Nicholl, ‘‘ that Petit has seen this very one? ”’

‘* So it appears,’’ replied Barbican.

‘¢And do all astronomers admit its existence?’’
asked the Captain. :

‘¢ Well, some of them have their doubts,’’ replied
Barbican :

“‘If the unbelievers had been here a minute or
favo ago,’’ interrupted Ardan, ‘‘they would never
express a doubt again.”’

“If Petit’s calculation is right,’’ continued Barbi-





44 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

can, ‘I can even form avery good idea as to our
distance from the Earth.’’

“Tt seems to me Barbican can do what he pleases
here or elsewhere,’’ observed Ardan to the Captain,

‘¢ Let us see, Barbican,’’ asked M’Nicholl; ‘* where
has Petit’s calculation placed us?’”’

‘“‘The bolide’s distance being known,”’’ replied
Barbican, ‘‘at the moment we met it we were a
little more than 5 thousand miles from the Earth’s
surface.”’

‘“‘Five thousand miles already!’ cried Ardan,
‘¢ why we have only just started !’’

“‘Let us see about that,’’ quietly observed the
Captain, looking at tis chronometer, and calculating
with his pencil. ‘It is now ro minutes past eleven ;
we have therefore been 23 minutes on the road.
Supposing our initial velocity of 12,000 yards or
nearly seven miles a second, to have been kept up,
we should by this time be about 9,000 miles from
the Earth; but by allowing for friction and gravity,
we can hardly be more than 5,500 miles. Yes,
friend Barbican, Petit does not seem to be very
wrong in his calculations.’’

But Barbican hardly heard the observation. He
had not yet answered the puzzling question that had
already presented itself to them for solution ; and un-
til he had done so he could not attend to anything else.

‘© That’s all very well and good, Captain,’’ he re-
plied in an absorbed manner, “ but we have not yet
been able to account for a very strange phenomenon.
Why didn’t we hear the report ?”’



THE FIRST HALF HOUR, 45

No one replying, the conversation came toa stand-
still, and Barbican, still absorbed in his reflections,
began clearing the second light of its external shut-
ter. In afew minutes the plate dropped, and the
Moon beams, flowing in, filled the interior of the
‘Projectile with her brilliant light. ‘The Captain im-
mediately put out the gas, from motives of economy
as well as because its glare somewhat interfered with
the observation of the interplanetary regions.

The Lunar disc struck the travellers as glittering
with asplendor and purity of light that they had
never witnessed before. The beams, no longer
strained through the misty atmosphere of the Earth,
streamed copiously in through the glass and coated
the interior walls of the Projectile with a brilliant
silvery piating. The intense blackness of the sky
enhanced the dazzling radiance of the Moon. Even
the stars blazed with a new and unequalled splendor,
and, in the absence of a refracting atmosphere, they
flamed as bright in the close proximity of the Moon
as in any other part of the sky.

You can easily conceive the interest with which
these bold travellers gazed on the Starry Queen, the
final object of their daring journey. She was now
insensibly approaching the zenith, the mathematical
point which she was to reach four days later. They
presented their telescopes, but her mountains, plains,
craters and general characteristics hardly came out
a particle more sharply than if they had been viewed
from the Earth. Still, her light, unobstructed by air
or vapor, shimmered with a lustre actually trans-



46 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

plendent. . Her disc shone like a mirror of polished
platina. The travellers remained for some time ab-
sorbed in the silent contemplation of the glorious
scene.

‘‘ How they’re gazing at her this very moment
from Stony Hill!’’ said the Captain at last to break
the silence:

“*By Jove!’ cried Ardan; ‘it’s true! Captain
you’re right. We were near forgetting our dear old
Mother, the Earth. What ungrateful children !
Let me feast my eyes once more on the blessed old
creature |”? ,

Barbican, to satisfy his companion’s desire, imme-
diately commenced to clear away the disc which
covered the floor of the Projectile and prevented
them from getting at the lower light. This disc,
though it had been dashed to the bottom of the
Projectile with great violence, was still as strong as
ever, and, being made in compartments fastened by
screws, to dismount it was no easy matte'. se Barbi-
can, however, with the help of the others, soon had
it all taken apart, and put away the pieces carefully,
to serve again in case of need. A round hole about
a foot and a half in diameter appeared, bored through
the floor of the Projectile. It was closed by a circu-
lar pane of plate-glass, which was about six inches
thick, fastened by a ring of copper. Below, on the
outside, the glass was protected by an aluminium
plate, kept in its place by strong bolts and nuts.
The latter being unscrewed, the bolts slipped out by
their own weight, the shutter fell, and a new com-



THE FIRST HALE HOUR, ; “7

munication was established between the interior and
the exterior.

Ardan knelt down, applied his eye to the light,
and tried to look out. At first everything was
quite dark and gloomy.

‘‘T see no Earth!’ he exclaimed at last.

‘‘Don’t you see a fine ribbon of light?’’ asked
Barbican, ‘right beneath us? A thin, pale, silvery
crescent ?”?

- © OF course Ido. Can that be the Earth?”

‘© Terra Afater herself, friend Ardan. That fine
fillet of light, now hardly visible on her eastern bor-
der, will disappear altogether as soon as the Moon is
full, Then, lying as she wiil be between the Sun
and the Moon, her illuminated face will be turned
away from us altogether, and for several days she
will be involved in impenetrable darkness.’’

“‘And that’s the Earth !’’ repeated Ardan, hardly
able to believe his eyes, as he continued to gaze on
the slight thread of silvery white light, somewhat
resembling the appearance of the ‘* Young May
Moon”? a few hours after sunset.

Barbican’s explanation was quite correct. The
Earth, in reference to the Moon or the Projectile,
was in her last phase, or octant as it is called, and
showed a sharp-horned, attenuated, but brilliant
crescent strongly relieved by the black background
of the sky. Its light, rendered a little bluish by the
density of the atmospheric envelopes, was not quite
as brilliant asthe Moon’s. But the Earth’s crescent,
compared to the Lunar, was of dimensions much



gb _ ALL AROUND THE MOON.

greater, being fully 4 times larger. You would have
called it a vast, beautiful, but very thin bow ex-
tending over the sky.. A few points, brighter than
the rest, particularly in its concave part, revealed
the presence of lofty mountains, probably the Hima-
layahs. But they disappeared every now and then
under thick vapory spots, which are never seen on
the Lunar disc. They were the thin concentric
cloud rings that surround the terrestrial sphere.

However, the travellers’ eyes were soon able to
trace the rest of the Earth’s surface not only with
facility, but even to follow its outline with absolute
delight. This was in consequence of two different
phenomena, one of which they could easily account
for; but the other they could not explain without
Barbican’s assistance. No wonder. Never before
had mortal eye beheld such a sight. Let us take
each in its turn.

We all know that the ashy light by means of which
we perceive what is called the Off Moon tu the
Young Moon's arms is due to the Earth-shine, or
the reflection of the solar rays from the Earth to the
Moon. By a phenomenon exactly identical, the
travellers could now see that portion of the Earth’s
surface which was unillumined by the Sun ; only, as,
in consequence of the different areas of the respec-
tive surfaces, the Larthlight is thirteen times more
intense than the Afooniight, the dark portion of the
Earth’s disc appeared eorsacialy more adumbrated
than the Old Moon.

But the other pheuomenon had burst on them so



THE FIRST HALF HOUR. . 49

suddenly that they uttered acry loud enough to
wake up Barbican from his problem. They had dis-
covered a true starry ring! Around the Earth’s
outline, a ting, of internally well defined thickness,
but somewhat hazy on the outside, could easily be
traced by its surpassing brilliancy. Neither the
Pleiades, the Northern Crown, the Magellanic
Clouds nor the great nebulas of Orion, or of Argo,
no sparkling cluster, no corona, no group of glitter-
ing star-dust that the travellers had ever gazed at,
presented such attractions as the diamond ring they
now saw encompassing the Earth, just as the brass
meridian encompasses a terrestrial globe. ‘The re-
splendency of its light enchanted them, its pure
softness delighted them, its perfect regularity aston-
ished them. What was it? they asked Barbican.
In a few words he explained it. The beautiful
luminous ring was simply an. optical illusion, pro-
duced by the refraction of the terrestrial atmosphere.
All the stars in the neighborhood of the Earth, and
many actually behind it, had their rays refracted,
diffused, radiated, and finally converged to a focus
by the atmosphere, as if by a double convex lens of
gigantic power,

Whilst the travellers were seotbanaly absorbed in
the contemplation of this wondrous sight, a spark-
ling shower of shooting stars suddenly flashed over
the Earth’s dark surface, making it for a moment as
bright as the external ring. Hundreds of bolides,
catching fire from contact with the atmosphere,

streaked the dari kness with their luminous trails,
4



5O ALL AROUND 1HE MOON.

overspreading it occasionally with sheets of electric
flame. The Earth was just then in her perihelion,
and we all know that the months of November and
December are so highly favorable to the appearance
of these meteoric showers that at the famous display
of November, 1866, astronomers counted as many as
8,000 between midnight and four o’clock.

Barbican explained the whole matter in a few
words. The Earth, when nearest to the sun, occa-
sionally plunges into a group of countless meteors
travelling like comets, in eccentric orbits around
the grand centre of our solar system. The atmos-
phere strikes the rapidly moving bodies with such
violence as to set them on fire and render them visi-
ble to usin beautiful star showers. But to this simple
explanation of the famous November meteors Ardan
would not listen, He preferred believing that
Mother Earth, feeling that her three daring chil-
dren were still looking at her, though five thousand
miles away, shot off her best rocket-signals to show
that she still'thought of them and would never let
them out of her watchful eye.

For hours they continued to gaze with indescrib-
able interest on the faintly luminous mass so easily
distinguishable among the other heavenly bodies.
Jupiter blazed on their right, Mars flashed his ruddy
light on their left, Saturn with his rings looked like
a round white spot on a black wall; even Venus
they could see almost directly under them, easily
recognizing her by her soft, sweetly scintillant light.
But no planet or constellation possessed any attrac-



THE FIRST HALF HOUR, SL

tion for the travellers, as long as their eyes could
trace that shadowy, crescent-edged, diamond-girdled,
meteor-furrowed spheroid, the theatre of their exis-
tence, the home of so many undying desires, the
mysterious cradle of their race !

Meantime the Projectile cleaved its way upwards,
rapidly, unswervingly, though with a gradually re-
tarding velocity. As the Earth sensibly grew darker,
and the travellers’ eyes grew dimmer, an irresistible
somnolency slowly stole over their weary frames.
The extraordinary excitement they had gone through
during the last four or five hours, was naturally fol-
lowed by a profound reaction.

‘¢Captain, you’re nodding,’’ said Ardan at last,
afterea longer silence than usual; ‘‘ the fact is, Bar-
bican is the only wake man of the party, because he
is puzziing over his problem. Dum oiaimus viva-
mus / As we are asleep let us be asleep !”’

So saying he threw himself on the mattress, and
his companions immediately followed the example.

They had been lying hardly a quarter of an hour,
when Barbican ‘started up with a cry so loud and
sudden as instantly to awaken his companions.

The bright moonlight showed them the President
sitting up in his bed, his eye blazing, his arms wav-
ing, as he shouted ina tone reminding them of the
day they had found him in St. Helena wood.

“ Eurcka! Vve got it! Iknow it!”

‘What have you got?’’ cried Ardan, bouncing
up and seizing him by the right hand.



52 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

«* What do you know ?”’ cried the Captain, stretch-
ing over and seizing him by the left.

“¢ The reason why we did not hear the report! ’’

“Well, why did not we hear it!’’ asked both
rapidly in the same breath.

‘‘ Because we were shot up 30 times faster than
sound can travel!”



‘CHAPTER III.

THEY MAKE THEMSELVES AT HOME AND FEEL QUITE
COMFORTALLE,

‘Bus curious explanation given, and its soundness
immediately recognized, the three friends were soon
fast wrapped in the arms of Morpheus. Where in
fact could they have found a spot more favorable for
undisturbed repose? On land, where the dwellings,
whether in populous city or lonely country, contin-
ually experience every shock that thrills the Earth’s
crust? At sea, where between waves or winds or
paddles or screws or machinery, everything is tremor,
quiver or jar? In the air, where the balloon is in-
cessantly twirling, oscillating, on account of the
ever varying strata of different densities, and even

cecasionally threatening to spill you out? The Pro-
jectile alone, floating grandly through the absolute
void, in the midst of the profoundest silence, could
offer to its inmates the possibility of enjoying slum-
ber the most complete, repose the most profound.

There is no telling how long our three daring
travellers would have continued to enjoy their sleep,
if it had not been suddenly terminated by an unex-
pected noise about seven o’clock in the morning of
December 2nd, eight hours after their departure.

This noise was most decidedly of barking.

“ (33)



S54. ALL AROUND THE HOON,

“The dogs! It’s the dogs!’’ cried Ardan,
springing up at a bound.

“They must be hungry! ’’ observed the Captain.

‘¢We have forgotten the poor creatures!’’ cried
Barbican.

‘¢ Where can they have gone to?’’ asked Ardan,
looking for them in all directions.

At last they found one of them hiding under the
sofa. Thunderstruck and perfectly bewildered by
the terrible shock, the poor animal had kept close in
its hiding place, never daring to utter a sound, until
at last the pangs of hunger had proved too strong
even for its fright.

They readily recognized the amiable Diana, but
they could not allure the shivering, whining animal
from her retreat without a good deal of coaxing.
Ardan talked to her in his most honeyed and seduc-
tive accents, while trying to pull her out by the
neck.

“Come out to your friends, charming Diana,’’ he
went on, ‘‘come out, my beauty, destined for a lofty
niche in the temple of canine glory! Come out,
worthy scion of a race deemed worthy by the Egypt-
jans to be a companion of the great god, Anubis,
by the Christians, to be a friend of the good Saint
Roch! Come out and partake of a glory before
which the stars of Montargis and of St. Bernard shall
henceforward pale their ineffectual fire! Come out,
my lady, and let me think o’er the countless multi-
plication of thy species, so that, while sailing through
the interplanetary spaces, we may indulge in endless







































































































































































































































































































QUITE COMFORTALLE, : SS

flights of fancy on the number and variety of thy
descendants who will ere long render the Selenitic
atmosphere vocal with canine ululation !’’

Diana, whether flattered or not, allowed herself to
be dragged out, still uttering short, plaintive whines,
A hasty examination satisfying her friends that she
was more frightened than hurt and more hungry
than either, they continued their search for her
companion.

‘Satellite ! Satellite! Step this way, sir!’’ cried
Ardan. Put no Satellite appeared and, what was
worse, not the slighest sound. indicated his presence.
At last he was discovered on a ledge in the upper
portion of the Projectile, whither he had been shot
by the terrible concussion. . Less fortunate. than his
female companion, the poor fellow had received a
frightful shock and his life. was evidently in great
danger. 7

a The acclimatization project looks shaky !’’ cried
Ardan, handing the animal very carefully and ten-
derly to the others. Poor Satellite’s head had been
crushed against the roof, but, though recovery seemed
hopeless, they laid the body on a soft cushion, and
soon had the satisfaction of hearing it eine vent toa
slight sigh.

*©Good!’’ said Ardan, ** while there’s life there’s
hope. . You must not die yet, old boy. We shall
nurse you. We know our duty and shall not shirk
the responsibility. I should rather lose the right arm
off my body than be the cause of your death, poor
Satcllitel Try a little water?”



56 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

The suffering creature swallowed the cool draught
with evident avidity, then sank into a deep slumber.

The friends, sitting around and having nothing
more to do, looked out of the window and began
once more to watch the Earth and the Moon with
great attention. The glittering crescent of the Earth
was evidently narrower than it had been the prece-
ding evening, but its volume was still enormous when
compared to the Lunar crescent, which was now
rapidly assuming the proportions of a perfect circle.

“‘By- Jove,’’ suddenly exclaimed “Ardan, ‘* why
didn’t we start at the moment of Full Earth ?-—
that is when our globe and the Sun were in opposi-
tion?” ,

“Why should we !’’ growled M’ Nicholl.

‘Because in that case we should be now looking
at the great continents and the great seas in a new
light—the former glittering under the solar rays, the
latter darker and somewhat shaded, as we see them
on certain maps. Ilow I should like to get a glimpse
at those poles of the Earth, on which the. eye of
man has never yet lighted !”’

' © True,”? replied Barbican, ‘but if the Earth had
been Full, the Moon would have been New, that is
to say, invisible to us on account of solar irradiation.
Of the two it is much preferable to be able to keep
the point of arrival in view rather than the point of
departure.” 2
at You're right, Barbican,’ observed the Captain;
“besides, once we’re in the Moon, the long Lunar
night will give us plenty of time to gaze our full



QUITE COMFORTABLE, 57

at yonder great celestial body, our former home,
and still swarming with: our fellow beings. ’’

“¢ Our fellow beings no longer, dear boy!’’ cried
Ardan. ‘We inhabit a new world peopled by our-
selves alone, the Projectile! Ardan is Barbican’s
fellow being, and Barbican M’Nicholl’s. Beyond
us, outside us, humanity ends, and we are now the
only inhabitants of this microcosm, and so we shall
continue till the moment when we become Selenites
pure and simple.”’

‘¢ Which shall be in about eighty-eight hours from
now,’’ replied the Captain.

‘‘ Which is as much as to say—?’’ asked Ardan.

‘¢'That it is half past eight,’’ replied M’ Nicholl.

‘My regular hour for breakfast,’’ exclaimed Ardan,
“Cand I don’t see the shadow of a reason for chang-
ing it now.’ : a

The proposition was most acceptable, especially to
the Captain, who frequently boasted that, whether
on land or water, on mountain summits or in the
depths of mines, he had never missed a meal in all
his life. In escaping from the Earth, our travellers
felt that they had by no means escaped from the
laws of humanity, and their stomachs now called on
them lustily to fill the aching void. Ardan, as a
Frenchman, claimed the post of chief cook, an im-
portant office, but his companions yielded it with
alacrity. The gas furnished the requisite heat, and
the provision chest supplied the materials for their
first repast. They commenced with three plates of
excellent soup, extracted from ' Zzedrg’s precious



58: ALL AROUND THE MOON.

tablets, prepared from the best beef that ever roamed.
over the, Pampas. .

To: this succeeded several. tenderloin beefsteaks,
which, though. reduced to a;small: bulk .by the hy-
draulic engines of the American Destccating Com-
pany, were pronounced to be fully as tender, juicy
and savory as if:they had just left the gridiron of a
London Club House. Ardan even swore that they
were ‘‘ bleeding,’’? and the others were :too busy to
contradict him.

Preserved : vegetables of. various kinds, ‘‘ fresher
than nature,’’ according to Ardan, gave an agreeable.
variety tothe entertainment, and these were followed
by several cups of magnificent tea, unanimously: al-
lowed to-be the best: they had ever tasted.. It. was
an odoriferous young. hyson. gathered that very year,
and presented to the Emperor of Russia by the famous
rebel chief Yakub Kushbegi, and: of which Alexander
had expressed himself as. very happy -in- being :able
to send a few boxes. to his friend, the distinguished
President -of: the. Baltimore Gun ‘Club. . To crown.
the meai; Ardan unearthed an exquisite bottle, of
Chambertin, and, in glasses sparkling with the richest
juice of the Cote d’or, the travellers drank to the
speedy union of the Ifarth and her satellite.

. And, as if his work among the generous vineyards
of Burgundy had not been enough to show his interest
in the matter, even the Sun wished to join the party.
Precisely at this moment, the Projectile beginning to
leave the conical shadow cast by. the Earth, the rays
ofthe glorious King of Day struck its lower surface,

?







QUITE COMFORTABLE. 59

not obliquely, but perpendicularly, on account of the
slight obliquity of the Moon’s orbit with that of the
Earth.

¢¢ The Sun,”’ cried Ardan.

“¢ Of course,’’ said Barbican, looking at his watch,
‘¢he’s exactly up to time.”

“‘ How is it that we see him only through the bot-
tom light of our Projectile ?’’ asked Ardan.

‘“*A moment’s reflection must tell you,’’ replied
Barbican, ‘‘ that when we started last night, the Sun
was almost directly below us; therefore, as we con-
tinue to move ina straight line, he must still be in
our rear.”’

‘That’s clear enough,’’

said the Captain, ‘* but
another consideration, I’m free to say, rather per-
plexes me. Since our Earth lies between us and the
Sun, why don’t we see the sunlight forming a great
ring around the globe, in other words, instead of the
full Sun that we plainly see there below, why do we
not witness an annular eclipse ?”’

“* Your cool, clear head has not yet quite recovered
from the shock, my dear Captain;’’ replied Barbi-
can, with asmile. ‘‘ For two reasons we can’t see
the ring eclipse: on account of the angle the Moon’s
orbit makes with the Earth, the three bodies are not
at present in adirect line; we, therefore, see the Sun
a little to the west of the earth; secondly, even if
they were exactly in a straight line, we-should still
be far from the point whence an annular eclipse
would be visible.’’

‘eThat’s true,’’ said Ardan; ‘the cone of the



co ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Earth’s shadow must extend far beyond the
Moon.”’

‘* Nearly four times as far,’’ said Barbican ; ‘still,
as the Moon’s orbit and the Earth’s do not lie in
exactly the same plane, a Lunar eclipse can occur
only when the nodes coincide with the period of the
Full Moon, which is generally twice, never more
than three times in a year. If we had started about:
four days before the occurrence of a Lunar eclipse,
we shotild travel all the time in the dark. ‘This
would have been obnoxious for many reasons.”’

“One, forinstance?’”?

“*An evident one is that, though at the present
moment we are moving through a vacuum, our Pro-
jectile, steeped in the solar rays, revels in their light
and heat. Hence great saving in gas, an important
point in our household economy.”

In effect, the solar rays, tempered by no genial
medium like our atmosphere, soon began to glare
and glow with such intensity, that the Projectile
under their influence, felt like suddenly passing from
winter to summer. Between the Moon overhead
and the Sun beneath it was actually inundated with
fiery rays.

“One feels good here,’’ cried the Captain, rub-
bing his hands. :

‘A little too good,’’ cried Ardan. ‘It’s already
like a hot-house. With a little garden clay, I could
raise you a splendid crop of peas in twenty-four
hours. I hope in heaven the walls of our Projectile
won’t melt like wax!”



QUITE COMFORTABLE. 61

‘Don’t be alarmed, dear friend,’’ observed Bar-
bican, quietly. ‘‘The Projectile has seen the worst
as far as heat is concerned ; when tearing through
the atmosphere, she endured a temperature with
which what she is liable to at present stands no
comparison. In fact, I should not be astonished if,
in the eyes of our friends at Stony Hill, it had re-
sembled for’a moment or two a red-hot meteor.”’

‘¢ Poor Marston must have looked on us as roasted
alive!?? observed Ardan. .

‘¢ What could have saved us I’m sure I can’t tell,’’
replied Barbican. ‘I must acknowledge that against
such a danger, I had made no provision whatever.”’

“*T knew all about it,’? said the Captain, ‘‘and on
the strength of it, I had laid my fifth wager.”

“¢ Probably,’’ laughed Ardan, ‘there was not time
enough to get grilled in: I have heard of men who
dipped their fingers into molten iron with impunity.’’

Whilst Ardan and the Captain were arguing the
point, Barbican began busying himself in making
everything as comfortable as if, instead of a four days’
journey, one of four years was contemplated. The
reader, no doubt, remembers that the floor of the
Projectile contained about 50 square feet; that the
chamber was nine feet high; that space was econo-
mized as much as possible, nothing but the most ab-
solute necessities being admitted, of which each was
kept strictly in its own place; therefore, the travel-
lers had room enough to move around in with a cer-
tain liberty. The thick glass window in the floor
was quite as solid as any other part of it; but the



62 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Sun, streaming in from below, lit up the Projectile
strangely, producing some very singular and startling
effects of light appearing to come in by the wrong
way.

The first thing now to be done was to see after
the water cask and the provision chest. They were
not injured in the slighest respect, thanks to the
means taken to counteract the shock. The provis-
ions were in good condition, and abundant enough
to supply the travellers for a whole. year—Barbican
having taken care to be on the safe side, in case the
Projectile might land in a deserted region of the
Moon. As for the water and the other liquors, the
travellers had enough only for two months. Relying
on the latest observations of astronomers, they had
convinced themselves that the Moon’s atmosphere,
being heavy, dense and thick in the deep valleys,
springs and streams of water could hardly fail to show
themselves there. During the journey, therefore, and
for the first year of their installation on the Lunar
continent, the daring travellers would be pretty safe
from all danger of hunger or thirst.

The air supply proved also to be quite satisfactory.
The Reset and Regnault apparatus for producing
oxvgen contained a supply of chlorate of potash suf-
ficient for two months, As the productive material
had to be maintained at a temperature of between 7
and 8 hundred -degrees Fahr., a steady consumption
of gas was required ; but here too the supply far ex-
ceeded thedemand. The whole arrangement worked
charmingly, requiring only an odd glance now and



QUITE COMFORTABLE, 69

then. The high temperature changing the chlorate
into achloride, the oxygen was disengaged gradually
but abundantly, every eighteen pounds of chlorate of
potash, furnishing the seven pounds of oxygen neces-
sary for the daily consumption of the inmates of the
Projectile.

Still—as the reader need hardly be reminded—
it was not sufficient to renew the exhausted oxygen ;
the complete purification of the air required the ab-
sorption of the carbonic acid, exhaled from the
lungs. For nearly 1r2 hours the atmosphere had
been gradually becoming more and more charged
with this deleterious gas, produced from the com-
bustion of the blood by the inspired oxygen. The
Captain soon saw this, by noticing with what dimf-
culty Diana was panting. She even appeared to be
smothering, for the carbonic acid—as in the famous
Grotio del Cane on the banks of Lake Agnano, near
Naples—was collecting like water on the floor of the
Projectile, on account of its great specific gravity.
It already threatened the poor dog’s life, though not
yet endangering that of her masters. The Captain,
seeing this state of things, hastily laid on the floor
one or two cups containing caustic potash and water,
and stirred the mixture gently: this substance, hav-
ing a powerful affinity for carbonic acid, greedily
absorbed it, and after a few moments the air was
completely purified.

The others had begun by this time to check off
the state of the instruments. The thermometer and
the barometer were all right, except one sel{-recor-



Og ALL AROUND THE JIOON.

der of which the glass had got broken. An excel-
lent aneroid barometer, taken safe and sound out of
its wadded box, was carefully hung on a hook in the
wall. It marked not only the pressure of the air in
the Projectile, but also the quantity of the watery
vapor that it contained. The needle, oscillating
a oe a ee pointed pretty steadily at
rar.

The mariner’s compasses were also found to be
quite free from injury. It is, of course, hardly nec-
essary to say that the needles pointed in no particu-
lar direction, the magnetic pole of the Earth being
unable at such a distance to exercise any appreciable
influence on them. But when brought to the Moon,
it was expected that these compasses, once more
subjected to the influence of the current, would attest
certain phenomena. In any case, it would be inter-
csting to verify if the Earth and her satellite were
similarly affected by the magnetic forces.

A hypsometer, or instrument for ascertaining the
heights of the Lunar mountains by the barometric
pressure under which water boils, a sextant to
measure the altitude of the Sun, a theodolite for
taking horizontal or vertical angles, telescopes, of
indispensable necessity when the travellers should ap-
proach the Moon,—all these instruments, carefully,
examined, were found to be still in perfect working
order, notwithstanding the violence of the terrible
shock at the start.

As to the picks, spades, and other tools that had
been carefully selected by the Captain ; also the bags











QUITE COMFORTABLE, 6s

of various kinds of grain and the bundles of various
kinds of shrubs, which Ardan expected to transplant
to the Lunar plains—they were all still safe in their
places around the upper corners of the Projectile.

Some other articles were also up there which evi-
dently possessed’ great, interest for the Frenchman,
What they. were nobody else seemed to know, and he
seemed to be in no hurry to tell, Every now and
then, he would climb up, by means of iron. pins
fixed in the wall, to inspect his treasures ;, whatever
they were, he arranged them: and rearranged: them
with evident pleasure, and as he rapidly passed a
careful hand through certain mysterious boxes, he
joyfully sang in the falsest possible of false voices
the lively piece from JVico/o :

Le temps est beau, la route est belle,
La promenade est un plaisir.

§ The day is bright, our hearts are light. 2
? How sweet to rove through wood and dell. §

or the well known air in Af%ignon ¢

Lezores hiron.leiles,

Oiseaux bénis de Divit,
Ouvres—ouvrez. vos ailes,
Envaiexz~vous ! adieu!

Farewell, happy Swallows, farewell !
With summer for ever to dwell

Ye leave our northern strand

For the genial southern land

Balmy with breezes bland,

Return? Ah, who can tell ?
Farewell, happy Swallows, farewell!



66 ALL AROUND TIE MOON.

Barbican was much gratified to find that his rockets
and other fireworks had not received the least injury.
He relied upon them for the performance of a very
important service as soon as the Projectile, having
passed the point of neutral attraction between the
Earth and the Moon, would begin to fall with ac-
celerated velocity towards the Lunar surface. This
descent, though—thanks to the respective volumes of
theattracting bodies—six times less rapid thanit would
have been on the surface of the Earth, would still be
violent enough to dash the Projectile into a thousand
pieces. But Barbican confidently expected by means
of his powerful rockets to offer very considerable ob-
struction to the violence of this fall, if not to coun-
teract its terrib'e effects altogether.

The inspection having thus given general satisfac-
tion, the travellers once more set themselves to watch-
ing external space through the lights in the sides and
the floor of the Projectile.

Everything still appeared to be in the same state
as before. Nothing waschanged. The vast arch of
the celestial dome glittered with stars, and constella-
tions blazed with a light clear and pure enough to
throw an astronomer into an ecstasy of admiration.
Below them shone the Sun, like the mouth of a white-
hot furnace, his dazzling dise defined sharply on the
pitch-black back-ground of the sky. Above them
the Moon, reflecting back his rays from her glowing
surface, appeared tastand motionless in the midst of
the starry host.

A little to the east of the Sun, they could see a



QUITE COMFORTABLE, 67

pretty large dark spot, like a hole in the sky, the
broad silver fringe on one edge fading. off into a
faint glimmering mist on the other—it was the Earth.
Here and there in all directions, nebulous masses
gleamed like large flakes of star dust, in which, from
nadir to zenith, the eye could trace without a break
that vast ring of impalpable star powder, the famous
Afiiky Way, through the midst of which the beams
of our glorious Sun struggle with the dusky pallor of
a star of only the fourth magnitude.

Our observers were never weary of gazing on this
magnificent and novel spectacle, of the grandeur of
which, it is hardly necessary to say, no description
can give an adequate idea. What profound reflec-
tions it suggested to their understandings! What
vivid emotions it enkindled in their imaginations !
Barbican, desirous of commencing the story of the
journey while still influenced by these inspiring im-
pressions, noted carefully hour by hour every fact
that signalized the beginning of his enterprise. He
wrote out his notes very carefully and systematically,
his round full hand, as business-like as ever, never
betraying the slighest emotion.

The Captain was quite as busy, but in a different
way. Pulling out his tablets, he reviewed his calcu-
lations regarding the motion of projectiles, their
velocities, ranges and paths, their retardations and
their accelerations, jotting down the figures with a
rapidity wonderful to behold. Ardan neither wrote
nor calculated, but kept up an incessant fire of small
ialk, now with Barvican, who hardly ever answered



68 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

him, now with M’ Nicholl, who never heard him, oc-
casionally with Diana, who never understood him,
but oftenest with himself, because, as he said, he liked
not only to talk to a sensible man but also to hear
what a sensible man had. to say. He never stood
still for a moment, but kept ‘bobbing around”’
with the effervescent briskness of a bee, at one time
roosting at the top of the ladder, at another peering
through the floor light,:now to the right, then to the
left, always humming scraps from the Ofera Bouffe,
but never changing the air. In the small space
which was then a whole world to the travellers, he
represented to the life the animation and loquacity
of the French, and I need hardly say he played his
part to perfection.

The eventful day, or, to speak more correctly, the
space of twelve hours which with us forms a day,
ended for our travellers with an abundant supper,
exquisitely cooked. It was highly enjoyed.

No incident had yet occurred of a naturé calcu-
lated to shake their confidence. Apprehending none
therefore, full of hope rather and already certain of
success, they were soon lost in a peaceful slumber,
whilst the Projectile, moving rapidly, though with a
velocity uniformly retarding, still cleaved its way
through the pathless regions of the empyrean.



CHAPTERIV.

\

A CHAPTER FOR TITE CORNELL GIRLS.

No incident worth recording occurred during the
night, if night indeed it could be called. In reality
there was now no night oreven day in the Projectile,
or rather, strictly speaking, it was always xzght on
the upper end of the bullet, and always day on the
lower. Whenever, therefore, the words wight and
day occur in our story, the reader will readily
understand them as referring to those spaces of time
that are so called in our Earthly almanacs, and were
so measured by the travellers’ chronometers.

The repose of our friends must indeed have been
undisturbed, if absolute freedom from sound or jar
of any kind could secure tranquillity. In spite of
its immense velocity, the Projectile still seemed to
be perfectly motionless. Not the slightest sign of
movement could be detected. Change of locality,
though ever so rapid, can never reveal itself to our
senses when it takes place. in a vacuum, or when the
enveloping atmosphere travels at the same rate as the
moving body. Though we are incessantly whirled
around the Sun at the rate of about seventy thousand
miles an hour, which of us is conscious of the slight-
est motion? In such a case, as far as sensation is
concerned, motion and repose are absolutely iden-
tical, Neither has any effect one way or another on

(69)



7O ALL AROUND THE MOON,

a material body.. Is such a body in motion? It re-
mains in motion until some obstacle stopsit. Is it at
rest? It remains at rest until some superior force
compels it to change its position. This indifference of
bodies to motion or rest is what physicists call zzertia.

Barbican. and his companions, therefore, shut up
in the Projectile, could readily imagine themselves to
be completely motionless) Had they been outside,
the effect would have been precisely the same. No
rush of air, no jarring sensation would betray the
slightest movement. But for the sight of the Moon
gradually growing larger above them, and of the
Earth gradually growing smaller beneath them, they
could safely swear that they were fast anchored in an
ocean of deathlike immobility. /

Towards the morning of next day (December 3),
they were awakened by a joyful, but quite unexpected
sound.

“‘Cock-a-doodle! doo!’’ accompanied by a de-
cided flapping of wings. ,

The Frenchman, on his feet in one instant and
on the top of the ladder in another, attempted to
shut the lid of a half open box, speaking in an angry
but suppressed voice : .

‘*Stop this hullabaloo, won’t you? Do you want
me to fail in my great combination! ’’

“ Yello?’ cried Barbican and M’Nicholl, start-
ing up and rubbing their eyes.

‘What noise was that ?’’ ‘asked Barbican.

“Seems tome I heard the crowing of a cock,’’ ob-
served the Captain.



FOR THE COKNELL GikLS. VI

*T never thought your ears could be so easily de-
ceived, Captain,’’ cried Ardan, quickly. ‘‘ Let us
try it again,’ and, flapping his ribs with his arms,
he gave vent to a crow so loud and natural that the
lustiest chanticleer that ever saluted the orb of day
might-be proud of it.

The Captain roared right out, and even Barbican
snickered, but as they saw that their companion evi-
dently wanted to conceal something, they immedi-
ately assumed straight faces and pretended to think
no more about the matter.

‘¢ Barbican,’’ said Ardan, coming down the lad-
der and evidently anxious to change the conversa-
tion, ‘* have you any idea of what I was thinking
about all night? ”’

“¢ Not the slightest.’’

“T was thinking of the promptness of the reply
you received last year from the authorities of Cam-
bridge University, when you asked them about. the
feasibility of sending a bullet to the Moon. You
know very well by this time what a perfect ignoramus
Iam in Mathematics. I own I have been often
puzzled when thinking on what grounds they could
form such a positive opinion, in a case where I am
certain that the calculation must be an exceedingly
delicate matter.”’

“¢ The feasibility, you mean to say,’ replied Bar-
bican, ‘not exactly of sending a bullet to the Moon,
but of sending it to the neutral point between the
Earth and the Moon, which lies at about nine-tenths
of the journey, where the two attractions counteract

W



72 ALL AROUND THE MOON:

each other. Because that point once passed, the
Projectile would reach the Moon’s surface by virtue
of its own weight.” ,

“Well, reaching that neutral point be it;’’ re-
plied Ardan, ‘but, once more, I should like to
know how they have been able to come at the nec+
essary initial velocity of 12,000 yards a second?”

“Nothing simpler.’’ answered Barbican.

“‘Could you have done it yourself?’’ asked the
Frenchman. :

‘* Without the slightest difficulty. The Captain
and myself could have readily solved the problem,
only the reply from the University saved us the
trouble.”

“‘Well, Barbican, dear boy,’’ observed Ardan,
“all I’ve got to say is, you might chop the head off
my body, beginning with my feet, before you could
make me go through such a calculation.”’

‘* Simply because you don’t understand Algebra,”’
replied Barbican, quietly.

‘*Oh! that’s all very well!’’ cried Ardan, with
an ironical smile. ‘* You great «-+-y men think
you settle everything by uttering the word Algebra /”’

*¢ Ardan,’’ asked Barbican, ‘*do you think people
could beat iron without a hammer, or turn up furrows
without a plough ?”’

“Hardly.”

“‘ Well, Algebra is an instrument or utensil just as
much as a hammer or a plough, and a very good in-
strument too if you know how to make use of it,’’

** You’re in earnest?’



FOR THE CORNELL GIRLS. 73

** Quite so.’?

«And you can handle the instrument right before
my eyes?”’

‘* Certainly, if it interests you so much.”’

“You can show me how they got at the initial
velocity of our Projectile? ’’

“With the greatest pleasure. By taking into
proper consideration all the elements of the problem,
viz.: (1) the distance between the centres of the
Earth and the Moon, (2) the Earth’s radius, (3) its
volume, and (4) the Moon’s volume, I can easily
calculate what must be the initial velocity, and that
too by a very simple formula.’’

“Let us have the formula.’’

‘In one moment; only I can’t give you the
curve really described by the Projectile as it moves
between the Earth and the Moon; this is to be ob-
tained by allowing for their combined movement
around the Sun. . I will consider the Earth and the
Sun to be one e that being sufficient for our
present purpose.’ :

“Why so?’”’ ,

“‘ Because to give you that exact curve would’be to
solve a point in the‘ Problem of the Three Bodies,’
which Integral Calculus has not yet reached.”

«“What!’’ cried Ardan, in a mocking tone, * is
there really anything that Mathematics can’t do?’?

“* Yes,”’ said Barbican, * there is still a great deal
that Mathematics can’t even attempt.”’

‘‘So far,so good; ’’ resumed Ardan. ‘Now then
what is this Integral Calculus of yours?’



(4 ALL ARCUND 1HE MOON,

“Tt is a branch of Mathematics that has for its
object the summation of a certain infinite series of ,
indefinitely small terms: but for the solution of
which, we must generally know the function of which
a given function is the differential coefficient. In
other words,’’ continued Barbican, ‘in it we return
from the differential coefficient, to the function from
which it was deduced.”

“Clear as mud!’’ cried Ardan, with a hearty laugh,

“Now then, let me have a bit of paper and a
pencil.’” added Barbican, “and in half an hour you
shall have your formula; meantime you can easily
find something interesting to do.”

In a few seconds Barbican was profoundly ab-
sorbed in his problem, while M’ Nicholl was watch
ing out of the window, and Ardan was busily em-
ployed in preparing breakfast.

The morning meal was not quite ready, when
Barbican, raising his head, showed. Ardan a page
covered with algebraic signs at the end of which
stood the following formula :—- .

2 r mi fy r
4 (ol — ea) eat Se
i(« “) me {2 Pt m \d-~x% der

«* Which means?’?’ asked Ardan.

“It means,’ said the Captain, now taking part in
the discussion, ‘‘that the half of » prime squared
minus v squared equals gr multiplied by. 7 over x
minus one plus # prime over # multiplied by 7 over
@ minus + minus 7 over d minus 7........that is ae





FOR THE CORNELL GIRLS. 75

*¢ That is,’ interrupted Ardan, in a roar of laugh-
ter, ‘x stradlegs on y, making for z and jumping
over / Do you mean to say you understand the
terrible jargon, Captain ?”’

‘* Nothing is clearer, Ardan.”’

‘Vou too, Captain! Then of course I must give
in gracefully, and declare that the sun at noon-day
isnot more palpably evident than the sense of Bar-
bican’s formula.’’ ; :

“Vou asked for Algebra, you know,
Barbican.

‘Rock crystal is nothing to it!”’

‘*The fact is, Barbican,’’ said the Captain, who
had been looking over the paper, ‘‘ you have worked
the thing out very well. You have the integral
equation of the living forces, and I have no doubt it
will give us the result sought for.’’

**Yes, but I should like to understand it, you
know,’’ cried Ardan: ‘‘I would give ten years of
the Captain’s life to understand it!”’

‘Listen then,’’ said Barbican. ‘‘ Half of » prime
squared less v squared, is the formula giving us the
half variation of the living force.”’

** Mac pretends he understands all that !’’

“You need not be a Se/omon to do it,’’ said the
Captain. ‘All these signs that you appear to con-
sider so cabalistic form a language the clearest, the
shortest, and the most logical, for all those who can
read it.’’

“You pretend, Captain, that, by means of these
hieroglyphics, far more incomprehensible than the

” observed



76 ‘ALL AROUND THE MOON.

sacred Ibis of the Egyptians, you can discover ‘the
velocity at which the Projectile should start ?”’

“¢ Most undoubtedly,’” replied the Captain, ‘‘and,
by the same formula I can even tell you the rate o
our velocity at < = particular point of our journey.’

“You can?’

**T can.’ :

‘“‘Then you're just as deep a one ‘as our Presi-
dent.’

“No, Ardan; not ‘at all. The really difficult
part of the question Barbican has done. ‘That is, to
make out such an equation as takes into account all
the conditions of the problem. After that, it’s a
simple affair of Arithmetic, pee only a knowl-
edge of the four rules to work it out.’

‘Very simple,’’ observed Ardan, who always got
muddled at 2 ay kind of a difficult sum in addition.

“‘Captain,’’ said Barbican, ‘vow could have
found the formulas too, if you tried.”

**T don’t know about that,’’? was the Captain’s
reply, ‘but I do know that this formula is won-
derfully come at.”

‘« Now, Ardan, listen a moment,’’ said Barbican,
‘¢and you will sce what sense there is in all these
letters.’’

“T listen,’? sighed Ardan with the resignation of a
martyr.

‘¢ dis the distance from the centre of the Earth to
the centre of the Moon, for it is from the centres that
we must calculate the attractions.’’

“« That I comprehend.”

39



FORTHE CORNELL GIXLS, 77

€¢ is the radius of the Earth.”
‘«¢ That I comprehend.”’

‘*m is the mass or volume of the Earth ; m prime
that of the Moon. We must take the mass of the two
attracting bodies into consideration, since attraction
is in direct proportion to their masses.’’

“That I comprehend.”

«vis the gravity or the velocity acquired at the
end of asecond by a body falling towards the cen-

eof the Earth. Clear?’’

ne That I comprehend.” :

““Now LT represent by « the varying distance that
separates the Projectile from the centre of the Earth,
and by gv prime its velocity at that distance.’’

“¢That I comprehend.’’

se v is. its velocity when os our at-
mosphere.’

“Yes,’? chimed in the Captain, ‘it is for this
point, you see, that the velocity had to be calculated,
because’we know already that the initial velocity is
exactly the three halves of the velocity when the Pro-
jectile quits the atmosphere.’’

«That I don’t comprehend,” cried the French-
man, energetically.

“Tt’s simple enough, however,’’ said Barbican.

‘“‘Not so simple as a simpleton.” replied the
Frenchman.

‘The Captain merely means,’” said Barbican,
‘that at the instant the Projectile: quitted the terres-
trial atmosphere it had already lost a third of its
initial velocity.”’

2



78 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“So much asa third? ”

“Ves, by friction against the atmospheric layers :
the quicker its motion, the greater resistance it en-
countered.”’

“That of course I admit, but your # squared and
your v prime squared rattle in my head like nails in a
box !”?

“The usual effect of Algebra on one who is a
stranger to it; to finish you, our next step is to ex-
press numerically the value of these several symbols.
Now some of them are already known, and some are
to be calculated.”’

“‘ Wand the latter over to me.’’ said the Captain.

‘‘Tirst,’? continued Barbican: ‘+7, the Earth’s
radius is, in the latitude of Florida, about 3,921
miles. @, the distance from the centre of the Earth
to the centre of the Moon is 56 terrestrial radii,
which the Captain calculates to be.........? 7”

*“To be,’’ cried M’Nicholl working rapidly with
his pencil, ‘219,572 miles, the moment the Moon
isin her perigee, or nearest point to the Earth.’’

**Very well,’’? continued Barbican. ‘*Now m
prime over m, that is the ratio of the Moon’s mass
to that of the Earth isabout the ,!;. g gravity being
at Florida about 321 feet, of course g Xr must be
how much, Captain ?”’

** 38,465 miles,’’ replied M’ Nicholl.

+ Nel then?’? asked Ardan.

‘* Now then,’’ replied Barbican, ‘the expression
having numerical values, I am trying to find gz,
that is to say, the initial velocity which the Projec-

















































FOR THE CORNELL GIkLS. 79

tile must possess in order to reach the point where
the two attractions neutralize each other. Here the
velocity being null, » prime becomes zero, and
x the required distance of this neutral point must
be represented by the mine. -tenths o @, the distance
between. the two centres.’

‘*Thave a vague kind of idea that it must be so,’’
said Ardan.

“‘T shall, therefore, have the following result ;”’
continued Barbican, figuring up; ‘‘« being nine-
tenths of @, and v prime being zero, my formula
becomes :

we eee 1or I 107 r -
eee Boo BEN a der

The Captain read it off rapidly.
‘* Right ! that’s correct !’’ he cried.
- You think so??? asked Barbican.

“* As true as Euclid !’’ exclaimed M’Nicholl.

“‘ Wonderful fellows,’? murmured the Frenchman,
smiling with admiration.

“¢You understand now, Ardan, don’ t ro “ asked
Barbican.

‘*Don’t I though ?”’ exclaimed Ardan, ‘* why my
head is splitting withtit!’’

‘«Therefore,’? continued Barbican,

a ae ror a jror r ee
ee) “a 8x do a-r







80 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“*And now,’’ exclaimed M’Nicholl, sharpening
his pencil 5 ‘*in order to obtain the velocity of the
Projectile when leaving the atmosphere, we have
only to make a slight calculation.”’

The Captain, who before clerking on a Mississippi
steamboat had been professor of Mathematics in an
Indiana university, felt quite at home at the work.
He rained figures from his pencil with a velocity
that would have made Marston stare. Page after
page was filled with his multiplications and divisions,
while Barbican looked quietly on, and Ardan impa-
tiently stroked his head and ears to keep down a
rising head-ache. ,

“Well?” at last asked Barbican, seeing the Cap-
tain stop and throw asomewhat hasty glance over his
work, |

‘‘Well,’’? answered M’Nicholl slowly. but confi-
dently, ‘‘the-calculation is made, I think correctly ;
and v, that is, the velocity of the Projectile when
quitting the atmosphere, sufficient to carry it to the
neutral point, should be at least...... has

«How much?’ asked Barbican, eagerly.

‘¢ Should beat least 11,972 yards the first second.’’

‘*What!’’ cried Barbican, jumping off his seat.
** How much did you say?’’

‘*r1,972 yards the first second it quits the atmos-
phere.”’

“Oh, malediction !’’ cried Perel, with a ges-
ture of terrible despair.

“‘What’s the matter?’’ asked sean very much
surprised. .



FOR THE CORNELL GIRLS, S&F

«Enough is the matter!’’ answered Barbican ex-
citedly. ‘* This velocity having been diminished by

a third, our initial velocity should have been at least
2?

ecccocoes

“¢ 77,088 yards the first second!’ cried M’ Nicholl,

apidly flourishing his pencil.

‘¢ But the Cambridge Observatory having declared
that 12,000 yards the first second were sufficient, our
Projectile started with no greater velocity !’’
‘© Well?’’ asked M’ Nicholl.

«¢ Well, such a velocity will never do!”’

“How ??’’ ) cried the Captain and Ardan in one

“How !!”? i voice. a

“¢ We can never reach the neutral point ! ”’

«Thunder and lightning ”’

‘Fire and Fury!’

““We can’t get even half way!”

‘Heaven and Earth! ”’

“ Mille noms d'un boulet!?? cried dies an, wildly
gesticulating.

«* And we shall fall back to the Earth!’

Oh!”

fe ALT”?

“They could say no more. This fearful revelation
took them like a stroke of apoplexy.

Nore. In the French edition, the algebraical formulas
having been very incorrectly printed, it cost the Translator a
good deal of time and trouble to rectify them. The idea
ef explaining in the text how they had been arrived at,
though at first seriously entertained, was soon abandoned.
Doing so might perhaps have’ gratified the curiosity of some

; : :



&2 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

rare scientific student,but it would certainly have exhausted
the patience of the general reader, For the benefit of our
friend the student, however, we here append another of the
means for solving the problem, over which the Cambridge
men had so woefully blundered. It is furnished by one of
our mathematical teachers.

Problem. Yo find a point between the Earth and the
Moon at which the attractions of these bodies would be equal,
and also to find the initial velocity necessary to be given to a
projectile at the surface of the Earth to make it reach this
point.

Assume the distance between the Earth’s and the
Moon’s centres to be 240000 miles (round numbers), Mass
of Earth == 81. Mass of Moon ==1. Let «== distance
between Earth’s centre and the point sought. Since attrac-
tion varies directly as the mass, and inversely as square of
distance, we have:

Sr: 1 ::x2%: (240000-—-x)?
or gi: 1

tix : 240000
4 == 2160000 ++ 9x
10% == 2160000

x == 216000

The neutral point is therefore 216000 miles distant from
the Earth, and 24000 miles distant from the Moon.

To find the Earth's effect on the initial velocity, Takea
unit of mass weighing, say 32 pounds, at the Earth’s sur-
face, and suppose it to move towards the neutral point,
affected by the Earth’s attraction alone—or from that point
to the Earth’s surface. Let P represent the variable inten-
sity of this force. Let + == distance of the body at the
neutral point from the Earth’s centre Let Q = the quantity
of work done by Earth’s action each moment. .°. Q==
P integrated with regard to x, Let P!==some known



FOR THE CORNELL GIRLS.

a
~)
intensity of gravitation, say 32 Ibs. ou the surface, and x! =
the distance from Earth’s centre to the point where P! is

Pox x?



exerted, Then P: Pis: xt': x? or P= 32
__ 32 X (21,120,000)?



xi » 32 Ibs. being the weight of the

unit mass on the Earth’s surface, and 21,120,000 — Earth’s
Radius, ‘or 4000 miles reduced to feet. Therefore P=
14,273,740,800,000.000

. But Q being = P integrated

x2

with regard to x, or =f Pdx, Q must be = 14,273,740,-

dx : : a
800,0c0,00c0 [= Now integrating between the limits
J x?

4000 miles and 216,000 miles, or 21,120,000 feet





and 1,140,480,coo feet; 2, = 14,273,740,800,000,000
I 1
—————— — ) or 2 = 663,324,444. But
21,120,000 1,140,480,000
vu? : af :
Q ==-~, v being the initial velocity and the mass of the
5 g
8, ‘i , vt
projectile being unity. Therefore —- == 663,324,444 or,
2
v% == 1,326,648,888, and v == 36423 feet per second,

This is the initial velocity if the action of the Earth alone
is considered... But this need not be quite so great, as the
Moon’s attraction helps the Projectile a little even at the
start. Accordingly we have now to find: The Moon's effect
on the initial velecity.

The weight of the unit of mass 32 Ibs, at the neutral
point from Moon’s action alone or Earth’s action alone is

2

8 :
—*-. lbs. or —— Ibs. determined by the proportion :

2916 729 :

(216000)? : 40002 :: 32 : ——

92
7=



4 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

‘Now to determine the Moon’s action on this at the:
Earth’s surface. The distance from the neutral point to
the Moon being 24000 miles, and the ‘distance from the
Moon to the Earth’s surface being 236000 miles, we have
the following proportion : :

8 .
(236000)? : (24000)? :: -—

ta. Therefore + == .0001134
729 :

the effect of Moon’s action at Earth's surface. ee ex-
729
pressed decimally == .o1097 Ibs, Let Q' == work of

Moon’s action; it can be expressed as before Q! =f Pdx,

P representing the varialsle intensity of this force. Now
letting P! == some known intensity, we have as before

P: Pli: x: «2 or P= P xv == 107997 X (126720000)

ae xe

as xtis equal to 24000 miles reduced to feet. Now pro-
ceeding precisely 2s in the former case, we shall find Qt ==
1,200,c00 (nearly). But Q being already found to be
663,324,444, the difference between both or 663,324,444—
1,200,000 must be the real half square of the velocity or

ue : :
--, Therefore the square root of 1,324,248,888, or 36400
2 :

feet (nearly) in a second must be the Projectile’s initial
velocity to reach the neutral point, without taking into
account the resistance of the atmosphere. ‘That is about
12000 yards per second; but it must be 18000 yards per
second to allow for the loss of 3 through friction.



CHAPTER V.

THE COLDS OF SPACE.

How could they imagine that the Observatory men
had committed such a blunder? Barbican would
not believe it possible. He made the Captain go
over his calculation again and again; but no flaw
was to be found in it. He himself carefully exam-
ined it, figure after figure, but he could find nothing
wrong. They both took up the formula and sub-
jected it to the strongest tests; but it was invulner-
able. There was no denying the fact. The Cam-
bridge professors had undoubtedly blundered in say-
ing that an initial velocity of 12,000 yards a second
would be enough to carry them to the neutral point.
A velocity of nearly 18,c0oo yards would be the very
lowest required fér such a purpose. They had simply
forgotten to allow a third for friction.

The three friends kept profound silence for some
time. Breakfast now was the last thing thought of.
Barbican, with teeth grating, fingers clutching, and
eye-brows closely contracting, gazed grimly through
the window. ‘The Captain, as a last resource, once
more examined his calculations, earnestly hoping to
find a figure wrong. Ardan could neither sit, stand
nor lie still for a second, though he tried all three.

His Silence, of course, did not last long.
(85)



86 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“Hat ha! ha!’’ he laughed bitterly. ‘* Pre-
cious scientific men! Villainous old hombogues!
The whole set not worth a straw! ‘I hope to gra-
cious, since we must fall, that we shall drop down
plumb on Cambridge Observatory, and not leave a
single one of the miserable old women, called pro-
fessors, alive in the premises!’

A certain expression in Ardan’s angry exclama-
tion had struck the Captain like a shot, and set his
temples throbbing violently.

“© Afust fall!’’ he exclaimed, starting up sud-
denly. ‘‘ Let us see about that! It is now seven
o’clock in the morning. We must have, therefore,
been at least thirty-two hours on the road, and more
than half of our passage is already made. If we are
going to fall at all, we must be falling now! I’m
certain we’re not, but, Barbican, you have to find it
out !””

Barbican caught the idea like lightning, and, seiz-
ing a compass, he began through the floor window
to measure the visual angle of the distant Earth.
The apparent immobility of the Projectile allowed
him to do this with great exactness. Then laying
aside the instrument, and wiping off the thick drops
of sweat that bedewed his forehead, he began jotting
down some figures on a piece of paper. The Captain
looked on with keen interest; he knew very well
that Barbican was calculating their distance from the
Earth by the apparent measure of the terrestrial di-
ameter, and he eyed him anxiously.

Pretty soon his friends saw a color stealing into



THE COLDS OF SPACE, 87

Barbican’s pale face, and a triumphant light glitter-
ing in his eye.

‘©No, my brave boys!’’ he exclaimed at last
throwing down his pencil, ‘‘ we’re not falling! | Far
from it, we are at present more than 150 thousand
miles from the Earth !’’

“* Hurrah !’? ) cried M’Nicholl sad Ardan, ina

‘‘Bravo!’? { breath.

‘*« We have passed the point where we should have
stopped if we had had no more initial velocity than
the Cambridge men allowed us! ”’

*¢ Hurray! hurrah !”’

*< Bravo, Bravissimo ! ’’

“* And we’re still going up!”

“Glory, glory, hallelujah! ’’ sang M’Nicholl, in
the highest excitement.

“* Vive ce cher Barbican /”’ cried Ardan, bursting
into French as usual whenever his feelings had the
better of him. .

““OF course we’re marching on!’’ continued
M’Nicholl, ‘“‘and I know the reason why, too.
Those 400,000 pounds of gun-cotton gave us greater
initial velocity than we had expected !”’

** You're right, Captain! ’’ added ‘Barbican ; ‘‘ be-
sides, you must not forget that, by getting rid of the
water, the Projectile was relieved of considerable
weight !”’

**Correct again ! ” cried the Captain. <‘‘I had
not thought of that !’’

‘*Therefore, my brave boys,’’ continued Barbi-



&8 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

can, with some excitement 5. “‘ away with melancholy!
We're all right !”’

“Yes; everything is lovely and the goose hangs
high!’? cried the Captain, who on grand occasions.
was not above.a little slang.

“‘ Talking of ‘goose reminds me of: breakfast,’’
cried Ardan ;°‘‘ I assure you, my fright has not taken
away my appetite!’’

“©VYes,’?. continued Barbican. ‘‘ Captain, you’re
quite right. Our initial velocity very. fortunately
was much greater’ than what our Cambridge friends
had calculated for us !’’

*‘Hang our Cambridge friends and their calcula
tions!’’ cried Ardan, with some asperity; ‘‘as
usual with your scientific men they’ve more brass
than brains! If we’re not now bed-fellows with the
oysters in the Gulf of Mexico, no thanks to our kind
Cambridge friends, But talking of oysters, let me
remind you again that breakfast is ready.”’

The meal was a most joyous one. They ate much,
they talked more, but they laughed most.. The little
incident of Algebra had certainly very much enlivened
the situation. :

“*Now, my boys,’’ Ardan went on, {all things
thus turning. out quite comfortable, I would just ask
you why we should not succeed? We are fairly
started. No breakers ahead that I can see.. No
rock on our road. It is freer than the ships on the
raging ocean, aye, freer than the. balloons in‘ the
blustering air. -But the ship arrives at her destina-
tion; the balloon, borne on the wings of the wind,



THE COLDS OF SPACE. 8&9

rises to as high an altitude as can be endured; why
then should not our Projectile reach the Moon?”

“Tt wil reach the Moon !’’ nodded Barbican.

“‘We shall reach the Moon or know. for what !”’
cried M’Nicholl, enthusiastically.

. ©The great American nation must not be disap-
pointed! ’’ continued Ardan.. ‘They are the only
people .on Earth capable of originating such an en-
terprise! They. are the only people capable of Ere
ducing a Barbican !”’

“ Hurrah !’’ cried M’ Nicholl.

‘That point settled,’? continued the Frenchman,
“‘ another question comes up to which I have ‘not
yet called your attention. When we get to the
Moon, what shall we do there? How are we going
to amuse ourselves? 1’m afraid our life there will be
awfully slow! ”?

His companions emphatically disclaimed the pos-
sibility of such a thing.

“You may deny it, but I know better, and know-
ing .better, I have laid in my stores accordingly.
You have but to choose. I possess a varied assort-
ment. Chess, draughts, cards, dominoes—everything
in fact, but.a billiard table? ’’

“What !’’ exclaimed Barbican ; “cumbered a
self with such gimcracks ?”’

“Such gimcracks are not only good to amuse our-
selves with, but are eminently calculated also to win
us the friendship of the Selenites.””

‘¢ Friend Michael,’’ said Barbican, ‘‘ if the Moon
is inhabited at all, her inhabitants must have ap-



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EAGLNLEQH_9TW87D INGEST_TIME 2012-04-06T14:15:55Z PACKAGE AA00009646_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


EEL

|
/

tyj4

LL

Yes

Ze
YE


The Baldwin Library

University
KNB sc
Florida


















BEE GA SS

EF; Pee Ss
EL a
vad &S
é CC
A

BI TE SSS =. 80
A 5 Mi

TREE RRS
pep RHO
A COLLECT Ne









inne 2
Serenytalie







E







Engraved by Edw. Busch. T IF BE M @ INE Drawn by Jos. S.Ward.

Ce opyright secured by Et dward Roth. =






ALL

Arounp tut Moon

FROM THE FRENCH OF

JULES VERNE

FREELY TRANSLATED BY

EDWARD ROTH

(AUTOUR DE LA LUNE)
ok *

‘With a Mav of the Moon constructed and engraved for this edition,
and also with an Appendix containing the Famous
Moon Hoax by R. Adams Locke

New York:

THE CATHOLIC PUBLICATION SOCIETY
No. 9 WARREN STREET,

1876.


Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1876, by
EDWARD ROTH,

In the Office of the Librarian at Washington.



Kine & Barro, Printers AND STEREOTYPERS,
Nos. 607 and 609 Sansom Street,
PHILADELPHIA.
PREFACE,

The following is taken mainly from the first volume of
my contemplated translation of Jules Verne’s most impore
tant works t— ‘

I resolved to tnake the best translatioti I could of works
so undeniably meritorious, a translation which, whilst
strictly following the spirit of the author and tfying to
make the most of his strong points, would thtow his weak
ones into shade, soften off his extravagances, give his names
a familiar sound, correct palpable errors—unless where
radical, and then say nothing about them—simplify crabbed
science; explain difficulties, amplify and naturalize local
coloring, clear up strange allusions, omit blunders, put a
little blood and heart into the dramatis personae—in short,
a translation which should aim as near as possible at that
natural, clear, familiar idiomatic but rather exaggerated
style which Verne himself would have used if addressing
himself in English to an American audience.

Such services rendered to those famous stories, if only
done honestly, unobtrusively, and with even tolerable suc«
cess, could hardly fail to be of advantage to the American

public,
(3)
é PREFACE.

The present volume is my second instalment. In it the
Reader has the famous Moon Story done for the first time
into real English, corrected, edited, revised, annotated, col-
laborated—

Improved?

I should like my Readers to sincerely think so,

To assist the reader in appreciating what is really the
most interesting portion of the narrative, a careful reduc-
tion of Beer and Maedler’s famous Map of the Moon has
been prepared expressly for this work. It is the only thing
of the kind that I know of existing in English, the places
being named instead of numbered, and represented direct
as they appear to the eye, not inverted as seen in the teles-
cope. It is the creditable work of a promising . young
scientific student, Mr. Josepa S. Warp, a former Pupil.

The Moon Hoax is reprinted as a curiosity which
many think well worth preserving,

E. R.

January 1, 1876
Cuar.

CONTENTS.



PRELIMINARY, +» 66 + + + »

I.
II,
il,

iv,
Vv.
VI

VIL
VILL.
IX.
x.
XI.
XII.

XIII.
XIV.
XV,

From 10 P. M. TO 10. 46’ 40”

Tue Firsr Hatr Hour, .

‘THEY MAKE THEMSELVES AT FlomEr

QUITE COMFORTABLE, . .
For THE CorRNELL GIRLS, .

Tue Cops oF SPACE, . .

InstrRucTIVE CONVERSATION,

A Hiegu Oup TimE,. » .
Tue NEUTRAL PoINT, . .

A LITTLE OFF THE TRACK,

THE OBSERVERS OF THE Moon,

Fact AND Fancy, . ~. .

.

.

.

A Birp’s Eve View oF THE Lunar Moun-

TAINS. » © © _
Lunar LANDSCAPES,. . «
A Nicut or FIFTEEN Days,

IMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE
GLimpseEs HE I ,

Paar.

9
15

24

Ior

175

187
206
226

250
6 CONTENTS.

CHAP.

XVI, THe SOUTHERN FIEMISPHERE, . « 6 « «

XVII Tycno,. . 2. 2. 1 6 © ws ew ew
XVIII. Puzzrinc Questions, ‘ ee
XIX, In EVERY Ficut, THE Impossis.e Wins,
XX, Orr THE Paciric Coast,. . . ....
XXI, News ror Marsron!. . ......
XXII. On THE Wincs oF THE WIND,. «4 . 6

XXII. Tue CLusB MENGOAFIsHING,. . . .

XXIV. FAREWELL FO THE BALTIMORE GuN CLUB,

APPENDIX:

Tue Moon Hoax, sy R. Apams Locke, .

431
. Tuer OxyGen! RE CRIED, 2.

. A croup @la Jardin Mabiile,

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Pacz
Map or THE Moon . . 4... ©) Frentispiece.

Hus rrrst CARE Was TO TURN ON THE GAS, . .
Diana AND SATELLITE, ©. 1. 6 2 ee ee
HE COXTRIVED TO GET ON HIS FEET, . 2. .
He HELPED ARDAN TO LirT Barpican, . .
MORE HUNGRY THAN EITHER, soe eee
THEY DRANK TO THE SPEEDY UNION OF THE

Eartru AND HER SATELLITE, . 2...
Tle PASSED A CAREFUL HAND THROUGH CERTAIN

MYSTERIOUS EOXES, . 2°. «ee we ee
Don’r I ‘rHoucH? My uead 1s sPLirrinc

WirHir!, 2. 2. 2. 1 ee ee

Poor SaTELLITE WAS DROPPED OUT, . . 2.
THE BODY OF THE DOG THROWN OUT YESTER-
DAY, 2 «© 6 «© © © © «

A DEMONIACAL HULLABALOO,. . . 4

AN IMMENSE BATTIE FIELD PILED WITH BLEACH-

ING BONES, 2 6 2 6 6

+ © © 9 ©

16
20
27
29
55.

79

100

144

199
& LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

‘ Pacr.
15. NEVERTHELESS THE SOLUTION ESCAPED HiM, . . 216

16, THEY COULD UTTER NO WORD, THEY COULD

BREATHE NO PRAYER, » « 6 6 2 «© «© « 2 269
17. THE TERRIBLE FIRE BALL BURST LIKE ASHELL, . 271
18. THEY SEEMED HALF ASLEEP IN HIS VITALIZING

BEAMS,. 2 + + 2 + 6 6 © 8 «© © oe © 290
19. THESE ARCHES EVIDENTLY ONCE BORE THE PIPES

OF AN AQUEDUCT, . 2. 2. 6 2 1 2 ee + 298
20, ARDAN GAZED AT THE PAIR FOR A FEW MINUTES, 341
21. OLD Mac DISCOVERED TAKING OBSERVATIONS, . 356
22. For A SECOND ONLY DID THEY CATCH ITS FLASH, 361
23. How Is THAT FOR HIGH? . 2. 2 6 6 © 6 6 4I4
24. EVERYWHERE THEIR DEPARTURE WAS ACCOMPaA-

NIED WITH THE MOST TOUCHING SYMPATHY, 425
PRELIMINARY CHAPTER,

RESUMING THE FIRST PART OF THE WORK AND SERVING
AS AN INTRODUCTION TO THE SECOND,

A few years ago the world was suddenly astounded by
hearing of an experiment of a most novel and daring nature,
altogether unprecedented in the annals of science, The
Battimore Gun Cuus, a society of artillerymen started in
America during the great Civil War, had conceived the idea
of nothing less than establishing direct communcation with
the Moon by means of a projectile! President Barbican, the
originator of the enterprise, was strongly encouraged in its
feasibility by the astronomers of Cambridge Observatory,
and took upon himself to provide all the means necessary to

ecure its success. Having realized by means of a public
subscription the sum of nearly five and a half millions of
dollars, he immediately set himself to work at the necessary
gigantic labors.

In accordance with the Cambridge men’s note, the can-
non intended to discharge the projectile was to be planted
in some country not further than 28° north or south from
the equator, so that it might be aimed vertically at the Moon
in the zenith. ‘The bullet was to be animated with an
initial velocity of 12,000 yards to the second. It was to be
fired off on the night of December rst, at thirteen minutes
and twenty seconds before eleven o’clock, precisely. Four
days afterwards it was to hit the Moon, at the very moment
that she reached her perigee, that is to say, her nearest point
to the Earth, about 228,000 miles distant.

The leading members of the Club, namely President
Barbican, Secretary Marston, Major Elphinstone and Gen-

(9)
ZO ALL AROUND THE MOON.

eral Morgan, forming the executive committee, held several
meetings to discuss the shape and material of the bullet, the
nature and position of the cannon, and the quantity and
quality of the powder. The decision soon arrived at was
as follows: rst—The bullet was to be a hollow aluminium
shell, its diameter nine feet, its walls a foot in thickness,
and its weight 19,250: pounds; 2d—The cannon was to be
a columbiad goo feet in length, a well of that depth form-
ing the vertical mould in which it was to be cast ; and 3d—
The powder was to be 400 thousand pounds of gun cotton,
which, by developing more than 209 thousand millions of
cubic feet of gas under the projectile, would easily send it
as far as our satellite.

These questions settled, Barbican, aided by Murphy, the
Chief Engineer of the Cold Spring Iron Works, selected a
spot in Florida, near the 27th degree north latitude, called
Stony Hill, where, after the performance of many wonderful
feats in mining engineering, the Columbiad was successfully
cast.

Things had reached this state when an incident occurred
which excited the general interest a hundred fold.

A Frenchman from Paris, Michel Ardan by name, eccen-
tric, but keen and shrewd as well as daring, demanded, by the
Atlantic telegraph, permission to be enclosed in the bullet
so that he might be carried to the Moon, where he was
curious to make certain investigations, Received in America
with great enthusiasm, Ardan held a great meeting, tri-
umphantly carried his point, reconciled Barbican to his
mortal foe, a certain Captain M’Nicholl, and even, by way
of clinching the reconciliation, induced both the newly made
friends to join him in his contemplated trip to the Moon.

The bullet, so modified as to become a hollow conical
cylinder with plenty of room inside, was further provided
with powerful water-springs and readily-ruptured partitions
PRELIMINARY CHAPTER. if

below the floor, intended to deaden the dreadful ‘concussion
sure to accompany the start. It was supplied with provi-
sions for a year, water for a few months, and gas for nearly
two weeks. A selfacting apparatus, of ingenious construc-
tion, kept the confined atmosphere sweet and healthy by
manufacturing pure oxygen and absorbing carbonic acid.
Finally, the Gun Club had constructed, at enormous ex-
pense, a gigantic telescope, which, from the summit of
Long’s Peak, could pursue the Projectile as it winged its
way through the regions of space. Everything at last was
ready.

On December 1st, at the appointed moment, in the midst

fan immense concourse of spectators, the departure took
place, and,. for the first time in the world’s history, three
human beings quitted our terrestrial globe with some pos-
sibility in their favor of finally reaching a point of destina-
tion in the inter-planetary spaces. They expected to accom-
plish their journey in 97 hours, 13 minutes and 20 ‘seconds,
consequently reaching the Lunar surface precisely at mid-
night on December 5-6, the exact moment when the Mcon
would be full.

Unfortunately, the instantaneous explosion of such a vast
quantity of gun-cotton, by giving rise to a violent commo-
tion in the atmosphere,. generated so much vapor and mist
as to render the Moon invisible for several nights to the
innumerable watchers in the Western Hemisphere, who
vainly tried to catch sight of her.

In the meantime, J.T. Marston, the Secretary of the
Gun Club, anda most devoted friend of Barbican’s, had
started for Long’s Peak, Colorado, on the summit of which
the immense telescope, already alluded to, had been
erected ; it was of the reflecting kind, and possessed power
sufficient to bring the Moon within a distance. of five miles.
While Marston was prosecuting his long journey with all
I2 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

possible speed, Professor Belfast, who had charge of the
telescope, was endeavoring to catch a glimpse of the Pro-
jectile, but for a long time with no success. The hazy,
cloudy weather lasted for more than a week, to the great dis
gust of the public at large. People even began to fear that
further observation would have to be deferred to the 3d
of the following month, January, as during the latter half
of December the waning Moon could not possibly give
light enough to render the Projectile visible.

At last, however, to the unbounded satisfaction of all, a
violent tempest suddenly cleared the sky, and on the 13th
of December, shortly after midnight, the Moon, verging
towards her last quarter, revealed herself sharp and bright
on the dark background of the starry firmament.

That same morning, a few hours before Marston’s arrival
at the summit of Long’s Peak, a very remarkable telegram
had been dispatched by Professor Belfast to the Smithsonian
Institute, Washington, It announced:

That on December 13th, at 2 o’clock in the morning,
the Projectile shot from Stony Hill had been perceived by
Professor Belfast and his assistants; that, deflected a little
from its course by some unknown cause, it had not reached
its mark, though it had approached near enough to be
affected by the Lunar attraction ; and that, its rectilineal
motion having become circular, it should henceforth con-
tinue to describe a regular orbit around the Moon, of which
in fact it had become the Satellite. The dispatch went on
further to state:

That the elements of the new heavenly body had not yet
been calculated, as at least three different observations, taken
at different times, were necessary to determine them. ‘The
distance of the Projectile from the Lunar surface, however,
might be set down roughly at 2833 miles,

The dispatch concluded with the following hypotheses,
PRELIMINARY CHAPTER, I?

positively pronounced to be the only two possible: Either,
1, The Lunar attraction would finally prevail, in which
case the travellers would reach their destination; or 2,
The Projectile, kept whirling forever in an immutable
orbit, would go on revolving around the Moon till time
should be no more,

In either alternative, what should be the Jot of the daring
adventurers? They had, it is true, abundant provisions to
last them for some time, but even supposing that they did
reach the Moon and thereby completely establish the prac-
ticability of their daring enterprise, how were they ever to
get back? Could they ever get back ? or ever even be heard
from? Questions of this nature, freely discussed by the
ablest pens of the day, kept the public mind in a very rest-
less and excited condition,

We must be pardoned here for making a little remark
which, however, astronomers and other scientific men of
sanguine temperament would do well to ponder over, An
observer cannot be too cautious in announcing to the pub-
lic his discovery when it is of a nature purely speculative.
Nobody is obliged to discover a planet, or a comet, or even
a satellite, but, before announcing to the world that you
have made such a discovery, first make sure that such is
really the fact.. Because, you know, should it afterwards
come out that you have done nothing of the kind, you
make yourself a butt for the stupid jokes of the lowest news-
paper scribblers, Belfast had never thought of this. Im-
pelled by his irrepressible rage for discovery—the furor in-
veniendi ascribed to all astronomers by Aurelius Priscus—
he had therefore been guilty of an indiscretion highly un-
scientific when his famous telegram, launched to the world at
large from the summit of the Rocky Mountains, pronounced
so dogmatically on the only possible issues of the great-en-
terprise. .
ig ALL AROUND 7HE MOON.

7

The truth was that his telegram contained fqva very im-
portant errors: 1. Error of observation, as facts afterwards
proved; the Projectile was not seen on the 13th and could
not have been on that day, so that the little black spot
which Belfast professed to have seen was most certainly not
the Projectile; 2. Error of t#eory regarding the final fate of
the Projectile, since to make it become the Moon’s satellite
was flying in the face of one of the great fundamental laws
of Theoretical Mechanics. -

Only one, therefore, the first,of the hypotheses so posi-
tively announced, was capable of realization, ‘The travel-
lers—that is to say if they still lived—might so combine
and unite their own efforts with those of the Lunar attrac-
tion as actually to succeed at last in reaching the Moon’s
surface,

Now the travellers, those daring but cool-headed men
who knew very well what they were about, did still live,
they Aad survived the frightful concussion of the start, and
it is to the faithful record of their wonderful trip in the bul-
let-car, with all its singular and dramatic details, that the
present volume is devoted. ‘The story may destroy many
illusions, prejudices and conjectures; but it will at least
give correct ideas of the strange incidents to which such an
enterprise is exposed, and it will certainly bring out in
strong colors the effects of Barbican’s scientific conceptions,
M’Nicholl’s mechanical resources, and Ardan’s daring,
eccentric, but brilliant and effective combinations.

Besides, it will show that J. T. Marston, their faithful
friend and a man every way worthy of the friendship of
such men, was only losing his time while mirroring the
Moon in the speculum of the gigantic telescope on the lofty
peak of the mountains,
CHAPTER I. ‘*
FROM Io P.M. TO 10 46! qo’.

THE moment that the great clock belonging to
the works at Stony Hill had struck ten, Barbican,
Ardan and M’Nicholl began to take their last fare-
wells of the numerous friends surrounding them.
The two dogs intended to accompany them had
been already deposited in the Projectile. The
three travellers approached the mouth of the enor-
mous cannon, seated themselves in the flying car,
and once more took leave for the last time of the
vast throng standing in silence around them. The
windlass creaked, the car started, and the three
daring men disappeared in the yawning gulf.

The trap-hole giving them ready access to the in-
terior of the Projectile, the car soon came back
empty; the great windlass was presently rolled
away; the tackle and scaffolding were removed,
and in a short space of time the great mouth of
the Columbiad was completely rid of all obstruc-
tions.

M’Nicholl took upon himself to fasten the door
of the trap on the inside by means of a powerful
combination of screws and bolts of his own inven-
tion, He also covered up very carefully the glass
lights with strong iron plates of extreme solidity
and tightly fitting joints.

{25}
r6 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Ardan’s first care was to turn on the gas, which
he found burning rather low; but he lit no more
than one burfier, being desirous to economize as
much as possible their store of light and heat,
which, as he well knew, could not at the very
utmost last them longer than a few weeks.

Under the ‘cheerful blaze, the interior of the
Projectile looked like a comfortable little chamber,
with its circular sofa,’ nicely padded walls, and
dome shaped ceiling.

All the articles that it contained, arms, instru-
ments, utensils, etc., were solidly fastened to the
projections of the wadding, so as to sustain . the
least injury possible from the first terrible shock.
Tn fact, all precautions possible, humanly. speak-
‘ing, had been taken to counteract this, the first,
and: possibly ‘one of the very greatest dangers to
which the courageous adventurers would ‘be exposed.

‘Ardan expressed himself to be quite pleased with
the appeatance of things in general.

‘¢Tt’s a prison, to be sure,’’ said he ‘ but not one
of your ordinary prisons that always keep in the one
spot. For my part, as long as I can have the privi-
lege of looking out of the window, I am willing to
lease it for a hundred years. Ah! Barbican, that
brings out one of your stony smiles. You think
our lease may last longer than that! Our tene-
ment may become our coffin, eh? Be it so.
I prefer it anyway to Mahomet’s; it may indeed
float in the air, but it won’t be motionless as a
milestone !”



FROM ro P. MM. TO 16 46’ 4a". i7

- Barbican, having made sure by personal inspec-
tion that everything was in perfect order, consulted
his chronometer, which he had carefully set a short
time before with Chief Engineer Murphy’s, who had
been charged to fire off the Projectile.

‘¢Friends,’’ he said, *‘it is now twenty minutes
past ten. At 10 46’ 40”, precisely, Murphy will
send the electric current into the guns«cotton. We
have, therefore, twenty-six minutes more to remain
on earth.’’

‘“« Twenty-six minutes and twenty seconds,’’ ob-
served Captain M’Nicholl, who always aimed at
mathematical precision. _

“¢ Twenty-six minutes! ’’ cried Ardan, gaily. “An
age, a cycle, according to the use you make of them.
In twenty-six minutes how much can be done! The
weightiest questions of warfare, politics, morality,
can be discussed, even decided, in twenty-six min-
utes. Twenty-six minutes well spent are infinitely
more valuable than twenty-six lifetimes wasted! A
few seconds even, employed by a Pascal, or a New-
ton, or a Barbican, or any other profoundly intellec-
tual being ,
Whose thoughts wander through ¢eternity—— ’?

‘¢As mad as Marston! Every bit!’? muttered the
Captain, half audibly.

‘What do you conclude from this rigmarole of
yours?’’ interrupted Barbican.

**T conclude that we have twenty-six good min-
utes still left——’’
rsé ALL AROUND THE AtOON:

** inter-

‘© Only twenty-four minutes, ten seconds,
rupted the Captain, watch in hand.

‘¢ Well, twenty-four minutes, Captain,’? Ardan
went on; ‘*now even in twenty-four a I

maintain——”’

‘‘Ardan,’’ interrupted Barbican, ‘after a very
little while we shall have plenty of time for philo-
sophical disputations. Just new let us think of
something far more pressing.’

‘“‘More pressing! what do you mean? are we
not fully prepared ?’’

‘Ves, fully prepared, as far at least as we have
been able to foresee. But we may still, I think,
possibly increase the number of precautions to be
taken against thé terrible shock that we are so soon
to experience.”’

‘*What? Have you any doubts whatever of the
effectiveness of your brilliant and extremely original
idea? Don’t you think that the layers of water,
regularly disposed in easily-ruptured partitions be-
neath this floor, will afford us sufficient nes
by their elasticity ? ’’

‘‘T hope so, indeed, my dear friend, but a am by
no means confident.”

‘‘He hopes! He is by no means confident! Lis-
ten to that, Mac! aay. time to tell us so! Let me
out of here!’’

“Too late!” observed the Captain quietly.
“‘The trap-hole ae would take ten or fifteen
minutes to open.”’

‘¢Oh then I suppose I must make the best of it,’’
FROM 10 P. M. TO 10 36! go". I9

said Ardan, laughing. ‘‘ All aboard, gentlemen !
The train starts in twenty minutes!”

‘ said the Captain, who never took his eye off the
chronometer.

The three travellers looked at each other for a
little while, during which even Ardan appeared to
become serious. After another careful glance at the
several objects lying around them, Barbican said,
quietly :

‘Everything is in its place, except ourselves.
What we have now to do is to decide on the posi-
tion we must take in order to neutralize the shock
as much as possible. We must be particularly care-
ful to guard against a rush of blood to the head.’’

“* Correct !’’ said the Captain.

‘Suppose we stood on our heads, like the circus
tumblers !’’ cried Ardan, ready to suit the action to
the word.

‘* Better than that,’’ said Barbican; ‘* we can lie
on our side. Keep clearly. in mind, dear friends,
that at the instant of departure it makes very little
difference to us whether we are inside the bullet or
in front of it, There is, no doubt, some difference,’’
he added, seeing the great eyes made by his friends,
‘*but it is exceedingly little.’’

‘‘Thank heaven for the somes”? interrupted
Ardan, fervently.

“Don’t you approve of my suggestion, Captain?”
asked Barbican,

‘*Certainly,’’ was the hasty reply. ‘That is to
20. ALL AROUND .THE MOON.

say, absolutely. Seventeen minutes twenty-seven
seconds !’’

¢¢ Mac isn’t a human being at all! ’’ cried Ardan,
admiringly. ‘‘ He is a repeating chronometer, hori-
zontal escapement, London-made lever, capped, jew-

2?



elled,

His companions let him run.on while they busied
themselves in making their last arrangements, with
the greatest coolness and most systematic method.
In fact, I don’t think, of anything just now to com-
pare them to.except a couple of old travellers who,
having to pass the night in the train, are trying to
make themselves. as comfortable as possible for their
long journey. In your profound astonishment, you
may. naturally ask me of what strange material can
the hearts of these Americans be made, who can
view without the slightest semblance of a flutter the
approach of the most appalling dangers? In your
curiosity I fully participate, but, I’m sorry to say, I
can’t gratify it. It is one of those things that I
could: never find out. :

Three mattresses, thick and well wadded, spread
on the disc forming the false bottom. of the Projec-
tile, were arranged in lines whose parallelism was
simply perfect.. But Ardan would never think of
occupying his until the very last moment. Walking
up and down, with the restless nervousness of a wild
beast in a cage, he kept up a continuous fire of talk;
at one moment with his friends, at another. with the
dogs, addressing the latter by the euphonious and
suggestive names of Diana and Satellite.



































































FROM 10 P. AL TO 790 gd 42". az

«Ho, pets!’’ he would exclaim as he patted them
gently, ‘you must not forget the noble part you ‘are
to play up there. You must be models of canine de-
portment. The eyes of the whole Selenitic world will
be upon you, You are the standard bearers of your
race. From you they will receive their first impres-
sion regarding its merits. Let it be a favorable one.
Compel those Selenites to acknowledge, in spite of
themselves, that the terrestrial race of canines is far
superior to that of the very best Moon dog among
them !7?

“Dogs in the Moon!”’ sneered M’Nicholl, I
like that !”’

“*Plenty of dogs!’’ cried Ardan, ‘and horses too,
and cows, and sheep, and no end of chickens! ’”’

‘“*A hundred dollars to one there isn’t a single
chicken within the whole Lunar realm, not exclu-
ding even the invisible side!’’ cried the Captain, in
an authoritative tone, but never taking his eye off
the chronometer.

“‘T take that bet, my son,’’ coolly replied Ardan,
shaking the Captain’s hand by way of ratifying the
wager; ‘‘and this reminds me, by the way, Mac,
that you have lost three bets already, to the pretty
little tune of six thousand dollars.”’

‘‘And paid them, too!’’ cried the captain, mo-
notonously; ‘ten, thirty-six, six !’’

‘Yes, and in a quarter of an hour you will have
to pay nine thousand dollars more; four thousand
because the Columbiad will not burst, and five thou-
sand because the Projectile will rise more than six
miles from the Earth.”
22 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“*T have the money ready,’’ answered the Captain,
touching his breeches pocket. ‘‘ When I lose I pay.
Not sooner. Ten, thirty-eight, ten!’’

‘* Captain, you’re a man of method, if there evér
was one. I think, however, that you made a mis-
take in your wagers.””

‘* How so?’’ asked the Captain listlessly, his eye
still on the dial.

“* Because, by Jove, if you win there will be no
more of you left to take the money than will
be of Barbican to pay it!’’

‘¢ Friend Ardan,’’ quietly observed Barbican,
“my stakes are deposited in the Wall Street
Bank, of New York, with orders to pay them
over to the Captain’s heirs, in case the Captain
himself should fail to put in an appearance at the
proper time.’”

‘“©Oh! you rhinoceroses, you pachyderms, you
granite men!’’ ‘cried Ardan, ‘gasping with = sur-
prise; ‘* you machines with iron heads, and iron
hearts! I may admire you, but I’m blessed if I
understand you!”

‘Ten, forty-two, ten!’’ repeated M’Nicholl, as
mechanically as if it was the chronometer itself that
spoke.

‘« Four minutes and a half more,’’ said Barbican.

‘*Oh! four and a half little minutes!’’ went on
Ardan. ‘Only think of it! Weare shut up ina
bullet that lies in the chamber of a cannon nine hun-
dred feet long. Underneath this bullet is piled a
charge of 400 thousand pounds of gun-cotton, equiv-
FROM 10 P. M. TO io 4b! go”. 23

alent to 1600 thousand pounds of ordinary gun-
powder! And at this very instant our friend Mur-
phy, chronometer in hand, eye on dial, finger on
discharger, is counting the last seconds and getting
ready to launch us into the limitless regions of plane-

a9

tary

‘¢ Ardan, dear friend,’’ interrupted Barbican, in a
grave tone, ‘a serious moment is now at hand. Let
us meet it with some interior recollection. Give me
your hands, my dear friends.”’

“¢ Certainly,’’ said Ardan, with tears in his voice,
and already at the other extreme of his apparent
levity.

The three brave men united in one last, silent,
but warm and impulsively affectionate pressure.’

‘‘ And now, great God, our Creator, protect us!
In Thee we trust !’’ prayed Barbican, the others join-
ing him with folded hands and bowed heads.’

“Ten, forty-six !’’ whispered the Captain, as he
and Ardan quietly took their places on the mat-
tresses.

Only forty seconds more !

Barbican rapidly extinguishes the gas and lies
down beside his companions.

The deathlike silence now reigning in the Projec-
tile is interrupted only by the sharp ticking of the
chronometer as it beats the seconds.

Suddenly, a dreadful shock is felt, and the Projec-
tile, shot up by the instantaneous development ot
200,000 millions of cubic feet of gas, is flying into
space with inconceivable rapidity!


CHAPTER II.
THE FIRST HALF HOUR.

Wuat had taken place within the Projectile?
What effect had been produced by the frightful
concussion? Had Barbican’s ingenuity been at-
tended with a fortunate result? Had the shock
been sufficiently deadened by the springs, the buffers,
the water layers, and the partitions so readily rup-
tured? Had their combined effect succeeded in
counteracting the tremendous violence of a velocity
of 12,000 yards a second, actually sufficient to carry
them from London to New York in six minutes?
These, and a hundred other questions of a similar
nature were asked that night by the millions who
had been watching the explosion from the base of
Stony Hill. Themselves they forgot altogether for
the moment ; they forgot eveything in their absorb-
ing anxiety regarding the fate of the daring travel-
lers. Had one among them, our friend Marston,
for instance, been favored with a glimpse at the in-
terior of the projectile, what would he have seen ?

Nothing at all at first, on account of the dark-
ness; except that the walls had solidly resisted the
frightful shock. Not acrack, nor a bend, nor adint
could be perceived; not even the slightest injury
had the admirably constructed piece of mechanical
workmanship endured. It had not yielded an inch

(24)
THE FIRST HALF HOUR. 25

to the enormous pressure, and, far from melting and
falling back to earth, as had been so seriously appre-
hended, in showers of blazing aluminium, it was still
as strong in every respect as it had been on the very
day that it left the Cold Spring Iron Works, glitter-
ing like a silver dollar,

Of real damage there was actually none, and even
the disorder into which things had been thrown in
the interior by the violent shock was comparatively
slight. A few small objects lying around loose had
been furiously hurled against the ceiling, but the
others appeared not to have suffered the slightest
injury. The straps that fastened them up were un-
frayed, and the fixtures that held them down were
uncracked.

The partitions beneath the disc having been rup-
tured, and the water having escaped, the false floor
had been dashed with tremendous violence against
the bottom of the Projectile, and on this disc at this
moment three human bodies could be seen lying
perfectly still and motionless.

Were they three corpses? Had the Projectile
suddenly become a great metallic coffin bearing its
ghastly contents through the air with the rapidity of
a lightning flash ?

In a very few minutes after the shock, one of the
bodies stirred a little, the arms moved, the eyes
opened, the head rose and tried to look around;
finally, with some difficulty, the body managed to
get on its knees. It wasthe Frenchman! He held
his head tightly squeezed between his hands for some
26 ALL. AROUND THE MOON.

time as if to keep it from splitting. .Then he felt
himself rapidly all over, cleared his throat with a
vigorous ‘‘hem!’’ listened to the sound critically
for an instant, and then said to himself in a relieved
tone, but in his native tongue:

“One man all right! Call the roll for the
others!”

He tried to rise, but the effort was too great for
his strength. He fell back again, his brain swim-
ming, his eyes bursting, his head splitting. His
state very much resembled that of a young man
waking up in the morning after his first tremendous
“«spree.’’

‘* Br—rr!’’? he muttered to himself, still talking
French; ‘this reminds me of one of my wild
nights long ago in the Quartier Latin, only de-
cidedly more so! ”’

Lying quietly on his-back for a while, he could
soon feel that the circulation of his blood, so sud-
denly and violently arrested by the terrific shock,
was gradually recovering its regular flow; his heart
grew more normal in its action; his head became
clearer, and the pain less distracting.

‘¢Time to call that roll,’’ he at last exclaimed in
a voice with some pretentions to firmness; ‘‘Barbi-
can! MacNicholl!’’

He listens anxiously for a reply. None comes.
A’snow-wrapt grave at midnight is not more silent.
In vain does he try to catch even the faintest sound
of breathing, though he listens intently enough to

THE FIRST HALF HOUR, 27,

hear the beating of their hearts; but he hears only
his own.

“Call that roll again !’’ he mutters in a voice far
less assured than before; ‘‘ Barbican! MacNicholl!’’

The same fearful unearthly stillness.

“The thing is getting decidedly monotonous! ’’
he exclaimed, still speaking French. Then rapidly
recovering his consciousness as the full horror of the
situation began to break on his mind, he went on
muttering audibly: ‘* Have they really hopped the
twig? Bah! Fudge! what has not been able to
knock the life out of one little Frenchman can’t
have killed two Americans! They’re all right! But
first and foremost, let us enlighten the situation !’’

So saying, he contrived without much difficulty to
get on his feet. Balancing himself then for a mo-
ment, he began groping about for the gas. “But he
stopped suddenly. / .

“¢ Hold on a minute!’’ he cried; ‘’ before light-
ing this match, let us see if the gas has been escaping.
Setting fire to a mixture of air and hydrogen
would make a pretty how-do-you-do! Such an ex-
plosion would infallibly burst the Projectile, which
so far seems all right, though I’m blest if I can tell
whether we’re moving or not.’ -

He began sniffing and ‘smelling to discover if pas-
sible the odor of escaped gas: He could not detect
the slightest sign of anything of.the kind. ‘This
gave him great courage. He knew of course that
his senses were not yet in good. order, still he
thought he might trust them so far as to be certain
28 ALL AROUND THE MOON. :

that the gas had not escaped and that consequently
all the other receptacles were uninjured.

At the touch of the match, the gas burst into light
and burned with a steady flame. Ardan immedi-
ately bent anxiously over the prostrate bodies of his
friends. They lay on each other like inert masses,
M’ Nicholl stretched across Barbican.

Ardan first lifted up the Captain, laid him on the
sofa, opened his clenched hands, rubbed them, and
slapped the palms vigorously. Then he went all over
the body carefully, kneading it, rubbing it, and
gently patting it. In such intelligent efforts to re-
store suspended circulation, he seemed perfectly at
home, and after a few minutes his patience was re-
warded by seeing the Captain’s pallid face gradually
recover its natural color, and by feeling his heart
gradually beat with a firm pulsation.

At last M’Nicholl opened his eyes, stared at
Ardan for an instant, pressed his hand, looked
around searchingly and anxiously, and at last whis-
pered ina faint voice:

‘¢ How’s Barbican ?”’ te

‘¢ Barbican is all right, Captain,’’? answered Ardan
quietly, but still speaking French. ‘‘ Tl attend to
him in a jiffy. He had to wait for his turn. I be-
gan with you because you were the top man. We'll
see in a minute what we can do for dear old Barby
(ce cher Barbican) \""

In less than thirty seconds more, the Captain not
only was able to sit up himself, but he even insisted



THE FIRST HALF HOUR. 29

on helping Ardan to lift Barbican, and deposit him
gently on the sofa.

The poor President had evidently suffered more
from the concussion than either of his companions.
As they took off his coat they were at first terribly
shocked at the sight of a great patch of blood stain-
ing his shirt bosom, but they were inexpressibly re-
lieved at finding that it proceeded froma slight con-
tusion of the shoulder, little more than skin deep.

Every approved operation that Ardan had per-
formed for the Captain, both now repeated ‘for Bar-
bican, but for a long time with nothing like a favor-
able result. .

Ardan at first tried to encourage the Captain by
whispers of a lively and hopeful nature, but not yet
understanding why M’Nicholl did not deign to
make a single reply, he grew reserved by degrees
and at last would not speaka single word. He
worked at Barbican, however, just as before.

M’Nicholl interrupted himself every moment to
lay his ear on the breast of the unconscious man.
At first he had shaken his head quite despondingly,
but by degrees he found himself more and more en-
couraged to persist. ~

&* He breathes! ’’ he shicpered at last.

“Ves, he has been breathing for some time,’’ re-
plied Ardan, quietly, still unconsciously speaking
French. ‘A little more rubbing and pulling and
pennding will make him as spry as a young grass-
hopper.’’ :

They worked at him, in fact, so vigorously, intel-
jo ALL AROUND THE MOON.

ligently and perseveringly, that, after what they con-
sidered a long hour’s labor, they had the delight of
seeing the pale face assume a healthy hue, the inert
limbs give signs of returning animation, and the
breathing become strong and regular.

At last, Barbican suddenly opened his eyes,
started into an upright position on the sofa, took
his friends by the hands, and, in a voice showing
complete consciousness, demanded eagerly:

“‘Ardan, M’Nicholl, are we moving ?”’

His friends looked at each other, a little amused,
but. more perplexed. In their anxiety regarding
their own and their friend’s recovery, they had
never thought of asking such ‘a question. His
words recalled them at once toa full sense of their
situation.

“‘ Moving? Blessed ve I can tell!’’ said Ardan,
still speaking French. ,

‘*We may be lying fifty feet deep in a Florida
marsh, for all I know,’’ observed M’ Nicholl.

“Or, likely as not, in the bottom of the Gulf of
Mexico,’’ suggested Ardan, still in French.”

“¢ Suppose we find out,’? observed Barbican,
jumping up to try, his voice as clear and his step
as firm as ever.

But trying is one thing, and finding out another.
Having no means of comparing themselves-with ex-
ternal objects, they could not possibly tell whether
they were moving, or at an absolute stand-still.
Though our Earth is whirling us continually around
the Sun at the tremendous speed of 500 miles a min-
THE FIRST HALF HOOR. or

ute, its inhabitants are totally unconscious of the
slightest motion. It was the same with oyr travel-
lers. Through their own personal consciousness
they could tell absolutely nothing. Were they
shooting through space like a meteor? They could
not tell. Had they fallen back and buried them-
selves deep in the sandy soil of Florida, or, still
more likely, hundreds of fathoms deep beneath the
waters of the Gulf of Mexico? They could not
form the slightest idea,

Listening evidently could dono good. The pro-
found silence proved nothing. The padded walls
of the Projectile were too thick to admit’ any sound
whether of wind, water, or human beings. Barbi-
can, however, was soon struck forciby by one cir-
cumstance. He felt himself to be very uncomfort-
ably warm, and his friend’s faces looked very hot
and flushed. Hastily removing the cover that pro-
tected the thermometer, he closely inspected it, and
in an instant uttered a joyous exclamation.

“‘Hurrah!’’ he cried. ‘* We’re moving! There’s
no mistake about it. ‘The thermometer marks 113
degrees Fahrenheit. Such a stifling heat could not
come from the gas. It comes from the. exterior
walls of our projectile, which atmospheric friction
must have made almost red hot. But this heat
must soon diminish, because we are already far be-
yond the regions of the atmosphere, so that instead
of smothering we shall be shortly in danger of
freezing.”’

‘What?’? asked Ardan, much bewildered. ‘We
JS? ALL AROUND THE MOON.

are already far beyond the limits of the terrestrial
atmosphere! Why do you think so?’”’

M’ Nicholl was still too much flustered to venture
a word.

“If you want me to answer your question satisfac-
torily, my dear Ardan,’’ replied Barbican, with a
quiet smile, ‘you will have the kindness to put your
questions in English.”

“¢ What do you mean, Barbican!’’ asked Ardan,
hardly believing his ears.

‘¢ Hurrah!’’ cried M’Nicholl, in the tone of a
man who has suddenly made a welcome but most
unexpected discovery. a

**T don’t know exactly how it is with the Cap-
tain,’’ continued Barbican, with the utmost tranquil-
lity, ‘‘ but for my part the study of the languages
never was my strong point, and though I always ad-
mired the French, and even understood it pretty
well, I never could converse in it without giving
myself more trouble than I always find it conve-
nient to assume.’’

“* You don’t mean to say that I have been talking
French to you all this time !’’ cried Ardan, horror-
stricken.

‘¢The most elegant French I ever heard, backed
by the purest Parisian accent,’’ replied Barbican,
highly amused; “‘Don’t you think so, Captain ?’’
he added, turning to M’ Nicholl, whose countenance
still showed the most comical traces of bewilder-
ment.

‘* Well, I swan to man!’’ cried the Captain,
THE FIRST HALF HOUR, So?

who always swore a little when his feelings got be-
yond his control; ‘‘Ardan, the Boss has got the
rig on both of us this time, but rough as it is on you
it isa darned sight more soon me. Be hanged if I
did not think you were talking English the whole
time, and I put the whole blame for not understand-
ing you on the disordered state of my brain! ”’

Ardan only stared, and scratched his head, but
Barbican actually—no, not Jaughed, that serene na-
ture could not /augh. His cast-iron features puck-
ered into a smile of the richest drollery, and his
eyes twinkled with the wickedest fun ; but no un-
dignified giggle escaped the portal of those majestic
lips. ;
“It sounds like French, I’d say to myself,’’? con-
tinued the Captain, ‘‘ but I 4zcw it’s English, and
by and by, when this whirring goes out of my head,
I shall easily understand it.’’

Ardan now looked as if he was beginning to see
the joke.

“‘The most puzzling part of the thing to me,”’
went on M’Nicholl, giving his experience with the
utmost gravity, ‘was why English sounded ‘so like
french. Jf it was simple incomprehensible gibber-
ish, I-could readily blame the state of my ears for
it. But the idea that my bothered ears could turn
a mere confused, muzzled, buzzing reverberation
into a sweet, harmonious, articulate, though unin-
telligible, human language, made me sure that I was
fast becoming crazy, if I was not so already.’’

“‘Hia! ha! ha!’ roared Ardan, laughing till the
3
SF ALL AROUND THE MOON,

tears,came. ‘¢ Now I understand why the poor Cap-
tain made me no reply all the time, and looked at
me with such a hapless woe-begone expression of
countenance. The fact is, Barbican, that shock
was too much both for M’Nicholl and myself. You
are the only man among us whose head is fire-proof,
blast-proof, and powder-proof. I really believe a
burglar would have greater difficulty in blowing
your head-piece open than in bursting one of those
famous American safes your papers make such a fuss
about. . A wonderful head, the Boss’s, isn’t it
M’ Nicholl? ”’

“* Yes,’’ said the Captain, as slowly as if every
word were a gem of the profoundest thought, ‘ thé
Boss has a fearful and a wonderful head !”’

‘But now to business!’’ cried the versatile
Ardan, ‘‘Why do you think, Barbican, that we
are at present beyond the limits of the terrestrial
atmosphere ?”’ ‘ .

‘¢ For avery simple reason,’’ said Barbican, point-
ing to the chronometer; ‘‘it isnow more than seven
minutes after 11. We must, therefore, have been
in motion more than twenty minutes. Consequently,
unless our initial velocity has been very much di-
minished by the friction, we must have long before
this completely cleared the fifty miles of atmosphere
enveloping the earth.”’

**Correct,’’ said the Captain, cool as a cucum-
ber, because once more in complete possession of all
his senses; *‘ but how much do you think the initial
velocity to have been diminished by the friction?”
THE FIRST HALF HOUR. OF

‘*By a third, according to my calculations,’’ re-
plied Barbican, ‘‘ which I think are right. Suppo-
sing our initial velocity, therefore, to have been
12,000 yards per second, by the time we quitted
the atmosphere it must have been reduced to 8,000
yards per second. At that rate, we must have gone
by this time ea

“Then, Mac, my boy, you’ve lost your two
bets!’’ interrupted Ardan. ‘¢The Columbiad has
not burst, four thousand dollars; the Projectile has
risen at least six miles, five thousand dollars; come,
Captain, bleed! ”’

“Let me first be sure we’re right,’’ said the Cap-
tain, quietly. ‘‘I don’t deny, you see, that friend
Barbican’s arguments are quite right, and, therefore,
that I have lost my nine thousand dollars. But
there is another view of the case poses which
might annul the bet.”’

‘¢What other view?’’ asked Barbican, quickly.

‘¢ Suppose,’’ said the Captain, very drily, ‘that
the powder had not caught, and that we were still
lying quietly at the bottom of the Columbiad !”

“By Jove!’ laughed Ardan, ‘‘ there’s an idea
truly worthy of my own nondescript brain! We
must surely have changed heads during that concus-
sion! No matter, there is some sense left in us yet.
Come now, Captain, consider a little, if you can.
Weren’t we both half-killed by the shock? Didn’t
I rescue you from certain death with these two
hands? Don’t you see Barbican’s shoulder still
bleeding by the violence of the shock?’’


36 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

«Correct, friend Michael, correct in ‘every par-
ticular,’’ replied the Captain. ‘‘ But one little ques-
tion.”’

“Out with it!’

“¢ Friend Michael, you say we’re moving ?”’

“© Yes.”?

. Tn consequence of the explosion? ’’

“¢ Certainly !’’

‘¢Which must have been attended with a tremen-
dous report? ’”’ ;

“© Of course!’

‘* Did you hear that report, friend Michael ?’’

«¢N—o,’’ replied Ardan, a little disconcerted at
the question. ‘Well, no; I can’t say that I did
hear any report.’’

‘¢Did you, friend Barbican ?”’

‘*No,’’ replied Barbican, promptly. ‘I heard
no report whatever.”’

His answer was ready, but his look was quite as
disconcerted as Ardan’s.

‘¢Well, friend Barbican and friend Michael,’’ said
the Captain, very drily as he leered wickedly at both,
‘*put that and that together and tell me what you
make of it.’’

“It’s a-fact!’’ exclaimed Barbican, puzzled, but
not bewildered. <‘‘Why did we not hear that re-
port P’’

“‘Too hard for me,’’ said Ardan. ‘‘Give it up!”’

The three friends gazed at each other for a while
with countenances expressive of much perplexity.
Barbican appeared to be the least self-possessed of
THE FIRST HALF HOUR. 37

the party. It was a complete turning of the tables
from the state of things a few moments ago. The
problem was certainly simple enough, but for that
very reason the more inexplicable. If they were
moving the explosion must have taken place ; but if
the explosion had taken place, why had they not
heard the report ?

Barbican’s decision soon put an end to specula-
tion. ,

‘‘Conjecture being useless,’’ said he, ‘let us
have recourse to facts. First, let us see where we
are. Drop the deadlights !’’

' This operation, simple enough in itself and being
immediately undertaken by the whole three, was
easily accomplished. The screws fastening the bolts
by which the external plates of the deadlights were
solidly pinned, readily yielded to the pressure of a
powerful wrench. ‘The bolts were then driven out-
wards, and the holes which had contained them
were immediately filled with solid plugs of India
rubber. The bolts once driven out, the external
plates dropped by their own weight, turning on a
hinge, like portholes, and thestrong plate-glass form-
ing the light immediately showed itself. A second
light exactly similar, could be cleared away on the
opposite side of the Projectile; a third, on the sum-
mit of the dome, and a fourth, in the centre of the
bottom. The travellers could thus take observations
in four different directions, having an opportunity
of gazing at the firmament through the side lights,
38 ALL AROUND THE MOON.-

and at the Earth and the Moon through the lower
and the upper lights of the Projectile.

Ardan and the Captain had commenced examin-
ing the floor, previous to operating on the bottom
light. But Barbican was the first to get through his
work at one of the side lights, and M’Nicholl and
Ardan soon heard him shouting:

‘“*No, my friends!’’ he exclaimed, in tones of
decided emotion;. ‘*we have wzof¢ fallen back to
Earth ; ‘nor are we lying in the bottom of the Gulf
of Mexico. No! We are driving through space!
Look at the stars, glittering all around! Brighter,
but smaller than we have ever seen them before!
We have left the Earth and the Earth’s atmosphere
far behind us!” ‘

‘¢Hurrah! Hurrah!’ cried M’Nicholl and Ardan,
feeling as if electric shocks were coursing through
them, though they could see nothing, looking down
from the side light, but the blackest and profound-
est obscurity. *

Barbican soon convinced them that this pitchy
blackness proved that they were not, and could not
be, reposing on the surface of the Earth, where at
that moment, everything was illuminated by the
bright moonlight; also that they had passed the
different layers of the atmosphere, where the dif-
fused and refracted rays would be also sure to re-
veal themselves through the lights of the Projectile.
‘They were, therefore, certainly moving. No doubt
was longer possible. :
THE FIRST HALF HOUR, 39

“It’s a fact!’’ observed the Captain, now quite
convinced. ‘Then I’ve lost!’’

‘‘Let me congratulate you!’ cried Ardan,. sha-
king his hand.

‘Here is your nine thousand dollars, friend Bar-
bican,’’ said the Captain, taking a roll of green-
backs of high denomination out of his porte-mon-
naie.

““You want a receipt, don’t you, Captain ?”’
asked Barbican, counting the money.

*¢ Yes, I should prefer one, if it is not too much
trouble,’? answered M’Nicholl; ‘it saves dispute.”’

Coolly and mechanically, as if seated at his desk,
in his office, Barbican opened his memorandum
book, wrote a receipt on a blank page, dated,
signed and sealed it, and then handed it to the
Captain, who put it away carefully among the other
papers of his portfolio.

Ardan, taking off his hat, made a profound bow
to both of his companions, without saying a word.
Such formality, under such extraordinary circum-
stances, actually paralysed his tongue for the mo-
ment. No wonder that he could not understand
those Americans. Even Indians would have sur-
prised him by an exhibition of such stoicism. After
indulging in silent wonder for a minute or two, he
joined his companions who were now busy looking
out at the starry sky.

‘¢Where is the Moon?’ he aked, “* How is it
that we cannot see her? ’’

«¢ The fact of our not seeing her,

22

answered Bar-
4o ALL AROUND THE MOON.

bican, ‘*gives me very great satisfaction in one re-
spect; it shows that our Projectile was shot so
rapidly out of the Columbiad that it had not time
to be impressed with the slightest revolving motion
—for us a most fortunate matter. As for the rest—
see, there is Casséopeia, a little to the left is Andro-
meda, further down is the great square of Pega-
sus, and to the southwest /oma/haut can be easily
seen swallowing the Cascade. All this shows we are
looking west and consequently cannot see the Moon,
which is approaching the zenith from the east.
Open the other light—But hold on! Look here !
What can this be? ’”’

The three travellers, looking westwardly in the di-
rection of Adpherat, saw a brilliant object rapidly
approaching them, At a distance, it looked like a
dusky moon, but the side turned towards the Earth
blazed with a bright light, which every moment be-
came more intense. It ‘came towards them with
prodigious velocity and, what was worse, its path lay
so directly in the course of the Projectile that a col-
lision seemed inevitable. As it moved onward,
from west to east, they could easily see that it ro-
tated on its axis, like all heavenly bodies; in fact, it
somewhat resembled a Moon on a small scale, de-
scribing its regular orbit around the Earth.

“¢ Mille tonerres /’’ cried Ardan, greatly excited ;
‘what is that? Can it be another projectile ?’’
M’ Nicholl, wiping his spectacles, looked again, but
made no’ reply. Barbican looked puzzled and un-
easy. Accollision was quite possible, and the results,
THE FIRST HALF HOUR. GI

even if not frightful in the highest degree, must be
extremely deplorable. The Projectile, if not abso-
lutely dashed to pieces, would be diverted from its
own course and dragged along in a new one in obe-
dience to the irresistible attraction of this furious
asteroid,

Barbican fully realized that either alternative in-
volved the complete failure of their enterprise. He
kept perfectly still, but, never losing his presence of
mind, he curiously looked on the approaching object
with a gladiatorial eye, as if seeking to detect some
unguarded point in his terrible adversary. The Cap-
tain was equally silent ; he looked like a man who
had fully made up his mind to regard every possible
contingency with the most stoical indifference. But
Ardan’s tongue, more fluent than ever, rattled away
incessantly. _-

‘Look ! Look! ’’ he exclaimed, in tones so per-
fectly expressive of his rapidly alternating feelings as
to render the medium of words totally unnecessary.
“* How rapidly the cursed thing is nearing us! Plague
take your ugly phiz, the more I know you, the less
I like you! Every second she doubles in size!
Come, Madame Projectile! Stir your stumps a
little livelier, old lady! He’s making for you as
straight as an arrow! We’re going right in his way,
or he’s coming in ours, I can’t say which. It’s
taking a mean advantage of us either way. As for
ourselves—what can we do! Before such a monster
as that we are as helpless as three men in a little
g2 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

skiff shooting down the rapids to Bue brink of
Niagara! Now “for it!”

Nearer and nearer it came, but without noise,
without sparks, without a trail, though its lower
part was brighter than ever. Its path lying little
above them, the nearer it came the more the collis-
ion seemed inevitable. Imagine yourself caught on
a narrow railroad bridge at midnight with an express
train approaching at full speed, its reflector already
dazzling you with its light, the roar of the cars rat-
tling in your ears, and you may conceive the feel-
ings of the travellers. At last it was so near that
the travellers started back in affright, with eyes
shut, hair on end, and fully believing their last
hour had come. Even then Ardan had his mot.

‘¢ We can neither switch off, down brakes, nor clap
on more steam! Hard luck!’”’

In an instant-all was over. The velocity of the
Projectile was fortunately great enough to carry it
barely above the dangerous point; and in a flash
the terrible bolide disappeared rapidly several hun-
dred yards beneath the affrighted travellers.

**Good bye! And may you never come back!”’
cried Ardan, hardly able tobreathe. ‘It’s perfectly
outrageous! Not room enough in infinite space to
let an unpretending bullet like ours move*about a
little without incurring the risk of being run over by
such a monster as that! What isit anyhow? Do
you know, Barbican ?’’

‘‘T do,’’ was the reply.
‘THE FIRST HALF HOUR, 43

**Of course, you do! What is it that he don’t
know? Eh, Captain? ’”’ ©

“Tt is a simple bolide, but one of such enormous
dimensions that the Earth’s attraction has made it a
satellite.’’

‘¢What!’’ cried Ardan, ‘‘another satellite be-
sides the. Moon? I hope there are no more of
them!”

‘«They are pretty numerous,’’ replied Barbican :
‘* but they are so small and they move with such
enormous velocity that they are very seldom seen.
Petit, the Director of the Observatory of Toulouse,
who these last years has devoted much time and
care to the observation of bolides, has calculated
that the very one we have just encountered moves
with such astonishing swiftness that it accomplishes
its revolution around the Earth in about 3 hours and
20 minutes !”’

*¢Whew!’’ whistled Ardan, “where should we
be now if it had struck us! ’”’

‘“*You don’t mean to say, Barbican,’’ observed
M’ Nicholl, ‘‘ that Petit has seen this very one? ”’

‘* So it appears,’’ replied Barbican.

‘¢And do all astronomers admit its existence?’’
asked the Captain. :

‘¢ Well, some of them have their doubts,’’ replied
Barbican :

“‘If the unbelievers had been here a minute or
favo ago,’’ interrupted Ardan, ‘‘they would never
express a doubt again.”’

“If Petit’s calculation is right,’’ continued Barbi-


44 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

can, ‘I can even form avery good idea as to our
distance from the Earth.’’

“Tt seems to me Barbican can do what he pleases
here or elsewhere,’’ observed Ardan to the Captain,

‘¢ Let us see, Barbican,’’ asked M’Nicholl; ‘* where
has Petit’s calculation placed us?’”’

‘“‘The bolide’s distance being known,”’’ replied
Barbican, ‘‘at the moment we met it we were a
little more than 5 thousand miles from the Earth’s
surface.”’

‘“‘Five thousand miles already!’ cried Ardan,
‘¢ why we have only just started !’’

“‘Let us see about that,’’ quietly observed the
Captain, looking at tis chronometer, and calculating
with his pencil. ‘It is now ro minutes past eleven ;
we have therefore been 23 minutes on the road.
Supposing our initial velocity of 12,000 yards or
nearly seven miles a second, to have been kept up,
we should by this time be about 9,000 miles from
the Earth; but by allowing for friction and gravity,
we can hardly be more than 5,500 miles. Yes,
friend Barbican, Petit does not seem to be very
wrong in his calculations.’’

But Barbican hardly heard the observation. He
had not yet answered the puzzling question that had
already presented itself to them for solution ; and un-
til he had done so he could not attend to anything else.

‘© That’s all very well and good, Captain,’’ he re-
plied in an absorbed manner, “ but we have not yet
been able to account for a very strange phenomenon.
Why didn’t we hear the report ?”’
THE FIRST HALF HOUR, 45

No one replying, the conversation came toa stand-
still, and Barbican, still absorbed in his reflections,
began clearing the second light of its external shut-
ter. In afew minutes the plate dropped, and the
Moon beams, flowing in, filled the interior of the
‘Projectile with her brilliant light. ‘The Captain im-
mediately put out the gas, from motives of economy
as well as because its glare somewhat interfered with
the observation of the interplanetary regions.

The Lunar disc struck the travellers as glittering
with asplendor and purity of light that they had
never witnessed before. The beams, no longer
strained through the misty atmosphere of the Earth,
streamed copiously in through the glass and coated
the interior walls of the Projectile with a brilliant
silvery piating. The intense blackness of the sky
enhanced the dazzling radiance of the Moon. Even
the stars blazed with a new and unequalled splendor,
and, in the absence of a refracting atmosphere, they
flamed as bright in the close proximity of the Moon
as in any other part of the sky.

You can easily conceive the interest with which
these bold travellers gazed on the Starry Queen, the
final object of their daring journey. She was now
insensibly approaching the zenith, the mathematical
point which she was to reach four days later. They
presented their telescopes, but her mountains, plains,
craters and general characteristics hardly came out
a particle more sharply than if they had been viewed
from the Earth. Still, her light, unobstructed by air
or vapor, shimmered with a lustre actually trans-
46 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

plendent. . Her disc shone like a mirror of polished
platina. The travellers remained for some time ab-
sorbed in the silent contemplation of the glorious
scene.

‘‘ How they’re gazing at her this very moment
from Stony Hill!’’ said the Captain at last to break
the silence:

“*By Jove!’ cried Ardan; ‘it’s true! Captain
you’re right. We were near forgetting our dear old
Mother, the Earth. What ungrateful children !
Let me feast my eyes once more on the blessed old
creature |”? ,

Barbican, to satisfy his companion’s desire, imme-
diately commenced to clear away the disc which
covered the floor of the Projectile and prevented
them from getting at the lower light. This disc,
though it had been dashed to the bottom of the
Projectile with great violence, was still as strong as
ever, and, being made in compartments fastened by
screws, to dismount it was no easy matte'. se Barbi-
can, however, with the help of the others, soon had
it all taken apart, and put away the pieces carefully,
to serve again in case of need. A round hole about
a foot and a half in diameter appeared, bored through
the floor of the Projectile. It was closed by a circu-
lar pane of plate-glass, which was about six inches
thick, fastened by a ring of copper. Below, on the
outside, the glass was protected by an aluminium
plate, kept in its place by strong bolts and nuts.
The latter being unscrewed, the bolts slipped out by
their own weight, the shutter fell, and a new com-
THE FIRST HALE HOUR, ; “7

munication was established between the interior and
the exterior.

Ardan knelt down, applied his eye to the light,
and tried to look out. At first everything was
quite dark and gloomy.

‘‘T see no Earth!’ he exclaimed at last.

‘‘Don’t you see a fine ribbon of light?’’ asked
Barbican, ‘right beneath us? A thin, pale, silvery
crescent ?”?

- © OF course Ido. Can that be the Earth?”

‘© Terra Afater herself, friend Ardan. That fine
fillet of light, now hardly visible on her eastern bor-
der, will disappear altogether as soon as the Moon is
full, Then, lying as she wiil be between the Sun
and the Moon, her illuminated face will be turned
away from us altogether, and for several days she
will be involved in impenetrable darkness.’’

“‘And that’s the Earth !’’ repeated Ardan, hardly
able to believe his eyes, as he continued to gaze on
the slight thread of silvery white light, somewhat
resembling the appearance of the ‘* Young May
Moon”? a few hours after sunset.

Barbican’s explanation was quite correct. The
Earth, in reference to the Moon or the Projectile,
was in her last phase, or octant as it is called, and
showed a sharp-horned, attenuated, but brilliant
crescent strongly relieved by the black background
of the sky. Its light, rendered a little bluish by the
density of the atmospheric envelopes, was not quite
as brilliant asthe Moon’s. But the Earth’s crescent,
compared to the Lunar, was of dimensions much
gb _ ALL AROUND THE MOON.

greater, being fully 4 times larger. You would have
called it a vast, beautiful, but very thin bow ex-
tending over the sky.. A few points, brighter than
the rest, particularly in its concave part, revealed
the presence of lofty mountains, probably the Hima-
layahs. But they disappeared every now and then
under thick vapory spots, which are never seen on
the Lunar disc. They were the thin concentric
cloud rings that surround the terrestrial sphere.

However, the travellers’ eyes were soon able to
trace the rest of the Earth’s surface not only with
facility, but even to follow its outline with absolute
delight. This was in consequence of two different
phenomena, one of which they could easily account
for; but the other they could not explain without
Barbican’s assistance. No wonder. Never before
had mortal eye beheld such a sight. Let us take
each in its turn.

We all know that the ashy light by means of which
we perceive what is called the Off Moon tu the
Young Moon's arms is due to the Earth-shine, or
the reflection of the solar rays from the Earth to the
Moon. By a phenomenon exactly identical, the
travellers could now see that portion of the Earth’s
surface which was unillumined by the Sun ; only, as,
in consequence of the different areas of the respec-
tive surfaces, the Larthlight is thirteen times more
intense than the Afooniight, the dark portion of the
Earth’s disc appeared eorsacialy more adumbrated
than the Old Moon.

But the other pheuomenon had burst on them so
THE FIRST HALF HOUR. . 49

suddenly that they uttered acry loud enough to
wake up Barbican from his problem. They had dis-
covered a true starry ring! Around the Earth’s
outline, a ting, of internally well defined thickness,
but somewhat hazy on the outside, could easily be
traced by its surpassing brilliancy. Neither the
Pleiades, the Northern Crown, the Magellanic
Clouds nor the great nebulas of Orion, or of Argo,
no sparkling cluster, no corona, no group of glitter-
ing star-dust that the travellers had ever gazed at,
presented such attractions as the diamond ring they
now saw encompassing the Earth, just as the brass
meridian encompasses a terrestrial globe. ‘The re-
splendency of its light enchanted them, its pure
softness delighted them, its perfect regularity aston-
ished them. What was it? they asked Barbican.
In a few words he explained it. The beautiful
luminous ring was simply an. optical illusion, pro-
duced by the refraction of the terrestrial atmosphere.
All the stars in the neighborhood of the Earth, and
many actually behind it, had their rays refracted,
diffused, radiated, and finally converged to a focus
by the atmosphere, as if by a double convex lens of
gigantic power,

Whilst the travellers were seotbanaly absorbed in
the contemplation of this wondrous sight, a spark-
ling shower of shooting stars suddenly flashed over
the Earth’s dark surface, making it for a moment as
bright as the external ring. Hundreds of bolides,
catching fire from contact with the atmosphere,

streaked the dari kness with their luminous trails,
4
5O ALL AROUND 1HE MOON.

overspreading it occasionally with sheets of electric
flame. The Earth was just then in her perihelion,
and we all know that the months of November and
December are so highly favorable to the appearance
of these meteoric showers that at the famous display
of November, 1866, astronomers counted as many as
8,000 between midnight and four o’clock.

Barbican explained the whole matter in a few
words. The Earth, when nearest to the sun, occa-
sionally plunges into a group of countless meteors
travelling like comets, in eccentric orbits around
the grand centre of our solar system. The atmos-
phere strikes the rapidly moving bodies with such
violence as to set them on fire and render them visi-
ble to usin beautiful star showers. But to this simple
explanation of the famous November meteors Ardan
would not listen, He preferred believing that
Mother Earth, feeling that her three daring chil-
dren were still looking at her, though five thousand
miles away, shot off her best rocket-signals to show
that she still'thought of them and would never let
them out of her watchful eye.

For hours they continued to gaze with indescrib-
able interest on the faintly luminous mass so easily
distinguishable among the other heavenly bodies.
Jupiter blazed on their right, Mars flashed his ruddy
light on their left, Saturn with his rings looked like
a round white spot on a black wall; even Venus
they could see almost directly under them, easily
recognizing her by her soft, sweetly scintillant light.
But no planet or constellation possessed any attrac-
THE FIRST HALF HOUR, SL

tion for the travellers, as long as their eyes could
trace that shadowy, crescent-edged, diamond-girdled,
meteor-furrowed spheroid, the theatre of their exis-
tence, the home of so many undying desires, the
mysterious cradle of their race !

Meantime the Projectile cleaved its way upwards,
rapidly, unswervingly, though with a gradually re-
tarding velocity. As the Earth sensibly grew darker,
and the travellers’ eyes grew dimmer, an irresistible
somnolency slowly stole over their weary frames.
The extraordinary excitement they had gone through
during the last four or five hours, was naturally fol-
lowed by a profound reaction.

‘¢Captain, you’re nodding,’’ said Ardan at last,
afterea longer silence than usual; ‘‘ the fact is, Bar-
bican is the only wake man of the party, because he
is puzziing over his problem. Dum oiaimus viva-
mus / As we are asleep let us be asleep !”’

So saying he threw himself on the mattress, and
his companions immediately followed the example.

They had been lying hardly a quarter of an hour,
when Barbican ‘started up with a cry so loud and
sudden as instantly to awaken his companions.

The bright moonlight showed them the President
sitting up in his bed, his eye blazing, his arms wav-
ing, as he shouted ina tone reminding them of the
day they had found him in St. Helena wood.

“ Eurcka! Vve got it! Iknow it!”

‘What have you got?’’ cried Ardan, bouncing
up and seizing him by the right hand.
52 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

«* What do you know ?”’ cried the Captain, stretch-
ing over and seizing him by the left.

“¢ The reason why we did not hear the report! ’’

“Well, why did not we hear it!’’ asked both
rapidly in the same breath.

‘‘ Because we were shot up 30 times faster than
sound can travel!”
‘CHAPTER III.

THEY MAKE THEMSELVES AT HOME AND FEEL QUITE
COMFORTALLE,

‘Bus curious explanation given, and its soundness
immediately recognized, the three friends were soon
fast wrapped in the arms of Morpheus. Where in
fact could they have found a spot more favorable for
undisturbed repose? On land, where the dwellings,
whether in populous city or lonely country, contin-
ually experience every shock that thrills the Earth’s
crust? At sea, where between waves or winds or
paddles or screws or machinery, everything is tremor,
quiver or jar? In the air, where the balloon is in-
cessantly twirling, oscillating, on account of the
ever varying strata of different densities, and even

cecasionally threatening to spill you out? The Pro-
jectile alone, floating grandly through the absolute
void, in the midst of the profoundest silence, could
offer to its inmates the possibility of enjoying slum-
ber the most complete, repose the most profound.

There is no telling how long our three daring
travellers would have continued to enjoy their sleep,
if it had not been suddenly terminated by an unex-
pected noise about seven o’clock in the morning of
December 2nd, eight hours after their departure.

This noise was most decidedly of barking.

“ (33)
S54. ALL AROUND THE HOON,

“The dogs! It’s the dogs!’’ cried Ardan,
springing up at a bound.

“They must be hungry! ’’ observed the Captain.

‘¢We have forgotten the poor creatures!’’ cried
Barbican.

‘¢ Where can they have gone to?’’ asked Ardan,
looking for them in all directions.

At last they found one of them hiding under the
sofa. Thunderstruck and perfectly bewildered by
the terrible shock, the poor animal had kept close in
its hiding place, never daring to utter a sound, until
at last the pangs of hunger had proved too strong
even for its fright.

They readily recognized the amiable Diana, but
they could not allure the shivering, whining animal
from her retreat without a good deal of coaxing.
Ardan talked to her in his most honeyed and seduc-
tive accents, while trying to pull her out by the
neck.

“Come out to your friends, charming Diana,’’ he
went on, ‘‘come out, my beauty, destined for a lofty
niche in the temple of canine glory! Come out,
worthy scion of a race deemed worthy by the Egypt-
jans to be a companion of the great god, Anubis,
by the Christians, to be a friend of the good Saint
Roch! Come out and partake of a glory before
which the stars of Montargis and of St. Bernard shall
henceforward pale their ineffectual fire! Come out,
my lady, and let me think o’er the countless multi-
plication of thy species, so that, while sailing through
the interplanetary spaces, we may indulge in endless

































































































































































































































































































QUITE COMFORTALLE, : SS

flights of fancy on the number and variety of thy
descendants who will ere long render the Selenitic
atmosphere vocal with canine ululation !’’

Diana, whether flattered or not, allowed herself to
be dragged out, still uttering short, plaintive whines,
A hasty examination satisfying her friends that she
was more frightened than hurt and more hungry
than either, they continued their search for her
companion.

‘Satellite ! Satellite! Step this way, sir!’’ cried
Ardan. Put no Satellite appeared and, what was
worse, not the slighest sound. indicated his presence.
At last he was discovered on a ledge in the upper
portion of the Projectile, whither he had been shot
by the terrible concussion. . Less fortunate. than his
female companion, the poor fellow had received a
frightful shock and his life. was evidently in great
danger. 7

a The acclimatization project looks shaky !’’ cried
Ardan, handing the animal very carefully and ten-
derly to the others. Poor Satellite’s head had been
crushed against the roof, but, though recovery seemed
hopeless, they laid the body on a soft cushion, and
soon had the satisfaction of hearing it eine vent toa
slight sigh.

*©Good!’’ said Ardan, ** while there’s life there’s
hope. . You must not die yet, old boy. We shall
nurse you. We know our duty and shall not shirk
the responsibility. I should rather lose the right arm
off my body than be the cause of your death, poor
Satcllitel Try a little water?”
56 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

The suffering creature swallowed the cool draught
with evident avidity, then sank into a deep slumber.

The friends, sitting around and having nothing
more to do, looked out of the window and began
once more to watch the Earth and the Moon with
great attention. The glittering crescent of the Earth
was evidently narrower than it had been the prece-
ding evening, but its volume was still enormous when
compared to the Lunar crescent, which was now
rapidly assuming the proportions of a perfect circle.

“‘By- Jove,’’ suddenly exclaimed “Ardan, ‘* why
didn’t we start at the moment of Full Earth ?-—
that is when our globe and the Sun were in opposi-
tion?” ,

“Why should we !’’ growled M’ Nicholl.

‘Because in that case we should be now looking
at the great continents and the great seas in a new
light—the former glittering under the solar rays, the
latter darker and somewhat shaded, as we see them
on certain maps. Ilow I should like to get a glimpse
at those poles of the Earth, on which the. eye of
man has never yet lighted !”’

' © True,”? replied Barbican, ‘but if the Earth had
been Full, the Moon would have been New, that is
to say, invisible to us on account of solar irradiation.
Of the two it is much preferable to be able to keep
the point of arrival in view rather than the point of
departure.” 2
at You're right, Barbican,’ observed the Captain;
“besides, once we’re in the Moon, the long Lunar
night will give us plenty of time to gaze our full
QUITE COMFORTABLE, 57

at yonder great celestial body, our former home,
and still swarming with: our fellow beings. ’’

“¢ Our fellow beings no longer, dear boy!’’ cried
Ardan. ‘We inhabit a new world peopled by our-
selves alone, the Projectile! Ardan is Barbican’s
fellow being, and Barbican M’Nicholl’s. Beyond
us, outside us, humanity ends, and we are now the
only inhabitants of this microcosm, and so we shall
continue till the moment when we become Selenites
pure and simple.”’

‘¢ Which shall be in about eighty-eight hours from
now,’’ replied the Captain.

‘‘ Which is as much as to say—?’’ asked Ardan.

‘¢'That it is half past eight,’’ replied M’ Nicholl.

‘My regular hour for breakfast,’’ exclaimed Ardan,
“Cand I don’t see the shadow of a reason for chang-
ing it now.’ : a

The proposition was most acceptable, especially to
the Captain, who frequently boasted that, whether
on land or water, on mountain summits or in the
depths of mines, he had never missed a meal in all
his life. In escaping from the Earth, our travellers
felt that they had by no means escaped from the
laws of humanity, and their stomachs now called on
them lustily to fill the aching void. Ardan, as a
Frenchman, claimed the post of chief cook, an im-
portant office, but his companions yielded it with
alacrity. The gas furnished the requisite heat, and
the provision chest supplied the materials for their
first repast. They commenced with three plates of
excellent soup, extracted from ' Zzedrg’s precious
58: ALL AROUND THE MOON.

tablets, prepared from the best beef that ever roamed.
over the, Pampas. .

To: this succeeded several. tenderloin beefsteaks,
which, though. reduced to a;small: bulk .by the hy-
draulic engines of the American Destccating Com-
pany, were pronounced to be fully as tender, juicy
and savory as if:they had just left the gridiron of a
London Club House. Ardan even swore that they
were ‘‘ bleeding,’’? and the others were :too busy to
contradict him.

Preserved : vegetables of. various kinds, ‘‘ fresher
than nature,’’ according to Ardan, gave an agreeable.
variety tothe entertainment, and these were followed
by several cups of magnificent tea, unanimously: al-
lowed to-be the best: they had ever tasted.. It. was
an odoriferous young. hyson. gathered that very year,
and presented to the Emperor of Russia by the famous
rebel chief Yakub Kushbegi, and: of which Alexander
had expressed himself as. very happy -in- being :able
to send a few boxes. to his friend, the distinguished
President -of: the. Baltimore Gun ‘Club. . To crown.
the meai; Ardan unearthed an exquisite bottle, of
Chambertin, and, in glasses sparkling with the richest
juice of the Cote d’or, the travellers drank to the
speedy union of the Ifarth and her satellite.

. And, as if his work among the generous vineyards
of Burgundy had not been enough to show his interest
in the matter, even the Sun wished to join the party.
Precisely at this moment, the Projectile beginning to
leave the conical shadow cast by. the Earth, the rays
ofthe glorious King of Day struck its lower surface,

?

QUITE COMFORTABLE. 59

not obliquely, but perpendicularly, on account of the
slight obliquity of the Moon’s orbit with that of the
Earth.

¢¢ The Sun,”’ cried Ardan.

“¢ Of course,’’ said Barbican, looking at his watch,
‘¢he’s exactly up to time.”

“‘ How is it that we see him only through the bot-
tom light of our Projectile ?’’ asked Ardan.

‘“*A moment’s reflection must tell you,’’ replied
Barbican, ‘‘ that when we started last night, the Sun
was almost directly below us; therefore, as we con-
tinue to move ina straight line, he must still be in
our rear.”’

‘That’s clear enough,’’

said the Captain, ‘* but
another consideration, I’m free to say, rather per-
plexes me. Since our Earth lies between us and the
Sun, why don’t we see the sunlight forming a great
ring around the globe, in other words, instead of the
full Sun that we plainly see there below, why do we
not witness an annular eclipse ?”’

“* Your cool, clear head has not yet quite recovered
from the shock, my dear Captain;’’ replied Barbi-
can, with asmile. ‘‘ For two reasons we can’t see
the ring eclipse: on account of the angle the Moon’s
orbit makes with the Earth, the three bodies are not
at present in adirect line; we, therefore, see the Sun
a little to the west of the earth; secondly, even if
they were exactly in a straight line, we-should still
be far from the point whence an annular eclipse
would be visible.’’

‘eThat’s true,’’ said Ardan; ‘the cone of the
co ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Earth’s shadow must extend far beyond the
Moon.”’

‘* Nearly four times as far,’’ said Barbican ; ‘still,
as the Moon’s orbit and the Earth’s do not lie in
exactly the same plane, a Lunar eclipse can occur
only when the nodes coincide with the period of the
Full Moon, which is generally twice, never more
than three times in a year. If we had started about:
four days before the occurrence of a Lunar eclipse,
we shotild travel all the time in the dark. ‘This
would have been obnoxious for many reasons.”’

“One, forinstance?’”?

“*An evident one is that, though at the present
moment we are moving through a vacuum, our Pro-
jectile, steeped in the solar rays, revels in their light
and heat. Hence great saving in gas, an important
point in our household economy.”

In effect, the solar rays, tempered by no genial
medium like our atmosphere, soon began to glare
and glow with such intensity, that the Projectile
under their influence, felt like suddenly passing from
winter to summer. Between the Moon overhead
and the Sun beneath it was actually inundated with
fiery rays.

“One feels good here,’’ cried the Captain, rub-
bing his hands. :

‘A little too good,’’ cried Ardan. ‘It’s already
like a hot-house. With a little garden clay, I could
raise you a splendid crop of peas in twenty-four
hours. I hope in heaven the walls of our Projectile
won’t melt like wax!”
QUITE COMFORTABLE. 61

‘Don’t be alarmed, dear friend,’’ observed Bar-
bican, quietly. ‘‘The Projectile has seen the worst
as far as heat is concerned ; when tearing through
the atmosphere, she endured a temperature with
which what she is liable to at present stands no
comparison. In fact, I should not be astonished if,
in the eyes of our friends at Stony Hill, it had re-
sembled for’a moment or two a red-hot meteor.”’

‘¢ Poor Marston must have looked on us as roasted
alive!?? observed Ardan. .

‘¢ What could have saved us I’m sure I can’t tell,’’
replied Barbican. ‘I must acknowledge that against
such a danger, I had made no provision whatever.”’

“*T knew all about it,’? said the Captain, ‘‘and on
the strength of it, I had laid my fifth wager.”

“¢ Probably,’’ laughed Ardan, ‘there was not time
enough to get grilled in: I have heard of men who
dipped their fingers into molten iron with impunity.’’

Whilst Ardan and the Captain were arguing the
point, Barbican began busying himself in making
everything as comfortable as if, instead of a four days’
journey, one of four years was contemplated. The
reader, no doubt, remembers that the floor of the
Projectile contained about 50 square feet; that the
chamber was nine feet high; that space was econo-
mized as much as possible, nothing but the most ab-
solute necessities being admitted, of which each was
kept strictly in its own place; therefore, the travel-
lers had room enough to move around in with a cer-
tain liberty. The thick glass window in the floor
was quite as solid as any other part of it; but the
62 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Sun, streaming in from below, lit up the Projectile
strangely, producing some very singular and startling
effects of light appearing to come in by the wrong
way.

The first thing now to be done was to see after
the water cask and the provision chest. They were
not injured in the slighest respect, thanks to the
means taken to counteract the shock. The provis-
ions were in good condition, and abundant enough
to supply the travellers for a whole. year—Barbican
having taken care to be on the safe side, in case the
Projectile might land in a deserted region of the
Moon. As for the water and the other liquors, the
travellers had enough only for two months. Relying
on the latest observations of astronomers, they had
convinced themselves that the Moon’s atmosphere,
being heavy, dense and thick in the deep valleys,
springs and streams of water could hardly fail to show
themselves there. During the journey, therefore, and
for the first year of their installation on the Lunar
continent, the daring travellers would be pretty safe
from all danger of hunger or thirst.

The air supply proved also to be quite satisfactory.
The Reset and Regnault apparatus for producing
oxvgen contained a supply of chlorate of potash suf-
ficient for two months, As the productive material
had to be maintained at a temperature of between 7
and 8 hundred -degrees Fahr., a steady consumption
of gas was required ; but here too the supply far ex-
ceeded thedemand. The whole arrangement worked
charmingly, requiring only an odd glance now and
QUITE COMFORTABLE, 69

then. The high temperature changing the chlorate
into achloride, the oxygen was disengaged gradually
but abundantly, every eighteen pounds of chlorate of
potash, furnishing the seven pounds of oxygen neces-
sary for the daily consumption of the inmates of the
Projectile.

Still—as the reader need hardly be reminded—
it was not sufficient to renew the exhausted oxygen ;
the complete purification of the air required the ab-
sorption of the carbonic acid, exhaled from the
lungs. For nearly 1r2 hours the atmosphere had
been gradually becoming more and more charged
with this deleterious gas, produced from the com-
bustion of the blood by the inspired oxygen. The
Captain soon saw this, by noticing with what dimf-
culty Diana was panting. She even appeared to be
smothering, for the carbonic acid—as in the famous
Grotio del Cane on the banks of Lake Agnano, near
Naples—was collecting like water on the floor of the
Projectile, on account of its great specific gravity.
It already threatened the poor dog’s life, though not
yet endangering that of her masters. The Captain,
seeing this state of things, hastily laid on the floor
one or two cups containing caustic potash and water,
and stirred the mixture gently: this substance, hav-
ing a powerful affinity for carbonic acid, greedily
absorbed it, and after a few moments the air was
completely purified.

The others had begun by this time to check off
the state of the instruments. The thermometer and
the barometer were all right, except one sel{-recor-
Og ALL AROUND THE JIOON.

der of which the glass had got broken. An excel-
lent aneroid barometer, taken safe and sound out of
its wadded box, was carefully hung on a hook in the
wall. It marked not only the pressure of the air in
the Projectile, but also the quantity of the watery
vapor that it contained. The needle, oscillating
a oe a ee pointed pretty steadily at
rar.

The mariner’s compasses were also found to be
quite free from injury. It is, of course, hardly nec-
essary to say that the needles pointed in no particu-
lar direction, the magnetic pole of the Earth being
unable at such a distance to exercise any appreciable
influence on them. But when brought to the Moon,
it was expected that these compasses, once more
subjected to the influence of the current, would attest
certain phenomena. In any case, it would be inter-
csting to verify if the Earth and her satellite were
similarly affected by the magnetic forces.

A hypsometer, or instrument for ascertaining the
heights of the Lunar mountains by the barometric
pressure under which water boils, a sextant to
measure the altitude of the Sun, a theodolite for
taking horizontal or vertical angles, telescopes, of
indispensable necessity when the travellers should ap-
proach the Moon,—all these instruments, carefully,
examined, were found to be still in perfect working
order, notwithstanding the violence of the terrible
shock at the start.

As to the picks, spades, and other tools that had
been carefully selected by the Captain ; also the bags





QUITE COMFORTABLE, 6s

of various kinds of grain and the bundles of various
kinds of shrubs, which Ardan expected to transplant
to the Lunar plains—they were all still safe in their
places around the upper corners of the Projectile.

Some other articles were also up there which evi-
dently possessed’ great, interest for the Frenchman,
What they. were nobody else seemed to know, and he
seemed to be in no hurry to tell, Every now and
then, he would climb up, by means of iron. pins
fixed in the wall, to inspect his treasures ;, whatever
they were, he arranged them: and rearranged: them
with evident pleasure, and as he rapidly passed a
careful hand through certain mysterious boxes, he
joyfully sang in the falsest possible of false voices
the lively piece from JVico/o :

Le temps est beau, la route est belle,
La promenade est un plaisir.

§ The day is bright, our hearts are light. 2
? How sweet to rove through wood and dell. §

or the well known air in Af%ignon ¢

Lezores hiron.leiles,

Oiseaux bénis de Divit,
Ouvres—ouvrez. vos ailes,
Envaiexz~vous ! adieu!

Farewell, happy Swallows, farewell !
With summer for ever to dwell

Ye leave our northern strand

For the genial southern land

Balmy with breezes bland,

Return? Ah, who can tell ?
Farewell, happy Swallows, farewell!
66 ALL AROUND TIE MOON.

Barbican was much gratified to find that his rockets
and other fireworks had not received the least injury.
He relied upon them for the performance of a very
important service as soon as the Projectile, having
passed the point of neutral attraction between the
Earth and the Moon, would begin to fall with ac-
celerated velocity towards the Lunar surface. This
descent, though—thanks to the respective volumes of
theattracting bodies—six times less rapid thanit would
have been on the surface of the Earth, would still be
violent enough to dash the Projectile into a thousand
pieces. But Barbican confidently expected by means
of his powerful rockets to offer very considerable ob-
struction to the violence of this fall, if not to coun-
teract its terrib'e effects altogether.

The inspection having thus given general satisfac-
tion, the travellers once more set themselves to watch-
ing external space through the lights in the sides and
the floor of the Projectile.

Everything still appeared to be in the same state
as before. Nothing waschanged. The vast arch of
the celestial dome glittered with stars, and constella-
tions blazed with a light clear and pure enough to
throw an astronomer into an ecstasy of admiration.
Below them shone the Sun, like the mouth of a white-
hot furnace, his dazzling dise defined sharply on the
pitch-black back-ground of the sky. Above them
the Moon, reflecting back his rays from her glowing
surface, appeared tastand motionless in the midst of
the starry host.

A little to the east of the Sun, they could see a
QUITE COMFORTABLE, 67

pretty large dark spot, like a hole in the sky, the
broad silver fringe on one edge fading. off into a
faint glimmering mist on the other—it was the Earth.
Here and there in all directions, nebulous masses
gleamed like large flakes of star dust, in which, from
nadir to zenith, the eye could trace without a break
that vast ring of impalpable star powder, the famous
Afiiky Way, through the midst of which the beams
of our glorious Sun struggle with the dusky pallor of
a star of only the fourth magnitude.

Our observers were never weary of gazing on this
magnificent and novel spectacle, of the grandeur of
which, it is hardly necessary to say, no description
can give an adequate idea. What profound reflec-
tions it suggested to their understandings! What
vivid emotions it enkindled in their imaginations !
Barbican, desirous of commencing the story of the
journey while still influenced by these inspiring im-
pressions, noted carefully hour by hour every fact
that signalized the beginning of his enterprise. He
wrote out his notes very carefully and systematically,
his round full hand, as business-like as ever, never
betraying the slighest emotion.

The Captain was quite as busy, but in a different
way. Pulling out his tablets, he reviewed his calcu-
lations regarding the motion of projectiles, their
velocities, ranges and paths, their retardations and
their accelerations, jotting down the figures with a
rapidity wonderful to behold. Ardan neither wrote
nor calculated, but kept up an incessant fire of small
ialk, now with Barvican, who hardly ever answered
68 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

him, now with M’ Nicholl, who never heard him, oc-
casionally with Diana, who never understood him,
but oftenest with himself, because, as he said, he liked
not only to talk to a sensible man but also to hear
what a sensible man had. to say. He never stood
still for a moment, but kept ‘bobbing around”’
with the effervescent briskness of a bee, at one time
roosting at the top of the ladder, at another peering
through the floor light,:now to the right, then to the
left, always humming scraps from the Ofera Bouffe,
but never changing the air. In the small space
which was then a whole world to the travellers, he
represented to the life the animation and loquacity
of the French, and I need hardly say he played his
part to perfection.

The eventful day, or, to speak more correctly, the
space of twelve hours which with us forms a day,
ended for our travellers with an abundant supper,
exquisitely cooked. It was highly enjoyed.

No incident had yet occurred of a naturé calcu-
lated to shake their confidence. Apprehending none
therefore, full of hope rather and already certain of
success, they were soon lost in a peaceful slumber,
whilst the Projectile, moving rapidly, though with a
velocity uniformly retarding, still cleaved its way
through the pathless regions of the empyrean.
CHAPTERIV.

\

A CHAPTER FOR TITE CORNELL GIRLS.

No incident worth recording occurred during the
night, if night indeed it could be called. In reality
there was now no night oreven day in the Projectile,
or rather, strictly speaking, it was always xzght on
the upper end of the bullet, and always day on the
lower. Whenever, therefore, the words wight and
day occur in our story, the reader will readily
understand them as referring to those spaces of time
that are so called in our Earthly almanacs, and were
so measured by the travellers’ chronometers.

The repose of our friends must indeed have been
undisturbed, if absolute freedom from sound or jar
of any kind could secure tranquillity. In spite of
its immense velocity, the Projectile still seemed to
be perfectly motionless. Not the slightest sign of
movement could be detected. Change of locality,
though ever so rapid, can never reveal itself to our
senses when it takes place. in a vacuum, or when the
enveloping atmosphere travels at the same rate as the
moving body. Though we are incessantly whirled
around the Sun at the rate of about seventy thousand
miles an hour, which of us is conscious of the slight-
est motion? In such a case, as far as sensation is
concerned, motion and repose are absolutely iden-
tical, Neither has any effect one way or another on

(69)
7O ALL AROUND THE MOON,

a material body.. Is such a body in motion? It re-
mains in motion until some obstacle stopsit. Is it at
rest? It remains at rest until some superior force
compels it to change its position. This indifference of
bodies to motion or rest is what physicists call zzertia.

Barbican. and his companions, therefore, shut up
in the Projectile, could readily imagine themselves to
be completely motionless) Had they been outside,
the effect would have been precisely the same. No
rush of air, no jarring sensation would betray the
slightest movement. But for the sight of the Moon
gradually growing larger above them, and of the
Earth gradually growing smaller beneath them, they
could safely swear that they were fast anchored in an
ocean of deathlike immobility. /

Towards the morning of next day (December 3),
they were awakened by a joyful, but quite unexpected
sound.

“‘Cock-a-doodle! doo!’’ accompanied by a de-
cided flapping of wings. ,

The Frenchman, on his feet in one instant and
on the top of the ladder in another, attempted to
shut the lid of a half open box, speaking in an angry
but suppressed voice : .

‘*Stop this hullabaloo, won’t you? Do you want
me to fail in my great combination! ’’

“ Yello?’ cried Barbican and M’Nicholl, start-
ing up and rubbing their eyes.

‘What noise was that ?’’ ‘asked Barbican.

“Seems tome I heard the crowing of a cock,’’ ob-
served the Captain.
FOR THE COKNELL GikLS. VI

*T never thought your ears could be so easily de-
ceived, Captain,’’ cried Ardan, quickly. ‘‘ Let us
try it again,’ and, flapping his ribs with his arms,
he gave vent to a crow so loud and natural that the
lustiest chanticleer that ever saluted the orb of day
might-be proud of it.

The Captain roared right out, and even Barbican
snickered, but as they saw that their companion evi-
dently wanted to conceal something, they immedi-
ately assumed straight faces and pretended to think
no more about the matter.

‘¢ Barbican,’’ said Ardan, coming down the lad-
der and evidently anxious to change the conversa-
tion, ‘* have you any idea of what I was thinking
about all night? ”’

“¢ Not the slightest.’’

“T was thinking of the promptness of the reply
you received last year from the authorities of Cam-
bridge University, when you asked them about. the
feasibility of sending a bullet to the Moon. You
know very well by this time what a perfect ignoramus
Iam in Mathematics. I own I have been often
puzzled when thinking on what grounds they could
form such a positive opinion, in a case where I am
certain that the calculation must be an exceedingly
delicate matter.”’

“¢ The feasibility, you mean to say,’ replied Bar-
bican, ‘not exactly of sending a bullet to the Moon,
but of sending it to the neutral point between the
Earth and the Moon, which lies at about nine-tenths
of the journey, where the two attractions counteract

W
72 ALL AROUND THE MOON:

each other. Because that point once passed, the
Projectile would reach the Moon’s surface by virtue
of its own weight.” ,

“Well, reaching that neutral point be it;’’ re-
plied Ardan, ‘but, once more, I should like to
know how they have been able to come at the nec+
essary initial velocity of 12,000 yards a second?”

“Nothing simpler.’’ answered Barbican.

“‘Could you have done it yourself?’’ asked the
Frenchman. :

‘* Without the slightest difficulty. The Captain
and myself could have readily solved the problem,
only the reply from the University saved us the
trouble.”

“‘Well, Barbican, dear boy,’’ observed Ardan,
“all I’ve got to say is, you might chop the head off
my body, beginning with my feet, before you could
make me go through such a calculation.”’

‘* Simply because you don’t understand Algebra,”’
replied Barbican, quietly.

‘*Oh! that’s all very well!’’ cried Ardan, with
an ironical smile. ‘* You great «-+-y men think
you settle everything by uttering the word Algebra /”’

*¢ Ardan,’’ asked Barbican, ‘*do you think people
could beat iron without a hammer, or turn up furrows
without a plough ?”’

“Hardly.”

“‘ Well, Algebra is an instrument or utensil just as
much as a hammer or a plough, and a very good in-
strument too if you know how to make use of it,’’

** You’re in earnest?’
FOR THE CORNELL GIRLS. 73

** Quite so.’?

«And you can handle the instrument right before
my eyes?”’

‘* Certainly, if it interests you so much.”’

“You can show me how they got at the initial
velocity of our Projectile? ’’

“With the greatest pleasure. By taking into
proper consideration all the elements of the problem,
viz.: (1) the distance between the centres of the
Earth and the Moon, (2) the Earth’s radius, (3) its
volume, and (4) the Moon’s volume, I can easily
calculate what must be the initial velocity, and that
too by a very simple formula.’’

“Let us have the formula.’’

‘In one moment; only I can’t give you the
curve really described by the Projectile as it moves
between the Earth and the Moon; this is to be ob-
tained by allowing for their combined movement
around the Sun. . I will consider the Earth and the
Sun to be one e that being sufficient for our
present purpose.’ :

“Why so?’”’ ,

“‘ Because to give you that exact curve would’be to
solve a point in the‘ Problem of the Three Bodies,’
which Integral Calculus has not yet reached.”

«“What!’’ cried Ardan, in a mocking tone, * is
there really anything that Mathematics can’t do?’?

“* Yes,”’ said Barbican, * there is still a great deal
that Mathematics can’t even attempt.”’

‘‘So far,so good; ’’ resumed Ardan. ‘Now then
what is this Integral Calculus of yours?’
(4 ALL ARCUND 1HE MOON,

“Tt is a branch of Mathematics that has for its
object the summation of a certain infinite series of ,
indefinitely small terms: but for the solution of
which, we must generally know the function of which
a given function is the differential coefficient. In
other words,’’ continued Barbican, ‘in it we return
from the differential coefficient, to the function from
which it was deduced.”

“Clear as mud!’’ cried Ardan, with a hearty laugh,

“Now then, let me have a bit of paper and a
pencil.’” added Barbican, “and in half an hour you
shall have your formula; meantime you can easily
find something interesting to do.”

In a few seconds Barbican was profoundly ab-
sorbed in his problem, while M’ Nicholl was watch
ing out of the window, and Ardan was busily em-
ployed in preparing breakfast.

The morning meal was not quite ready, when
Barbican, raising his head, showed. Ardan a page
covered with algebraic signs at the end of which
stood the following formula :—- .

2 r mi fy r
4 (ol — ea) eat Se
i(« “) me {2 Pt m \d-~x% der

«* Which means?’?’ asked Ardan.

“It means,’ said the Captain, now taking part in
the discussion, ‘‘that the half of » prime squared
minus v squared equals gr multiplied by. 7 over x
minus one plus # prime over # multiplied by 7 over
@ minus + minus 7 over d minus 7........that is ae


FOR THE CORNELL GIRLS. 75

*¢ That is,’ interrupted Ardan, in a roar of laugh-
ter, ‘x stradlegs on y, making for z and jumping
over / Do you mean to say you understand the
terrible jargon, Captain ?”’

‘* Nothing is clearer, Ardan.”’

‘Vou too, Captain! Then of course I must give
in gracefully, and declare that the sun at noon-day
isnot more palpably evident than the sense of Bar-
bican’s formula.’’ ; :

“Vou asked for Algebra, you know,
Barbican.

‘Rock crystal is nothing to it!”’

‘*The fact is, Barbican,’’ said the Captain, who
had been looking over the paper, ‘‘ you have worked
the thing out very well. You have the integral
equation of the living forces, and I have no doubt it
will give us the result sought for.’’

**Yes, but I should like to understand it, you
know,’’ cried Ardan: ‘‘I would give ten years of
the Captain’s life to understand it!”’

‘Listen then,’’ said Barbican. ‘‘ Half of » prime
squared less v squared, is the formula giving us the
half variation of the living force.”’

** Mac pretends he understands all that !’’

“You need not be a Se/omon to do it,’’ said the
Captain. ‘All these signs that you appear to con-
sider so cabalistic form a language the clearest, the
shortest, and the most logical, for all those who can
read it.’’

“You pretend, Captain, that, by means of these
hieroglyphics, far more incomprehensible than the

” observed
76 ‘ALL AROUND THE MOON.

sacred Ibis of the Egyptians, you can discover ‘the
velocity at which the Projectile should start ?”’

“¢ Most undoubtedly,’” replied the Captain, ‘‘and,
by the same formula I can even tell you the rate o
our velocity at < = particular point of our journey.’

“You can?’

**T can.’ :

‘“‘Then you're just as deep a one ‘as our Presi-
dent.’

“No, Ardan; not ‘at all. The really difficult
part of the question Barbican has done. ‘That is, to
make out such an equation as takes into account all
the conditions of the problem. After that, it’s a
simple affair of Arithmetic, pee only a knowl-
edge of the four rules to work it out.’

‘Very simple,’’ observed Ardan, who always got
muddled at 2 ay kind of a difficult sum in addition.

“‘Captain,’’ said Barbican, ‘vow could have
found the formulas too, if you tried.”

**T don’t know about that,’’? was the Captain’s
reply, ‘but I do know that this formula is won-
derfully come at.”

‘« Now, Ardan, listen a moment,’’ said Barbican,
‘¢and you will sce what sense there is in all these
letters.’’

“T listen,’? sighed Ardan with the resignation of a
martyr.

‘¢ dis the distance from the centre of the Earth to
the centre of the Moon, for it is from the centres that
we must calculate the attractions.’’

“« That I comprehend.”

39
FORTHE CORNELL GIXLS, 77

€¢ is the radius of the Earth.”
‘«¢ That I comprehend.”’

‘*m is the mass or volume of the Earth ; m prime
that of the Moon. We must take the mass of the two
attracting bodies into consideration, since attraction
is in direct proportion to their masses.’’

“That I comprehend.”

«vis the gravity or the velocity acquired at the
end of asecond by a body falling towards the cen-

eof the Earth. Clear?’’

ne That I comprehend.” :

““Now LT represent by « the varying distance that
separates the Projectile from the centre of the Earth,
and by gv prime its velocity at that distance.’’

“¢That I comprehend.’’

se v is. its velocity when os our at-
mosphere.’

“Yes,’? chimed in the Captain, ‘it is for this
point, you see, that the velocity had to be calculated,
because’we know already that the initial velocity is
exactly the three halves of the velocity when the Pro-
jectile quits the atmosphere.’’

«That I don’t comprehend,” cried the French-
man, energetically.

“Tt’s simple enough, however,’’ said Barbican.

‘“‘Not so simple as a simpleton.” replied the
Frenchman.

‘The Captain merely means,’” said Barbican,
‘that at the instant the Projectile: quitted the terres-
trial atmosphere it had already lost a third of its
initial velocity.”’

2
78 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“So much asa third? ”

“Ves, by friction against the atmospheric layers :
the quicker its motion, the greater resistance it en-
countered.”’

“That of course I admit, but your # squared and
your v prime squared rattle in my head like nails in a
box !”?

“The usual effect of Algebra on one who is a
stranger to it; to finish you, our next step is to ex-
press numerically the value of these several symbols.
Now some of them are already known, and some are
to be calculated.”’

“‘ Wand the latter over to me.’’ said the Captain.

‘‘Tirst,’? continued Barbican: ‘+7, the Earth’s
radius is, in the latitude of Florida, about 3,921
miles. @, the distance from the centre of the Earth
to the centre of the Moon is 56 terrestrial radii,
which the Captain calculates to be.........? 7”

*“To be,’’ cried M’Nicholl working rapidly with
his pencil, ‘219,572 miles, the moment the Moon
isin her perigee, or nearest point to the Earth.’’

**Very well,’’? continued Barbican. ‘*Now m
prime over m, that is the ratio of the Moon’s mass
to that of the Earth isabout the ,!;. g gravity being
at Florida about 321 feet, of course g Xr must be
how much, Captain ?”’

** 38,465 miles,’’ replied M’ Nicholl.

+ Nel then?’? asked Ardan.

‘* Now then,’’ replied Barbican, ‘the expression
having numerical values, I am trying to find gz,
that is to say, the initial velocity which the Projec-











































FOR THE CORNELL GIkLS. 79

tile must possess in order to reach the point where
the two attractions neutralize each other. Here the
velocity being null, » prime becomes zero, and
x the required distance of this neutral point must
be represented by the mine. -tenths o @, the distance
between. the two centres.’

‘*Thave a vague kind of idea that it must be so,’’
said Ardan.

“‘T shall, therefore, have the following result ;”’
continued Barbican, figuring up; ‘‘« being nine-
tenths of @, and v prime being zero, my formula
becomes :

we eee 1or I 107 r -
eee Boo BEN a der

The Captain read it off rapidly.
‘* Right ! that’s correct !’’ he cried.
- You think so??? asked Barbican.

“* As true as Euclid !’’ exclaimed M’Nicholl.

“‘ Wonderful fellows,’? murmured the Frenchman,
smiling with admiration.

“¢You understand now, Ardan, don’ t ro “ asked
Barbican.

‘*Don’t I though ?”’ exclaimed Ardan, ‘* why my
head is splitting withtit!’’

‘«Therefore,’? continued Barbican,

a ae ror a jror r ee
ee) “a 8x do a-r




80 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“*And now,’’ exclaimed M’Nicholl, sharpening
his pencil 5 ‘*in order to obtain the velocity of the
Projectile when leaving the atmosphere, we have
only to make a slight calculation.”’

The Captain, who before clerking on a Mississippi
steamboat had been professor of Mathematics in an
Indiana university, felt quite at home at the work.
He rained figures from his pencil with a velocity
that would have made Marston stare. Page after
page was filled with his multiplications and divisions,
while Barbican looked quietly on, and Ardan impa-
tiently stroked his head and ears to keep down a
rising head-ache. ,

“Well?” at last asked Barbican, seeing the Cap-
tain stop and throw asomewhat hasty glance over his
work, |

‘‘Well,’’? answered M’Nicholl slowly. but confi-
dently, ‘‘the-calculation is made, I think correctly ;
and v, that is, the velocity of the Projectile when
quitting the atmosphere, sufficient to carry it to the
neutral point, should be at least...... has

«How much?’ asked Barbican, eagerly.

‘¢ Should beat least 11,972 yards the first second.’’

‘*What!’’ cried Barbican, jumping off his seat.
** How much did you say?’’

‘*r1,972 yards the first second it quits the atmos-
phere.”’

“Oh, malediction !’’ cried Perel, with a ges-
ture of terrible despair.

“‘What’s the matter?’’ asked sean very much
surprised. .
FOR THE CORNELL GIRLS, S&F

«Enough is the matter!’’ answered Barbican ex-
citedly. ‘* This velocity having been diminished by

a third, our initial velocity should have been at least
2?

ecccocoes

“¢ 77,088 yards the first second!’ cried M’ Nicholl,

apidly flourishing his pencil.

‘¢ But the Cambridge Observatory having declared
that 12,000 yards the first second were sufficient, our
Projectile started with no greater velocity !’’
‘© Well?’’ asked M’ Nicholl.

«¢ Well, such a velocity will never do!”’

“How ??’’ ) cried the Captain and Ardan in one

“How !!”? i voice. a

“¢ We can never reach the neutral point ! ”’

«Thunder and lightning ”’

‘Fire and Fury!’

““We can’t get even half way!”

‘Heaven and Earth! ”’

“ Mille noms d'un boulet!?? cried dies an, wildly
gesticulating.

«* And we shall fall back to the Earth!’

Oh!”

fe ALT”?

“They could say no more. This fearful revelation
took them like a stroke of apoplexy.

Nore. In the French edition, the algebraical formulas
having been very incorrectly printed, it cost the Translator a
good deal of time and trouble to rectify them. The idea
ef explaining in the text how they had been arrived at,
though at first seriously entertained, was soon abandoned.
Doing so might perhaps have’ gratified the curiosity of some

; : :
&2 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

rare scientific student,but it would certainly have exhausted
the patience of the general reader, For the benefit of our
friend the student, however, we here append another of the
means for solving the problem, over which the Cambridge
men had so woefully blundered. It is furnished by one of
our mathematical teachers.

Problem. Yo find a point between the Earth and the
Moon at which the attractions of these bodies would be equal,
and also to find the initial velocity necessary to be given to a
projectile at the surface of the Earth to make it reach this
point.

Assume the distance between the Earth’s and the
Moon’s centres to be 240000 miles (round numbers), Mass
of Earth == 81. Mass of Moon ==1. Let «== distance
between Earth’s centre and the point sought. Since attrac-
tion varies directly as the mass, and inversely as square of
distance, we have:

Sr: 1 ::x2%: (240000-—-x)?
or gi: 1

tix : 240000
4 == 2160000 ++ 9x
10% == 2160000

x == 216000

The neutral point is therefore 216000 miles distant from
the Earth, and 24000 miles distant from the Moon.

To find the Earth's effect on the initial velocity, Takea
unit of mass weighing, say 32 pounds, at the Earth’s sur-
face, and suppose it to move towards the neutral point,
affected by the Earth’s attraction alone—or from that point
to the Earth’s surface. Let P represent the variable inten-
sity of this force. Let + == distance of the body at the
neutral point from the Earth’s centre Let Q = the quantity
of work done by Earth’s action each moment. .°. Q==
P integrated with regard to x, Let P!==some known
FOR THE CORNELL GIRLS.

a
~)
intensity of gravitation, say 32 Ibs. ou the surface, and x! =
the distance from Earth’s centre to the point where P! is

Pox x?



exerted, Then P: Pis: xt': x? or P= 32
__ 32 X (21,120,000)?



xi » 32 Ibs. being the weight of the

unit mass on the Earth’s surface, and 21,120,000 — Earth’s
Radius, ‘or 4000 miles reduced to feet. Therefore P=
14,273,740,800,000.000

. But Q being = P integrated

x2

with regard to x, or =f Pdx, Q must be = 14,273,740,-

dx : : a
800,0c0,00c0 [= Now integrating between the limits
J x?

4000 miles and 216,000 miles, or 21,120,000 feet





and 1,140,480,coo feet; 2, = 14,273,740,800,000,000
I 1
—————— — ) or 2 = 663,324,444. But
21,120,000 1,140,480,000
vu? : af :
Q ==-~, v being the initial velocity and the mass of the
5 g
8, ‘i , vt
projectile being unity. Therefore —- == 663,324,444 or,
2
v% == 1,326,648,888, and v == 36423 feet per second,

This is the initial velocity if the action of the Earth alone
is considered... But this need not be quite so great, as the
Moon’s attraction helps the Projectile a little even at the
start. Accordingly we have now to find: The Moon's effect
on the initial velecity.

The weight of the unit of mass 32 Ibs, at the neutral
point from Moon’s action alone or Earth’s action alone is

2

8 :
—*-. lbs. or —— Ibs. determined by the proportion :

2916 729 :

(216000)? : 40002 :: 32 : ——

92
7=
4 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

‘Now to determine the Moon’s action on this at the:
Earth’s surface. The distance from the neutral point to
the Moon being 24000 miles, and the ‘distance from the
Moon to the Earth’s surface being 236000 miles, we have
the following proportion : :

8 .
(236000)? : (24000)? :: -—

ta. Therefore + == .0001134
729 :

the effect of Moon’s action at Earth's surface. ee ex-
729
pressed decimally == .o1097 Ibs, Let Q' == work of

Moon’s action; it can be expressed as before Q! =f Pdx,

P representing the varialsle intensity of this force. Now
letting P! == some known intensity, we have as before

P: Pli: x: «2 or P= P xv == 107997 X (126720000)

ae xe

as xtis equal to 24000 miles reduced to feet. Now pro-
ceeding precisely 2s in the former case, we shall find Qt ==
1,200,c00 (nearly). But Q being already found to be
663,324,444, the difference between both or 663,324,444—
1,200,000 must be the real half square of the velocity or

ue : :
--, Therefore the square root of 1,324,248,888, or 36400
2 :

feet (nearly) in a second must be the Projectile’s initial
velocity to reach the neutral point, without taking into
account the resistance of the atmosphere. ‘That is about
12000 yards per second; but it must be 18000 yards per
second to allow for the loss of 3 through friction.
CHAPTER V.

THE COLDS OF SPACE.

How could they imagine that the Observatory men
had committed such a blunder? Barbican would
not believe it possible. He made the Captain go
over his calculation again and again; but no flaw
was to be found in it. He himself carefully exam-
ined it, figure after figure, but he could find nothing
wrong. They both took up the formula and sub-
jected it to the strongest tests; but it was invulner-
able. There was no denying the fact. The Cam-
bridge professors had undoubtedly blundered in say-
ing that an initial velocity of 12,000 yards a second
would be enough to carry them to the neutral point.
A velocity of nearly 18,c0oo yards would be the very
lowest required fér such a purpose. They had simply
forgotten to allow a third for friction.

The three friends kept profound silence for some
time. Breakfast now was the last thing thought of.
Barbican, with teeth grating, fingers clutching, and
eye-brows closely contracting, gazed grimly through
the window. ‘The Captain, as a last resource, once
more examined his calculations, earnestly hoping to
find a figure wrong. Ardan could neither sit, stand
nor lie still for a second, though he tried all three.

His Silence, of course, did not last long.
(85)
86 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“Hat ha! ha!’’ he laughed bitterly. ‘* Pre-
cious scientific men! Villainous old hombogues!
The whole set not worth a straw! ‘I hope to gra-
cious, since we must fall, that we shall drop down
plumb on Cambridge Observatory, and not leave a
single one of the miserable old women, called pro-
fessors, alive in the premises!’

A certain expression in Ardan’s angry exclama-
tion had struck the Captain like a shot, and set his
temples throbbing violently.

“© Afust fall!’’ he exclaimed, starting up sud-
denly. ‘‘ Let us see about that! It is now seven
o’clock in the morning. We must have, therefore,
been at least thirty-two hours on the road, and more
than half of our passage is already made. If we are
going to fall at all, we must be falling now! I’m
certain we’re not, but, Barbican, you have to find it
out !””

Barbican caught the idea like lightning, and, seiz-
ing a compass, he began through the floor window
to measure the visual angle of the distant Earth.
The apparent immobility of the Projectile allowed
him to do this with great exactness. Then laying
aside the instrument, and wiping off the thick drops
of sweat that bedewed his forehead, he began jotting
down some figures on a piece of paper. The Captain
looked on with keen interest; he knew very well
that Barbican was calculating their distance from the
Earth by the apparent measure of the terrestrial di-
ameter, and he eyed him anxiously.

Pretty soon his friends saw a color stealing into
THE COLDS OF SPACE, 87

Barbican’s pale face, and a triumphant light glitter-
ing in his eye.

‘©No, my brave boys!’’ he exclaimed at last
throwing down his pencil, ‘‘ we’re not falling! | Far
from it, we are at present more than 150 thousand
miles from the Earth !’’

“* Hurrah !’? ) cried M’Nicholl sad Ardan, ina

‘‘Bravo!’? { breath.

‘*« We have passed the point where we should have
stopped if we had had no more initial velocity than
the Cambridge men allowed us! ”’

*¢ Hurray! hurrah !”’

*< Bravo, Bravissimo ! ’’

“* And we’re still going up!”

“Glory, glory, hallelujah! ’’ sang M’Nicholl, in
the highest excitement.

“* Vive ce cher Barbican /”’ cried Ardan, bursting
into French as usual whenever his feelings had the
better of him. .

““OF course we’re marching on!’’ continued
M’Nicholl, ‘“‘and I know the reason why, too.
Those 400,000 pounds of gun-cotton gave us greater
initial velocity than we had expected !”’

** You're right, Captain! ’’ added ‘Barbican ; ‘‘ be-
sides, you must not forget that, by getting rid of the
water, the Projectile was relieved of considerable
weight !”’

**Correct again ! ” cried the Captain. <‘‘I had
not thought of that !’’

‘*Therefore, my brave boys,’’ continued Barbi-
&8 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

can, with some excitement 5. “‘ away with melancholy!
We're all right !”’

“Yes; everything is lovely and the goose hangs
high!’? cried the Captain, who on grand occasions.
was not above.a little slang.

“‘ Talking of ‘goose reminds me of: breakfast,’’
cried Ardan ;°‘‘ I assure you, my fright has not taken
away my appetite!’’

“©VYes,’?. continued Barbican. ‘‘ Captain, you’re
quite right. Our initial velocity very. fortunately
was much greater’ than what our Cambridge friends
had calculated for us !’’

*‘Hang our Cambridge friends and their calcula
tions!’’ cried Ardan, with some asperity; ‘‘as
usual with your scientific men they’ve more brass
than brains! If we’re not now bed-fellows with the
oysters in the Gulf of Mexico, no thanks to our kind
Cambridge friends, But talking of oysters, let me
remind you again that breakfast is ready.”’

The meal was a most joyous one. They ate much,
they talked more, but they laughed most.. The little
incident of Algebra had certainly very much enlivened
the situation. :

“*Now, my boys,’’ Ardan went on, {all things
thus turning. out quite comfortable, I would just ask
you why we should not succeed? We are fairly
started. No breakers ahead that I can see.. No
rock on our road. It is freer than the ships on the
raging ocean, aye, freer than the. balloons in‘ the
blustering air. -But the ship arrives at her destina-
tion; the balloon, borne on the wings of the wind,
THE COLDS OF SPACE. 8&9

rises to as high an altitude as can be endured; why
then should not our Projectile reach the Moon?”

“Tt wil reach the Moon !’’ nodded Barbican.

“‘We shall reach the Moon or know. for what !”’
cried M’Nicholl, enthusiastically.

. ©The great American nation must not be disap-
pointed! ’’ continued Ardan.. ‘They are the only
people .on Earth capable of originating such an en-
terprise! They. are the only people capable of Ere
ducing a Barbican !”’

“ Hurrah !’’ cried M’ Nicholl.

‘That point settled,’? continued the Frenchman,
“‘ another question comes up to which I have ‘not
yet called your attention. When we get to the
Moon, what shall we do there? How are we going
to amuse ourselves? 1’m afraid our life there will be
awfully slow! ”?

His companions emphatically disclaimed the pos-
sibility of such a thing.

“You may deny it, but I know better, and know-
ing .better, I have laid in my stores accordingly.
You have but to choose. I possess a varied assort-
ment. Chess, draughts, cards, dominoes—everything
in fact, but.a billiard table? ’’

“What !’’ exclaimed Barbican ; “cumbered a
self with such gimcracks ?”’

“Such gimcracks are not only good to amuse our-
selves with, but are eminently calculated also to win
us the friendship of the Selenites.””

‘¢ Friend Michael,’’ said Barbican, ‘‘ if the Moon
is inhabited at all, her inhabitants must have ap-
90 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

peared several thousand years before the advent of
Man on our Earth, for there seems to be very little
doubt that Luna is considerably older than Terra in
her present state. Therefore, Selenites, if their brain
is organized like our own, must have by this time in-
vented all that we are possessed of, and even much
which we are still to invent in the course of. ages.
The probability is that, instead of their learning
from us, we shall have much to learn from them.”’

‘What!’ asked Ardan, “you think they have
artists like Phidias, Michael Angelo and Raphael ?”’

“ Certainly.”

“And poets like Homer, Virgil, Dante, Shaks-
peare, Gothe and Hugo?”’

** Not a doubt of it.”’

** And philosophers like Plato, Aristotle, Descartes,
Bacon, Kant?’’

‘“Why not ?”’

‘And scientists like Euclid, Archimedes, Coper-
nicus, Newton, Pascal?’’

‘J should think so.”

‘«And famous actors, and singers, and composers,
and—and photographers? ’’

“I could almost swear to it.’’

** Then, dear boy, since they have gone ahead as
far as we and even farther, why have not those great
Selenites tried to start a communication with the
Earth? Why have they not fired a projectile from
the regions lunar to the regions terrestrial ?”’

“* Who says they have not done so?’’ asked Bar-
bican, coolly.
THE COLDS OF SPACE. ~ or

“Attempting such a communication,’’ observed

the Captain, ‘‘ would certainly be much easier for
them than for us, principally for tworeasons. First,
attraction on the Moon’s surface being six times less
than on the Earth’s, a projectile could be sent off
more rapidly ; second, because, as this projectile
need be sent only 24 instead of 240 thousand
miles, they could doit with a quantity of powder ten
times less than what we should require for the same
purpose.”’

«¢ Then I ask again,’” said the Frenchman; ‘‘ why
haven’t they made such an attempt? ”’

“And reply again,’’ answered Barbican. ‘* How

do you knew that they have not made such an at
tempt ?”’

“Made it? When?”

“¢ Thousands of years ago, before the invention of
writing, before even the appearance of Man on the
Earth.”

“But the bullet?’’ asked Ardan, triumphantly ;
‘‘Where's the bullet? Produce the bullet! ’’

“Friend Michael,’? answered Barbican, with a
quiet smile, ‘‘ you appear to forget that the £ of the
surface of our Earth is water. 5 to 1, therefore, that
the bullet is more likely to be lying this moment at
the bottom of the Atlantic or the Pacific than any.
where else on the surface of our globe. Besides, it
may have sunk into some weak point of the surface,
at the early epoch when the crust of the Earth had
not acquired sufficient solidity.”’

Captain,” said Ardan, turning with a smile to

?
92 ALL AROUND THE MOOK,

M’ Nicholl; ‘no use in trying to catch Barby ; slip.
pery as an eel, he has an answer for everything.
Still I have a theory on the subject myself, which I
think it noharm to ventilate. It isthis: The Selen-
ites have never sent us any projectile at all, simply
because they had no gunpowder: being older and
wiser than we, they were never such fools as to in
vent any.—But, what’s that? Diana howling for
her breakfast! Good! Like genuine scientific men,
while squabbling over nonsense, we let the poor ani-
mals die of hunger. Excuse ‘us, Diana} it is not the
first time the little suffer from the senséless disputes
of the great.”’

. So saying he laid before the animal a very tooth-

some pie, and contemplated with evident pleasure
her very successful efforts towards its hasty and com-
plete disappearance.
« Looking at Diana,’? he went on, ‘‘ makes me
almost wish we had made a Noah’s Ark of our Pro-
jectile by introducing into ic a pair of all the domes-
tic animals!”

‘« Not room enough.’’ observed Barbican.

“No doubt,’ remarked the Captain, ‘‘ the ox, the
cow, the horse, the goat, all. the ruminating. animals
sould be very useful in the Lunar continent.. But
we couldn’t turn our Projectile into a stable, you
know.”

“Still, we might have made room for a pair of
poor little donkeys!’’ observed Ardan; ‘‘how I
love the poor beasts. Fellow feeling, you will say.
No doubt, but there really is no animal I pity more.
THE COLDS OF SPACE. OF

‘They are the most ill-treated. brutes in all creation.
They are not only banged during life; they are
banged worse after death !’’

“Hey ! How do you make that out?’’ asked his
companions, surprised.

‘‘ Because we make their skins into drum heads!’’
replied Ardan, with an air, as if answering a conun-
drum.

Barbican and M’Nicholl could hardly help laugh-
ing at the absurd reply of their lively companion,
but their hilarity was soon stopped by the expression
his face assumed as he bent over Satellite’s body,
where it lay stretched on the sofa.

What's the matter now ?’’ asked Barbican,

“¢ Satellite’s attack is over,’’ replied Ardan.

“€Good!’’ said M’ Nicholl, misunderstanding him.

“Yes, I suppose it is good for the poor fellow,’’
observed Ardan, in melancholy accents. ‘Life
with one’s skull broken ‘is hardly an enviable pos-
session. Our grand acclimatization project is
knocked sky high, in more senses than one !”’

There was no doubt of the poor dog’s death.
The expression of Ardan’s countenance, as he looked
at his friends, was of a very rueful order. -

‘‘Well,’’ said the practical Barbican, “ there’s no
‘help for that now; the next thing to be done is to
get rid of the body. We can’t keep it here with us
forty-eight hours longer.’’

“OF course not,’”’ replied the Captain, ‘nor
need we; our lights, being. provided with hinges,
can be lifted back. What is to prevent us from
O4 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

opening: one of them, and flinging the body out
through it !”’

The President of the-Gun Club reflected a few
minutes; then he spoke:

“Ves, it can be done; but we must take the most
careful precautions.”’

“¢ Why so?’?’ asked Ardan.

“For two simple reasons; replied Barbican ;
**the first refers to the air enclosed in the Projectile,
and of which we must be very careful to lose only
the least possibie quantity.”

‘But as we manufacture air ourselves!’’ objected
Ardan.

“¢ We manufacture air only partly, friend Michael,’’
replied Barbican. ‘‘ We manufacture only oxygen ;
we can’t supply nitrogen—By the bye, Ardan, won’t
you watch the apparatus carefully every now and
then to see that the oxygen is not generated too
freely. Very serious consequences would attend an
immoderate supply of oxygen—No, we can’t manu-
facture nitrogen, which is-so absolutely necessary for
our air and which might escape readily through the
open windows.”’

“What ! the few seconds we should require for
flinging out poor Satellite ?’’

“« A very few seconds indeed they should be,’’ said
Barbican, very gravely.

‘« Your second reason? ’’ asked Ardan.

“©The second reason is, that we must not allow
the external cold, which must be exceedingly great,
to penetrate inte our Projectile and freeze us alive.’’

?
THE COLDS UF SPACE, C5:

9?



«* But the Sun, you know.

“¢ Yes,.the Sun heats our Projectile, but it does
not heat the vacuum through which we are now float-
ing. Where there-is no air there can neither be heat
nor light ; just as wherever the rays of the Sun do
not arrive directly, it must be both cold and dark.
The temperature around us, if there be anything that
‘can be called temperature, is produced solely by
stellar radiation. I need not say how low that is in
the scale, or that it would be the temperature to
which our Earth should fall, if the Sun were suddenly
extinguished.’’

‘Little fear of that for a few more million years,”
said M’ Nicholl.

‘“¢Who can tell?’’ asked Ardan. ‘* Besides, even
admitting that the Sun will not soon be extinguished,
what-is to prevent the Earth from shooting away
from him?”’

‘*Let friend Michael speak,’’ said Barbican, with
asmile, to the Captain ; ‘‘ we may learn something.”’

“Certainly you may,’’ continued the Frenchman,
“if you-have room for anything new. Were we not
struck by a comet’s tail in 1861?’

“*So it was said, anyhow,’’ observed the Captain.
“‘T well remember what nonsense there was in the
papers about the ‘ phosphorescent auroral glare.’ ’’

‘‘Well,”’ continued the Frenchman, “suppose the
comet of 186r influenced the Earth by an attraction
superior to the Sun’s. What would be the conse-
quence? Would not the Earth follow the attracting
body, become its satellite, and thusat last be dragged
96 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

off to such a distance that the Sun’s rays could no
longer excite heat on her surface? ”’

‘‘Well, that might possibly occur,’’ said Barbican
slowly, “but even then I question if the ‘conse~
quences would be so terrible as you seem to appre-
hend.”’

‘Why not?”

“Because the cold and the heat might still man-
age to be nearly equalized on our globe. It has
been calculated that, had the Earth been carried off
by the comet of 761, when arrived at her greatest
distance, she would have experienced a temperature
hardly sixteen times greater than the heat we receive
from the Moon, which, as everybody knows, pro-
duces no appreciable effect, even when concentrated
to a focus by the most powerful lenses.’”

*¢ Well then,’’ exclaimed Ardan, “at such: a tem-
7?

7



perature

«Wait a moment, ’’replied Barbican. *“‘ Have
you never heard of the principle of compensation ?
Listen to another calculation. Had the Earth been
dragged along with the comet, it has been calculated
that at her perihelion, or nearest point to the Sun,
she would have to endure a heat 28,000 times greater
than our mean summer temperature. But this heat,
fully capable of turning the rocks into glass and the
oceans into vapor, before proceeding to such ex-
tremity, must have first formed a thick interposing
ring of clouds, and thus considerably modified the ex-
cessive temperature. Therefore, between the ex-
treme cold of the aphelion and the excessive heat of
THE COLDS OF SPACE, 97

the perihelion, by the great law of compensation, it
is probable that the mean temperature would be
tolerably endurable.”’

‘‘At how many degrees is the temperature of the
interplanetary space estimated?’’ asked M’Nicholl.

“Some time ago,’’ replied Barbican, ‘this tem-
perature was considered to be very low indeed—
millions and millions of degrees below zero. But
Fourrier of Auxerre, a distinguished member of the
Académie des Sciences, whose Mémoires on the tem-
perature of the Planetary spaces appeared about 1827,
reduced these figures to considerably diminished pro-
portions. According to his careful estimation, the
temperature of space is not much lower than 70 or
80 degrees Fahr. below zero.”’

““No more ?”’ asked Ardan.

‘‘No more,’’ answered Barbican, ‘‘ though I must
acknowledge we have only his word for it, as the
Afémoirve in which he had recorded all the elements
of that important determination, has been-lost some*
where, and is no longer to be found.’’

“I don’t attach the slightest importance to his,
or to any man’s words, unless they are sustained by
reliable evidence,’? exclaimed M’Nicholl. <‘ Be-
sides, if I’m not very much mistaken, Pouillet—
another countryman of yours, Ardan, and an Acade-
mician as well as Fourrier—esteems the temperature
of interplanetary spaces to be at least 256° Fahr.
below zero. This we can easily cy for ourselves
this moment by actual experiment.”’

“‘Not just now exactly,’’ observed Barbican, “for
7
98 ALL AROUND THE'MOON.

the solar rays, striking our Projectile directly, would
give us a very elevated instead of a very low temper-
ature. But once arrived at the Moon, during those
nights fifteen days long, which each of her faces
experiences alternately, we shall have plenty of time
to make an experiment with every condition in our
favor. To be sure, our Satellite is at present move
ing in a vacuum.”

‘““A vacuum?’’ asked Ardan; ‘‘a perfect vace
uum ?”?

‘Well, a perfect vacuum as far as air is con-
cerned,”’

‘* But is the air replaced by nothing ?”’

“*Oh yes,’ replied Barbican. <‘‘ By ether.”

** Ah, ether! and what, pray, is ether? ”’

‘¢ Ether, friend Michael, is an elastic gas consist-
ing of imponderable atoms, which, as we are told by
works on molecular physics, are, in proportion to
their size, as far apart as the celestial bodies are from
each other in space. This distance is less than the
eet a?
3000000 1000’
vibrations of the molecules of this ether produce the
sensations of light and heat, by making 430 trill-
ions of undulations per second, each undulation
being hardly more than the one ten-millionth of an
inch in width.” ,

‘¢ Trillions per second! ten-millionths of an inch
in width!’’ cried Ardan. ‘These oscillations have
been very neatly counted and ticketed, and checked
off! Ah, friend Barbican,’? continued the French-

or the one trillionth of a foot. ‘The
THE COLDS OF SPACE. o9

man, shaking his head, ‘‘these numbers are just.
tremendous guesses, frightening the ear but reveal-
ing nothing to the intelligence.”’

**To get ideas, however, we must calculate—”’

‘No, no!”’ interrupted Ardan: ‘not calculate,
but compare. A trillion tells you nothing—Com-
parison, everything., For instance, you say, the
volume of Uranis is 76 times greater than the
Earth’s; Saturn's goo times greater; /ufpiler’s 1300
times greater; the Sun’s 1300 thousand times
greater—You may tell me all that till I’m tired
hearing it, and I shall still be almost as ignorant as
ever. For my part I prefer to be told one of those
simple comparisons that I find in the old almanacs:
The Sun is a globe two feet in diameter ; /upiter, a
good sized orange; Safwr2,asmaller orange; Vep-
tune, a plum; Oranus, a good sized cherry; the
Earth, a pea; Venus, also a pea *but ‘somewhat
smailer; AZars, a large pin’s head; Afercury, a mus-
tard seed ; Juno, Ceres, Vesta, Pallas, and the other
asteroids so many grains of sand. Be told some-
thing like that, and you have got at least the tail of
an idea!’?

This learned burst of Ardan’s had the natural
effect of making his hearers forget whit they had
been arguing about, and they therefore proceeded
at once to dispose of Satellite’s body. It was a sim-
ple matter enough—no more than to fling it out of
the Projectile into space, just as the sailors get rid
of a dead body by throwing it into the sea. Only in
this operation they had to act, as Barbican recom-
OO ALL AROUND THE. MOON,

mended, with the utmost care and dispatch, so as to
lose as little as possible of the internal air, which,
by its great elasticity, would. violently strive to
escape. The bolts of. the floor-light, which was
more than a foot in diameter, were carefully un-
screwed, while Ardan, a good deal affected, prepared
to launch his dog’s body into space. The glass,
worked by a powerful lever which enabled it to
overcome the pressure of the enclosed air, turned
quickly on its hinges, and poor Satellite was dropped
out. The whole operation was so well managed
that very little air escaped, and ever afterwards Bar-
bican employed the same means to rid the Projectile
of all the litter and other useless matter by which it
was occasionally encumbered.

The evening of this third of December wore away
without further incident. As soon as Barbican had
announced that the Projectile was still winging its
way, though with retarded velocity, towards the
lunar disc, the travellers quietly retired to rest,
it | i ,

:
|

[

i
















CHAPTER VI.
INSTRUCTIVE CONVERSATION.

On the fourth of December, the Projectile chro-
nometers marked five o’clock in the morning, just
as the travellers woke up from a pleasant slumber.
They had now been 54 hours on their journey. As
to lapse of “me, they had passed not much more
than half of the number of hours during which their
trip was to last; but, as to lapse of ssace,.they
had already accomplished very nearly the seven-
tenths of their passage. This difference between
time and distance was due to the regular retardation
of their velocity.

They looked at the earth through the floor-light,
but it was little more than visible—a black spot
drowned in the solar rays. No longer any sign of a
crescent, no longer any sign of ashy light. Next
day, towards midnight, the Earth was to be zez, at
the precise moment when the Moon was to be /id/.
Overhead, they could see the Queen of Night com-
ing nearer and nearer to the line followed by the
Projectile, and evidentiy approaching the point
where both should meet at the appointed moment.
All around, the black vault of heaven was dotted
with luminous points which seemed to move some-
what, though, of course, in their extreme distance
their relative size underwent no change. The Sun

(zorz)
102? ALL AROUND THE MOON.

and the stars looked exactly as they had. appeared
when observed from the Earth. The Moon indeed
had become considerably enlarged in size, but the
travellers’ telescopes were still too weak to enable
them to make any important observation regarding
the nature of her surface, or that might determine
her topographical or geological features.

Naturally, therefore, the time slipped away in end-
less conversation. The Moon, of course, was the
chief topic. Each one contributed his share of pecu-
liar information, or peculiar ignorance, as the case
might be. Barbican and M’Nicholl always treated
the subject gravely, as became learned ‘scientists, but
Ardan preferred to look on things with the eye of
fancy. The Projectile, its situation, its direction,
the incidents possible to occur, the precautions
necessary to take in order to break the fall on the
Moon’s surface—these and many other subjects fur-
nished endless food for constant debate and inex-
haustible conjectures. .

For instance, at breakfast that morning, a ques-
tion of Ardan’s regarding the Projectile drew from
Barbican an answer curious enough to be reported.

“« Suppose, on the night that we were shot up from
Stony Hill,” said Ardan, ‘suppose the Projectile
had encountered some obstacle powerful enough to
stop it—what would be the consequence of the sud-
den halt???

“‘But,’’ replied Barbican, “I. don’t understand
what obstacle it could have met powerful enough to
stop it.’
INSTRUCTIVE CONVERSATION. 103

“‘Suppose some obstacle, for the sake of argu-
ment,’’ said Ardan.

“‘ Suppose what can’t be supposed,’’ replied the
matter-of-fact Barbican, ‘what cannot possibly be
supposed, unless indeed the original impulse proved
too weak. In that case, the velocity would have de-
creased by degrees, but the Projectile itself would
not have suddenly stopped.”

“‘Suppose it had struck against some body in
space.’

«‘What body, for instance ?’”’

*‘ Well, that enormous bolide which we met.’’

“Oh!” hastily observed the Captain, ‘‘the Pro-
jectile would have been dashed into a thousand
pieces and we along with it.”’

“Better than that,’? observed Barbican; ‘we
should have been burned alive.’’

‘Burned alive!’’ laughed Ardan. ‘* What a pity
we missed so interesting an experiment! How I
should have liked to find out how it-felt!’’

‘You would not have much time to record your
observations, friend Michael, I assure you,”’ observed
Barbican. ‘*The case is plain’enough. Heat and
motion are convertible terms. What do we mean
by heating water ? ‘Simply giving increased, in fact,
violent motion to its molecules.”

“Well!’’ exclaimed the Frenchman, ‘that’s an
ingenious theory any how!”’

‘* Not only ingenious but correct, my dear friend,
for it completely explains all the phenomena of
caloric. Heat is nothing but molecular movement,

”?
104 ALLE AROUND THE MOON,

the violent oscillation of the particles of a body.
When you apply the brakes to the train, the train
stops. But what has become of its motion? It
turns into-heat and makes the brakes hot. Why do
people grease the axles? To hinder them from get-
ting too hot, which they assuredly would become if
friction was allowed to obstruct the motion. You
understand, don’t you? ”’

“Don’t I though?’’ replied Ardan, apparently
in earnest. ‘Let me show you how thoroughly.
When I have been running hard and long, I feel
myself perspiring like a bull and hot as a furnace.
Why am I then forced to stop? Simply because my
motion has been transformed into heat! Of course,
I understand all about it!”’

Barbican smiled a moment at this comical illus-
tration of his theory and then went on:

“Accordingly, in case of a collision it would have
been all over instantly with our Projectile. You
have seen what becomes of the bullet that strikes the
iron target. It is flattened out of all shape; some-
times it is even melted into a thin film. Its motion
has been turned into heat. Therefore, I maintain
that if our Projectile had struck that bolide, its
velocity, suddenly checked, would have given rise to
a heat capable of completely volatilizing it in less
than a second.”’

_ Not a doubt of it!’’ said the Captain. “ Presi-
dent,’’? he added after a moment, ‘‘haven’t they
calculated what would be the result, if the Earth
INSIRLCTIVE CONVERSATION. L05

were suddenly brought to a stand-still in her journey,
througn her orbit?”

“Tt has been calculated,’? answered Barbican,
‘that in such a case so much heat would be devel-
oped as would instantly reduce her to vapor.’’

“TIm!’’ exclaimed Ardan; ‘‘a remarkably sim-
ple way for putting an.end to the world !”’

** And supposing the Earth to fall into the Sun ?”’
asked the Captain.

“Such a fall,’? answered Barbican, ‘according
to the calculations of Tyndall and Thomson, would
develop an amount of heat equal to that produced
by sixteen hundred globes of burning coal, each
globe equal in size to the earth itself. Furthermore
such ‘a fall would supply the Sun with at least as
much heat as he expends in a hundred years!’’

‘*A hundred years! Good! Nothing like accu-
racy!’’ cried Ardan. ‘Such infallible calculators
as Messrs. Tyndall and Thomson I can easily excuse
for any airs they may give themseves. They must
be of an order much higher than that of ordinary
mortals like us!’’ .

*‘T would not answer myself for the accuracy of
such intricate problems,’’ quietly observed Barbi-
can; ‘*but there is no doubt whatever regarding
one fact: motion suddenly interrupted always devel-
ops heat. And this has given rise to another theory
regarding the maintenance of the Sun’s temperature
at a constant point. An incessant rain of bolides
falling on his surface compensates sufficiently for the
106 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

heat that he is continually giving forth. It has been
calculated-———— ”” . ,

‘©Good Lord deliver us!’’ cried Ardan, putting
his hands to his ears: ‘‘here comes Tyndall and
Thomson again !”’

— ‘Jt has been calculated,’’ continued Barbican,
not heeding the interruption, ‘‘ that the shock of
every bolide drawn to the Sun’s surface by gravity,
must produce there an amount of heat equal to that
of the combustion of four thousand blocks of coal,
each the same size as'the falling bolide.’’

‘Pll wager another cent that our bold savants
calculated the heat ofthe Sun himself,’ cried Ardan,
with an incredulous laugh.

“That is precisely what they. have done,’’ an-
swered Barbican referring to his memorandum
book; ‘‘the heat emitted by the Sun,’’ he contin-
ued, ‘is exactly that which would be produced by
the combustion of a layer of coal enveloping the
Sun’s surface, like: an atmosphere, 17 miles in thick-
ness.”’

‘Well done! and such heat would be capabie

of 2”



“* Of melting in aa hour a stratum of ice 2400 feet
thick, or, according to another calculation, of rais-
ing a globe of ice-cold water, 3 times the size of our
Earth, to the boiling point in an hour.”

“*Why not calculate the exact fraction of a sec-
ond it would take to cook a couple of eggs?”
laughed Ardan. ‘I should as soon believe in one
calculation as in the other. —But—by the by—why
INSTRUCTIVE CONVERSATION, IO7

does‘ not such extreme heat cook us all up like so
many beefsteaks?”?

“‘For two very good and sufficient reasons,’’ an-
swered Barbican. ‘In the first place, the terrestrial
atmosphere absorbs the 74, of the solar heat. In the
second, the quantity of solar heat intercepted by the
Earth is only about the two billionth part of all
that is radiated.”’

‘¢ How fortunate to have such a handy thing as an
atmosphere. around us,’’ cried the Frenchman; ‘‘it
not only enables us to breathe, but it actually keeps
us from sizzling up like griskins.’’

“*Ves,’’ said the Captain, ‘“‘ but unfortunately we
can’t say so much for the Moon.”’

‘©Oh pshaw!”’ cried Ardan, always full of confi-
dence. ‘It’s all right there too! The Moon is
either inhabited or she is not. . If.she is, the inhabi-
tants must breathe. If she is not, there must be
oxygen enough left for we, us and co., even if we
should have to go after it to the bottom of the
ravines, where, by its gravity, it must have accumu-
lated! So much the better! we shall not have to
climb those thundering mountains!”’

So saying, he jumped up and began to gaze with
considerable interest on the lunar disc, which just
then was glittering with dazzling brightness.

“By Jove!’ he exclaimed at length; ‘it muss
be pretty hot up there!”’

“‘T should think so,’’ observed the Captain ;
‘especially when you remember that the day up
there lasts 360 hours!’’
z08 ALL AROUND THE JOON,

‘*Yes,’’ observed Barbican, ‘‘ but remember on’
the other hand that the nights are just as long, and,
as the heat escapes by radiation, the mean tempera-
ture cannot be much greater than that of interplane-
tary space.”’

‘A high old place for living in!’’ cried Ardan.
‘‘No matter! I wish we were there now! Wouldn't
it be jolly, dear boys, to have old Mother Earth for
our Moon, to see her always on our sky, never rising,
never setting, never undergoing any change except
from New Earth to-Last Quarter! Would not it be
fun to trace the shape of our great Oceans and Con-
tinents, and to say: ‘there is the Mediterranean !
there is China! there is the gulf of Mexico! there
is the white line of the Rocky Mountains where old
Marston is watching for us with his big telescope!’
Then we should see every line, and brightness, and
shadow fade away by degrees, as she came nearer
and nearer to the Sun, until at last she sat completely
lost in lis dazzling rays! But—by the way—Bar-
bican, are there any eclipses in the Moon?’’

“©O yes; solar eclipses ’’ replied Barbican, ‘‘ must
always occur whenever the centres of the three heav-
enly bodies are in the same line, the Earth occupy-
ing the middle place. However, such eclipses must
always be annular, as the Earth, projected like a
screen on the solar disc, allows more than half of the
Sun to be still visible.’’

“How is that??? asked M’Nicholl, “‘no_ total
eclipses in the Moon? Surely the cone of the
INSTRUCTIVE CONVERSATION. Io9

Tearth’s shadow must extend far enough to envelop
her surface ?”’

“© Tt does reach her, in one sense,’’ replied Barbi-
can, ‘but it does not in another. Remember the
great refraction of the solar rays that must be pro-
duced by the Earth’s atmosphere. It is easy to show
that this refraction prevents the Sun from ever being
totally invisible. See here!’’ he continued, pulling
out his tablets,. ** Let @ represent the horizontal
parallax, and 4 the half of the Sun’s apparent diame-

1?

?



ter

“Ouch!’* cried the Frenchman, making a wry
face, ‘*here comes Mr. x square riding to the mis-
chief on a pair of double zeros again ! Talk English,
or Yankee, or Dutch, or Greek, and I’m your man!
Even a little Arabic I can digest! But hang me, if
Ican endure your Algebra! ’’ :

‘Well then, talking Yankee,’’ replied. Barbican
with a smile, ‘the mean distance of the Moon from
the Earth being sixty terrestrial radii, the length of
the conic shadow, in consequence of atmospheric
refraction, is reduced to less than forty-two radii.
Consequently, at the moment of an eclipse, the
Moon is far beyond the reach of the real shadow, so
that she can see not only the border rays of the Sun,
but even those proceeding from his very centre.’’

‘*Oh then,’’ cried Ardan with a loud laugh, ‘ we
have an-eclipse of the Sun at the moment when the
Sun is quite visible! Isn’t that very like a bull, Mr.
Philosopher Barbican ?.”’

“Yet it is perfectly true notwithstanding,’’ an-
IIO: : ALL AROUND THE MOON,

swered Barbican. ‘At such a moment the Sun is
not eclipsed, because we can see him: .and then
again he is eclipsed because we see. him only by
means of a few of his rays, and even these have lost
nearly all their brightness in their passage through
the terrestrial atmosphere ! ”’

‘¢ Barbican is right, friend Michael,’’ observed the
Captain slowly: ‘‘the same phenomenon occurs on
earth every morning at sunrise, when refraction

shows us -
‘the Sun new risn

Looking through the horizontal misty air,
Shorn of his beams.”

‘‘ He must be right,’’ said Ardan, who, to’'do him
justice, though quick at seeing a reason, was quicker
to acknowledge its justice: ‘‘ yes, he must be right,
because I begin to understand at last very clearly.
what he really meant. However, we can judge for
ourselves when we get there.—But, apropos of
nothing, tell me, Barbican, what do you think of
the Moon being an ancient comet, which had come
so far within the sphere of the Earth’s attraction as
to be kept there and turned into a satellite? ’”’

“* Well, that zs an original idea!’’ said Barbican:
with a smile.

“My ideas generally are of that category,’’ ob-
served Ardan with an affectation of dry pomposity.

‘‘ Not this time, however, friend Michael,’’ ob-
served M’ Nicholl.

“Oh! I’m a plagiarist, am I?’’ asked the
Frenchman, pretending to be irritated.
INSTRUCTIVE CONVERSATION, Jil

‘*Well, something very like it,’’ observed M’Ni-
choll quietly. ‘‘ Apollonius Rhodius, as I read one
evening in the Philadelphia Library, speaks of the
Arcadians of Greece having a tradition that their
ancestors were so ancient that they inhabited the
Earth long before the Moon had ever become our
satellite. ‘They therefore called them I/poczdqvor or
Ante-lunarians. Now starting with some such wild
notion as this, certain scientists have looked on the
Moon as an ancient comet brought close enough to
the Earth to be retained in its orbit by terrestrial
attraction.”’

‘*Why may not there be something plausible in
such a hypothesis?’’ asked Ardan with some -curi-
osity.

“There is nothing whatever in it,’’ replied Barbi-
can decidedly: ‘fa simple proof is the fact that the
Moon does not retain the slightest trace of the
yaporous envelope by which comets are always sur-
rounded.”’

‘*Lost her tail you mean,’’ said Ardan. ‘* Pooh!
Easy to account for that! It might have got cut
off by coming too close to the Sun !”’

“Tt might, friend Michael, but an amputation by
such means is not very likely.’’

““No? Why not?’’

‘* Because—because—By Jove, I can’t say, because
I don’t know,”’ cried Barbican with a quiet smile on
his countenance.

“Oh what a lot of volumes,’’ cried Ardan, “could
be made out of what we don’t know!”
if ALL AROUND THE ALOON.

“At present, for instance,’’ observed M’Nicholl,
‘©T don’t know what o’clock it is.”’ ;
' © Three o’clock!’? said Barbican, glancing at his
chronometer.

‘*No!’’ cried Ardan in surprise. ‘* Bless us!
How rapidly the time passes when we are engaged in
scientific conversation! Ouf! I’m getting decid-
edly too learned! I feel as if I had swallowed:a
library !”’ ;

“IT feel,’’ observed M’ Nicholl, ‘¢ as if I had been
listening to a lecture on Astronomy in the Svter
course,”’

‘Better stir around a little more,’’ said the
Frenchman ; ‘‘ fatigue of body is the best antidote
to such severe mental labor as ours. I'll run up the
ladder a bit.’’ So saying, he paid another visit to
the upper portion of the Projectile and remained
there awhile whistling JZa/breuk, whilst his compan-
ions amused themselves in looking through the floor
window,

Ardan was coming down the ladder, when his
whistling was cut short by a sudden exclamation of
surprise.

“*What’s the matter?’’ asked Barbican quickly,
as he looked up and saw the Frenchman pointing to
something outside the: Projectile.

Approaching the window, Barbican saw: with
much surprise a sort of flattened bag floating in space
and only a few yards off. It seemed perfectly
motionless, and, consequently, the travellers knew
INSTRUCTIVG CONVERSATION, ITZ

that it must be animated by the same ascensional
movement as themselves.

‘*What on earth can such a consarn be, Barbi-
can?’’ asked Ardan, who every now and then liked
to ventilate his stock of American slang. ‘Is it
one of those particles of meteoric matter you were
speaking of just now, caught within the sphere of
our Projectile’s attraction and accompanying us to
the Moon?” :

‘‘What I am surprised at,’? observed the Captain,
‘tis that though the specific gravity of that body is
far inferior to’ that of our Projectile, it moves with

?

2?

exactly the same velocity.

*¢ Captain,”’ said Barbican, after a moment’s re-
flection, ‘I know no more what that object is than
you do, but Ican understand very well why it keeps
abreast with the Projectile.’’

“Very well then, why?”

“Because, my dear Captain, we are. moving
through a vacuum, and because all bodies fall or
move—the same thing—with equal velocity through
a vacuum, no matter what may be their shape or
their specific gravity. It is the air alone that makes
a difference of weight. Produce an artificial vacuum
in a glass tube and you will see that all objects what-
ever falling through, whether bits of feather or
grains of shot, move with precisely the same rapidity.
Up here, in space, like cause and like effect.’

“* Correct,’” assented M’Nicholl, ‘* Everything
therefore that we shall throw out of the Projectile
is bound to accompany us to the Moon.”
IITd ALL AROUND THE MOON,

“Well, we zere smart!’’ cried Ardan suddenly.

“* How so, friend Michael ?’’ asked Barbican.

“*Why not have packed the Projectile with ever
so many useful objects, books, instruments, tools, et
cetera, and fling them out into space once we were
fairly started! They would have all followed us
safely! Nothing would have been lost! And—now
Ithink on it—why not fling ourselves out through
the window? Shouldn’t we be as safe out there as
that bolide ? . What fun it would be to feel ourselves
sustained and upborne in the ether, more highly
favored even than the birds, who must keep on
flapping their wings continually to prevent them-
selves from falling !”?

“Very true, my dear boy,”’
“but how could we breathe? ”’ :

“It’s a fact,’’ exclaimed the Frenchman. ‘ Hang
the air for spoiling our fun! So we must remain
shut up in our Projectile ?”’

‘Not a doubt of it !”’

— Oh Thunder!” roared Ardan, suddenly stri-
king his forehead.

‘¢ What ails you?’’ asked the Captain, somewhat
surprised.

“* Now I know what that bolide of ours is! Why
didn’t we think of it before? It is no asteroid !
It is no particle of meteoric matter! Nor is it a
piece of a shattered planet !’’

‘*What is it then?’ asked both of his compan.
ions in one voice.

observed Barbican ;









INSTRUCTIVE CONVERSATION. IIg

‘Tt is nothing more or less than the body of the
dog that we threw out yesterday !’’

So in fact it was. That shapeless, vaseeegsie
able mass, melted, expunged, flat as a bladder under
an unexhausted receiver, drained of its air, was poor
Satellite’s body, flying like a rocket through space,
and rising higher and higher in close company, with
the rapidly ascending Projectile!
CHAPTER VII.
A HIGH OLD TIME,

A NEw phenomenon, therefore, strange but logical,
startling but admitting of easy explanation, was now
presented to their view, affording a fresh subject for
lively discussion. Not that they disputed much
about it. They soon agreed on a principle from
which they readily deducted the following general
law: Lvery object thrown out of the Projectile
should partake of the Projectile’s motion s it should
therefore follow the same path, and never cease to
move until the Projectile ttself cane to a standstill,

But, in sober truth, they were at anything but a
loss of subjects of warm discussion. As the end of
their journey began to approach, their senses became
keener and their sensations vivider. Steeled against
surprise, they looked for the unexpected, the strange,
the startling; and the only thing at which they
would have wondered would be to be five minutes
without having something new to wonder at. Their
excited imaginations flew far ahead of the Projectile,
whose velocity, by the way, began to be retarded
very decidedly by this time, though, of course, the
travellers had as yet no means to become aware of
it. The Moon’s size on the sky was meantime get-
ting larger and larger; her apparent distance was
growing shorter and shorter, until at last they could

(776)
A HIGH OLD TIME, : £17

almost imagine that by putting their hands out they
could nearly touch her.

Next morning, December sth, all were up and
dressed at a very early hour. This was to be the
last day of their journey, if all calculations were cor-
rect. That very night, at 12 o’clock, within nine-
teen hours at furthest, at the very moment of Full
Moon, they were to reach her resplendent surface.
At that hour was to be completed the most extraor-
dinary journey ever undertaken by man in ancient
or modern times. Naturally enough, therefore, they
found themselves unable to sleep after four o’clock
in the morning; peering upwards through the win-
dows now visibly glittering under the rays of the
Moon, they spent some very exciting hours in gazing
at her slowly enlarging disc, and shouting at her
with confident and joyful hurrahs.

The majestic Queen of the Stars had now risen so
high in the spangled heavens that she could hardly
rise higher. In a few degrees more she would reach
the exact point of space where her junction with the
Projectile was to be effected. According to his own
observations, Barbican calculated that they should
strike her in the northern hemisphere, where her
plains, or seas as they are called, are immense, and
her mountains are comparatively rare. This, of
course, would be so much the more favorable, if, as
was to be apprehended, the lunar atmosphere was
confined exclusively to the low lands.

“ Besides,’? as Ardan observed, ‘‘a plain is a
more suitable Janding place than a mountain. A
rs ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Selenite deposited on the top of Mount Everest or
even on Mont Blanc, could hardly be considered, in
strict language, to have arrived on Earth.’’

‘‘Not to talk,’? added M’Nicholl, ‘¢of-the com-
fort of the thing! When you land on a plain, there
you are. When you land ona peak or on a steep
mountain side, where are you? Tumbling over an
embankment with the train going forty miles an
hour, would be nothing to it.”’

“Therefore, Captain Barbican,”’ cried the French-
man, ‘as we should like to appear before the Selen-
ites in full skins, please land us in the snug though
unromantic North. We shall have time enough to
break our necks in the South.’’

Barbican made no reply to his companions,
because a new reflection had begun to trouble him,
to talk about which would have done no good.
There was certainly something wrong. The Projec-
tile was evidently heading towards the northern
hemisphere of the Moon. What did this prove?
Clearly, a deviation resulting from some cause.
The bullet, lodged, aimed, and fired with the most
careful mathematical precision, had been calculated
to reach the very centre of the Moon’s disc. Clearly
it was not going to the centre now. What could
have produced the deviation? This Barbican could
not tell; nor could he even determine its extent,
having no points of sight by which to make his
observations. For the present he tried to console
himself with the hope that the deviation of the Pro-
jectile would be followed by no worse consequence
A HIGH OLD TIME. rig

than carrying them towards the northern border of
the Moon, where for several reasons it would be
comparatively easier to alight. Carefully avoiding,
therefore, the use of any expression which might
needlessly alarm his companions, he continued to
observe the Moon as carefully as he could, hoping
every moment to find some grounds for believing
that the deviation from the centre was only a slight
one. He almost shuddered at the thought of what
would be their situation, if the bullet, missing its
aim, should pass the Moon, and plunge into the
interplanetary space beyond it.

As he continued to gaze, the Moon, ‘aciead of
presenting the usual flatness of her disc, began deci-
dedly to show a surface somewhat convex. Had the
Sun been shining on her obliquely, the shadows
would, have certainly thrown the great mountains
into strong relief. The eye could then bury itself
deep in the yawning chasms of the craters, and easily
follow the cracks, streaks, and ridges which stripe,
flecker, and bar the immensity of her plains. But
for the present ail relief was lost in the dazzling
glare. The Captain could hardly distinguish even
those dark spots that impart to the full Moon some
resemblance to the human face.

“Face!’’ cried Ardan: ‘¢ well, a very fctel eye
may detect a face, though, for the sake of Apollo’s
beauteous sister, I regret to say, a terribly pock-
marked one! ’’

The travellers, now evidently approaching the end
of their journey, observed the rapidly increasing
£20 ALL AROUND, THE MOON.

world above them with newer and greater curiosity
every moment. Their fancies enkindled at the
sight of the new and strange scenes dimly presented
to their view. In imagination they climbed to the
summit of this lofty peak. They let themselves
down to the abyss of that yawning crater. Here
they imagined they saw vast seas hardly kept in their
basins by a rarefied atmosphere; there they thought
they could trace mighty rivers bearing to vast oceans
the tribute of the snowy mountains, In the first
promptings of their eager curiosity, they peered
greedily into her cavernous depths, and almost ex-
pected, amidst the deathlike hush of inaudible
nature, to surprise some sound from the mystic orb
floating up there in eternal silence through a bound-
less ocean of never ending vacuum.

This last day of their journey left their memories
stored with thrilling recollections. They took care-
ful note of the slightest details. As they neared
their destination, they felt themselves invaded by a
vague, undefined restlessness. But this restlessness
would have given way to decided uneasiness, if they
had known at what a slow rate they were travelling.
They would have surely concluded that their present
velocity would never be able to take them as far as
the neutral point, not to talk of passing it. The
reason of such considerable retardation was, that
by this time the Projectile had reached such a great
distance from the Earth that it had hardly any
weight. But even this weight, such as it was, was to
be diminished still further, and finally, to vanish
A HIGH OLD TIME. r2gt

altogether as soon as the bullet reached the neutral
point, where the two attractions, terrestrial and
lunar, should. counteract each other with new and
surprising effects.

Notwithstanding the absorbing nature of his obser
vations, Ardan never forgot to prepare breakfast
with his usual punctuality. It was eaten readily and
relished heartily. Nothing could be more exquisite
than his calf’s foot jelly liquefied and prepared by
gas heat, except perhaps his meat biscuits of pre
served Texas beef and Southdown mutton. A bottle
of Chateau Yquem and another of Clos de Vougeot,
both of superlative excellence in quality and flavor,
crowned the repast. Their vicinity to the Moon and
their incessant glancing at her surface did not pre
vent the travellers from touching each other’s glasses
merrily and often. Ardan took occasion to remark
that the lunar vineyards—if any existed—-must be
magnificent, considering the intense solar heat they
continually experienced. Not that he counted on
them too confidently, for he told his friends that to
provide for the worst he had supplied himself with a
few cases of the best vintages of Médoc and the Cote
d’ Or, of which the bottles, then under discussion,
might be taken as very favorable specimens.

The Reiset arid Regnault apparatus for purifying
the air worked splendidly, and maintained the at-
mosphere in a perfectly sanitary condition. Not an
atom of carbonic acid could resist the caustic pot-
ash ; and as for the oxygen, according to M’Ni-
choll’s expression, “it was A prime number one }”’
£22 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

The small quantity of watery vapor enclosed in the
Projectile did no more harm than serving to temper
the dryness of the air: many a splendid saloz
in New York, London, or Paris, and many an audi-«
torium, even of theatre, opera house or Academy of
Music, could be considered its inferior in what
concerned its hygienic condition.

To keep it in perfect working order, the apparatus
should be carefully attended to. This, Ardan looked
on as his own peculiar occupation. He was never
tired regulating the tubes, trying the taps, and test-
ing the heat of the gas by the pyrometer. So far
everything had worked satisfactorily, and the trav+
ellers, following the example of their friend Marston
on a previous occasion, began to get so stout that
their own mothers would not know them in another
month, should their imprisonment last so long.
Ardan said they all looked so sleek and thriving
that he was reminded forcibly of a nice lot of pigs
fattening in a pen for a country fair. But how long
was this good fortune of theirs going to last ?

Whenever they took their eyes off the Moon, they
could not help noticing that they were still attended
outside by the spectre of Satellite’s corpse and by
the other refuse of the Projectile. An occasional
melancholy howl also attested Diana’s recognition
of her companion’s unhappy fate. The travellers
saw with surprise that these waifs still seemed per-
fectly motionless in space, and kept their respective
distances apart as mathematically as if they had been
fastened with nails to a stone wall.
A HIGH OLD TIME. ‘ 123

“T tell you what, dear boys; ’’ observed Ardan,
commenting on this curious phenomenon; ‘if the
concussion had been a little too violent for one of us
that night, his survivors would have been seriously
embarrassed in trying. to get rid of his remains.
With no earth to cover him up, no sea to plunge
him into, his corpse would never disappear from
view, but would pursue us day and night, grim and
ghastly like an avenging ghost!’

‘“‘Ugh!’? said the Captain, shuddering at the
idea.

‘But, by the bye, Barbican !’’ cried the French-
man, dropping the subject with his usual abrupt-
ness; ‘‘you have forgotten something else! Why
didn’t you bring a scaphander and an air pump?
I could then venture out of the Projectile as readily
and as safely as the diver leaves his boat and walks
about on the bottom of the river! What fun to
float in the midst of that mysterious ether! to steep
myself, aye, actually to revel in the pure rays of
the glorious sun! I should have ventured out on
the very point of the Projectile, and there I should
have danced and postured and kicked and bobbed
and _capered in a style that Taglioni never dreamed
of!”

**Shouldn’t I like to see you!’’ cried the Cap-
tain grimly, smiling at the idea.

“You would not see him long! ’’ observed Barbi-
can quietly. ‘*The air confined in his body, freed
from external pressure, would burst him like a shell,
or like a balloon that suddenly rises to too great a
L24 ALL AROUND TIE MOON.

height in the air! A scaphander would have been a
fatal gift. Don’t regret its absence, friend Michael ;
never forget this axiom: As long as we are floating
in empty space, the only spot where safety is possible is
tnside the Projectile!’

The words ‘ possible’? and ‘‘ impossible ’’ al-
ways grated on Ardan’s ears. If he had been a
lexicographer, he would have rigidly excluded them
from his dictionary, both as meaningless and useless.
He was preparing an answer for Barbican, when he
was cut out by a sudden observation from M’Ni-
choll,

“See here, friends!’’ cried the Captain; ‘¢ this
going to the Moon is all very well, but how shall we
get back ?”’

His listeners looked at each other with a surprised
and perplexed air. The question, though a very
natural one, now appeared to have presented itself
to their consideration absolutely for the first time.

“What do you mean by sucha question, Cap-
tain? ’’ asked Barbican in a grave judicial tone.

‘“Mac, my boy,’’ said Ardan seriously, ‘ don’t it
strike you as a little out of order to ask how you are
to return when you have not got there yet ?”’

“‘T don’t ask the question with any idea of back-
ing out,’’ observed the Captain quietly ; ‘‘as a mat-
ter of purely scientific inquiry, I repeat my question:
how are we to return? ”’

“*T don’t know,’’ replied Barbican promptly.

“‘For my part,’’ said Ardan; ‘‘if I had known
how to get back, I should have never come at all!”
A HIGH OLD TIME. -I25

“Well! of all the answers!’’ said the Captain,
lifting his hands and shaking his head.

‘©The best under the circumstances ;’’ observed
Barbican; ‘‘and I shall further observe that such a
question as yours at present is both useless and
uncalled for. On some future occasion, when we
shall consider it advisable to return, the- question
will be in order, and we shall discuss it with all the
attention it deserves. Though the Columbiad is at
Stony Hill, the Projectile will still be in the
Moon.”

‘‘Much we shall gain by that! A bullet without
a gun!”?

“The gua we can make and the powder too!’’
replied Barbican confidently. ‘‘ Metal and sulphur
and charcoal and saltpetre are likely enough to be
present in sufficient quantities beneath the-Moon’s
surface. Besides, to return is a problem of compara-
tively easy solution: we should have to overcome
the lunar attraction only—a slight matter—the rest
of the business would be readily done by gravity.”

‘‘ Enough said on the subject !’’ exclaimed Ardan
curtly; ‘how to get back is indefinitely postponed !
How to communicate with our friends on the Earth,
is another matter, and, as it seems to me, an ex-
tremely easy one.”’

?

‘Let us hear thé very easy means by which you
propose to communicate with our friends on Earth,’’
asked the Captain, with a sneer, for he was by this
time a little out of humor.

“By means of bolides ejected from the lunar
726 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

volcanoes,”? replied the Frenchman without an
instant’s hesitation.

‘¢Well said, friend Ardan,’’ exclaimed Barbican.
‘*Tam quite disposed to acknowledge the feasibility
of your plan. Laplace has calculated that a force
five times greater than that of an ordinary cannon
would be sufficient to send a bolide from the Moon
to the Earth. Now there is no cannon that can vie
in force with even the smallest volcano.”’

“Hurrah !’’ cried Ardan, delighted at his suc-
cess; ‘just imagine the pleasure of sending our
letters postage free! But—oh! what a splendid
idea !—Dolts that we were for not thinking of it
sooner !’?

‘*Let us have the splendid ideat’’ cried the Cap-
tain, with some of his old acrimony.

‘¢ Why didn’t we fasten a wire to the Projectile?’’
asked Ardan, triumphantly. ‘It would have enabled
us to exchange telegrams with the Earth !”’

“Ho! hot ho!* roared the Captain, rapidly
recovering his good humor; “decidedly the best
joke of the season! Ha! ha! ha! Of course you
have calculated the weight of a wire 240 thousand
miles long? ”?

‘No matter about its weight !’? cried the French-
man impetuously; ‘we should have laughed at its
weight! We could have tripled the charge of the
Columbiad ; we could have quadrupled it !—~aye,
quintupled it, if necessary !’’ he added in tones evi-
dently increasing in loudness and violence.

‘Ves, friend Michael,’ observed Barbican; “but
4A HIGH OLD TIME, 127

there isaslight and unfortunately a fatal defect in
your project. The Earth, by its rotation, would
have wrapped our wire around herself, like thread
around a spool, and dragged us back almost with the
speed of lightning !”’

“By the Nine gods of Porsena!’’ cried Ardan,
‘something is wrong with my head to-day! My
brain is out of joint, and I am making as nice a mess
of things as my friend Marston was ever capable of !
By the bye—talking of Marston—if we never return
to the Earth, what is to prevent him from following
us to the Moon? ”’

‘Nothing !’’ replied Barbican; ‘he is a faithful
friend and a reliable comrade. Besides, what is
easier? Is not the Columbiad still at Stony Hill ?
Cannot gun-cotton be readily manufactured on any
occasion? Will not the Moon again pass through
the zenith of Florida? Eighteen years from now,
will she not occupy exactly the same spot that she
does to day ?”’ :

“Certainly! ’’ cried Ardan, with increasing
enthusiasm, ‘* Marston will come! and Elphinstone
of the torpedo! and the gallant Bloomsbury, and
Billsby the brave, and all our friends of the Balti-
more Gun Club! And we shall receive them with
all the honors!) And then we shall establish projec-
tile trains between the Earth and the Moon! Hur-
rah for J. T. Marston! ”’

“‘Hurrah for Secretary Marston!’’ cried the
Captain, with an enthusiasm almost equal to
Ardan’s.
z28 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“¢ Hurrah for my dear friend Marston ! ’’ cried

Barbican, hardly less excited than his comrades.

Our old acquaintance, Marston, of course could
not have heard the joyous acclamations that wel-
comed his name, but at that moment he certainly
must have felt his ears most unaccountably tingling.
What was he doing at the time? He was rattling
along the banks of the Kansas River, as fast as an
express train could take him, on the road to Long’s
Peak, where, by means of the great Telescope, he
expected to find some traces of the Projectile that
contained his friends. He never forgot them for
a moment, but of course he little dreamed that
his name at that very time was exciting their vivid-
est recollections and their warmest applause.

In fact, their recollections were rather too vivid,
and their applause decidedly too warm. Was not
the animation that prevailed among the guests of
the Projectile of a very unusual character, and. was
it not becoming more and more violent every
moment? Could the wine have caused it? No;
though not teetotallers, they never drank to excess.
Could the Moon’s proximity, shedding her subtle,
mysterious influence over their nervous systems, have
stimulated them to a degree that was threatening to
border’ on frenzy? Their faces were as red as if
they were standing before a hot fire; their breath-
ing was loud, and their lungs heaved like a smith’s
bellows ; their eyes blazed like burning coals; their
voices sounded as loud and harsh as that of a stump
speaker trying to make himself heard by an inatten-
A HIGH OLD TIME. 129

tive or hostile crowd; their words popped from
their lips like corks from Champagne. bottles ; their
gesticulating became wilder and in fact more alarm-
ing—considering the little room left in the Projec-
tile for muscular displays of any kind.

But the most extraordinary part of the whole phe-
nomenon was that neither of them, not even
Barbican, had the slightest consciousness of any
strange or unusual ebullition of spirits either on his
own part or on that of the others.

‘“‘See here, gentlemen!’’ said the Captain in a
quick imperious manner—the roughness of his old
life on the Mississippi would still break out—‘‘ See
here, gentlemen! It seems I’m not to know if we
‘are to return from the Moon. Well!—Pass that for
the present! But there is one thing I must know !”?

‘‘Hear! hear the Captain! ’’ cried Barbican,
stamping with his foot, like an excited fencing mas-
‘ter. ‘There is one thing he mus¢ know!”’

“‘T want to know what we’re going to do when
we get there!’

‘* He wants to know what we’re going to do when
we get there! A sensible question! Answer it,
Ardan!”’

‘‘ Answer it yourself, Barbican! You know more
about the Moon than Ido! You know more about
it than all the Nasmyths that ever lived !”’

‘I’m blessed if I know anything at all about
it!” cried Barbican, with a joyous laugh. ‘ Ha,
ha, ha! The first eastern shore Marylander or any
other simpleton you meet in Baltimore, knows as

9
£30 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

much about the Moon as Ido! Why we’re going
there, I can’t tell! What we’re going to do when
we get there, can’t tell either! Ardan knows all
about it! Hecantell! He’s taking us there!’”’

*¢ Certainly I can tell! should I have offered to
take you there without a good object in view?’’
cried Ardan, husky with continual roaring. ‘ An-
swer me that!’’

“*No conundrums! ”’ cried the Captain, in a
voice sourer and rougher than ever; ‘tell us if you
can in plain English, what the demon we have come
here for!”

“¢T’ll tell you if I feel like it,’’ cried Ardan, fold-
ing his arms with an aspect of great dignity; ‘*and
I'll not tell you if I don’t feel like it!” ,
- «©What’s that ?’’ cried Barbican. ‘You'll not
give us an answer when we ask you a reasonable
question ?”’

‘‘Never! ’’ cried Ardan, with great deterrhina-
tion. “I'll never answer a question reasonable or
unreasonable, unless it is asked in a proper man-
ner!’?

‘“*None of your French airs here!’’ exclaimed
M’ Nicholl, by this time almost completely out of
himself between anger and excitement. ‘I don’t
know where Iam; I don’t know where I’m going;
I don’t know why I’m going; you know all about
it, Ardan, or at least you think you do! Well then,
give me a plain answer to a plain question, or by
the Thirty-eight States of our glorious Union, I
shall know what for !’’
A WiGH OLD TIME, L5L

«Listen, Ardan!’’ cried Barbican, grappling
with the Frenchman, and with some difficulty re-
straining him from flying at M’Nicholl’s throat;
‘Vou ought to tell him! It is only your duty!
One day you found us both in St. Helena woods,
where we had no more idea of going to the Moon
than of sailing to the South Pole! There you
twisted us both around your finger, and induced us
to follow you blindly on the most formidable jour-
ney ever undertaken by man! And now you refuse
to tell us what it was all for!’’

“‘T don’t refuse, dear old Barbican! To you, at
least, I can’t refuse anything!’’ cried Ardan, seiz-
ing his friend’s hands and wringing them violently.
Then letting them go and suddenly starting back,
‘‘you wish to know,’’ he continued in resounding
tones, ‘‘ why we have followed out the grandest idea
that ever set a human brain on fire! Why we have
undertaken a journey that for length, danger, and
novelty, for fascinating, soul-stirring and delirious
sensations, for all that can attract man’s burning
heart, and satisfy the intensest cravings of his intel-
lect, far surpasses the vividest realities of Dante’s
passionate dream! Well, I will tell you! It is to
annex another World to the New One! It is to
take possession of the Moon in the name of the
United States of America! It is to add a thirty-
ninth State to the glorious Union! It is to colonize
the lunar regions, ‘to cultivate them, to people them,
to transport to them some of our wonders of art,
science, and industry! It is to civilize the Selen-
32 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

ites, unless they are more civilized already than we
are ourselves! It is to make them all good Repub-
licans, if they are not so already! ”’

‘* Provided, of course, that there are Sélenites in
existence! ’’ sneered the Captain, now sourer than
ever, and in his unaccountable excitement doubly
irritating.

“Who says there are no Selenites?’’ cried Ardan
fiercely, with fists clenched and brows contracted.

“TI do!’’ cried M’Nicholl stoutly; ‘‘I deny the
existence of anything of the kind, and I denounce
every one that maintains any such whim as a vision-
ary, if not a fool!”’

Ardan’s reply to this taunt was a desperate facer,
which, however, Barbican managed to stop while on
its way towards the Captain’s nose. M’ Nicholl,
seeing himself struck at, immediately assumed such
a posture of defence as showed him to be no novice
at the business. A battle seemed unavoidable; but
even at this trying moment Barbican showed himself
equal to the emergency.

“Stop, you crazy fellows! you ninnyhammers !
you overgrown babies!’’ he exclaimed, seizing his
companions by the collar, and violently swinging
them around with his vast strength until they stood
back to back ; ‘‘ what are you going to fight about?
Suppose there are Lunarians in the Moon! Is that
a reason why there should be Lunatics in the Projec-
tile! But, Ardan, why do you insist on Lunarians?
Are we so shiftless that we can’t do without them
when we get to the Moon? ”’
A HIGH OLD TIME. 133

“I don’t insist on them!’’ cried Ardan, who
submitted to Barbican like a child. ‘‘ Hang the
Lunarians! Certainly, we can do without them!
What do I care for them? Down with them!’’

“Yes, down with the Lunarians!’’ cried M’Ni-
choll as spitefully as if he had even the slightest
belief in their existence.

‘“ We shall take possession of the Moon our-
selves!’’ cried Ardan. ‘‘Lunarians or no Lunari-
ans!?’

‘‘We three shall constitute a Republic !’’ cried
M' Nicholl.

“‘T shall be the House!’’ cried Ardan.

**And I the Senate! ’’ answered the Captain.

‘And Barbican our first’ President!’’ shrieked
the Frenchman.

“Our first and last !?? roared M’ Nicholl.

‘No objections to a third term!’’ yelled Ardan.

‘‘He’s welcome to any number of terms he
pleases !’’ vociferated M’ Nicholl.

“¢ Hurrah for President Barbican of the Lunatic—
I mean of the Lunar Republic!’ screamed Ardan.

‘‘Long may he wave, and may his shadow never
grow less!’’ shouted Captain M’Nicholl, his’ eyes
almost out of their sockets. .

Then with voices reminding you of sand. fierccly
blown against the window panes, the President and
the Senate chanted the immortal Yankee Doodle,
whilst the House delivered itself of the Marserlatse,
in a style which even the wildest Jacobins in Robes-
picrre’s day could hardly have surpassed. .
T34 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

But long before either song was ended, all threc
broke out into a dance, wild, insensate, furious, de-
lirious, paroxysmatical. No Orphic festivals on
Mount Cithaeron ever raged more wildly. No Bac-
chic revels on: Mount: Parnassus were ever more
corybantic.: Diana, demented by the maddening
example, joined in the orgie, howling and barking
frantically in her turn, and wildly jumping as high
as the ceiling of the Projectile. Then came new
accessions to the infernal din. Wings suddenly
began to flutter, cocks to crow, hens to cluck; and
five or six chickens, managing to escape out of their
coop, flew backwards and forwards blindly, with
frightened screams, dashing against each other and
against the walls of the ‘Projectile, and altogether
getting up as demoniacal a hullabaloo as could be
made by ten thousand bats that you suddenly dis-
turbed in a cavern where they had slept through the
winter.

Then the three companions, no longer -able to
withstand the overpowering influence of the myste-
rious force that mastered them, intoxicated, more
than drunk, burned by the air that scorched their
organs of respiration, dropped at: last, and lay flat,
motionless, senseless as dabs of clay, on the flcor of
the Projectile.







CHAPTER VIII.

THE NEUTRAL POINT.

Wuat had taken place? Whence. proceeded this
strange intoxication whose consequences might have
proved so disastrous? A little forgetfulness on
Ardan’s part had done the whole mischief, but for-
tunately M’ Nicholl was able to remedy it in time.

After a regular fainting spell several minutes long,
the Captain was the first man to return to conscious-
ness and the full recovery of his intellectual faculties.
His first feelings were far from pleasant. His stom-
ach gnawed him as if he had not eaten for a week,
though he had taken breakfast only a few hours
before; his eyes were dim, his brain throbbing, and
his limbs shaking. In short, he presented every
symptom usually seen in a man dying of starvation.
Picking himself up with much care and difficulty, he
roared out to Ardan for something to eat. Seeing
that the Frenchman was unable or unwilling to re-
spond, he concluded to help himself, by beginning
first of all to prepare a little tea. To do this, fire
was necessary ; so, to light his lamp, he struck a
match,

But what was his surprise at seeing the sulphur tip
of the match blazing with a light so bright and daz-
zling that his eyes could hardly bear it! Touching

it to the gas burner, a stream of light flashed forth
(435)
Z50 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

equal in its intensity to the flame, of an electric
Jamp. Then he understood it all in an instant.
‘The dazzling glare, his maddened brain, his gnaw-
ing stomach—all were now clear as the noon-day Sun.

“©The oxygen!’’ he cried, and, suddenly stoop-
ing down and examining the tap of the air apparatus,
he saw that it had been only half turned off. Con-
sequently the air was gradually getting more and
more impregnated with this powerful gas, colorless,
odorless, tasteless, infinitely precious, but, unless
when strongly diluted with nitrogen, capable of pro-
ducing fatal disorders in the human system. . Ardan,
startled by .M’Nicholl’s question about the means of
returning from the Moon,.had turned the cock only
half off.

The Captain instantly stopped.the escape of the
oxygen, but not. one moment ‘too soon. It had
completely saturated the atmosphere.. A few min-
utes more and.it. would have killed the travellers,
not like carbonic acid, by smothering them, but by
burning them up, as a strong draught burns up the
coals in a stove.

It took nearly an hour for the air to become pure
enough to allow the lungs their natural play.
Slowly and by degrees, the travellers recovered from
their intoxication ; they had actually to sleep off
the fumes of the oxygen asa drunkard has to sleep
off the effects of his brandy. When Ardan learned
that he was, responsible for the whole trouble, do you
think the information disconcerted him? Not a bit
of it. On the contrary, he was rather proud of
\

is
il
Hh

i

Hi
‘ei

4








THE NEUTRAL POINT, 137

having done something startling, to break the
monotony of the journey ; and to put a little life, as
he said, into old Barbican and the grim Captain,
so as to get a little fun out of such grave philoso-
phers.

After laughing heartily at the comical figure cut
by his two friends capering like crazy students at
the Closerie des Lilas, he went on moralizing on the
incident:

‘For my part, I’m not a bit sorry for having par-
taken of this fuddling gas. It gives me an idea,
dear boys. Would it not be worth some enterpris-
ing fellow’s while to establish a sanatorium provided
with oxygen chambers, where. people of a debili-
tated state of health could enjoy-a few hours of
intensely active existence! There’s money in it, as
you Americans say. Just suppose balls or parties
given in halls where the air would be provided with
an extra supply of this enrapturing gas! Or,
theatres where the atmosphere would be main-
tained in a highly oxygenated condition. What
passion, what firein the actors! What enthusiasm
in the spectators! And, carrying the idea a little
further, if, instead of an assembly or an audience,
we should oxygenize towns, cities, a whole country
—what activity would be infused into the whole
people! What new life would electrify a stagnant
community! Out of an old used-up nation we
could perhaps make a bran-new one, and, for my
part, I know more than one state in old Europe
where this-oxygen experiment might be attended
738 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

with a decided advantage, or where, at all events, it
could do no harm!”’

The Frenchman spoke so glibly and gesticulated
so earnestly that M’ Nicholl once more gravely ex-
amined the stop-cock; but Barbican damped. his
enthusiasm by a single observation.

‘¢ Friend Michael, ’’ said he, «your | new and in-
teresting idea we shall discuss at a more favorable
opportunity. At present we want to know where all
these cocks and hens have come from. ”’

«¢ These cocks and hens? ’”’

“© Yes,”

Ardan threw a glance of comical bewilderment
on half a dozen or so of splendid barn-yard fowls
that were now beginning to recover from the effects
of the oxygen. For an instant he could not utter a
word; then, shrugging his shoulders, he muttered
in a low voice:

“¢ Catastrophe prematurely exploded !”?

“¢ What are you. going to do with these chickens?”
persisted Barbican. ;

«« Acclimatize them in the Moon, by Jove! what
else? ’’ was the ready reply.

“¢Why conceal them then? ’’

‘¢A hoax, a poor hoax, dear President, which
proves a miserable failure! Tintended to let them
loose on the Lunar Continent at the first favorable
opportunity. Ioften had a good laugh to myself,
thinking of your astonishment and the Captain’s at
seeing a lot of American poultry scratching for
worms on a Lunar dunghill!’’
THE NEUTRAL POINT. £39

te Ah! wag, jester, incorrigible farceur /”’ cried
Barbican with a smile; ‘you want no nitrous
oxide to put a bee in your bonnet! He is always
as bad as you and I were fora short time, M’Ni-
choll, under the laughing gas! He’s never had a
sensible moment in his life]’’

“‘T can’t say the same of you,’’ replied Ardan;
“you had at least one sensible moment in all your
lives, and that was about an hour ago!”’

Their incessant chattering did not prevent the
friends from at once repairing the disorder of the
interior of the Projectile. Cocks and hens were
put back in their cages. But while doing so, the
friends were astonished to find that ‘the birds,
though good sized creatures, and now pretty fat
and plump, hardly felt heavier in their hands than
if they had been so many sparrows. This drew
their interested attention to a new phenomenon.

From the moment they had left the Earth, their
own weight, and that of the Projectile and the ob-
jects therein. contained, had been undergoing a
progressive diminution. They might never be able
to ascertain this fact with regard to the Projectile,
but the moment was now rapidly approaching when
the loss of weight would become perfectly sensible,
both regarding themselves and the tools and instru-
ments surrounding them. Of course, it is quite
clear, that this, decrease could not be indicated by
an ordinary scales, as the weight to balance the ob-
ject would have lost precisely as much as the object
itself, But a spring balance, for instance, in which
Igo ALL AROUND THE MOON.

the tension of the coil is independent of attraction,
would have readily given the exact equivalent of the
loss.

Attraction or weight, according to Newton’s well
known law, acting in direct proportion to the mass
of the attracting body and in inverse proportion to
the square of the distance, this consequence clearly
follows: Had the Earth been-alone in space, or had
the other heavenly bodies been suddenly annihi-
lated, the further from the Earth the Projectile
would be, the less weight it would have. However,
it would never ezirely lose its weight, as the terres-,
trial attraction would have always made itself felt at
no matter what distance. But as the Earth is not
the only celestial body possessing attraction, it is
evident that there may be a point in space where
the respective attractions may be entirely annihi-
lated by mutual counteraction. Of this phenome-
non the present instance was a case in point. Ina
short time, the Projectile and its contents would for
a few moments be absolutely and completely de-
prived of all weight whatsoever.

The path described by the Projectile was evidently
a line from the Earth to the Moon averaging some-
what less than 240,000 miles in length. According
as the distance between the Projectile and the Earth
was increasing, the terrestrial attraction was dimin-
ishing in the ratio of the square of the distance,
and the lunar attraction was augmenting in the same
proportion.

As before observed, the point was not now far off
THE NEUTRAL POINT, LAI

where, the two attractions counteracting each other,
the bullet would actually weigh nothing at all. If
the masses of the Earth and the Moon had been
equal, this should evidently be found half way be-
tween the two bodies. But by making allowance
for the difference of the respective masses, it was
easy to calculate that this point would be situated at
the ~, of the total distance or, in round numbers, at
something less than 216,000 miles from the Earth.

At this point, a body that possessed no energy or
principle of movement within itself, would remain
forever, relatively motionless, suspended like Ma-
homet’s coffin, being equally attracted by the two
orbs and nothing impelling it in one direction
rather than in the other.

Now the Projectile at this moment was nearing
this point; if it reached it, what would be the con-
sequence ?

To this question three answers presented them-
selves, all possible under the circumstances, but
very different in their results.

1. Suppose the Projectile to possess velocity enough
to pass the neutral point. In such case, it would un-
doubtedly proceed onward to the Moon, being drawn
thither by Lunar attraction.

2. Suppose it lacked the requisite velocity for reach-
ing the neutral point. In such acase it would just
as certainly fall back to the Earth, in obedience to
the law of Terrestrial attraction.

3- Suppose it to be animated by just sufficient
velocity to reach the neutral point, but not to pass it.
Ig2 : ALL AROUND THE MOON.

In that case, the Projectile would remain forever in
the same spot, perfectly motionless as far as regards
the Earth and the Moon, though of course follow-
ing them both in their annual orbits round the Sun

Such was now the state of things, which Barbican
tried to explain to his friends, who, it need hardly
be said, listened to his remarks with the most in-
tense interest. How were they to know, they asked
him, the precise instant at which the Projectile
would reach the neutral point? That would be an
easy matter, he assured them. It would be at the
very moment when both themselves and all the
other objects contained in the Projectile would be
completely free from every operation of the law of
gravity; in other words, when everything would
cease to have weight. |

This gradual diminution of the action of gravity,
the travellers had been for some time noticing, but
they had not yet witnessed its total cessation. But
that very morning, about an hour before noon, as
the Captain was making some little experiment in
Chemistry, he happened by accident to overturn a
glass full of water. What was his surprise at seeing
that neither the glass nor the water fell to the floor!
Both remained suspended in the air almost com-
pletely motionless,

‘‘The prettiest experiment I ever saw!’ cried
Ardan ; ‘let us have more of it!”

Arfd seizing the bottles, the arms, and the other
objects in the Projectile, he arranged them around
each other in the air with some regard to symmetry
THE NEUTRAL POINT. I43

and proportion. The different articles, keeping
strictly each in its own place, formed a very attrac-
tive group wonderful to behold. Diana, placed in
the'apex of the pyramid, would remind you of those
marvellous suspensions in the air performed by
Houdin, Herman, and a few other first class wizards.
Only being kept in her place without being ham-
pered by invisible strings, the animal rather seemed
to enjoy the exhibition, though in all probability she
was hardly conscious of any thing unusual in her
appearance.

Our travellers had been fully prepared for such a
phenomenon, yet it struck them with as much surprise
as if they had never uttered a scientific reason to ac-
count for it. They saw that, no longer subject to
the ordinary laws of nature, they were now entering
the realms of the marvellous. They felt that their
bodies were absolutely without weight. Their arms,
fully extended, no longer sought their sides. Their
heads oscillated unsteadily on their shoulders. Their
feet no longer rested.on the floor. In their efforts
to hold themselves straight, they looked like drunken
men trying to maintain the perpendicular. We have
all read stories of some men deprived of the power
of reflecting light and of others who could not cast
a shadow. -But here reality, no fantastic story,
showed you men who, through the counteraction of
attractive forces, could tell no difference between
light substances and heavy substances, and who
absolutely had no weight whatever themselves !

“‘Let us take graceful attitudes !’’ cried Ardan,
IZA ALL AROUND THE MOON.

*‘and imagine we are playing zad/eaux / Let us, fot
instance, form a grand historical group of the three
great goddesses of the nineteenth century. Barbi-
can will represent Minerva or Science s the Captain,
Bellona or War; while I, as Madre Natura, the
newly born goddess of Progress, floating gracefully
over you both, extend my hands so, fondly patroniz-
ing the one, but grandly ordering off the other, to
the regions of eternal night! More on your toe,
Captain! Your right foot a little higher! Look
at Barbican’s admirable pose! Now then, prepare
to receive orders for a new tableau! Form: group
@ la Jardin Mabille! Presto! Change!”’

In an instant, our travellers, changing attitudes,
formed the new group with tolerable success. [ven
Barbican, who had been to Paris in his youth, yield-
ing for a moment. to the humor of the thing, acted
the naif Anglais to the life. The Captain was
frisky enough to remind you of:a middle-aged
Frenchman from the provinces, on ‘a hasty.visit to
tthe capital for a,few days’ fun. Ardan was-in rap-
tures, : . :

“*Oh! if Raphael could only see us he ex-
claimed in a kind: of ecstasy. ‘He would paint
such a picture as would throw all his other. master-
pieces in the shade !’’

_** Knock spots out of the best of them by fifty per
cent !’’: cried the Captain, gesticulating well enough
aL étudiant, but rather mixing his metaphors.

‘¢He should be pretty quick in getting through
the job,’ observed Barbican, the first as usual to re-

$??













































































































































































































































THE NEVTRAL POINT. L4G

cover tranquillity. ‘As soon as the Projectile will
have passed the neutral point—in half an hour at
longest—lunar attraction will draw us to the Moon.”’

“We shall have to crawl on the ceiling then like
flies’? said Ardan.

‘‘Not at all,’’ said the Captain; ‘the Projectile,
having its centre of gravity very low, will turn ups
side down by degrees.’’

“Upside down !’’ cried Ardan, ‘That will be
a nice mess! everything higgledy-piggledy !”’

“No danger, friend Michael,’’ said M’ Nicholl ;
there shall be no disorder whatever ; nothing will
quit its place; the movement of the Projectile will
be effected by such slow degrees as to be impercepti-
ble.

‘*Ves,’? added Barbican, ‘‘as soon as we shall
have passed the neutral point, the base of the Pro-
jectile, its heaviest part, will swing around gradually
until it faces the Moon. Before this phenomenon,
however, can take place, we must of course cross
the line.”

“* Cross the line!’’ cried the Frenchman ; ‘¢ then
let us imitate the sailors when they do the same
thing in the Atlantic Ocean! Splice the main
brace!”

A slight effort carried him sailing over to the side
of the Projectile. Opening a cupboard and taking
out a bottle and a few glasses, he placed them ona
tray. Then setting the tray itself in the air as ona
table in front of his companions, he filled the
glasses, passed them around, and, in a lively speech

To
£26 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

$

interrupted with many a joyous hurrah, congratite
lated his companions on their glorious achievement
in being the first that ever crossed the lunar line.

This counteracting influence of the attractions
lasted nearly an hour, By that time the travellers
could keep themselves on the floor without much
efforts Barbican also made his companions remark
that the conical point of the Projectile diverged a
little from the direct line to the Moon, while by an
inverse movement, as they could notice through the
window of the floor, the bise was gradually turning
away from the Earth, The Lunar attraction was
evidently getting the better of the Terrestrial. The
fall towards the Moon, though still almost insensi-
ble, was certainly beginning. .

It could not be more than the eightieth part of an
inch in the first second. But by degrees, as the at-
tractive force would increase, the fall would be more
decided, and the Projectile, overbalanced by its base,
and presenting its cone to the Earth, would descend
with accelerated velocity to the Lunar surface. The
object of their daring attempt would: then be suc-
cessfully attained. No further. obstacle, therefore,
being likely to stand in the way of the complete
success of the enterprise, the Captain and the
Frenchman cordially shook hands with Barbican, all
kept congratulating each other on their good fortune
as long as the bottle lasted.

They could not talk enough about the wonderful
phenomenon lately witnessed ; the chief point, the
heutralization of the law of ‘gravity, particularly,
THE NEUTRAL POINT, 147

supplied them with an inexhaustible subject. The
Frenchman, as usual, as enthusiastic in his fancy, as
he was fanciful in his enthusiasm, got off some
characteristic remarks.

‘‘What a fine thing it would be, my boys,’’ he
exclaimed, ‘‘if on Earth we could be so fortunate as
we have been here, and get rid of that weight that
keeps us down like lead, that rivets us to it like an
adamantine chain! Then should we prisoners be-
come free! Adieu forever to all weariness of arms
or feet! At present, in order to fly over the surface
of the Earth by the simple exertion of our muscles
or even to sustain ourselves in the air, we require a
muscular force fifty times greater than we possess;
but if attraction did not exist, the simplest act of
the will, our slightest whim even, would be sufficient
to transport us to whatever part of space we wished
to visit.”’ 5

“* Ardan, you had better invent something to kill
attraction, ’? observed ‘M’ Nicholl drily ; ‘* you can
do it if youtry. Jackson and Morton have killed
pain by sulphuric ether. Suppose you try your
hand on attraction!”

“Tt would be worth a trial!’’ cried Ardan, so
full of his subject as not to notice the Captain’s
jeering tone; ‘attraction once destroyed, there is
an end forever to all loads, packs and burdens!
How the poor omnibus horses would rejoice! Adieu
forever to all cranes, derricks, capstans, jack-screws,
and even hotel-elevators! We could dispense with
all ladders, door steps, and even stair-cases | ”’
r48 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

‘¢ And with all houses too,’’ interrupted Barbi-
can; ‘for, at least, we shoud? dispense with them
because we could not have them. If there was no
weight, you could neither make a wall of bricks nor
cover your house with a roof. Even your hat would
not stay on your head. The cars would not stay on
the railway nor the boats on the water. What dol
say? We could not have any water. Even the
Ocean would leave its bed and float away into space.
Nay, the atmosphere itself would leave us, being de-
tained in its place by terrestrial attraction and by
nothing else.’’

‘“¢Too true, Mr. President,’’ replied Ardan after
a pause. ‘It’s a fact. I acknowledge the corn, as
Marston says. But how you positive fellows do
knock holes into our pretty little creations of
fancy! ”’

‘Don’t feel so‘ bad about it, Ardan ;’’ observed
M’Nicholl ; ‘*though there may be no orb from
which gravity is excluded altogether, we shall soon
land in one, where it is much less powerful than on
the Earth.’’

“You mean the Moon! ’’

“Yes, the Moon. Her mass being ,/; of the
Earth’s, her attractive power should be in the same
proportion; that is, a boy 10 years old, whose
weight on Earth is about go tbs., would weigh on
the Moon only about 1 pound, if nothing else were
to be taken into consideration. But when standing
on the surface of the Moon, he is relatively 4 times
nearer to the centre than when he is standing on the

23
THE NEUTRAL POINT. IgQ

surface of the Earth. His weight, therefore, having
to be increased by the square of the distance, must
be sixteen times greater. Now 16 times 1, being less
than 4, it is clear that my weight of 150 pounds
will be cut down to nearly 30 as soon as we reach
the Moon’s surface.’’

‘And mine?’’ asked Ardan. ;

“Yours will hardly reach 25 pounds, I should
think,’’ was the reply.

«Shall my muscular strength diminish in the
same proportion ?’’ was the next question.

‘On the contrary, it will be relatively so much
the more increased that you can take a stride 15 feet
in width as easily as you can now take one of ordi-
nary length.”

**We shall be all Samsons, then, in the Moon!’’
cried Ardan.,

“Especially,’’ replied M’Nicholl, ‘‘if the stature
of the Selenites is in proportion to the mass of their
globe.” «

‘Tf so, what should be their height ? ”’

“*A tall man would hardly be twelve inches in his
boots !?”

“They must be veritable Lilliputians then !”’
cried Ardan; ‘and we are all to be Gullivers!
The old myth of the Giants realized ! Perhaps the
Titans that played such famous parts in the prehis-
toric period of our Earth, were adventurers like our-
selves, casually arrived from some great planet !”’

“Not from such planets as Afercury, Venus or
4tars anyhow, friend Michael,’? observed Barbi-
IZO ALL AROUND THE MOON.

can. ‘But the inhabitants of Jupiter, Saturn,
Tranus, or Neptune, if they bear the same propor-
tion to their planet that we do ours, must certainly
be regular Brobdignagians.””

“‘Let us keep severely away from all planets of
the latter class then,’’ said Ardan. ‘I never liked
to play the part of Lilliputian myself! But how
about the Sun, Barbican? I always had a hankering
after the Sunt” .

“‘The Sun’s volume is about 134 million times
greater than that of the Earth, but his density being
only about 1%, the attraction on his surface is hardly
30 times greater than that of our globe. Still, every
proportion observed, the inhabitants of the Sun
can’t be much less than 350 or 160 feet in height.”

“* Nile tonnerres !?’ cried Ardan, ‘‘I should be
there like Ulysses among the Cyclops! Tl tell you
what it is, Barbican ; if we ever decide on going to
the Sun, we must provide ourselves before hand with
a few of your Rodman’s Columbiads to frighten off
the Solarians !””

“‘ Vour Columbiads would nat do great execution
there,’’? observed M’Nicholl; ‘* your bullet would
be hardly out of the barrel when it would drop to
tue surface like a heavy stone pushed off the wall of
a house.’?

‘“‘Oh! I like that!’’ laughed the incredulous
Ardan.

“© A little calculation, however, shows the Captain’s
remark to be perfectly just,’’ said Barbican. ‘ Rod-
man’s ordinary 15 inch Columbiad requires a charge
THE NEUTRAL POINT, ISL

of roo pounds of mammoth powder to throw a ball
of 500 pounds weight. What could such a charge
do with a ball weighing 30 times as much or 15,000
pounds ? Reflect on the enormous weight every-
thing must have on the surface of the Sun! Your
hat, for instance, would weigh 20 or 30 pounds,
Your cigar nearly a pound. In short, your own
weight on the Sun’s surface would be so great, more
than two tons, that if you ever fell you should never
be able to pick yourself up again! ’?

““Yes,”” added the Captain, ‘¢and whenever you
wanted to eat or drink you should rig up a set of
powerful machinery to hoist the eatables and drink-
ables into your mouth’? |

‘Enough of the Sun to-day, boys!’’ cried Ardan,
shrugging his shoulders ; ‘‘I don’t contemplate going
there at present. Let us be satisfied with the Moon !
There, at least, we shall be of some account ! ”
CHAPTER IX.
A LITTLE OFF THE TRACK.

BaRBICAN’s mind was now completely at rest at
least on one subject. The original force of the
discharge had been great enough to send the Pro-
jectile beyond the neutral line. Therefore, thete
was no longer any danger of its falling back to the
Earth. Therefore, there was no longer any danger
of its resting eternally motionless on the point of
the counteracting attractions. The next subject to
engage his attention was the question: would the
Projectile, under the influence of lunar attraction,
succeed in reaching its destination ?

The only way in which it could succeed was by
faliing through a space of nearly 24,000 miles and
then striking the Moon’s ‘surface. A most terrific
fall! Even taking the lunar attraction to be only
the one-sixth of the Earth’s, such a fall was simply
bewildering to think of. The greatest height to
which a balloon ever ascended was seven miles
(Glaisher, 1862). Imagine a fall from even that
distance! Then imagine a fall from a height of
four thousand miles!

Yet it was for a fall of this appalling kind on a
surface of the Moon that the travellers had now to
prepare themselves. Instead of avoiding it, how-

ever, they eagerly desired it and would be very
(452) .
A LITTLE OFF THE TRACK. ~ I53

much disappointed if they missed it. They had
taken the best precautions they could devise to
guard against the terrific shock. These were mainly
of two kinds: one was intended to counteract as
much as possible the fearful results to be expected
the instant the Projectile touched the lunar surface ;
the other, to retard the velocity of the fall itself,
and thereby to render it less violent.

‘The best arrangement of the nrst kind was cer-
tainly Barbican’s water-contrivance for counteract-
ing the shock at starting, which has been so fully
described in our former volume. (See Baltimore
Gun Club, page 353.) But unfortunately it could
be no longer employed. Even if the partitions
were in working order, the water—two thousand
pounds in weight had been required—was no longer
to be had. ‘he little still left in the tanks was of
no account for such a purpose. Besides, they had
not a single drop of the precious liquid to spare, for
they were as yet anything but sanguine regarding
the facility of finding water on the Moon’s surface,

Fortunately, however, as the gentle reader may
remember, Barbican, besides using: water to break
the concussion, had provided the movable disc with
stout pillars containing a strong buffing apparatus,
intended to protect it from striking the bottom too
violently after the destruction of the different parti-
tions. These buffers were still good, and, gravity
being as yet almost imperceptible, to put them once

more in order and adjust them to the disc was not a
difficult task,


I54 ALL AROUND THE HOON.

The travellers set to work at once and soon
accomplished it. The different pieces were put
together readily—a mere matter of bolts and screws,
with plenty of taols to manage them. In a short
time the repaired disc rested on its steel buffers, like
a table on its legs, or rather like a sofa seat on its
springs. ‘The new arrangement was attended with
at least one disadvantage. The bottom light being
covered up, a convenient view of the Moon’s sur-
face could not be had as soon as they should begin
to fall in a perpendicular descent. This, however,
was only a slight matter, as the side lights would
permit the adventurers to enjoy quite as favorable a
view of the vast regions of the Moon as is afforded
to balloon travellers when looking down on the
Earth over the sides of their car.

The disc arrangement was completed in about an
hour, but it was not till past twelve o’clock before
things were restored to their usual order. Barbican
then tried to make fresh observations regarding the
inclination of the Projectile ; but to his very decided
chagrin he found that it had not yet turned over
sufficiently to commence the perpendicular fall: on
the contrary, it even seemed to be following a curve
rather, parallel with that of the lunar disc. The
Queen of the Stars now glittered with a light more
dazzling than ever, whilst from an opposite part of
the sky, the glorious King of Day flooded her with
his fires.

The situation began to look a little serious.

‘*Shall we ever get there!’’ asked the Captain.
A LITTLE OFF THE TRACK. 55

«Let us be prepared for getting there any how,”’
was Barbican’s dubious reply.

“You're a pretty pair of suspenders,’’ said Ardan
cheerily 3 (he meant of course doubting hesitators,
but his fluent command of English sometimes led
him into such solecisms). ‘* Certainly we shall get
there—and perhaps a little sooner than will be good
for us.””

This reply sharply recalled Barbican to the task
he had undertaken, and he now went to work
seriously, trying to combine arrangements to break
the fall) The reader may perhaps remember Ar-
dan’s reply to the Captain on the. day of the
famous meeting in Tampa,

“Your fall would be violent enough,’’ the Cap-
tain had urged, ‘‘to splinter you like glass into a
thousand fragments.’’

* And what shall prevent me,’’ had been Ardan’s
ready reply, ‘from breaking my fall by means of
counteracting rockets suitably disposed, and let off
at the proper time ?”’

The practical utility of this idea had at once im-
pressed Barbican. It could hardly be doubted that
powerful rockets, fastened on the outside to the bot-
tom of the Projectile, could, when. discharged, con-
siderably retard the velocity of the fall by their
sturdy recoil. They, could burn in a vacuum by
means of oxygen furnished by themselves, as powder
burns in the chamber of a gun, or as the volcanoes
of the Moon continue their action regardless of the
absence of a lunar atmosphere.
I56— ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Barbican had therefore provided himself with
rockets enclosed in strong steel gun barrels, grooved
on the outside so that they could ‘be screwed! into
corresponding holes already made with much care
in the bottom of the Projectile. They were just
long enough, when flush with the floor inside, to
project outside by about six inches, .They were
twenty in number, and formed two concentric cir-
cles around the dead light. Small holes in the disc
gave admission to the wires by which each of the
rockets was to be discharged externally by electric-
ity. he whole effect was therefore to be confined
to the outside. The mixtures having been already
carefully deposited in each barrel, nothing further
need be done than to take away the metallic plugs
which had been screwed into the bottom of the Pro-
jectile, and replace them by the rockets, every one
of which was found to fit its grooved chamber with
rigid exactness.

This evidently should have been all done before
the disc had been finally laid on its springs. But as:
this had to be lifted up again in order to reach the
bottom of the Projectile, more work was to be done
than was strictly necessary. Though the labor was
not very hard, considering that gravity had as yet
scarcely made itself felt, M’Nicholl and Ardan were
not sorry to have their little joke at Barbican’s ex-
pense, The Frenchman began humming

“ Aliquandoque bonus dormitat Homerus,”

to a tune from Orphée aux Enfers, and the Cap-
A LITTLE OFF THE TRACK. I57

tain said something about the Philadelphia Highway
Conimissioners who pave a street one day and tear
it up the next to lay the gas pipes. But his friends’
humor was all lost on Barbican, who was so wrapped
up in his work that he probably never heard a word
they said.

Towards three o’clock every preparation was
made, every possible precaution taken, and now our
bold adventurers had nothing more to do than watch
and wait.

The Projectile was certainly approaching the
Moon. It had by this time turned over consider-
ably under the influence of attraction, but its own
original motion still followed a decidedly oblique
direction. The consequence of these two forces
might possibly be a tangent line approaching the
edge of the Moon’s disc. One thing was certain:
the Projectilehad not yet commenced to fall directly
towards her surface ; its base, in which its centre of
gravity lay, was still turned away considerably from
the perpendicular.

Barbican’s countenance soon showed perplexity
and even alarin, His Projectile was proving intract-
able to the laws of gravitation. The wxknown was
opening out dimly before him, the great boundless
unknown of the starry plains. In his pride and
confidence a3 a scientist, he had flattered himself
with having sounded the consequence of every
possible hypothesis regarding the Projectile’s ultimate
fate: the return to the Earth; the arrival at the
Moon; and the motionless dead stop at the neutral
Z58 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

point. But here, anew and incomprehensible fourth
hypothesis, big with the terrors of the mystic infinite,
rose up before his disturbed mind, like a grim and
hollow ghost. After a few seconds, however, he
looked at it straight in the face without wincing,
His companions showed themselves just as firm,
Whether it was science that emboldened Barbican,
his phlegmatic stoicism that propped up the Cap-
tain, or his enthusiastic vivacity that cheered the
irrepressible Ardan, I cannot exactly say. But cer-
tainly they were all soon talking over the matter as
calmly as you or I would discuss the advisability of
taking asail on the lake some beautful evening in
July.

Their first remarks were decidedly peculiar and
quite characteristic. Other men would have asked
themselves where the Projectile was taking them to.
Do you think such a question ever occurred to
them? Not a bit of it. They simply began ask-
ing each other what could have been the cause of
this new and strange state of things.

‘“‘Off the track, it appears,’’? observed Ardan.
‘¢ How’s that ?”’

‘* My opinion ‘is,’’ answered the Captain, that
the Projectile was not aimed true. Every possible
precaution had been taken, I am well aware, but we
all know that an inch, a line, even the tenth part of
a hair’s breadth wrong at the start would have sent
us thousands of miles off our course by this time.”

‘What have -you to say to that, Barbican?”
asked Ardan.
ALITTLE OF F THE TRACK, I59

“T don’t think there was any error at the start,’’
was the confident reply; ‘‘not even so much as a
line! We took too many tests proving the abso-
lute perpendicularity of the Columbiad, to enter-
tain the slightest doubt on that subject. Its direc-
tion towards the zenith being incontestable, I don’t
see why we should not reach the Moon when she
comes to the zenith.”’

‘Perhaps we’re behind time,’’ suggested Ardan.

“What have you to say to that, Barbican? ”’
asked the Captain. ‘* You know the Cambridge
men said the journey had to be done in 97 hours
13 minutes and 20 seconds. That’s as much as to
say that if we’re not up to time we shall miss the
Moon.”

“Correct,’? said Barbican. ‘‘ But we can’t be
behind time. We started, you know, on December
1st, at 13 minutes and 20 seconds before 11 o’clock,
and we were to arrive four days later at midnight
precisely. To-day is December 5th. Gentlemen,
please examine your watches. It is now half past
three in the afternoon. Eight hours and a half are
sufficient to take us to our journey’s end. Why
should we not arrive there? ’”

“How about being ahead of time?’’ asked the
Captain.

«Just so!’’ said Ardan. ‘* You know we have
discovered the initial velocity to have been greater
than was expected,”’

“Not at all! not at all!’’ cried Barbican. “A
slight excess of velocity would have done no harm
I60 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

whatever had the direction of the Projectile been
perfectly true. No. There must have been a
digression. We must have been switched off!”

“Switched off? By what?’’ asked both his
listeners in one breath.

“‘Tcan’t tell,’’ said Barbican curtly.

‘‘’Well!’? said Ardan; ‘‘if Barbican can’t tell,
there is an end. to all further talk on the subject.
We're switched off—that’s enough for me. What
has done it? I don’t care. Where are we going
to? I don’t care. What is the use of pestering
our brains about it? We shall soon find out. We
are floating around in space, and we shall end by
hauling up somewhere or other.”’

But in this indifference Barbican was far from par-
ticipating. Not that he was not prepared to meet
the future with a bold and manly heart. It was his
inability to answer his own question that rendered
him uneasy. What iad switched them off? He
would have given worlds for an answer, but his
brain sorely puzzled sought one in vain.

In the mean time, the Projectile continued to turn
its side rather than its base towards the Moon ; that
is, to assume a lateral rather than a direct movement,
and this movement was fully participated in by the
multitude of the objects that had been thrown out-
side. Barbican could even convince himseif by
sighting several points on. the lunar surface, by this
time hardly more than fifteen or eighteen thousand
miles distant, that the velocity of the Projectile in-
stead of accelerating was becoming more and more
A LITTLE OFF THE TRACK. IOL

uniform, This was another proof that there was no
perpendicular fall. However, though the original
impulsive force was still superior to the Moon’s
attraction, the travellers were evidently approaching
the lunar disc, and there was every reason to hope
that they would at last reach a point where, the
lunar attraction at last having the best of it, a de-
cided fall should be the result.

The three friends, it need hardly be said, con-
tinued to make their observations with redoubled
interest, if redoubled interest were possible. But
with all their care they could as yet determine noth-
ing regarding the topographical details of our radiant
satellite. Her surface still reflected’ the solar rays
too dazzlingly to show the relief necessary for satis-
factory observation.

Our travellers kept steadily on the watch looking
out of the side lights, till eight o’clock in the even-
ing, by which time the Moon had grown so large in
their eyes that she covered up fully half the sky. At
this time the Projectile itself must have looked like
a streak of light, reflecting, as it did, the Sun’s
brilliancy on the one side and the Moon’s splendor
on the other.

Barbican now took a careful observation and cal-
culated that they could not be much more than
2,000 miles from the object of their journey. The
velocity of the Projectile he calculated to be about
650 feet per second or 450 miles an hour. They had
therefore still plenty of time to reach the Moon in

about four hours, But though the bottom of the Pro-
IL
762 ALL AROUND THE SJIOON.,

jectile continued to turn towards the lunar surface
in obedience to the law of centripetal force, the
centrifugal force was still evidently strong enough to
change the path which it followed into some kind
of curve, the exact nature of which would be ex.
ceedingly difficult to calculate.

The careful observations that Barbican continued
to take did not however prevent him from endeavor-
ing to solve his difficult problem. What had
switched them off? The hours passed on, but
brought no result. That the adventurers were
approaching the Moon was evident, but it was just
as evident that they should never reach her. ‘The
nearest point the Projectile could ever possibly
attain would only be the result of two opposite
forces, the attractive and the repulsive, which, .as
was now clear, influenced its motion. Therefore, to
land in the Moon was an utter impossibility, and
any such idea was to be given up at once and for
ever.

“* Quand méme! What of it!’’ cried Ardan;
after some moments’ silence. ‘‘ We’re not to land
in the Moon! Well! let us do the next best thing
—pass close enough to discover her secrets !”’

But M’Nicholl could not accept the situation so
coolly. On the contrary, he decidedly lost his
temper, as is occasionally the case with even phleg-
matic men. He muttered an oath or two, but ina
voice hardly loud enough to reach Barbican’s ear
At last, impatient of further restraint, he burst out:

‘‘Who the deuce cares for her secrets? To the
A LITTLE OFF THE TRACK. 163

hahgman with her secrets! We started to land in
the Moon! That’s what’s got to be done! That I
want or nothing! Confound the darned thing, I
say, whatever it was, whether on the Earth or off it,
that shoved us off the track !”’

“‘On the Earth or off it!’’ cried Barbican, strik-
ing his head suddenly ; ‘* nowI see it! You're right,
Captain! Confound the bolide that we met the
first night of our journey !”’

“Hey? ’? cried Ardan,

«What do you mean ?’’ asked M’ Nicholl.

‘‘T mean,”’ replied Barbican, with a voice now
perfectly calm, and in a tone of quiet conviction,
“that our deviation is due altogether to that wander-
ing meteor.”

“Why, it did not even graze us!’? cried Ardan.

‘No matter for that,’’ replied Barbican. << Its
mass, compared to ours, was enormous, and its at-
traction was undoubtedly sufficiently great to influ-
ence our deviation.”’

“Hardly enough to be appreciable,’’ urged
M’ Nicholl.

“Right again, Captain,’’? observed Barbican,
“But just remember an observation of your own
made this very afternoon: an inch, a line, even the
tenth part of a hair’s breadth wrong at the begin-
ning, ina journey of 240 thousand miles, would be
quite sufficient to make us miss the Moon!”
CHAPTER X.
THE OBSERVERS OF THE MOON.

BarbIcan’s happy conjecture had probably hit the
nail on the head. . The divergency even of a second
may amount to millions of miles if you only have
your lines long enough. The Projectile had certainly
gone off its direct course; whatever the cause, the
fact was undoubted. It was a great. pity. The
daring attempt must end in a failure due altogether
to a fortuitous accident, against which no human
foresight could have possibly taken precaution
Unless in case of the occurrence of some other
most improbable accident, reaching the Moon was
evidently now impossible. To failure, therefore,
our travellers had to make up their minds.

But was nothing to be gained by the trip? Though
missing actual contact with the Moon, might they
not pass near enough to solve several problems in
physics and geology over which scientists had been
for a long time puzzling their brains in vain? Even
this would be some compensation for all their
rouble, courage, and intelligence. As to what was
to be their own fate, to what doom were themselves
to be reserved—they never appeared to think of
such a thing. They knew very well. that in the
midst of those.infinite solitudes they should soon
find themselves without air. The slight supply that

(x64)
THE OBSERVERS OF THE MOON, 165

kept them from smothering could not possibly last
more than five or six days longer. Five or six days !
What of that? Quand méme/ as Ardan often ex-
claimed. Five or six days were centuries to our bold
adventurers! At present every second was a year in
events, and infinitely too precious to be squandered
away in mere preparations for possible contingen-
cies. ‘The Moon could never be reached, but was it
not possible that her surface could be carefully ob-
served ? This they set themselves at once to find out.

The distance now separating them from our Satel-
lite they estimated at about 400 miles, Therefore
relatively to their power of discovering the details
of her disc, they were still farther off from the
Moon than some of our modern astronomers are to-
day, when provided with their powerful telescopes.

We know, for example, that Lord Rosse’s great
telescope at Parsonstown, possessing a power of
magnifying 6000 times, brings the Moon to within
40 miles of us; not to speak of Barbican’s great tele-
scope on the summit of Long’s Peak, by which the
Moon, magnified 48,000 times, was brought within
5 miles of the Earth, where it therefore could reveal
with sufficient distinctness every object above 4o feet
in diameter.

Therefore our adventurers, though at such a com-
paratively small distance, could not make out the
topographical details of the Moon with any satisfac-
tion by their unaided vision. The eye indeed could
easily enough catch the rugged outline of these vast
depressions improperly called **Seas,’’ but it could
766 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

do very little more. Its powers of adjustability
seemed to fail before-the strange and bewildering
scene. The prominence of the mountains vanished,
not only through the foreshortening, but also in the
dazzling radiation produced by the direct reflection
of the solar rays. After a short time therefore, com.
pletely foiled by the blinding glare, the eye turned
itself unwillingly away, as if from a furnace’ of
molten silver.

The spherical surface, however, had long since
begun to reveal its convexity. The Moon was
gradually assuming the appearance of a gigantic
egg with the smaller end turned towards the Farth
in the earlier days of her formation, while still ina
state of mobility, she had been probably a perfect
sphere in shape, but, under the influence of terres
trial gravity operating for uncounted ages, she was
drawn at last so much towards the centre of attraction
as to resemble somewhat a prolate spheriod. By
becoming a satellite, she had lost the native perfect
regularity of her outline; her centre of gravity had
shifted from her real centre; and as a result of this
arrangement, some scientists have drawn the conclu:
sion that the Moon’s air and water have been at-
tracted to that portion of her surface which is
always invisible to the inhabitants of the Earth.

The convexity of her outline, this bulging promi-
nence of her surface, however, did not last long.
The travellers were getting too near to notice it
They were beginning to survey the Moon as balloon-
ists survey: the Earth, The Projectile was now mov
THE OBSERVERS OF THE MOON. 67

ing with great rapidity—with nothing like its initial
velocity, but still eight or nine times faster than an
express train. Its line of movement, however, be-
ing oblique instead of direct, was so deceptive as to
induce Ardan to flatter himself that they might still
reach the lunar surface. He could never persuade
himself to believe that they should get so near their
aim and still miss it. No nothing might, could,
would or should induce him to believe it, he re-
peated again and again. But Barbican's pitiless
logic left him no reply.

‘*No, dear friend, no. We can reach the Moon
only by a fall, and we don’t fall. Centripetal force
keeps us at least for a while under the lunar influence,
but centrifugal force drives us away irresistibly.”

These words were uttered in a tone that killed
Ardan’s last and fondest hope.

The portion of the Moon they were now approach-
ing was her northern hemisphere, found usually in the
lower part of lunar maps. The lens of a telescope,
as is well known, gives only the inverted image of
the object; therefore, when an upright image is re-
quired, an additional glass must be used. But as
every additional glass is an additional obstruction to
the light, the object glass of a Lunar telescope is
employed without a corrector ; light is thereby saved,
and in viewing the Moon, as in viewing a map, it
evidently makes very little difference whether we see
her inverted or not. Maps of the Moon therefore,
being drawn from the image formed by the telescope,
168 ALL AROUND THE HOON.

show the north in the lower part, and wice versa,
Of this kind was the Jdfaspa Selenographica, by
Beer and Maedler, so often previously alluded to and
now carefully consulted by Barbican. The northern
hemisphere, towards. which they were now rapidly
approaching, presented a strong contrast with the
southern, by its vast plains and great depressions,
checkered here and there by very remarkable isolated
mountains,*

At midnight the Moon was full. This was the
precise moment at which the travellers would have
landed had not that unlucky bolide drawn them off
the track, The Moon was therefore strictly up to
time, arriving at the instant rigidly determined by
the Cambridge Observatory. She occupied the
exact point, to a mathematical nicety, where our
28th parallel crossed the perigee. An_ observer
posted in the bottom of the Columbiad at Stony
Hill, would have found himself at this moment pre-
cisely under the Moon. The axis of the enormous
gun, continued upwards vertically, would have struck
the orb of night exactly in her centre.

It is hardly necessary to tell our readers that,
during this memorable night of the 5th and 6th of
December, the travellers had no desire to close their



* In our Map of the Moon, prepared expressly for this
work, we have so far improved on Beer and Maedler as to
give her surface as it appears to the naked eye: that is, the
north is inthe north; only we must always remember that
the west is and must be on the right and.
THE OBSERVERS OF THE MOON, 169

eyes. Could they do so, even if they had desired ?
No! All their faculties, thoughts, and desires, were
concentrated in one single word: ‘*Look!’’ Rep-
resentatives of the Earth, and of all humanity past
and present, they felt that it was with their eyes that
the race of man contemplated the lunar regions and
penetrated the secrets of our satellite! A certain
indescribable emotion therefore, combined with an
undefined sense of responsibility, held possession of
their hearts, as they moved silently from window to
window,

Their observations, recorded by Barbican, were
vigorously remade,. revised, and re-determined, by
the others. To make them, they had telescopes
which they now began to employ with great advan-
tage.. To regulate and investigate them, they had
the best maps of the day. ;

Whilst occupied in this silent work, they could
not help throwing ‘a short retrospective glance on
the former Observers of the Moon.

The first of these was Galileo. His slight tele-
scope magnified only thirty times, still, in, the spots
flecking the lunar surface, like the eyes checkering a
peacock’s tail, he was the first to discover mountains
and even to measure their heights. These, con-
sidering the difficulties under which he labored,
were wonderfully accurate, but unfortunately he
made-no map embodying his observations.

A few years afterwards, Hevel of Dantzic,
(1611-1688) a Polish astronomer—more generally
known. as Hevelius, his works being all written in
£70 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Latin—undertook to correct Galileo’s measurements,
But as his method could be strictly accurate only
twice a month—the periods of the first and second
quadratures—his rectifications could be hardly called
successful.

Still it is to the labors of this eminent astron+
omer, carried on uninterruptedly for fifty years in
his own observatory, that we owe the first map of
the Moon. It was published in 1647 under the
name of Selenographia. He represented the circu
lar mountains by open spots somewhat round in
shape, and by shaded figures he indicated the vast
plains, or, as he called them, the seas, that occupied
so much of her surface. These he designated by
names taken from our Earth. His map shows you
a Afount Sina? in the midst of an Aradta, an Aetna
in the centre of a Siczly, Alps, Apennines, Car-
pathians, a Alediterranean, a Palus Meotis, a Pontus
Luxinus, and a Caspian Sea. But these names seem
to have been given capriciously and at random, for
they never recall any resemblance existing between
themselves and their namesakes on our globe. In
the wide open spot, for instance, connected on the
south with vast continents and terminating in a
point, it would be no easy matter to recognize the
reversed image of the Zudian Peninsula, the Bay of
Bengal, and Cochin China. Naturally, therefore,
these names were nearly all soon dropped; but
another system of nomenclature, proposed by an
astronomer better acquainted with the human heart,
met with a success that has lasted to the present day.
THE OBSERVERS OF 111i MOON, LLL

This was Father Riccioli, a Jesuit, and (1598-1671)
acotemporary of Hevelius. In his Astronomia Re-
formata (1663), he published a rough and incorrect
map of the Moon, compiled from observations made
by Grimaldi of Ferrara; but in designating the
mountains, he named them after eminent astrono-
mers, and this idea of his has been carefully carried
out by map makers of later times.

A third map of the Moon was published at Rome
in 1666 by Dominico Cassini of Nice (1625-1712),
the famous discoverer of Saturn’s satellites. Though
somewhat incorrect regarding measurements, it was
superior to Riccioli’s in execution, and for a long
time it was considered a standard work. Copies of
this map are still to be found, but Cassini’s original
copper-plate, preserved for a long time at the Zpri-
merie Royale in Paris, was at last sold to a brazier,
by no less a personage than the Director of the estab-
lishment himself, who, according to Arago, wanted
to get rid of what he considered useless lumber !

La Hire (1640-1718), professor of astronomy in
the College de France, and an accomplished draughts-
man, drew a map of the Moon which was thirteen
feet in diameter. This map could be seen long after-
wards in the library of St. Genevieve, Paris, but it
was never engraved.

About 1760, Mayer, a famous German astronomer
and the director of the observatory of Gdéttingen,
began the publication of a magnificent map of the
Moon, drawn after lunar measurements all rigorously
verified by himself. Unfortunately his death in 1762
17, ALL AROUND THE MOON.

interrupted a work which would have surpassed in
accuracy every previous effort of the kind.

Next appears Schroeter of Erfurt (1745-1816), a
fine observer (he first discovered the Lunar /7//s), but
a poor draughtsman : his maps are therefore of little
value. Lohrman of Dresden published in 1838 an
excellent map of the Moon, 15 inches in diameter,
accompanied by descriptive text and several charts
of particular portions on a larger scale.

But this and all other maps were thrown com-
pletely into:the shade by Beer and Maedler’s famous
Afappa Selenozraphica, so often alluded to in the
course of this‘:work. This map, projected orthogra-
phically—that is, one in which all the rays proceed-
ing from the surface to the eye are supposed to be
parallel to each other—gives a reproduction of the
lunar disc exactly as it appears. The representation
of the mountains and plains is therefore correct only
in the central portion ; elsewhere, north, south, east,
or west, the features, being foreshortened, are
crowded together, and cannot be compared in
measurement with those in the centre. It is more
than three feet square ; for convenient reference it is
divided into four parts, each having a very full in-
dex; in short, this map is in all respects a master
piece of lunar cartography.*

* In our Map the Mappa Selenographica is copied as
closely and as fully as is necessary for understanding the de-
tails of the story. For further information the reader is re-
ferred to Nasmyth’s late magnificent work: the MOON,
THE OBSERVERS OF THE MOON. 173

After Beer and Maedler, we should allude to Julius
Schmitt’s (of Athens) excellent selenographic reliefs :
to Doctor Draper’s, and to Father Secchi’s success-
ful application of photography to lunar representa-
tion; to De La Rue’s (of London) magnificent
stereographs of the Moon to be had at every opti-
cian’s ; to the clear and correct map prepared by Le-
couturier and Chapuis in 1860; to the many beautiful
pictures of the Moon in various phases of illumina-
tion obtained by the Messrs. Bond of Harvard Uni-
versity; to Rutherford’s (of New York) unparalleled
lunar photographs; and finally to Nasmyth and
Carpenter’s wonderful work on the Moon, illus-
trated by photographs of her surface in detail, -pre-
pared from models at which they had been laboring
for more than a quarter of the century.

Of ail these maps, pictures, and projections, Bar-
bican had provided himself with only two—Beer
and Maedler’s in German, and Lecouturier and
Chapuis’ in French. These he considered quite sufii-
cient for all purposes, and certainly they consider-
ably simplified his labors as an observer.

His best optical instruments were several excellent
marine telescopes, manufactured especially under his
direction, Magnifying the object a hundred times,
on the surface of the Earth they would have brought
the Moon to within a distance of somewhat less than
2400 miles, But at the point to which our travellers
had arrived towards three o’clock in the morning,
and which could hardly be more than 12 or 1300 miles
from the Moon, these telescopes, ranging through a
L7F ALE AROUND THE JIOON,

medium disturbed by no atmosphere, easily brought
the lunar surface to within less than 13 miles’ distance
from the eyes of our adventurers.

Therefore they should now see objects in the
Moon as clearly as people can see the opposite bank
of ariver that is about 12 miles wide.
CHAPTER XI.
FACT AND FANCY.

‘‘TTavE you ever seen the Moon?’’ said a teacher
ironically one day in class to one of his pupils.

“No, sir;’? was the pert reply; ‘‘ but I think I
can safely say I’ve heard it spoken about.’’

Though saying what he considered a smart thing,
the pupil was probably perfectly right. Like the
immense majority of his fellow beings, he had
looked at the Moon, heard her talked of, written
poetry about her, but, in the strict sense of the
term, he had probably never seen her—that is—
scanned her, examined her, surveyed her, inspected
her, reconnoitred her—even with an opera glass !
Not one in a thousand, not one in ten thousand, has
ever examined even the map of our only Satellite.
To guard our beloved and intelligent reader against
this reproach, we have prepared an excellent reduc-
tion of Beer and Maedler’s Afapfpa, on which, for
the better understanding of what is to follow, we
hope he will occasionally cast a gracious eye.

When you look at any map of the Moon, you are
struck first of all with one ptculiarity. Contrary to
the arrangement prevailing in Mars and on our
Earth, the continents occupy principally the southern
hemisphere of the lunar orb, Then these continents
are far from presenting such sharp and regular out-

(775)
176 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

lines as distinguish the Indian Peninsula, Africa, and
South America, On the contrary, their coasts, angu-
lar, jagged, and deeply indented, abound in bays and
peninsulas. They remind you of the coast of Nor-
way, or of the islands in the Sound, where the land
seems to be cut up into endless divisions. If navi-
gation ever existed on the Moon’s suface, it must
have been of a singularly difficult and dangerous
nature, and we can scarcely say which of the two
should be more pitied—the sailors who had to steer
through these dangerous and complicated passes, or
the map-makers who had to designate them on their
charts.

You will also remark that the southern pole of
the Moon is much more continental than the northern.
Around the latter, there exists only a slight fringe of
lands separated from the other continents by vast
“* seas.’ This word ‘‘seas’’—a term employed by
the first lunar map constructors—is still retained to
designate those vast depressions on the Mcon’s sur-
face, once perhaps covered with water, though
they are ncw only enormous plains. In the south,
the continents cover nearly the whole hemisphere.
It is therefore possible that the Selenites have planted
their flag on at least one of their poles, whereas the
Parrys and Franklins of England, the Kanes and the
Wilkeses of America, the Dumont d’Urvilles and
the Lamberts of France, have so far met with ob-
stacles completely insurmountable, while in search of
those unknown points of our terrestrial globe.

The islands—the next feature on the Moon’s sur-
FACT AND FANCY. 177

face—are exceedingly numerous. Generally oblong
or circular in shape and almost as regular in outline
as if drawn with a compass, they form vast archipela-
goes like the famous group lying between Greece and
Asia Minor, which mythology has made the scene
of her earliest and most charming legends. As we
gaze at them, the names of Naxos, Tenedos, Milo,
and Carpathos rise up before our mind’s eye, and we
begin looking around for the Trojan fleet and Jason’s
Argo. ‘This, at least, was Ardan’s idea, and at first
his eyes would see nothing on the map but a Grecian
archipelago. But his companions, sound practical
men, and therefore totally devoid of sentiment,
were reminded by these rugged coasts of the beet-
ling cliffs of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia; so
that, where the Frenchman saw the tracks of ancient
heroes, the Americans saw only commodious ship-
ping points and favorable sites for trading posts—
all, of course, in the purest interest of lunar com-
merce and industry.

To end our hasty sketch of the continental por-
tion of the Moon, we must say a few words regard-
ing her oreography or mountain systems. With a
fair telescope you can distinguish very readily her
mountain chains, her isolated mountains, her cir-
cuses or ring formations, and her rills, cracks and
radiating streaks. The character of the whole lunar
relief is comprised in these divisions. It is a surface
prodigiously reticulated, upheaved and depressed,
apparently without the slightest order or system. It

18a vast Switzerland, an enormous Norway, where
T2
178 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

everything is the result of direct plutonic action.
This surface, so rugged, craggy and wrinkled, seems
to be the result of successive contractions of the
crust, at an early period of the planet’s existence,
The examination of the lunar disc is therefore
highly favorable for the study of the great geological
phenomena of our own globe. As certain astrono-
mers have remarked, the Moon’s surface, though
older than the Earth’s, has remained younger.
That is, it has undergone less change. No water
has broken through its rugged elevations, filled up
its scowling cavities, and by incessant action tended
continuously to the production of a general level.
No atmosphere, by its disintegrating, decomposing
influence has softened off the rugged features of the
plutonic mountains. Volcanic action alone, unaf-
fected by either aqueous or atmospheric forces, can
here be seen in all its glory. In other words the
Moon looks now as our Earth did endless ages ago,
when ‘‘ she was void and empty and when darkness
sat upon the face of the deep ;’’ eons of ages ago,
long before the tides of the ocean and the winds of
the atmosphere had begun to strew her rough sur-
face with sand and clay, rock and coal, forest and
meadow, gradually preparing it, according to the laws
of our beneficent Creator, to be at last the pleasant
though the temporary abode of Man!

Having wandered over vast continents, your eye
is attracted by the ‘‘seas’’ of dimensions still vaster.
Not only their shape, situation, and look, remind us
of our own oceans, but, again like them, they occupy
FACT AND FANCY, I79

the greater part of the Moon’ssurface. The ‘‘seas,’’
or, more correctly, plains, excited our travellers’
curiosity to a very high degree, and they set them-
selves at once to examine their nature.

The astronomer who first gave names to those
‘seas’? in all probability was a Frenchman. MHeve-
lius, however, respected them, even Riccioli did not
disturb them, and so they have come down to us.
Ardan laughed heartily at the fancies which they
called up, and said the whole thing reminded him
of one of those ‘maps of matrimony ’’ that he had
once seen or read of in the works of Scudéry or
Cyrano de Bergerac.

“However,’’ he added, ‘‘I must say that this
map has much more reality in it than could be found
in the sentimental maps of the 17th century. In
fact, I have no difficulty whatever in calling it the
Map of Life! very neatly divided into two parts,
the east and the west, the masculine and the feminine.
The women on the right, and the men on the left !”

At such observations, Ardan’s companions ‘only
shrugged their shoulders. A map of the Moon in
their eyes was a map of the Moon, no more, no less ;
their romantic friend might view it as he pleased.
Nevertheless, their romantic friend was not altogether
wrong. Judge a little for yourselves.

What is the first ‘sea’’ you find in the hemisphere
onthe left? The Afare Jmbrium or the Rainy Sea,
a fit embiem of our human life, beaten by many a piti-
less storm. In acorresponding part of the southern
hemisphere you see Mare Nudium, the Cloudy Sea, in
I8o ALL AROUND THE MOON.

which our-poor human reason so often gets befogged.
Close to this lies AZzre Humorum, the Sea of Humors,
where we sail about, the sport of each fitful breeze,
“everything by starts and nothing Jong.’’ Around
all, embracing all, lies Oveanus Procellarum, the
Ocean of Tempests, where, engaged in one con-
tinuous struggle with the gusty whirlwinds, excited
by our own passions or those of others, so few of us
escape shipwreck. And, when disgusted by the difi-
culties of life, its deceptions, its treacheries and
all the other miseries “that flesh is heir to,”
where do we too often fly to avoid them? To the
Staus Iridium or the Sinus Rorts, that is Rain-
bow Gulf and Dewy Gulf whose - glittering
lights, alas! give forth no real illumination to
guide our stumbling feet, whose sun-tipped pin-
nacles have less substance than a dream, whose
enchanting waters all evaporate before we can lift
a cup-full to our parched: lips! Showers, storms,
fogs, rainbows—is not the whole mortal life of
man comprised in these four words ?

Now turn to the hemisphere on the right, the
women’s side, and you also discover ‘* seas,’’ more
numerous indeed, but of smaller dimensions and
with gentler names, as more befitting the feminine
temperament. First comes AZare Serenitatis, the Sea
of Serenity, so expressive of the calm, tranquil soul
of an innocent maiden. Near it is Zacus Somniorum,
the Lake of Dreams, in which she loves to gaze at her
gilded and rosy future. In the southern division is
seen Afare Nectaris, the Sea of Nectar, over whose soft
FACT AND FANCY. 8

heaving billows she is gently wafted by Love’s cares-
sing winds, *‘ Youth on the prow and Pleasure at the
helm.’’ Not far off is Mare Fecunditatts, the Sea
of Fertility, in which she becomes the happy mother
of rejoicing children. A little north is 4dare
Crisium, the Sea of Crises where her life and hap-
piness are sometimes exposed to sudden and unex-
pected dangers which fortunately, however, seldom
end fatally. Far to the left, near the men’s side, is
Afare Vaporum, the Sea of Vapors, into which,
though it is rather small, and full of sunken rocks,
she sometimes allows herself to wander, moody, and
pouting, and not exactly knowing. where she wants
to go or what she wants to do. Between the two
last expands the great Mare Tranqutlittatis, the Sea
of Tranquillity, into whose quiet depths are at last
absorbed all her siinulated passions, all her futile
aspirations, all her unglutted desires, and whose un-
ruffled waters are gliding on forever in noiseless cur-
rent towards Zacus ALortis, the Lake of Death, whose
misty shores

“In ruthless, vast, and gloomy woods are girt.”

So at least Ardan mused as he stooped over Beer
and Maedler’s map. Did not these strange succes-
sive names somewhat justify his flights of fancy?
Surely they had a wonderful variety of meaning.
Was it by accident or by forethought deep that, the
two hemisperes of the Moon had been thus so
strangely divided, yet, as man to woman, though
divided still united, and thus forming even in the
z82 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

cold regions of space a perfect image of our terres.
trial existence ? Who can say that our romantic
French friend was altogether wrong in thus explain-
ing the astute fancies of the old astronomers?

His companions, however, it need hardly be said,
never saw the ‘‘seas’’ in that light.. They looked
on them not with sentimental but with geographical
eyes. They studied this new world and tried to get
it by heart, working at it like a school boy at his
lessons. They began by measuring its angles and
diameters.

To their practical, common sense vision JZare
Nubium, the Cloudy Sea, was an immense depres-
sion of the surface, sprinkled here and there with a
few circular mountains. Covering a geat portion of
that part of the southern hemisphere which lies east
of the centre, it occupied a space of about 270 thou-
sand square miles, its central point lying in 15° south
latitude and 20° east longitude. Northeast from this
lav Oceanus Procellarum, the Ocean of Tempests,
the most extensive of all the plains on the lunar
disc, embracing a surface of about half a million of
square miles, its centre being in 10° north and 45°
east. From its bosom those wonderful mountains
Kepler and Aristarchus lifted their vast raraparts
glittering with innumerable streaks radiating in all
directions.

To the north, in the direction of Aare Prigoris,
extends AZare Sindrium, the Sea of Rains, its cen-
tral point in 35° north and 20° east. It is some-
what circular in shape, and it covers a space of about
FACT AND FANCY. 783

300 thousand. square miles. South of Oceanus Pro-
cellarum and separated from Jfare Nulium by a
goodly number of ring mountains, lies the little basin
of Mare Humoruim, the Sea of Humors, containing
only about 66 thousand square miles, its central
point having a latitude of 25° south and a longitude
of 40° east.

On the shores of these great seas three ‘‘ Gulfs’’
are easily found: Szus Aestuum, the Gulf of the
Tides, northeast of the centre; Stxws Lridiuin, the
Gulf of the Rainbows, northeast of the Afare Jin-
brium; and Staus Loris, the Dewy Gulf, a little
further northeast. All seem to be small plains
enclosed between chains of lofty mountains,

The western hemisphere, dedicated to the ladies,
according to Ardan, and therefore naturally more
capricious, was remarkable for ‘‘seas’’ of smaller
dimensions, but much more numerous. These were
principally: Adare Serenttatis, the Sea of Serenity,
25° north and 20° west, comprising a surface of
about 130 thousand square miles; ure Criséum,
the Sea of Crises, a round, well defined, dark de-
pression towards the northwestern edge, 17° north
55° west, embracing a surface of 60 thousand square
miles, a regular Caspian Sea in fact, only that the
plateau in which it lies buried is surrounded by a
girdle of much higher mountains. Then towards
the equator, with a latitude of 5° north and a
longitude of 25° west, appears Afare Tranguillitatis,
the Sea of Tranquillity, occupying about 180 thou-
sand square miles, ‘This communicates on the south
ISd ALL AROUND THE MOON.

with Afare Neetaris, the Sea of Nectar, embracing
an extent of about 42 thousand square miles, witha
mean latitude of 15° south and a longitude of 35°
west. Southwest from Jlare Tranquilittatis, lies
Mare Fecundilatis, the Sea of Fertility, the greatest
in this hemisphere, as it occupies an extent of
more than 300 thousand square miles, its latitude
being 3° south and its longitude 50° west. For
away to the north, on the borders of the Jfare
Frigoris, or Icy Sea, is seen the small Aare Hum-
boldtianum, or Humboldt Sea, with a surface of
about 10 thousand square miles. Corresponding to
this in the southern hemisphere lies the Afar
Australe, or South Sea, whose surface, as it extends
along the western rim, is rather difficult to calculate.
Finally, right in the centre of the lunar disc, where
the equator intersects the first meridian, can be seen
Stnus Afedii, the Central Gulf, the common property
therefore of all the hemispheres, the northern and
southern, as well as of the eastern and western.

Into these great divisions the surface of our satcl-
lite resolved itself before the eyes of Barbican and
M’Nicholl. Adding up the various measurements,
they found that the surface of her visible hemisphere
was about 734 millions of square miles, of which
about the two-thirds comprised the volcanoes, the
mountain chains, the rings, the islands—in short,
the land portion of the lunar surface; the other
third comprised the ‘seas,’’ the ‘lakes,’’ the
“«marshes,’’ the ‘* bays’’ or ‘¢ gulfs,’’ and the other
divisions usually assigned to water.
FACT AND FANCY. I8s

To all this deeply interesting information, though
the fruit of observation the closest, aided and con-
fimed by calculation the profoundest, Ardan listened
with the utmost indifference. In fact, even his
French politeness could not suppress two or three
decided yawns, which of course the mathematicians
were too absorbed to notice. :

In their enthusiasm they tried to make him under-
stand that though the Moon is 13% times smaller
than our Earth, she can show more than so thousand
craters, which astronomers have already counted and
designated by specific names.

“To conclude this portion of our investigation
therefore,’’ cried Barbican, clearing his throat, and
occupying Ardan’s right ear,—** the Moon’s surface
is a honey combed, perforated, punctured—’’

‘* A fistulous, a rugose, salebrous,—’’ cut in the
Captain, close on the left. .

—‘‘ And highly cribriform superficies—’’ cried
Barbican,

—‘A sieve, a riddle, a colander—’”’ shouted the
Captain,

—‘A skimming dish, a buckwheat cake, a lump
of green cheese—’?’ went on Barbican—

—In fact, there is no knowing how far they would
have proceeded with their designations, comparisons,
and scientific expressions, had not Ardan, driven to
extremities by Barbican’s last profanity, suddenly
jumped up, broken away from his companions, and
clapped a forcible extinguisher on their eloquence by
putting his hands on their lips and keeping them
r86 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

there awhile. Then striking a grand attitude, he
looked towards the Moon and burst out in accents
of thrilling indignation :

‘* Pardon, O beautiful Diana of the Ephesians!
Pardon, O Phoebe, thou pearl-faced goddess of night
beloved of Greece! O Isis, thou sympathetic queen
of Nile-washed cities! O Astarte, thou favorite deity
of the Syrian hills! O Artemis, thou symbolical
daughter of Jupiter and Latona, that is of light and
darkness! brilliant sister of the radiant Apollo!
enshrined in the enchanting strains of Virgil and
Homer, which I only half learned at college, and
therefore unfortunately forget just now! Otherwise
what pleasure I should have had in hurling them at the
heads of Barbican, M’Nicholl, and every other bar-
barous iconoclast of the nineteenth century !——”’

Here he stopped short, for two reasons: first he
was out of breath; secondly, he saw that the irre-
pressible scientists had been too busy making ob-
servations of their own to hear a single word of
what he had uttered, and were probably totally un-
conscious that he had spoken at all. In a few seconds
his breath came back in full blast, but the idea of
talking when only deaf men were listening was so
disconcerting as to leave him actually unable to get
off another syllable,
CHAPTER XII,
A BIRD’S EVE VIEW OF THE LUNAR MOUNTAINS.

J am rather inclined to believe myself that not one
word of Ardan’s rhapsody had been ever heard by
Barbican or M’Nicholl. Long before he had spoken
his last words, they had once more become mute as
statues, and now were both eagerly watching, pencil
in hand, spyglass to eye, the northern lunar hemis-
phere towards which they were rapidly but indi-
rectly approaching. They had fully made up their
minds by this time that they were leaving far behind
them the central point which they would have proba-
bly reached half an hour ago if they had not been
shunted off their course by that inopportune bolide.

About half past twelve o’clock, Barbican broke
the dead silence by saying that after a careful calcu-
lation they were now only about 875 miles from the
Moon’s surface, a distance two hundred miles less in
length than the lunar radius, and which was still to
be diminished as they advanced further north. They
were at that moment ten degrees north of the equator,
almost directly over the ridge lying between the Mare
Serenitatisand the Mare Tranquillitatis, From this
latitude all the way up to the north pole the travel-
lers enjoyed-a most satisfactory view of the Moon in
all directions and under the most favorable condi-

: (787)
88 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

tions. By means of their spyglasses, magnifying a
hundred times, they cut down this distance of 875
miles to about 9. The great telescope of the Rocky
Mountains, by its enormous magnifying power of
48,000, brought the Moon, it is true, within a dis-
tance of 5 miles, or nearly twice as near; but this
advantage of nearness was considerably more than
counterbalanced by a want of clearness, resulting
from the haziness and refractiveness of the terrestrial
atmosphere, not to mention those fatal defects in the
reflector that the art of man has not yet succeeded
in remedying. Accordingly, our travellers, armed
with excellent telescopes—of just’ power enough to
be no injury to clearness,—and: posted on unequalled
vantage ground, began already to distinguish certain
details that had probably never been noticed before
by terrestrial observers. Even Ardan, by this time
quite recovered from his fit of sentiment and prob-
ably infected a little by the scientific enthusiasm of
his companions, began to observe and note and ob-
serve and note, alternately, with all the sang/roid of
a veteran astronomer.

‘¢Friends,’’ said Barbican, again interrupting a
silence that had lasted perhaps ten minutes, ‘‘ whither
we are going I can’t say ; if we shall ever revisit the
Earth, I can’t tell. Still, it is our duty so to act in
all respects as if these labors of ours were one day
to be of service to our fellow-creatures. Let us
keep our souls free from every distraction. We are
now astronomers. We see now what no mortal eye
has ever gazed on before. This Projectile is simply
A BIRD'S EYE VIEW. 189

a work room of the great Cambridge Observatory:
lifted into space. Let us take observations! ’’

With these words, he set to work with a renewed
ardor, in which his companions fully participated.
The consequence was-that they soon had several of
the outline maps covered with the best sketches they
could make of the Moon’s various aspects thus pre+
sented under. such favorable circumstances. They
could now remark not only that they were passing
the tenth degree of north latitude, but that the Pro-
jectile followed almost directly the twentieth degree
of east longitude.

. “One thing always puzzled me when examining
maps of the Moon,’’ observed Ardan, ‘‘and I can’t
say that Isee it yet as clearly as if I had thought
over the matter.. It is this. I could understand,
when looking through a lens at an object, why we
get only its reversed image—a simple law of optics
explains ¢ta¢. Therefore, in a map of the Moon,
as the bottom means the north and the top the
south, why does not the right mean the west and
the left the east? I suppose I could have made this
out by a little thought, but thinking, that is reflec-
tion, not being my forte, it is the last thing I ever
care to do. Barbican, throw me a word or two on
the subject.’’

“‘T can see what troubles you,’’ answered Barbi-
can, “but I can also see that one moment’s reflec-
tion would have put an end to your perplexity. On
ordinary maps of the Earth’s surface when the north
is the top, the right hand must be the east, the left
90° ALL AROUND THE MOON.

hand the west, and so on. That is simply because
we look down from adove. And,such a map seen
through a lens will appear reversed in all respects,
But in looking at the Moon, that is wp from down,
we change our position so far that our right hand
points west and our left east. Consequently, in opr
reversed map, though the north becomes south, the
right remains east, and—.’’ :

‘Enough said! I see it at a glance! Thank
you, Barbican. Why did not they make you a pro-
fessor of astronomy? Your hint will save me a
world of trouble.’’*

Aided by the JAZappa Selenographica, the travels
lers could easily recognize the different portions of
the Moon over which they were now moving. An
occasional glance at our reduction of this map, given
as a frontispiece, will enable the gentle reader
to follow the travellers on the line in which they
moved and to understand the remarks and observa
tions in which they occasionally indulged.

‘¢ Where are we now?’? asked Ardan.

“¢ Over the northern shores of the Afere Nubium,”
replied Barbican. ‘‘ But we are still too far off to
see with any certainty what they are like. What is
the dfare itself? A sea, according to the eatly



* We must again remind our readers that, in our map,
though every thing is set down as it appears to the eye, not
as it is reversed by the telescope, still, for the reason made
so clear by Barbican, the right hand side must be the west
and the left the east.
A BIRD'S EVE VIEIV. 3 ZOE

astronomers? a plain of solid sand, according to
later authority? or an immense forest, according to
De la Rue of London, so far the Moon’s most suc-
cessful photographer? This gentleman’s authority,
Ardan, would have given you decided support in
your famous dispute with the Captain at the meeting
near Tampa, for he says very decidedly that the
Moon has an atmosphere, very low to be sure but
very dense. This, however, we must find out for
ourselves; and in the meantime let us affirm noth-
ing until we have good grounds for positive asser-
tion.”
» Mare Nudinm, though not very clearly outlined
on the maps, is easily recognized by lying directly
east of the regions about the centre. It would ap-
pear as if this vast plain were sprinkled with im-
mense lava blocks shot forth from the great volcanoes
on the right, Pfolemacus, Abhonse, Alpetragius and
‘Arsachel, But the Projectile advanced ‘so rapidly
that these mountains soon disappeared, and the
travellers were not long before they could distinguish
the great peaks that closed the ‘‘Sea’’ on its
northern boundary. Here a radiating mountain
showed a summit so dazzling with the reflection of
the solar rays that Ardan could not help crying eut :

“It looks like one of the carbon points of an
electric light projected on a screen! What do you
call it, Barbican ?’”’

“ Copernicus,’ replied the President. ** Let us
examine old Copernicus /””

This grand crater is deservedly considered. one of
rg2 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

the greatest of the lunar wonders. It lifts its giant
ramparts to upwards of 12,000 feet above the level
of the lunar surface. Being quite visible from the
Earth and well situated .for* observation, it is a
favorite object for astronomical study; this is par-
ticularly the case during the phase existing between
Last Quarter and the New Moon, when its vast
shadows, projected boldly from the east towards the
west, allow its prodigious dimensions to be measured.

After Zycho, which is situated in the southern
hemisphere, Cosernicus forms the most important
radiating mountain in the lunar disc. It looms up,
single and isolated, like a gigantic light-house, on
the peninsula separating AZare Wiudbium from Oceanus
Procellarum on one side and from Aare Lnbrium on
the other; thus illuminating with its splendid radia-
tion three ‘Seas’? at atime. The wonderful com-
plexity of its bright streaks diverging on all sides
from its centre presented a scene alike splendid and
unique. These streaks, the travellers thought, could
be traced further north than in any other direction:
they fancied they could detect them even in the |
Mare Imbrium, but this of course might be owing
to the point from which they made their observa-
tions. At one o’clock in the morning, the Projec-
tile, flying through space, was exactly over this
magnificent mountain.

In spite of the brilliant sunlight that was blazing
around them, the travellers could easily recognize
the peculiar features of Copernicus. It belongs to
those ring mountains of the first class called Cit
4 BIRD'S EVE VIEW. L903

cuses. Like Kepler and Aristarchus, who rule overt
Oceanus Procellarum, Copernicus, when viewed
through our telescopes, sometimes glistensso brightly
through the ashy light of the Moon that it has been
frequently taken for a volcano in full activity. What
ever it may have been once, however, it is certainly
nothing more now than, like all the other mountains
on the visible side of the Moon, an extinct volcano,
only with a crater of such exceeding grandeur and
sublimity as to throw utterly into the shade every-
thing like it on our Earth. The crater of Etna is
at most little more than a mile across. The crater
of Copernicus has a diameter of at least 50 miles.
Within it, the travellers could easily discover by
their glasses an immense number of terraced ridges,
probably landslips, alternating with stratifications
resulting from successive eruptions. Here and there,
but particularly in the southern side, they caught
glimpses of shadows of such intense blackness, pro-
jected across the plateau and lying there like pitch
spots, that they could not tell them from yawning
chasms of incalculable depth. Outside the crater
the shadows were almost as deep, whilst on the
plains all around, particularly in the west, so many
small craters could be detected that the eye in vain
attempted to count them. :

“Many circular mountains of this kind.’’ ob«
served Barbican, ‘‘can be seen on the lunar su~‘ace,
but Copernicus, though not one of the greatest, is
one of the most remarkable on account of those
diverging streaks of bright light that you see radia-

13
OF ALL AROUND THE MOON.

ting from its summit. By looking steadily into its
crater, you can see more cones than mortal eye ever
lit on before. They are so numerous as to render
the interior plateau quite rugged, and were formerly
so many openings giving vent to fire and volcanic
matter, A curious and very common arrangement
of this internal plateau of lunar craters is its lying at
a lower level than the external plains, quite the con-
trary to a terrestrial crater, which generally has its
bottom much higher than the level of the surround-
ing country. It follows therefore that the deep lying
curve of the bottom of these ring mountains would
give a sphere with a diameter somewhat smaller than
the Moon’s,’’

“What can be the cause of this peculiarity?”
asked M’ Nicholl.
~ TI can’t tell;’? answered Barbican, “ but, as a
conjecture, I should say that it is probably to the
comparatively smaller area of the Moon and the
more violent character of her volcanic action that
the extremely rugged character of her surface is
mainly due.”’ :

“Why, it’s the Cumpt Phlegrae/ or the Fire Fields
of Naples over again!’’ cried Ardan suddenly.
‘‘There’s Jfonte Barbaro, there’s the SoJfatara,
there is the crater of Astront, and there is the
Monte Nuovo, as’ plain as the hand on my
body!’

‘‘The great resemblance between the region you
speak of and the general surface of the Moon has
been often remarked ;’’ observed Barbican, ‘¢ but it
A BIRDS EVE VIEW.. 195

is even still more striking in the poabbor ees of
Theophilus on the borders of Mare Nectaris.”’

“That's fare Wectaris, the gray spot over there
on the southwest, isn’t it?’’? asked M’Nicholl; ‘is
there any likelihood of our getting a better view of
ibe

‘Not the slightest,’’ answered Barbican, ‘ unless
we go round. the Moon and return this way, like a
satellite describing its orbit.’’

By this time they had arrived at a point vertical
tothe mountain centre. Cofernicus’s vast ramparts
formed a perfect circle or rather a pair of concentric
circles. All around the mountain extended a dark
grayish plain of savage aspect, on which the peak
shadows projected themecives in sharp relief. .In the
gloomy bottom of the crater, whose dimensions are
vast enough to swallow Mont Blanc body and bones,
could be distinguished a magnificent group of cones,
at least half a mile in height and glittering like piles
of crystal, Towards the north several breaches could
be seen in the ramparts, due probably to a caving in
of immense masses*accumulated on the summit of
the precipitous walls. :

As already observed, the aroanding plains were
dotted with numberless craters mostly of small
dimensions, except Gay Zussac on the north, whose
crater was about 12 miles in diameter. Towards the
southwest and the immediate east, the plain appeared
to be very flat, no protuberance, no prominence of
any kind lifting itself above the general dead level.
‘Towards the north, on the contrary, as far as where
796 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

the peninsula jutted on Oceanus Procel/arum, the
plain looked like asea of lava wildly lashed for a
while by a furious hurricane and then, when its waves
and breakers and driving ridges were at their wildest,
suddenly frozen into solidity. Over this rugged,
rumpled, wrinkled surface and in all directions, ran
the wonderful streaks whose radiating point appeared.
to be the summit of Cogernicus. Many of them ap-
peared to be ten miles wide and hundreds of miles
in length,

The travellers disputed for some time on the
origin of these strange radii, but could hardly be
said to have arrived at any conclusion more satis-
factory than that already reached by some terrestrial
observers.

To M’Nicholl’s question :

““Why can’t these streaks be simply prolonged
mountain crests reflecting the sun’s rays more vividly
by their superior altitude and comparative smooth-
ness 2”?

Barbican readily replied:

‘* These streaks can’¢ be mountain crests, because,
if they.were, under cértain conditions of solar illu-
mination they should project shadozws—a thing which
they have never been known to do under any cir-
cumstances whatever. In fact, it is only during the
period of the full Moon that these streaks are seen
at all; as soon as the sun’s rays become oblique,
they disappear altogether—a proof that their ap-
pearance is due altogether to peculiar advantages in
their surface for the reflection of light.”
A BIRD'S EYE VIEW. 197

** Dear boys, will you allow me to give my little
guess on the subject ?’’ asked Ardan.

His companions were profuse in expressing their
desire to hear it.

«Well then,’’ he resumed, “seeing that these
bright streaks invariably start from a certain point to
radiate in all directions, why not suppose them to be
streams of lava issuing from the crater and flowing
down the mountain side until they cooled ? ’’

‘Such a supposition or something like it has been
put forth by Herschel,’’ replied Barbican ; ‘¢ but your
own sense will convince you that it is quite unten-
able when you consider that lava, however hot and
liquid it may be at the commencement of its journey,
cannot flow on for hundreds of miles, up hills, across
ravines, and over plains, all the time in streams of
almost exactly equal width.”’ /

“That theory of yours holds no more water than
mine, Ardan,’’ observed M’ Nicholl.

“Correct, Captain,’’ replied the Frenchman ;
“Barbican has a trick of knocking the bottom out
of every weaker vessel. But let us hear what he has
to say on the subject himself. What is your theory,
Barbican ? 7? :

‘My theory,’’ said Barbican, ‘is pretty much the
same as that lately presented by an English astrono-
mer, Nasmyth, who has devoted much study and re-
flection to lunar matters. Of course, T only formu-
late my theory, I don’t affirm it. These streaks are
cracks, made in the Moon’s surface by cooling or
by shrinkage, through which volcanic matter has
ros ALL AROUND THE MOON,

been forced up by internal pressure. The sinking
ice of a frozen lake, when meeting with some sharp
pointed rock, cracks in a radiating manner: every
one of its fissures then admits the water, which im-
mediately spreads laterally over the ice pretty much
as the lava spreads itself over the lunar surface,
This theory accounts for the radiating nature of
the streaks, their great and nearly equal thickness,
their immense length, their inability to cast a shadow,
and their invisibility at any time except at or near
the Full Moon. Still it is nothing but a theory, and
I don’t deny that serious objections may be brought
against it.’’

‘¢Do you know, dear boys,’’ cried Ardan, led off
as usual by the slightest fancy, ‘*do you know what
I am thinking of when I look down on the great
rugged plains spread out beneath us?’’

**T can’t say, I’m sure,’’ replied Barbican, some-
what piqued at the little attention he had secured
for his theory.

** Well, what are you thinking of ?’’ asked M’Ni-
choll.

«« Spillikins!’? answered Ardan triumphantly.

«‘Spillikins??’ cried his companions, somewhat
surprised.

“Yes, Spillikins! These rocks, these blocks,
these peaks, these streaks, these cones, these cracks,
these ramparts, these escarpments,—what are they
but aset of spillikins, though I acknowledge ona
grand scale? I wish I had a little hook to pull them
apart one by one !’”’





A BIRD'S EYE VIEW. I99

«Oh, do be serious, Ardan!’’ cried Barbican, a

little impatiently.

‘‘ Certainly,’’ replied Ardan. ‘‘ Let us be serious,
Captain, since seriousness -best befits the subject in
hand. “What do you think of another comparison ?
Does not this plain look like an immense battle
field piled with the bleaching bones of myriads who
had slaughtered each other to a man at the bidding
of some mighty Caesar? What do you think of
that lofty comparison, hey? ’’

“Tt is quite on a par with the other,’’ muttered
Barbican.

‘‘He’s hard to please, Captain,’’ continued Ardan,
“but let us try him again! Does not this plain look
like—— ?”? ,

‘““My worthy friend,’ interrupted Barbican,
quietly, but in a tone to discourage further discus-
sion, ‘what you think the plain Jooks like is of
very slight import, as long as you know no more
than a child what it really ts /??

‘Bravo, Barbican’! well put!’? cried the irre-
pressible Frenchman. ‘¢ Shall I ever realize the
absurdity. of my entering into an argument with a
scientist |”

But this time the Projectile, though advancing
northward with a pretty. uniform: velocity, had
neither gained nor lost-in its néarness to the lunar
disc. Each moment altering the character of the
fleeting landscape beneath them, the travellers, as
may well be imagined, never: thought of taking an
instant’s repose. At about half past one, looking
200 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

to their right on the west, they saw the summits of
another mountain; Barbican, consulting his map,
recognized Lratosthenes.

This was a ring mountain, about 33 miles in
diameter, having, like Copernicus, a crater of im-
mense profundity containing central cones. Whilst
they were directing their glasses towards its gloomy
depths, Barbican mentioned to his friends Kepler's
strange idea regarding the formation of these ring
mountains. ‘They must have been constructed,”
he said, ‘‘ by mortal hands.”’

“‘ With what object ?’’ asked the Captain.

‘¢ A very natural one,’’ answered Barbican. ‘‘The
Selenites must have undertaken the immense labor of
digging these enormous pits at places of refuge in
which they could protect themselves against the fierce
solar rays that beat against them for 15 days in suc-
cession ! 7’

‘“*Not a bad idea, that of the Selenites!’’ ex-
claimed Ardan. 3

“‘An absurd idea!’’ cried M’Nicholl. <‘ But
probably Kepler never knew the real dimensions of
these craters. Barbican knows the trouble and time
required to dig a well in Stony Hill only. nine hur-
dred feet deep. To dig out a single lunar crater
would take hundreds and hundreds of years, and even
then they should be giants who would attempt it!’

““Why so?’’ asked Ardan. ‘‘In the Moon,
where gravity is six times less than on the Earth, the
labor of the Selenites can’t be compared. with that
of men like us.’’
4 BIRD'S EVE VIEW. 20L

‘‘But suppose a Selenite to be six times smaller
than a man like us!’’ urged M’ Nicholl.

“‘And suppose a Selenite never had an existence
at all!’’ interposed Barbican with his usual success
in putting an end to the argument. ‘‘ But never
mind the Selenites now. Observe Zvratosthenes as
long as you have the opportunity.’’ ’

“Which will not be very long,’’ said M’ Nicholl.
‘‘He is already sinking out of view too far to the
right to be carefully observed.”’

“‘What are those peaks beyond him?’’ asked
Ardan. ’

“The Apennines,’ answered Barbican; ‘and
those on the left are the Carpathians.””

. “T have seen very few mountain chains or ranges
in the Moon,’’ remarked Ardan, after some minutes’
observation, /

‘Mountains chains are not numerous in the
Moon,” replied Barbican, ‘‘and in that respect her
oreographic system presents a decided contrast with
that of the Earth. With us the ranges are many, the
craters few ; in the Moon the ranges are few and the
craters innumerable.’’

Barbican might have spoken of another curious
feature regarding the mountain ranges: namely,
that they are chiefly confined to the northern hemis-
phere, where the craters are fewest and the ‘seas”’
the most extensive.

For the benefit of those interested, and to be done
at once with this part of the subject, we give in the
following little table a list of the chief Junar moun-
202 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

tain chains, with their latitude, and respective heights
in English feet. ;

. Degrees of
Name. Latitude, eight.
Altai Mountains.17° to 28° 13,c00ft.
Southern Cordillera ivreeces 10 tO 20 12,000
Hemisphere. ) Pyrvenees......+++. - 8 to 18 12,000
RIEPHCAN oeereaee 16 5 tO 10 2,600.

FTQemuS.csccsssveee¥O tO 20 6,300
Carpathiadit....15 tog 6,000

Nouhetn APEHMINES wi seerees 14 to 27 18,000

; TQUIUS..reecesecene 25 to34 8,500
Ifemisphere. ;

LTer cy nt att wvvevere 17, to 29 3,400

CAUCASUS. ccerveeees 33 to 40 17,000

AIDS vicereerseseenee42 tO 50 10,000

OF these different chains, the most important is
that of the Asennines, about 450 miles long, a
length, however, far inferior to that of many of the
great mountain ranges of our globe. They skirt the
western shores of the AZare Jnbrium, over which they
rise in immense cliffs, 18 or 20 thousand feet in
height, steep as a wall and casting over the plain in-
tensely black shadows at least go miles long. Of
Mt. Huyghens, the highest in the group, the travel-
lers were just barely able to distinguish the sharp
angular summit in the far west. To the east, how-
ever, the Carpathians, extending from the 18th to
zoth, degrees of east longitude, lay directly under
their eyes and could be examined in all the peculi
arities of their distribution.
A BIRD'S EVE VIEW. 203

Barbican proposed a hypothesis regarding the for-
mation of those mountains, which his companions
thought at least as good as any other. ‘Looking
carefully over the Carpathians and catching occa-
sional glimpses of semi-circular formations and half
domes, he concluded that the chain must have
formerly been a succession of vast craters. Then
had come some mighty internal discharge, or rather
the subsidence to which Jfare Jmbrium is due, for
it immediately broke off or swallowed up one half
of those mountains, leaving the other half steep as
a wall on one side and sloping gently on the other
to the level of the surrounding plains. The Car-
pathians were therefore pretty nearly in the same
condition as the crater mountains Pyolemy, Alpetra-
gius and Arzachel would find themselves in, if some
terrible cataclysm, by tearing away their eastern
ramparts, had turned them into a chain of moun-
tains whose towering cliffs would nod threateningly
over the western shores of Alare Nubium. The
mean height of the Carpathians is about 6,000
feet, the altitude of certain points in the Pyrenees
such as the Port of Pineda, or Roland’s Breach, in
the shadow of AZont Perdu, The northern slopes
of the Carpathians sink rapidly towards the shores
of the vast AZare Imbrium.

Towards two o’clock in the morning, Barbican
calculated the Projectile to be on the z2oth northern
parallel, and therefore almost immediately over the
little ring mountain called Pysheas, about 4600 feet
in height. The distance of the travellers from the
204 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Moon at this point could not be more than about 750
miles, reduced to about 7 by means of their excel-
lent telescopes.

Mare Inbrium, the Sea of Rains here revealed it-
self in all its vastness to the eyes of the travellers,
though it must be acknowledged that the immense
depression so called, did not afford them a very clear
idea regarding its exact boundaries. Right ahead
of them rose LamJer¢ about a mile in height; and
further on, more to the left, in the direction of
Oceanus Procellarum, Euler revealed itself by its
glittering radiations. This mountain, of about the
same height as Zambert, had been the object of very
interesting calculations on the part of Schroeter of
Erfurt. This keen observer, desirous of inquiring
into the probable origin of the lunar mountains,
had proposed to himself the following question:
Does the volume of the crater appear to be equal to
that of the surrounding ramparts? His calculations
showing him that this was generally the case, he
naturally concluded that these ramparts must there-
fore have been the product of a single eruption, for
successive eruptions of volcanic matter would have
disturbed this correlation. Zz/er alone, he found,
to be an exception to this general law, as the volume
of its crater appeared to be twice as great as that of
the mass surrounding it. It must therefore have
been formed by several eruptions in succession, but
in that case what had become of the ejected matter?

Theories of this nature and all manner of scien-
tific questions were, of course, perfectly permissible
4 BIRD'S EYE VIEW. 205

to terrestrial astronomers laboring under the disad-
vantage of imperfect instruments. But Barbican
could not think of wasting his time in any specula-
tion of the kind, and now, seeing that his Projectile
perceptibly approached the lunar disc, though he
despaired of ever reaching it, he was more sanguine
than ever of being soon able to discover positively
and unquestionably some of the secrets of its forma-
tion.
CHAPTER XIII.
LUNAR LANDSCAPES

At half past two in the morning of December 6th,
the travellers crossed the 30th northern parallel, at a
distance from the lunar surface of 625 miles, reduced
to about 6 by their spy-glasses. Barbican could not
yet see the least probability of their landing at any
point of the disc. The velocity of the Projectile
was decidedly slow, but for that reason extremely
puzzling. Barbican could not account for it. At
such a proximity to the Moon, the velocity, one
would think, should be very great indeed to be able
to counteract the lunar attraction. Why did it not
fall? Barbican could not tell; his companions
were equally in the dark. Ardan said he gave it
up. Besides they had no time to spend in investiga-
ting it. The lunar panorama was unrolling all its
splendors beneath them, and they could not bear to
lose one of its slightest details,

The lunar disc being brought within a distance of
about six miles by the spy-glasses, it is a fair ques-
tion to ask, what cou/d? an aeronaut at such an eleva-
tion from our Earth discover on its surface? At
present that question can hardly be answered, the
most remarkable balloon ascensions never having
passed an altitude of five miles under circumstances
favorable for observers. Here, however, is an ac-

(206)
LUNAR LANDSCAPES. 207

count, carefully transcribed from notes taken on the
spot, of what Barbican and his companions dd see
from their peculiar post of observation.

Varieties of color, in the first place, appeared
here and there upon the disc. Selenographers are
not quite agreed as to the nature of these colors.
Not that such colors are without variety or too faint
to be easily distinguished. Schmidt of Athens even
says that if our oceans on earth were all evaporated, an
observer in the Moon would hardly find the seas and
continents of our globe even so well outlined as
those of the Moon are to the eye of a terrestrial ob-
server.’ According to him, the shade of color dis-
tinguishing those vast plains known as ‘‘seas’’ isa
dark gray dashed with green and brown,—a color
presented also by a few of the great craters.

This opinion of Schmidt’s, shared by Beer and
Maedler, Barbican’s observations now convinced him
to be far better founded than that of certain astrono-
mers who admit of no color at all being visible on
the Moon’s surface but gray. In certain spots the
greenish tint was quite decided, particularly in
Mare Serenttatis and Mare Humorum, the very
localities where Schmidt had most noticed it. Bar-
bican also remarked that several large craters, of
the class that had no interior cones, reflected a kind
of bluish tinge, somewhat like that given forth by a
freshly polished steel plate. These tints, he now
saw enough to convince him, proceeded really from
the lunar surface, and were not due, as certain
astronomers asserted, either to the imperfections of
208 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

the spy-glasses, or to the interference of the terres-
trial atmosphere. His singular opportunity for cor-
rect observation allowed him to entertain no doubt
whatever on the subject. Hampered by no atmos-
phere, he was free from all liability to optical illu-
sion. Satisfied therefore as to the reality of these
tints, he considered such knowledge’ a positive gain
to science. But that greenish tint—to what was it
due? To a dense tropical vegetation maintained
by a low atmosphere, a mile or so in thickness?
Possibly. But this was another question that could
not be answered at present.

Further on he could detect here and there traces
of a decidedly ruddy tint. Such a shade he knew
had been already detected in the Palvs Somnit, near
Mare Cristum, and in the circular area of Lichien-
berg, near the Hercynian Mountains, on the eastern
edge of the Moon. To what cause was this tint to
be attributed? To the actual color of the surface
itself? Or to that of the lava covering it here and
there? Or tothe color resulting from the mixture
of other colors seen at. a distance too great to allow
of their being distinguished separately ? Impossible
to tell.

Barbican and his companions succeeded no better
at a new problem that soon engaged their undivided
attention. It deserves some detail.

Having passed Lamébert, being just over TZimo-
charis, all were attentively gazing at the magnificent
crater of Archimedes with a diameter of 52 miles
across and ramparts more than sooo feet in height,
LUNAR LANDSCAPES. 209

when Ardan startled his companions by suddenly
exclaiming :

‘Hello! Cultivated fields as I am a living
man!”

‘What do you mean by your cultivated fields ?”’
asked M’Nicholl sourly, wiping his glasses and
shrugging his shoulders.

“Certainly cultivated fields!’’ replied Ardan.
“Don’t you see the furrows? ‘They’re certainly
plain enough. They are white too from glistening
in the sun, but they are quite different from the
radiating streaks of Copernicus. Why, their sides
are perfectly parallel ! ’’

“Where are those furrows?’’ asked M’Nicholl,
putting his glasses to his eye and adjusting the focus.
- You can see them in all directions,’? answered
Ardan ; *‘but two are particularly visible : one run-
ning north from Archimedes, the other south towards
the Apennines.”

M’Nicholl’s face, as he gazed, gradually assumed
a grin which soon developed into a snicker, if not a
positive laugh, as he observed to Ardan :

“Your Selenites must be Brobdignagians, their
oxen Leviathans, and their ploughs bigger than
Marston’s famous cannon, if these are furrows!’

“How’s that, Barbican?’’ asked Ardan doubt-
fally, but unwilling to submit to M’ Nicholl.

“They’re not furrows, dear friend,’’ said Babi-
can, ‘fand can’t be, either, simply on account of
their immense size. They are what the German
astronomers called rZ/en; the French, vainures,

14
210 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

and the English, grooves, canals, clefts, cracks,
chasms, or fissures?

“You have a good stock of names for them any-
how,’’ observed Ardan, ‘‘if that does any good.”

‘©The number of names given them,’’ answered
Barbican, ‘‘ shows how little is really known about
them. They have been observed in all the level
portion of the-Moon’s surface. Small as they ap-
pear to us, a little calculation must convince you
that they are in some places hundreds of miles in
length, a mile in width and probably in many points
several miles in depth. Their width and depth,
however, vary, though their sides, so far as observed,
are always ngorously, parallels: Let us take a good
look at them.’

Putting the glass to his eye, Barbican examined
the clefts for some time with close attention. He
saw that their banks were sharp edged and extremely
steep. In many places they were of such geometri-
cal regularity that he readily excused Gruithuysen’s
idea of deeming them to be gigantic earthworks
thrown up by the Selenite engineers. Some of
them were as straight as if laid out with a line,
others were curved a little here and there, though
still maintaining the strict parallelism of their sides
‘These crossed each other; those entered craters and
came out at the other side. Here, they furrowed
annular plateaus, such as Posidonius or Petavius.
There, they wrinkled whole seas, for instance, are
Serenitatis.

These curious peculiarities of the lunar surface
LUNAR LANDSCAPES. 2ri

had interested the astronomic mind to a very high
degree at their first discovery, and have proved to
be very perplexing problems ever since, The first
observers do not seem to have noticed them.
Neither Hevelius, nor Cassini, nor La Hire, nor
Herschel, makes a single remark regarding their
nature.

It was Schroeter, in 1789, who called the atten-
tion of scientists to them for the first time. He
had only rr to show, but Lohrmann soon recorded
73 more. Pastorff, Gruithuysen, and particularly
Beer and Maedler were still more successful, but
Julius Schmidt, the famous astronomer of Athens,
has raised their number up to 425, and has even
published their names in a catalogue. But counting
them is one thing, determining their nature is another.
They are not fortifications, certainly: and cannot be
ancient beds of dried up rivers, for two very good
and sufficient reasons: first, water, even under the
most favorable circumstances on the Moon’s sur-
face, could have never ploughed up such vast chan-
nels} secondly, these chasms often traverse lofty
craters through and through, like an immense rail-
road cutting.

At these details, Ardan’s imaginatian became un-
usually excited and of course it was not without some
result. It even happened that he hit on an idea that
had already suggested itself to Schmidt of Athens.

“Why not consider them,’’ he asked, ‘* to be the
simple phenomena of vegetation ?’’

“What do you mean?’’ asked Barbican,
2f2 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

‘“Rows of sugar cane?’’ suggested M’ Nicholl
with a snicker.

‘‘Not exactly, my worthy Captain,’’ answered
Ardan quietly, ‘‘ though you.were perhaps nearer to
the mark than you expected. I don’t mean exactly
rows of sugar cane, but I do mean vast avenues of
treet—poplars, for instance—planted regularly on
each side of a great high road.”’

“Still harping on vegetation !’’ said the Captain,
“‘Ardan, what a splendid historian was spoiled in
you! The less you know about your facts, the
readier you are to account for them.’’

“* Ma fot,” said Ardan simply, ‘¢I do only what
the greatest of your scientific men do—that is,
guess. There is this difference however between us
—I call my guesses, guesses, mere conjectures—they
dignify theirs as profound theories or as astounding
discoveries! ’’

“*Often the case, friend Ardan, too often the
case,’’ said Barbican.

‘In the question under consideration, however,”
continued the Frenchman, ‘my conjecture has this
advantage over some others: it explains why these
rills appear and seem to disappear at regular
intervals.”’

‘*Let us hear the explanation,’’ said the Captain.

““They become invisible when the trees lose
their leaves, and they reappear when they resume
them.’’

‘* His explanation is not without ingenuity,’’ ob-
served Barbican to M’Nicholl, ‘* but, my dear
LUNAR LANDSCAPES. 2I3

friend,”? turning to Ardan, ‘it is hardly admissi-
ble.”’

“‘ Probably not,’’ said Ardan, ‘* but why not?’’

‘¢ Because as the Sun is nearly always vertical to
the lunar equator, the Moon can have no change of
seasons worth mentioning ; therefore her vegetation
can present none of the phenomena that you speak
of,”

This was perfectly true. The slight obliquity of
the Moon’s axis, only 134°, keeps the Sun in the
same altitude the whole year around. In the
equatorial regions he is always vertical, and in the
polar he is never higher than the horizon. There-
fore, there can be no change of seasons; according
to the latitude, it is a perpetual winter, spring, sum-
mer, or autumn the whole year round. ‘This state
of things is almost precisely similar to that which
prevails in Jupiter, who also stands nearly upright in
his orbit, the inclination of his axis being only about
3°.

But how to account for the gvooves ? A very hard
nut to crack, They must certainly be a later forma-
tion than the craters and the rings, for they are
often found breaking right through the circular ram-
parts. Probably the latest of all lunar features, the
results of the last geological epochs, they are due
altogether to expansion or shrinkage acting on a
large scale and brought about by the great forces of
nature, operating after a manner altogether unknown
on our earth, Such at least was Barbican’s idea.

“My friends,’ he quietly observed, ‘ without
2r4 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

meaning to put forward any pretentious claims to
originality, but by simply turning to account some
advantages that have never before befallen contem-
plative mortal eye, why not construct a little hypothe-
sis of our own regarding the nature of these grooves
and the causes that gave them birth? Look at that
great chasm just below us, somewhat tothe right. It
is at least fifty or sixty miles long and runs along
the base of the Apennines in a line almost perfectly
straight. Does not its parallelism with the moun-
tain chain suggest a causative relation? See that
other mighty #727, at least a hundred and fifty miles
long, starting directly north of it and pursuing so
true. a course that it- cleaves Archimedes almost
cleanly into two. The nearer it lies to the moun-
tain, as you perceive, the greater its width; as it
recedes in either direction it grows narrower. Does
not everything point out to one great cause of their
origin? They are simple crevasses, like those so
often noticed on Alpine glaciers, only that these
tremendous cracks in the surface are produced by
the shrinkage of the crust consequent on cooling.
Can we point out some analogies to this on the
Earth? . Certainly. The defile of the Jordan,
terminating in the awful depression of the Dead
Sea, no doubt occurs to you on the moment, But
the Yosemite Valley, as I saw it ten years ago, is al
apter comparison. There I stood on the brink of a
tremendous chasm with perpendicular walls, a mile
in width, a mile in depth and eight miles in length.
Judge if I was astounded! But how should we feel
LUNAR LANDSCAPES. 2r5

if, when travelling on, the lunar surface, we should
suddenly find ourselves on the brink of a yawning
chasm two miles wide, fifty miles long, and so
fathomless in sheer vertical depth as to leave its
black profundities absolutely invisible in spite of the
dazzling sunlight !’’

“T feel my flesh’ already crawling even in the
anticipation !’’ cried Ardan.

‘‘T shan’t regret it much if we never get to the
Moon/’ growled M’Nicholl; ‘I never hankered
after it anyhow !”’

By this time the Projectile had reached the fortieth
degree of lunar latitude, and could hardly be further
than five hundred miles from the surface, a distance
reduced to about 5 miles by the travellers’ glasses.
Away to their left appeared e/tcon, a ring moun-
tain about 1600 feet high; and still further to the
left the eye could catch a glimpse of the cliffs en-
closing a semi-elliptical portion of Aare Jmbriuim,
called the Szzus Jridium, or Bay of the Rainbows.

In order to allow astronomers to make complete
observations on the lunar surface, the terrestrial
atmosphere should possess a transparency seventy
times greater than its present power of transmission.
But in the void through which the Projectile was
now floating, no fluid whatever interposed between
the eye of the observer and the object observed.
Besides, the travellers now found themselves at a
distance that had never before been reached by the
most powerful telescopes, including even Lord
Rosse’s and the great instrument on the Rocky
216 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

Mountains... Barbican was therefore in a condition
singularly favorable to resolve the great question
concerning.the.Moon’s inhabitableness. Neverthe-
less, the solution still escaped him. He could dis-
cover nothing. around him but a dreary waste of
immense plains, and towards the north, beneath him,
bare mountains of the aridest character.

Not the slightest vestige of man’s work could be
detected over the vast expanse. -Not the slightest
sign of aruin spoke of his ever having been there.
Nothing betrayed: the slightest trace of the develop-
ment of animal life, even in an inferior degree. No
movement. Not: the least. glimpse of vegetation.
Of the three great kingdoms that hold dominion on
the surface of the globe, the mineral, the vegetable
and the animal, one alone was represented ‘on the
lunar sphere: the mineral, the whole mineral, and
nothing but the mineral.

“Why!’’ exclaimed Ardan, with a disconcerted
look, after a long and searching examination, ‘I
can’t find anybody. Everything is as motionless as
a street in Pompeii at 4 ©’clock in the morning!”

‘Good comparison, friend Ardan;’’- obseived
M’Nicholl. ‘ Lava, slag, volcanic eminences, vit-
reous matter glistening like ice, piles of scoria, pitch
black: shadows, dazzling streaks, like rivers of light
breaking over jagged rocks—these are now beneath
my. eye—these alone I can detect—not ‘a man—not
an animal—not.a tree. The great American Desert
is aland of milk and :honey in comparison with the
joyless orb over which we are now moving. How-

LUNAR LANDSCAPES. - 217

ever, €ven yet we can predicate nothing positive.
The atmosphere may have taken refuge in the depths
of the chasms, in the interior of the craters, or
even on the opposite side of the Moon, for all we
know!”

‘© Still we must remember,’’? observed Barbican,
**that even the sharpest eye cannot detect a man at
a-distance greater than four miles and a-half, and
our glasses have not yet brought us nearer than
five.”’

‘Which means to say,’’ observed Ardan, ‘‘ that
though we can’t see the Selenites, they can sce our
Projectile ! 7?

But matters had not improved much when, towards
four o’clock in the morning, the travellers found
themselves on the 5oth parallel, and at a distance of
only about 375 miles from the lunar surface. Still
no trace of the least movement, or even of the
lowest form of life.

“What peaked mountain is that which we have
just passed on our right?’’ asked Ardan. ‘It is
quite remarkable, standing as it does in almost soli-
tary grandeur in the barren plain.”’

“That ,is Pico,’? answered Barbican. ‘It is at
least 8000 feet high and is well known to terrestrial
astronomers as. well by its peculiar shadow as on ac-
count of its comparative isolation. See the collec-
tion of perfectly formed little craters nestling around
its base.””

“Barbican,’? asked M’Nicholl suddenly, ‘what
peak is that which lies almost directly south of
2r8 ALL AROUND THE MOON:

Pico? I see it plainly, but I can’t find it on my
map.’

“‘T have remarked that pyramidal peak myself,”
replied Barbican ; “ but I can assure you that so far
it has received no name as yet, although it is likely
enough to have been distinguished by the terrestrial
astronomers. It can’t be less than 4ooo feet in
height.”’ ;

“*T propose we called it Barbican /"’ cried Ardan
enthusiastically.

“© Aoreed!’? answered M’Nicholl, “unless we
can find a higher one.’’

“We must be before-hand with Schmidt of
Athens!’’ exclaimed Ardans ‘He will leave
nothing unnamed that his telescope can catch a
glimpse of.””

‘« Passed unanimously !’? cried M’Nicholl.

“And officially recorded!’’ added the French-
man, making the proper entry on his map.

“Salve, Mt. Barbican /"’ then cried both gentle-
men, rising and taking off their hats respectfully to
the distant peak.

“Look to the west interrupted Barbican,
watching, as usual, while his companions were talk-
ing, and probably perfectly unconscious of what
they were saying; ‘‘directly to the west! Now
tell me what you see! ”’

‘*T see a vast valley! ’’ answered M’ Nicholl.

“Straight as an arrow!’? added Ardan,

“ Running through lofty mountains!’ cried
M’ Nicholl,

1?
LUNAR LANDSCAPES. , , 2I9

“Cut through with a pair of saws and scooped
out with a chisel! ’’ cried Ardan.

‘¢ See the shadows of those peaks!’’ cried M’Ni-
choll catching fire at the sight. ‘‘ Black, long, and
sharp as if cast by cathedral spires!’ ;

“Oh! ye crags and peaks!’ burst forth Ardan;
‘chow I should like to catch even a faint echo of
the chorus you could chant, if a wild storm roared
over your beetling summits! The pine forests of
Norwegian mountains howling in midwinter would
not be an accordeon in comparison !”’

‘‘ Wonderful instance of subsidence on a grand
scale!’’ exclaimed the Captain, hastily relapsing
into science,

“Not at all!’’ cried the Frenchman, still true
to his colors; ‘‘no subsidence there! A comet
simply came too close and left its mark as it flew
past.’”

“Fanciful exclamations, dear friends,’’ observed
Barbican ; ‘‘ but I’m not surprised at your excite-
ment. Yonder is the famous Valley of the Alps,
a standing enigma to all selenographers. How it
could have been formed, no onecan tell. Even wilder
guesses than yours, Ardan, have been hazarded on the
subject. All we can state positively at present regard-
ing this wonderful formation, is what I have just re-
corded in my note-book¢ the Valley of the Aips is
about 5 mile wide and 70 or 80 long: it is remark-
ably flat and free from debris, though the mountains
on each side rise like walls to the height of at least
10,000 feet.—Over the whole surface of our Earth I
220 ALL AROUND TIE MOON,

know of no natural phenomenon that can be at all
compared with it.’”’

‘* Another wonder.almost in front of us!’? cried
Ardan. ‘I see avast lake black-as pitch and round
as acrater; it is surrounded by such lofty mountains
that their shadows reach clear across, rendering the
interior quite invisible !’’

“‘That’s Plato,’ said M’Nicholl; ‘*I know it
well; it’s the darkest spot on the Moon: many a
night I gazed at it from my little observatory in
Broad Street, Philadelphia,’’

“Right, Captain,’’ said Barbican; ‘the crater
Pilato, is, indeed, generally considered the blackest
spot on the Moon, but I am inclined to consider the
spots Grimaldi and Ricciolt on the extreme eastern
edge to be somewhat darker, If you take my glass,
Ardan, which is of somewhat greater power than
yours, you will distinctly see the bottom of the
crater. The reflective power of its plateau probably
proceeds from the exceedingly great number of
small craters that you can detect there.”’

“‘T think I see something like them now,’’ said
Ardan. ‘But Iam sorry the Projectile’s course will
not give us a vertical view.’’ :

“‘Can’t be helped!’’ said Barbican ; ¢* we must
go where it takes us. The day may come when
man can steer the projectile or the balloon in which
he is shut up, in any way he pleases, but that day has
not come yet !”’

Towards five in the morning, the northern limit
of Afare Librium was finally passed, and AZaze
LUNAR LANDSCAPES. ° 222

Frigoris spread its frost-colored plains far to the
right and left. On the east the travellers could
easily see the ring-mountain Cordamine, about
4ooo feet high, while a little ahead on the right
they could plainly distinguish /onfened/e with an
altitude nearly twice as great. JAfare Frigoris was
soon passed, and the whole lunar surface beneath the
travellers, as far as they could see in all directions,
now bristled with mountains, crags, and peaks.
Indeed, at the 7oth parallel the ‘*‘Seas’’ or plains
seem to have come to anend, The spy-glasses now
brought the surface to within about three miles, a
distance less than that between the hotel at Chamouni
and the summit of Mont Blanc. ‘To the left, they
had no difficulty in distinguishing the ramparts of
Philolaus, about 12,000 feet high, but though the
crater had a diameter of nearly thirty miles, the
black shadows prevented the slightest sign of its in-
terior from being seen. The Sun was now sinking
very low, and the illuminated surface of the Moon
was reduced to a narrow rim.

Dy this time, too, the bird’s eye view to which the
observations had so far principally confined, de-
cidedly altered its character. They could now look
back at the lunar mountains that they had been just
sailing over—a view somewhat like that enjoyed by
a tourist standing on the summit of Mt. St. Gothard
as he sees the sun setting behind the peaks of the
Bernese Oberland. The lunar landscapes however,
though seen under these new and ever varying con-
ditions, ‘hardly gained much by the change,’’ ac-
222 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

cording to Ardan’s expression. On the contrary,
they looked, if possible, more dreary and inhospit-
able than before.

VYhe Moon having no atmosphere, the benefit of
this gaseous. envelope in softening off and nicely
shading the approaches of light and darkness, heat
and cold, is never felt on her surface. There, no
twilight ever softly ushers in the brilliant sun, or
sweetly heralds the near approach of night’s dark
shadow. Night follows day, and day night, with the
startling suddenness of a match struck or a lamp ex-
tinguished in a cavern. Nor can it present any
gradual transition from either extreme of tempera-
ture. Hot jumps to cold, and cold jumps to hot.
A moment after a glacial midnight, it is a roasting
noon. Without an instant’s warning the tempera-
ture falls from 212° Fahrenheit to the icy winter of
interstellar space. The surface is all dazzling glare,
or pitchy gloom. Wherever the direct rays of the
sun do not fall, darkness reigns supreme. What we
call diffused light on Earth, the grateful result of
refraction, the luminous matter held. in suspension
by the air, the mother of our dawns and our dusks,
of our blushing mornings and our dewy eves, of our
shades, our penumbras, our tints and all the other
magical effects of chiaro-oscure—this diffused light
has absolutely no existence on the surface of the
Moon. Nothing is there to break the inexorable
contrast between intense white and intense black.
At mid-day, let a Selenite shade his eyes and look at
the sky: it will appear to him as black as pitch,
LUNAR LANDSCAPES. 223

while the stars still sparkle before him as vividly as
they do to us on the coldest and darkest night in
winter.

From this you can judge of the impression made
on our travellers by those strange lunar landscapes.
Even their decided novelty and very strange charac-
ter produced any thing but a pleasing effect on the
organs of sight. With all their enthusiasm, the
travellers felt their eyes ‘‘ get out of gear,’’ as Ardan
said, like those of a man blind from his birth and
suddenly restored to sight. They could not adjust
them so as to be able to realize the different plains of
vision. All things seemed in aheap. Foreground
and background were indistinguishably commingled.
No painter could ever transfer a lunar landscape to
his canvas. ;

“‘Landscape,’’ Ardan said ; ‘¢ whatdo you mean by
alandscape? Can you call a bottle of ink intensely
black, spilled over a sheet of paper intensely white,
a landscape? ’”? =

At the eightieth degree, when the Projectile was
hardly 100 miles distant from the Moon, the aspect
of things underwent no improvement. On the con-
trary, the nearer the travellers approached the lunar
surface, the drearier, the more inhospitable, and the
more wrearthly, everything seem to. look. Still
when five o’clock in the morning brought our travel-
lers to within 50 miles of AZount Groja—which their
spy-glasses rendered as visible as if it was only about
half a mile off, Ardan could not control himself.

“Why, we’re there’? he exclaimed; ‘‘we can
224 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

touch her with our hands! Open the windows and
let me out! Don’t mind letting me go by myself.
It is not very inviting quarters ladmit. But as we
are come to the jumping off place, I want to see the
whole thing through. Open the lower window and
let me out. I-can take care of myself!”’

‘* That’s what’s more than any other man can do,”
said M’ Nicholl drily, ‘‘ who wants to take a jump of
50 miles !”’

“ Better not try it, friend Ardan,’’ said Barbican
grimly: ‘think of Satellite! The Moon is -no
more attainable. by your body than by our Projec-
tile. You are far more comfortable in here than
when floating about in empty space like a bolide.””

Ardan, unwilling to quarrel with his companions,
appeared to give in; but he secretly consoled. him-
self by a hope which he had been entertaining for
some time, and which now looked like assuming the
appearance of acertainty. The Projectile had heen
lately approaching the Moon’s surface so rapidly that
it at last seemed actually impossible not to finally
touch it somewhere in the neighborhood of the
north pole, whose dazzling ridges now presented
themselves in sharp and strong relief against the
black sky. Therefore he kept silent, but quietly
bided his time.

The Projectile moved on, evidently getting nearer
and nearer to the lunar surface.. The Moon now ap-
peared to the travellers as’she does to us towards the
beginning of her Second Quarter, that is as a bright
crescent instead of a hemisphere.: On one side,
LUNAR LANDSCAPES. 225

glaring dazzling light; on the other, cavernous
pitchy darkness. The line separating both was
broken into a thousand bits of protuberances and
concavities, dented, notched, and jagged.

At six o’clock the travellers found themselves ex-
actly over the north pole. They were quietly gazing
at the rapidly shifting features of the wondrous view
unrolling itself beneath them, and were silently
wondering what was to come next, when, suddenly,
the Projectile passed the dividing line.” The Sun
and Moon instantly vanished from view. The next
moment, without the slightest warning the travellers
found themselves plunged in an ocean of the most
appalling darkness !

15
CHAPTER XIV.
A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS.

THE Projectile being not quite 30 miles from the
Moon’s north pole when the startling phenomenon,
recorded in our last chapter, took place, a few
seconds were quite sufficient to launch it at once
from the brightest day into the unknown realms
of night. The transition was so abrupt, so unex-
pected, without the slightest shading off, from daz-
zling effulgence to Cimmerian gloom, that the Moon
seemed to have been suddenly extinguished like a
lamp when the gas is turned off.

*¢Where’s the Moon ?”’ cried Ardan in amazement.

‘“‘It appears as if she had been wiped out of
creation !’’ cried M’ Nicholl.

Barbican said nothing, but observed carefully.
Not a particle, however, could he see of the disc
that had glittered so resplendently before his eyes a
few moments ago. Not a shadow, not a gleam, not
the slightest vestige could he trace of its existence.
The darkness being profound, the dazzling splendor
of the stars only gave a deeper blackness to the
pitchy sky. No wonder. The travellers found
themselves now in a night that had plenty of time
not only to become black itself, but to steep
everything connected with it in palpable blackness.
This was the night 35434 hours long, during which

(926)
A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS, 227

the invisible face of the Moon is turned away from
the Sun. In this black darkness the Projectile now
fully participated. Having plunged into the Moon’s
shadow, it was as effectually cut off from the action
of the solar rays as was every point on the invisible
lunar surface itself.

The travellers being no longer able to see each
other, it was proposed to light the gas, though such
an.unexpected demand on a commodity at once so
scarce and so valuable was certainly disquieting.
The gas, it will be remembered, had been intended
for heating alone, not illumination, of which ‘both
Sun and Moon had promised a never ending sup-
ply. But here both Sun and Moon, ina single in-
stant vanished from. before their eyes and left them
in Stygian darkness.

“Tt’s all the Sun’s fault!’’ cried Ardan, angrily
trying to throw the blame on something, and, like
every angry man in such circumstances, bound to
be rather nonsensical.

“ Put the saddle on the right horse, Ardan,’’ said
M’Nicholl patronizingly, always delighted at an
opportunity of counting a point off the Frenchman.
“You mean it’s all the Moon’s fault, don’t you, in
setting herself like a screen between us and the
Sun???

“No, Idon’t!’’ cried Ardan, not at all soothed
by his friend’s patronizing tone, and sticking like a
man to his first assertion right or wrong. ‘I know
what Isay! It will be all the Sun’s fault if we use
up our gas |.”
228 ALL AROUND THE. MOON,

“Nonsense! ’’.said M’Nicholl. * It’s the Moon,
who by her interposition has cut off the Sun’s light”

«¢ The Sun had no business to allow it to be cut
off,’ said Ardan, still angry and therefore decidedly
loose in his assertions.

Before M’Nicholl could reply, Barbican inter-
posed, and his even voice was soon heard pouring
balm on the troubled waters.

“¢ Dear friends,’’ he observed, ‘a little reflection
on either side would convince you that our present
situation is neither the Moon’s fault nor the Sun’s
fault! If anything is to be blamed for it, it is our
Projectile which, instead of rigidly following its
allotted course, has awkwardly contrived to deviate
from it. However, strict justice must acquit even
the Projectile. It only obeyed a great law of nature
in shifting its course ‘as soon as it came within the
sphere of that inopportune bolide’s influence.”’

‘All right!?’ said Ardan, as usual in the best of
humor after Barbican had laid down the law. “I
have no doubt it is exactly as you say; and, now
that all is settled, suppose we take breakfast. After
such a hard night spent in work, a little refreshment
would not be out of place!’

Such a proposition being too reasonable even for
M’ Nicholl to oppose, Ardan turned on the gas, and
had everything ready for the meal in a few minutes.
But, this time, breakfast was consumed in absolute
silence. No toasts were offered, no hurrahs were
uttered. A painful uneasiness had seized the hearts
of the daring travellers. The darkness into which
A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS. 229

they were so suddenly plunged, told decidedly on
their spirits. They felt almost as if they had been
suddenly deprived of their sight. That thick, dismal
savage blackness, which Victor Hugo’s pen is so fond
of occasionally revelling in, surrounded them on all
sides and crushed them like an iron shroud.

It was felt worse than ever when, breakfast being
over, Ardan carefully turned off the gas, and every-
thing within the Projectile was as dark as without.
However, though they could not see each other’s
faces, they could hear each other’s voices, and there-
fore they soon began to talk. The most natural sub-
ject of conversation was this terrible night 354 hours
long, which the laws of nature have imposed on the
Lunar inhabitants. Barbican undertook to give his
friends some explanation regarding the cause of the
startling phenomenon, and the consequences result-
ing from it. ,

“Yes, startling is the word for it,’ observed Bar-
bican, replying to a remark of Ardan’s:; ‘and still
more so when we reflect that not only are both
lunar hemispheres deprived, by turns, of sun light
for nearly 15 days, but that also the particular
hemisphere aver which we are at this moment float-
ing is all that long night completely deprived
of earth-light. In other words, it is only one
side of the Moon’s disc that ever receives any light
from the Earth. From nearly every portion of one
side of the Moon, the Earth is always as completely
absent as the Sun is from us at midnight. Suppose
an analogous case existed on the Earth; suppose,
2370 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

for instance, that neither in Europe, Asia or North
America was the Moon ever visible—that, in fact, it
was to be seen only at our antipodes. With what
astonishment should we contemplate her for the first
time on our arrival in Australia or New Zea
land!”

‘¢ Every man of us would pack off to Australia to
see her!’’ cried Ardan.

‘“*'Ves,’? said M’Nicholl sententiously ; ‘for a
visit to the South Sea a Turk would willingly forego
Mecca; and a Bostonian would prefer Sidney even
to Paris.”’

‘*Well,’’ resumed Barbican, ‘this interesting
marvel is reserved for the Selenite that inhabits the
side of the Moon which is always turned away from
our globe.”’

‘And which,’’ added the Captain, ‘* we should
have had the unspeakable satisfaction of contem-
plating if we had only arrived at the period when
the Sun and the Earth are not at the same side of
the Moon—that is, 15 days sooner or later than
now.”

“For my part, however,’’ continued Barbican,
not heeding these interruptions, ‘‘I.must confess
that, notwithstanding the magnificent splendor of
the spectacle when viewed for the first time by the
Selenite who inhabits the dark side of the Moon, I
should prefer to be a resicent on the illuminated side.
The former, when his long, blazing, roasting, daz-
zling day is over, has a night 354 hours long, whose
darkness, like that, just now surrounding us, is ever

>
A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS, 2pL

unrelieved save by the cold cheerless rays of the stars.
But the latter has hardly seen his fiery sun sinking
on one horizon when he beholds rising on the op-
posite one an orb, milder, paler, and colder indeed
than the Sun, but fully as large as thirteen of our
full Moons, and therefore shedding thirteen times as
much light. This would be our Earth. It would
pass through all its phases too, exactly like our Satel-
lite. The Selenites would have their New Earth,
Full Earth, and Last Quarter. At midnight, grandly
illuminated, it would shine with the greatest glory.
But that is almost as much as can be said for it. Its
futile heat. would but poorly compensate for its
superior radiance. All the caloric accumulated in
the lunar soil during the 354 hours day would have
by this time radiated completely into space. An in-
tensity of cold would -prevail, in comparison to
which a Greenland winter is tropical. The tempera-
ture of interstellar space, 250° below zero, would be
reached. Our Selenite, heartily tired of the cold
pale Earth, would gladly see her sink towards the
horizon, waning as she sank, till at last she appeared
no more than half full. Then suddenly a faint rim
of the solar orb reveals itself on the edge of the
opposite sky. Slowly, more than 14 times more
slowly than with us, does the Sun lift himself above
the lunar horizon. In half an hour, only half his
disc is revealed, but that is more than enough to
flood the lunar landscape with a dazzling intensity
of light, of which we have no counterpart on Earth.
No atmosphere refracts it, no hazy screen softens it,
232 ALL AROUND THE JIOON,

no enveloping vapor absorbs it, no obstructing
medium colors it. It breaks on the eye, harsh,
white, dizzling, blinding, like the electric light seen
a few yards off. As the hours wear away, the more
biasting becomes the glare; and the higher he rises
in the black sky, but slowly, slowly. It takes him
seven of our days to reach the meridian. By that
time the heat has increased from an arctic tempera-
ture to double the boiling water point, from 250°
below zero to 500° above it, or the point at which
tin melts. Subjected to these extremes, the: glassy
rocks crack, shiver and crumble away 3; enormous
land slides occur; peaks topple over ; and tons of
debris, crashing down the mountains, are swallowed
up forever in the yawing chasms of the bottomless
craters,’’

‘*Bravo!’’ cried Ardan, clapping his hands
softly: ‘* our President is sublime! He reminds me
of the overture of Guiliaume Tell /”

‘« Souvenir de Marston!’’ growled M’ Nicholl.

‘©These phenomena,’’ continued Barbican, heed-
less of interruption and his voice betraying a slight
glow of excitement, ‘‘these phenomena going on
without interruption from month to month, from
year to year, from age to age, from con to con, have
finally convinced me that—what?’’ he asked his
hearers, interrupting himself suddenly.

—‘* That the existence at the present time—”
answered M’ Nicholl.

—‘‘Of either animal or vegetable life—’’ inter-
rupted Ardan,
A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS. 233

—‘In the Moon is hardly possible! ’’ cried both
in one voice.

‘Besides?’ asked Barbican: ‘even if there zs
any life pe

—‘ That to live on the dark side would be much
more inconvenient than on the light side!’’ cried
M Nicholl promptly.

— ‘That there is no choice between them! ”’
cried Ardan just as ready. -‘* For my part, I should
think a residence on Mt. Erebus or in Grinnell Land
a terrestrial paradise in comparison to either. The
Earth shine might illuminate the light side of the
Moon a little during the long night, but for any
practical advantage towards heat or life, it would be
perfectly useless !’’

‘But there is another serious difference between
the two sides,’? said Barbican, ‘‘ in addition to those
enumerated, The dark side is actually more troubled
with excessive variations of temperature than the
light one.’?

“That assertion of our worthy President,’’ inter-
supted Ardan, ‘*with all possible respect for his
superior knowledge; T am disposed to question.”

“Its as clear as day!’ said Barbican.

“As clear as mud, you mean, Mr. President ;’’
interrupted Ardan, ‘‘the temperature of the light
side is excited by two objects at the same time, the
Earth and the Sun, whereas— ’’

—‘T beg your pardon, Ardan—”? said Barbican..

—‘‘ Granted, dear boy—granted with the utmost
pleasure !’’ interrupted the Frenchman.


254 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“‘T shall probably have to direct my observations
altogether to you, Captain,’’ continued Barbican;
“ friend Michael interrupts me so often that I’m
afraid he can hardly understand my remarks.”

‘¢T always admired your candor, Barbican,” said
Ardan; ‘it’s a noble quality, a grand quality!”

“*Don’t mention it,’’ replied Barbican, turning
towards M’ Nicholl, still in the dark, and addressing
him exclusively; ‘‘ You see, my dear Captain, the
period at which the Moon’s invisible side receives at
once its light and heat is exactly the period of her
conjunction, that is to say, when she is lying between
the Earth and the Sun. In comparison therefore
with the place which she had occupied at her offo-
sition, or when her visible side was fully illuminated,
she is nearer to the Sun by double her distance from
the Earth, or nearly 480 thousand miles. There-
fore, my dear Captain, you can see how when the
invisible side of the Moon is turned towards the
Sun, she is nearly half a million of miles nearer to
him than she had been before. Therefore, her heat
should be so much the greater.’’

“TI see it at a glance,’’ said the Captain,

«¢ Whereas ”” continued Barbican,

“©One moment!” cried Ardan.

«‘ Another interruption !’’ exclaimed Barbican;
‘¢ What is the meaning of it, Sir?’’

‘¢ Task my honorable friend the privilege of the
floor for one moment,’’ cried Ardan.

_ & What for?’’
“‘To continue the explanation.”


NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS. 235

“Why so?”

«© To show that I can understand as well as inter-
rupt!””

“You have the floor!’’ exclaimed Barbican, in
a voice no longer showing any traces of ill humor.

“T expected no less from the honorable gentle-
man’s well known courtesy,’’ replied Ardan. Then
changing his manner and imitating to the life
Barbican’s voice, articulation, and gestures, he con-
tinued: “‘ Whereas, you see, my dear Captain, the
period at which the Moon’s visible side receives at
once its light and heat, is exactly the period of her
opposition, that is to say, when she is lying on one
side of the Earth and the Sun at the other. In
comparison therefore with the point which she had
occupied in conjunction, or when her invisible side
was fully illuminated, she is farther from the Sun by
double her distance from the Earth, or nearly 480,000
miles. Therefore, my dear Captain, you can readily
see how when the Moon’s invisible side is turned
Jrom the Sun, she is nearly half a million miles
further from him than she had been before. There-
fore her heat should be so much the less.’’

“Well done, friend Ardan!’’ cried Barbican,
clapping his hands with pleasure. ‘‘ Yes, Captain,
he understood it as well as either of us the whole
time. Intelligence, not indifference, caused him to
interrupt. Wonderful fellow !”’

“That's the kind of aman Iam!’ replied Ar-
dan, not without some degree of complacency.
Then he added simply: ‘Barbican, my friend, if I
236 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

understand your explanations so readily, attribute it
all to their astonishing lucidity. If I have any facul-
ity, it is that of being able to scent common sense
at the first glimmer. Your sentences are so steeped
in it that I catch their full meaning long before you
end theni—hence my apparent inattention. But
we’re not yet done with the visible face of the
Moon: it seems to me you have not yet enumerated
all the advantages in which it surpasses the other
side.”

“Another of these advantages,”’ continued Barbi-
can, ‘fis that it is from the visible side alone that
eclipses of the Sun can be seen. This is self-evi«
dent, the interposition of the Earth being possible
only between this visible face and the Sun. Further-
more, such eclipses of the Sun would be of a far more
imposing character than anything of the kind to be
witnessed from our Earth. ‘This is chiefly for two
reasons: first, when we, terrestrians, see the Sun
eclipsed, we notice that, the discs of the two orbs
being of about the same apparent size, one cannot
hide the other except for a short time ;. second, as
the two bodies are moving in opposite directions, the
total duration of the eclipse, even under the most
favorable circumstances, can’t last longer than 7
minutes, Whereas to a Selenite who sees the Earth
eclipse the Sun, not only does the Earth’s disc ap-
pear four times larger than the Sun’s, but also, as his
day is 14 times longer than ours, the two heavenly
bodies must remain several hours in contact. . Be
sides, notwithstanding the apparent superiority of
4 NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS. 237

the Earth’s disc, the refracting power of the atmos-
phere will never allow the Sun to be eclipsed
altogether. Even when completely screened by the
Earth, he would form a beautiful circle around her
of yellow, red, and crimson light, in which she
would appear to float like'a vast sphere of jet ina
glowing sea of gold, rubies, sparkling carbuncles and
garnets,”’

“Tt seems to me,’’ said M’Nicholl, ‘‘that, taking
everything into consideration, the invisible side has
been rather shabbily treated.”’

‘IT know I should not stay there very long,’’ said
Ardan; ‘the desire of seeing such a splendid sight
as that eclipse would be enough to bring me to the
visible side as soon as possible.’’

“‘ Yes, I have no doubt of that, friend Michael,’’
pursued Barbican ; ‘‘but to see the eclipse it would
not be necessary to quit the dark hemisphere
altogether. You are, of course, aware that in con-
sequence of her librations, or noddings, or wob-
blings, the Moon presents to the eyes of the Earth
alittle more than the exact half of her disc. She
has two motions, one on her path around the Earth,
and the other a shifting around on her own axis by
which she endeavors to keep the same side always
turned towards our sphere. This she cannot always
do, as while one motion, the latter, is strictly uni-
form, the other being eccentric, sometimes accelera-
ting her and sometimes retarding, she has not time
to shift herself around completely and with perfect
correspondence of movement. At her perigee, for
238 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

instance, she moves forward quicker than she can
shift, so that we detect a portion of her western
border before she has time to conceal it. Similarly,
at her apogee, when her rate of motion is compara-
tively slow, she shifts a little too quickly for her
velocity, and therefore cannot help revealing a cer-
tain portion of her eastern border. She shows
altogether about 8 degrees of the dark side, about
4at the east and 4 at the west, so that, out of her
360 degrees, about 188, in-other words, a little more
than 57 per cent., about + of the entire surface, be-
comes visible to human eyes. Consequently a
Selenite could catch an occasional glimpse of our
Earth, without altogether quitting the dark side.”

‘“*No matter for that!’’ cried Ardan; ‘‘if we
ever become Selenites we must inhabit the visible
side. My weak point is light, and that I must have
when it can be got.’’

“‘Unless, as perhaps in this case, you might be
paying toodear for it,’”? observed M’ Nicholl, “‘ How
would you like to pay for your light by the loss of
the atmosphere, which, according to some philoso-
phers, is piled away on the dark side?”

‘¢Ah! In that case I should consider a little be-
fore committing myself,’ replied Ardan. “I
should like to hear your opinion regarding such a
notion, Barbican. Hey! Do your hear? Have
astronomers. any valid reasons for supposing the
atmosphere to have fled to the dark side of the
Moon?”

“Defer that question till some other time, Ars
4A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS. 239

dan,’? whispered M’ Nicholl; ‘¢ Barbican is just now
thinking out something that interests him far more
deeply than any empty speculation of astronomers.
if you are near the window, look out through it
towards the Moon. Can you see anything ?”’

“T can feel the window with my hand; but for
all I can see, I might as well be over head and ears
in a hogshead of ink.’’

The two friends kept up a desultory conversation,
but Barbican did not hear them. One fact, in par-
ticular, troubled him, and he sought in vain to ac-
count for it. Having come so near the Moon—
‘about 30 nailes—why had not the Projectile gone all
the way? Had its velocity been very great, the
tendency to fall could certainly be counteracted.
But the velocity being undeniably very moderate,
how explain such a decided resistance to Lunar at-
traction? Had the Projectile come within the
sphere of some strange unknown influence? Did
the neighborhood of some mysterious body retain
it firmly imbedded in ether? That it would never
reach the Moon, was now beyond all doubt; but
where was it going? Nearer to her or further off?
Or was it rushing resistlessly into infinity on the
wings of that pitchy night? Who could tell, know,
calculate—who could even guess, amid the horror
of this gloomy blackness P Questions, like these,
left Barbican no rest; in vain he tried to grapple
with them; he felt like a child before them, baffied
and almost despairing.

In fact, what could be more tantalizing? Just
240 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

outside their windows, only a few leagues off, per-
haps only a few miles, lay the radiant planet of the
night, but in every respect as far off from the eyes
of himself and. his companions as if she was hiding
at the other side of Jupiter! And to their ears she
was no nearer. Earthquakes of the old Titanic type
might at that very moment be upheaving her sur-
face with resistless force, crashing moustain against
mountain as fiercely as wave meets wave around the
storm-lashed cliffs of Cape Horn. But not the
faintest far off murmur even of sucha mighty tumult
could break the dead brooding silence that sur-
rounded the travellers. Nay, the Moon, realizing
the weird fancy of the Arabian poet, who calls her
a “ giant stiffening into granite, but struggling madly
against his doom,’’ might shriek, in a spasm of
agony, loudly enough to be heard in Sirius. But
our travellers could not hear it. Their ears no
sound could now reach. They could no more de-
tect the rending of a continent than the falling of a
feather. Air, the propagator and transmitter of
sound, was absent from her surface. Her cries, her
struggles, her groans, were all smothered beneath
the impenetrable tomb of eternal silence !

These were some of the fanciful ideas by which
Ardan tried to amuse his companions in the present
unsatisfactory state of affairs. His efforts, however
well meant, were not successful. M’Nicholl’s growis
were more savage than usual, and even Barbican’s
patience was decidedly giving way. The loss of the
other face they could have easily borne—with most
A NICHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS. 247i

of its details they had been already familiar. But,
no, it must be the dark face that now escaped theit
observation! The very one that for numberless rea-
sons they were actually dying tosee! They looked
out of the windows once more at the black Moon
beneath them, .

There it lay below them, a round black spot, hid-
ing the sweet faces of the stars, but otherwise no
more distinguishable by the travellers than if they
were lying in the depths of the Mammoth Cave of
Kentucky. And just think, Only fifteen days be-
fore, that dark face had been splendidly illuminated
by the solar beams, every crater lustrous, every peak
sparkling, every streak glistening under the vertical
ray. .In fifteen days later, a day light the most bril-
liant would have replaced a midnight the most Cims
merian, But in fifteen days later, where would the
Projectile be? In what direction would it have
been drawn by the forces innumerable of attractions
incalculable? To such a question as this, even Ars
dan would reply only Ly an ominous shake of the
head.

We know already that our travellers, as well a3
astronomers generally, judging from that portion of
the dark side occasionally revealed by the Moon’s
libations, were pretty certain that there is no great
difference between her two sides, as far as regards
their physical constitutions. This portion, about
the seventh part, shows plains and mountains, cir-
cles and craters, all of precisely the same nature as

those already laid down on the chart. Judging
16
242 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

therefore from analogy, the other three-sevenths are,
in all probability a world in every respect exactly
like the visible face—that is, arid, desert, dead.
But our travellers also knew that pretty certain is far
from gutte certain, and that arguing merely from
analogy may enable you to give a good guess, but
can never lead you to an undoubted conclusion.
What if the atmosphere had really withdrawn to
this dark face? And if air, why not water? Would
not this be enough to infuse life into the whole con-
tinent? Why should not vegetation flourish on its
plains, fish in its seas, animals in its forests, and man
in every one of its zones that were capable of sus»
taining life? ‘To these interesting questions, what a
satisfaction it would be to be able to answer posi-
tively one way or another! Tor thousands of diffi-
cult problems a mere glimpse at this hemisphere
would be enough to furnish a satisfactory reply.
How glorious it would be to contemplate a realm
on which the eye of man has never yet rested !
Great, therefore, as you may readily conceive,
was the depression of our travellers’ spirits, as they
pursued their way, enveloped in a veil of darkness
the most profound. Still.even then Ardan, as usual,
formed somewhat of an exception. JF inding it im-
possible to see a particle of the Lunar surface, he
gave it up for good, and.tried to console himself by
gazing at the stars, which now fairly blazed in the
spangled heavens. And certainly never before had
astronomer enjoyed an opportunity for gazing at the
heavenly bodies under such peculiar advantages.
A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS. 2493

How Fraye of Paris, Chacornac of Lyons, and
Father Secchi of Rome would have envied him !
For, candidly and truly speaking, never before
had mortal eye revelled on such a scene of starry
splendor. The black sky sparkled with lustrous
fires, like the ceiling of a vast hall of ebony en-
crusted with flashing diamonds. Ardan’s eye could
take in the whole extent in an easy sweep from the
Southern Cross to the Little Bear, thus embracing
within one glance not only the two polar stars of the
present day, but also Canopus and Vega, which, by
reason of the precession of the Equinoxes, are to be
our polar stars 12,000: years hence. His imagina-
tion, as if intoxicated, reeled wildly through these
sublime infinitudes and got lost in them. He forgot
all about himself and all about his companions. He
forgot even the strangeness. of the fate that had sent
them wandering through these forbidden regions,
like a bewildered comet that had lost its way. With
what a soft sweet light every star glowed! No mat-
ter what its magnitude, the stream that flowed from
it looked calm and holy. No twinkling, no scintil-
lation, no nictitation, disturbed their pure and lam-
bent gleam. No atmosphere here interposed its
layers of humidity or of unequal density to inter-
rupt the stately majesty of their effulgence. The
longer he gazed upon them, the more absorbing be-
came their attraction. He felt that they were great
kindly eyes looking down’ even yet with benevo-
lence and protection on himself and his compan-
ions now driving wildly through space, and lost
244 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

in the pathless depths of the black ocean of
infinity !

He soon became aware that his friends, following
his example, had interested themselves in gazing at
the stars, and were now just as absorbed as himself
in the contemplation of the transcendent spectacle,
For a long time all three continued to feast their
eyes on all the glories of the starry firmament ; but,
strange to say, the part that seemed to possess the
strangest and weirdest fascination for their wander-
ing glances was the spot where the vast disc of the
Moon showed like an enormous round hole, black
and soundless, and apparently deep enough: to per-
mit a glance into the darkest mysteries of the in-
finite.

A disagreeable sensation, however, against which
they had been for some time struggling, at last put
an end to their contemplations,, and compelled
them to think of themselves. This was nothing less
than a pretty sharp cold, at first somewhat endur-
able,’ but which soon covered ‘the inside surface
of the window panes with a thick coating of ice.
The fact was that, the Sun’s direct rays having
no longer an opportunity of warming up the Pro-
jectile, the latter began to lose rapidly by radiation
whatever heat it had stored away within its walls.
‘The consequence was a very decided falling of the
thermometer, and so thick a condensation of the
internal moisture on the window glasses as to soon
render. all external observations extremely difficult,
if not actually impossible,
A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS, : 245

The Captain, as the oldest man in the party,
claimed the privilege of saying he could stand it no
longer. Striking a light, he consulted the thermome-
ter and cried out: z

*¢Seventeen degrees below zero, centigrade!
that is certainly low enough to make an old fellow
like me feel rather chilly! ’’

“Just one degree and a half above zero, Fahren-
heit!’’ observed Barbican; ‘‘I really had no idea
that it was so cold.’’

His teeth actually chattered so much that he could
hardly articulate ; still he, as well as the others, dis-
liked té entrench on their short supply of gas.

‘One feature of our journey that I particularly ad-
mire,’”’ said Ardan, trying to laugh with freezing
lips, ‘is that we can’t complain of monotony. At
one time we are frying with the heat and blinded
with the light, like Indians caught on a burning
prairie: at another, we are freezing in the pitchy
darkness of a hyperborean winter, like Sir John
Franklin’s merry men in the Bay of Boothia.
Madame La Nature, you don’t forget your de-
votees: on the contrary, you overwhelm us with
your attentions ! ”’

“Our external temperature may be reckoned at
how much ?’’ asked the Captain, making a desper-
ate effort to keep up the conversation.

‘«The temperature outside our Projectile must be
precisely the same as that of interstellar space in
general,’’ answered Barbican.

“Ts not this precisely the moment then,’’ inter-
6 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

24

posed Ardan, quickly, ‘for making an experiment
which we could never have made as long as we were
in the sunshine? ’”’

““That’s so!’’ exclaimed Barbican; ‘now or
never! I’m glad you thought of it, Ardan, We
are just now in the positioh to find out the tempera-
ture of space by actual experiment, and so see whose
calculations are right, Fourier’s or Pouillet’s.”’

** Let’s see,’? asked Ardan, ‘* who was Fourier,
and who was Pouillet ?’’

‘* Baron Fourier, of the French Academy, wrote
a famous treatise on /Zeat, which I remember read-
ing twenty years ago-in Penington’s book store,”’
promptly responded the Captain; ‘* Pouillet was an
eminent professor of Physics at the Sorbonne, where
he died, last year, I think.”

«¢ Thank you, Captain,’ said Ardan; ‘the cold
does not injure your memory, though it is decidedly
on the advance. See how thick the ice is already
on the window panes! Let it only keep on and we
shall soon have our breaths falling around us in flakes
of snow.”

“Let us prepare a thermometer,”’ said Barbican,
who had already set himself to work in a business-
like manner. .

A thermometer of the usual kind, as may be readily
supposed, would be of no use whatever in the ex-
periment that was now about to be made. In an
ordinary thermometer Mercury freezes hard when
exposed to a temperature of 40° below zero. But
Barbican had provided himself with a J@ndmuim,

?
A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS. 247

sedf-recording thermometer, of a peculiar nature, in-
vented by Wolferdin, a friend of Arago’s, which
could correctly register exceedingly low degrees of
temperature. Before beginning the experiment, this
instrument was tested by comparison with one of
the usual kind, and then Barbican hesitated a few
moments regarding the. best means of employ-

ing it. ; .
‘< How shall we start this experiment ?’’ asked the
Captain.

“Nothing simpler,’’ answered Ardan, always ready
toreply ; ‘“you just open your windows, and fling
out your thermometer. It follows your Projectile,
as a calf follows her mother. In a quarter of an
hour you put out your hand a

“Put out your hand!’’ interrupted Barbican.

“Put out your hand ” continued Ardan,
quietly.

“You do nothing of the kind,’’ again interrupted
Barbican; ‘‘that is, unless you prefer, instead of a
hand, to pull back a frozen stump, shapeless, color-
less and lifeless! ’’

“‘T prefer a hand,’’ said Ardan, surprised and in-
terested. ; .

‘“‘Yes,’’ continued Barbican, ‘‘the instant your
hand left the Projectile, it would experience the
same terrible sensations as is produced by cauterizing
it with an iron bar white hot. For heat, whether
rushing rapidly out of our bodies or rapidly énter-
ing them, is identically the same force and does the
same amount of damage. Besides I am by no means




248 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

certain that we are still followed by the objects that
we flung out of the Projectile.”’

“Why not?” “asked M’Nicholl; ‘we saw them
all outside not long ago.”’

‘*But we can’t see them outside now,’’ answered
Barbican ; ‘‘that may be accounted for, I know, by
the darkness, but it may be also by the fact of: their
not being there at.all. In a case. like this, we can’t
rely on uncertainties. Therefore, to make sure of
not losing our thermometer, we shall fasten it with a
string and easily pull it in whenever we like.’”’

This advice being adopted, the window was opened
quickly, and the instrument was thrown out at once
by M’Nicholl, who held it fastened by a short stout
cord so that it could be pulled in immediately. The
window had hardly been open for longer than a
second, yet that second had been enough to admit a
terrible icy chill into the interior of the Projectile.

“Ten thousand ice-bergs!’’ cried Ardan, shivering
all over; ‘it’s cold enough to freeze a white bear! ”’

Barbican waited quietly for half an hour; that
time he considered quite long enough to enable the
instrument to acquire the temperature of the inter-
stellar space. Then he gave the signal, and it was
instantly pulled in,

It took him a few moments to calculate the quan-
tity of mercury that had escaped into the little diaph-
ragm attached to the lower part of the instrument ;
then he said :

‘*A hundred and forty degrees, centigrade, below
zero!’’

?
A NIGHT OF FIFTEEN DAYS. 249

“Two hundred and twenty degrees, Fahrenheit,
below zero!?? cried M’Nicholl; ‘‘no wonder that
we should feel a little chilly! ”’ .

**Pouillet is right, then,’”’ said Barbican, ‘and
Fourier wrong.”’

«Another victory for Sorbonne over the Acade-
my!’ cried Ardan. ‘‘ Vive le Sorbonne! Not that
I’m a bit proud of finding myself in the midst of a
temperature so very a@stingué—though it is more
than three times colder than Hayes ever felt it at
Humboldt Glacier or Nevenoff at Yakoutsk. If
Madame the Moon becomes as cold as this every
time that her surface is withdrawn from the sunlight
for fourteen days, I don’t think, boys, that her
hospitality is much to hanker after! ”?
CHAPTER XV.
GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE,

In spite of the dreadful condition in which the
three friends now found themselves, and the still
more dreadful future that awaited them, it must be
acknowledged that Ardan bravely kept up his spirits.
And his companions were just as cheerful. Their
philosophy was quite simple and perfectly intelligible.
What they could bear, they bore without murmuring.
When it became unbearable, they only complained,
if complaining would do any good. Imprisoned in
an iron shroud, flying through profound darkness
into the infinite abysses of space, nearly a quarter
million of miles distant from all human aid, freezing
with the icy cold, their little stock not only of
gas but of azr rapidly running lower and lower, a
near future of the most impenetrable obscurity
looming up before them, they never once thought
of wasting time in asking such useless questions as
where they were going, or what fate was about to be-
fall them. Knowing that no good could possibly
result from inaction or despair, they carefully kept
their wits about them, making their experiments and
recording their observations as calmly and as deliber-
ately as if they were working at home in the quiet
retirement of their own cabinets.

Any other course of action, however, would have
(250)
x GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE, 257

been perfectly absurd on their part, and this no one
knew better than themselves. Even if desirous to
act otherwise, what could they have done? As
powerless over the Projectile as a baby over a loco-
motive, they could neither clap brakes to its move-
ment nor switch off its direction. A sailor can
turn his ship’s head at pleasure ; an aeronaut has lit-
tle trouble, by means of his ballast and his throttle-
valve, in giving a vertical movement to his balloon.
But nothing of this kind could our travellers attempt.
No helm, or ballast, or throttle-valve could avail
them now. Nothing in the world could be done to
prevent things from following their own course to
the bitter end.

If these three men would permit themselves to
hazard an expression at all on the subject, which
they didn’t, each could have done it by his own
favorite motto, so admirably expressive of his indi-
vidual nature. ‘* Donnes téte baissée!’’ (Go it
baldheaded!) showed Ardan’s uncalculating im-
petuosity and his Celtic blood. ‘* fata guocunque
vocant !’? (To its logical. consequence! ) revealed
Barbican’s imperturbable stoicism, culture hardening
rather than loosening the original British phlegm.
Whilst M’Nicholl’s ** Screw down the valve and let
her rip!’? betrayed at once his unconquerable Yankee
coolness and his old experiences as a Western steam-
boat captain.

Where were they now, at eight o’clock in the
morning of the day called in America the sixth of
December? Near the Moon, very certainly; near
252 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

enough, in fact, for them to perceive easily in the
dark the great round screen which she formed be-
tween themselves and the Projectile on one side, and
the Earth, Sun, and stars on the other. But as to
the exact distance at which she lay from them—they
had no possible means of calculating it. The Pro-
jectile, impelled and maintained by forces inexpli-
cable and even incomprehensible, had come within
Jess than thirty miles from the Moon’s north pole.
But during those two hours of immersion in the
dark shadow, had this distance been increased or
diminished? There was evidently no stand-point
whereby to estimate either the Projectile’s direction
or its velocity. Perhaps, moving rapidly away from
the Moon, it would be soon out of her shadow
altogether. Perhaps, on the contrary, gradually ap-
proaching her surface, it might come into contact at
any moment with some sharp invisible peak of the
Lunar mountains—a catastrophe sure to put asudden
end to the trip, and the travellers too.

An excited discussion on this subject soon sprang
up, in which all naturally took part. Ardan’s
imagination as usual getting the better of his rea-
son, he maintained very warmly that the Projectile,
caught and retained by the Moon’s attraction, could
not help falling on her surface, just as an aerolite
cannot help falling on our-Earth.

“Softly, dear boy, softly,’’ replied Barbican ;
‘* aerolites can help falling on the Earth, and the
proof is, that few of them do fall—most of them
don’t. Therefore, even granting that we had already
GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE, 253

assumed the nature of an aerolite, it does not
necessarily follow that we should fall on the
Moon.”’ ,

“But,” objected Ardan, ‘if we approach only
near enough, I don’t see how we can help -

“* You don’t see, it may be,’’ said Barbican, ‘* but
you can see, if you only reflect a moment. Have
you not often seen the November meteors, for in-
stance, streaking the skies, thousands at a time ?”’

“Ves; on several occasions I was so fortunate.’’

‘Well, did you ever see any of them strike the
Earth’s surface? ’’ asked Barbican.

“IT can’t say I ever did,’’ was the candid reply,
“ but——.”’

‘‘ Well, these shooting stars,’’? continued Barbi-
can, “or rather these wandering particles of matter,
shine only from being inflamed by the friction of
the atmosphere. Therefore they can never be at a
greater distance from the Earth than 30 or 40 miles
at furthest, and yet they seldom fall on it. So with
our Projectile. It may go very close to the Moon
without falling into it.’’

“*But our roving Projectile must pull up some-
where in the long run,’’ replied Ardan, ‘¢and I
should like to know where that somewhere can be, if
not in the Moon.”’

‘Softly again, dear boy,’’ said Barbican; ‘how
do you know that our Projectile must pull up some-
where ?”’

“It’s self-evident,’’? replied Ardan; ‘it can’t
keep moving for ever.’’



?
254 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

‘¢ Whether it can or it can’t depends altogether
on which one of two mathematical curves it has fol-
lowed in describing its course. According to the
velocity with which it was endowed at a certain
moment, it must follow either the one or the other;
but this velocity I do not consider myself just now
able to calculate.’’

‘Exactly so,’? chimed in M’Nicholl; ‘it must
describe and RESP on describing either a Parole or
a hyperbola.”’

“*Precisely,’’ said Barbican; ‘‘ at acertain velocity
it would take a parabolic curve ; with a velocity con-
siderably greater it should describe a hyperbolic
curve.”’ ,

‘‘T always did like nice corpulent words,’’ said
Ardan, trying to laugh; ‘‘bloated and unwieldy,
they express in a neat handy way exactly what you
mean. Of course, I know all about the high—high
—those high curves, and those low curves. No mat-
ter. Explain them to me all the same. Consider
me most deplorably ignorant on the nature of these
curves.”

‘¢Well,’’ said the Captain, a little bumptiously,
**a parabola is a curve of the second order, formed
by the intersection of a cone by a plane parallel to
one of its sides.”’

“You don’t say so!’’ cried Ardan, with auth
agape. ‘Dotell!’’ -

‘It is pretty nearly the path taken by a shell shot
from a mortar.’

«Well now!’? observed Ardan, apparently much
GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE, 255
surprised ; ‘*who’d have thought it? Now for the
high—high—bully old curve! ”’

“‘The hyperbola,’’ continued the Captain, not
minding Ardan’s antics, ‘the hyperbola is a curve
of the second order, formed from the intersection of
a cone by a plane parallel to its axis, or rather paral-
lel to its two genxeratricces, constituting two separate
branches, extending indefinitely in both directions,’’

“©Oh, what an accomplished scientist I’m going to
turn out, if only left long enough at your feet, illus-
trious maestro /’? cried Ardan, with effusion. ‘Only
figure it to yourselves, boys; before the Captain’s
lucid explanations, I fully expected to hear some-
thing about the high curves and the low curves in
the back of an Ancient Thomas! Oh, Michael,
Michael, why didn’t you know the Captain earlier ?”’

But the Captain was now too deeply interested in
a hot discussion with Barbican to notice that the
Frenchman was only funning him. Which of the
two curves had been the one most probably taken
by the Projectile? Barbican maintained it was the
parabolic; M’Nicholl insisted that it was the hyper-
bolic. Their tempers were not improved by the
severe cold, and both became rather excited in the
dispute. They drew so many lines on the table, and
crossed them so often with others, that nothing was
left at last but a great blot. They covered bits.of
paper with w’s and y’s, which they read out like so
many classic passages, shouting them, declaiming
them, drawing attention to the strong points by
gesticulation so forcible and voice so loud. that
256 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

neither of the disputants could hear a word that the
other said. Possibly the very great difference in
temperature between the external air in contact with
their skin and the blood coursing through their veins,
had given rise to magnetic currents as potential in
their effects as a superabundant supply of oxygen.
At all events, the language they soon began to em-
ploy in the enforcement of their arguments fairly
made the Frenchman’s hair stand on end.

“You probably forget the important difference
between a directrix and an axis,’’ hotly observed
Barbican,

**T know what an @édscissa is, any how!’ cried
the Captain. ‘* Can you say as much ?’”’

**Did you ever understand what is meant by a
@ouble ordinate ?’’ asked Barbican, trying to keep
cool.

‘* More than you ever did about a ¢rausverse and
a conjugate!’ replied the. Captain, with much
asperity.

“Any one not convinced at a glance that this
eccentricity is equal to zzzty, must be blind as a
bat!’’ exclaimed Barbican, fast losing his ordinary
urbanity. |

** Zess than unify, you mean! If you want spec-
‘tacles, here are mine! ’’ shouted the Captain, angrily
tearing them off and offering them to his adver-
sary.



“‘Dear boys!’’ interposed Ardan
“— ©The eccentricity is equal to unity /’’ cried
Barbican.
GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE, 257

— The eccentricity is less than ey /’? screamed
NM’ Nicholl.
“Talking of eccentricity ? put in Ardan.
— Therefore it’s a parabola, and must be!”’
cried Barbican, triumphantly.
—“‘ Therefore it’s hyperdo/a and nothing shorter ! aie
was the Captain’s quite as confident reply.

‘‘ For gracious sake]! ”? resumed Ardan.

**Then produce your asympiote /’’ exclaimed Bar-
bican, with an angry sneer.

“Let us see the symmetrical point /’’ roared the
Captain, quite savagely.

‘* Dear boys! old fellows !
loud as his Jungs would let him.

“It’s useless to argue with a Mississippi steamboat
Captain,’’ ‘ejaculated Barbican; ‘he never gives in
till he blows up!’

‘Never try to convince a Yankee schoolmaster,”
replied M’ Nicholl; ‘he has one book by heart and
don’t believe in any other!”

“Here, friend Michael, get me a cord, won’t
you? It’s the only way to convince him!” cried
Barbican, hastily turning to the Frenchman.

“Hand me over that ruler, Ardan!’’ yelled the
Captain, ‘*The heavy one! It’s the only way
now left to bring him to reason !”’

“Look here, Barbican and M’Nicholl!’’ cried
Ardan, at last making himself heard, and keeping a
tight hold both on the cord and the ruler.‘ This
thing has gone far enough! Come. Stop your talk,

17







> cried Ardan, as
258 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

and answer me a few questions. What do you
want of this cord, Barbican ?”’

“¢ To describe a parabolic curve!”

‘*And what are you going to do with the ruler,
M’ Nicholl! ’?

“*'To help draw a true hyperbola

‘‘Promise me, Barbican, that you’re not going to
lasso the Captain !’’

*¢ Lasso the Captain! Ha! ha! ha!”

“* You promise, M’ Nicholl, that you’re not going
to brain the President ! ”’

“‘T brain the President! Ho! ho! ho!”

‘‘T want merely to convince him that it is a para-
bola 1”

‘‘T only want to make it clear as day that it is

17?

hyperbola !’’

“* Does it make any real difference whether it is
one or the other?’’ aelled Ardan.

“¢ The greatest possible difference—in the Eye of
Science,”’

«¢ A radical and incontrovertible difference—in the
Eye of Science!’’

“Oh! Hang the Eye of Science—will either
curve take us to the Moon?”

“No!”

“6 Will either take us back to the Earth?”’

“Nol”

‘‘Will either take us anywhere that you know
of?”

“No!”

«Why not?”
CLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE, 259

* Because they are both ofex curves, and therefore
can never end !”’ ;

“Ts it of the slightest possible importance which
of the two curves controls the Projectile ?”’

“Not the slightest—-except in the Eye of
Science!”

«‘Then let the Eye of Science and her parabolas
and hyperbolas, and conjugates, and asymptotes, and
the rest of the confounded nonsensical farrago, all
goto pot! What’s the use of bothering your heads
about them here! Have you not enough to trouble
you otherwise? A nice pair of scientists you are?
‘Stanislow’ scientists, probably. Do read scientists
lose their tempers for a trifle? Am I ever to see
my ideal of a true scientific man in the flesh? Bar-
bican came very near realizing my idea perfectly ;
but I see that Science just has as little effect as Cul-
ture in driving the Old Adam out of us! The idea
of the only simpleton in the lot having to lecture the
others on propriety of deportment ! I thought they
were going to tear each other’s eyes out! Ha! Ha!
Ha! It’s zwpayable ! Give me that cord, Michael !
Hand me the heavy ruler, Ardan! It’s the only
way to bring him to reason! Ho! Ho! Ho! It’s
too good! I shall never get over it!’ and he
laughed till his sides ached and his cheeks streamed,

His laughter was so contagious, and his merriment
so genuine, that there was really no resisting it, and

.the next few minutes witnessed nothing but laughing,
and handshaking and rib-punching in the Projectile
~—though Heaven knows there was very little for the
260 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

poor fellows to be merry about. As they could
neither reach the. Moon nor return to the Earth,
what was to befall them? The immediate outlook
was the very reverse of exhilarating. If they did
not die of hunger, if they did not die of thirst, the
reason would simply be that, in a few days, as soon
as their gas was. exhausted, they would die for want
of air, unless indeed the icy cold had killed them
beforehand!

By this time, in fact, the temperature had become
so exceedingly cold that a further encroachment on
their little stock of gas could be put off no longer.
The light, of course, they could manage to do with-
out; but a little heat was absolutely necessary to
prevent them from freezing to death. Fortunately,
however, the caloric developed by the Reiset and
Regnault process for purifying the air, raised the in-
ternal temperature of the Projectile a little, so that,
with an expenditure of gas much less than they had
expected, our travellers were able to maintain it at a
degree capable of sustaining human life.

By this time, also, all observations through the
windows had become exceedingly difficult. The in-
ternal moisture condensed so thick and congealed so
hard on the glass that nothing short of continued
friction could keep up its transparency. But this
friction, however laborious they might regard it at
other times, they thought very little of just now,
when observation had become far more interesting
andimportant than ever.

If the Moon had any atmosphere, our travellers
GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE, 262

were near enough now to strike any meteor that
might be rushing throught it. If the Projectile
itself were floating in it, as was possible, would not
such a good conductor of sound convey to their
ears the reflexion of some lunar echo, the roar of
some storm raging among the mountains, the rat-
tling of some plunging avalanche, or the detona-
tions ‘of some eructating volcano? And suppose
some lunar Etna or Vesuvius was flashing out its
fires, was it not even possible that their eye could
catch a glimpse of the lurid gleam? One or two
facts of this kind, well attested, would singularly
elucidate the vexatious question of a lunar atmos-
phere, which is still’so far from being decided. Full
of such thoughts and intensely interested in them,
Barbican, M’Nicholl and Ardan, patient as astrono-
mers at a transit of Venus, watched steadily at their
windows, and allowed nothing worth noticing to es-
cape their searching gaze.

Ardan’s patience first gave out. He showed it by
an observation natural enough, for that matter, toa
mind unaccustomed to long stretches of careful
thought :

“This darkness is absolutely killing! If we ever
take this trip again, it must be about the time of the
New Moon !’’

““There I agree with you, Ardan,”’ observed the
Captain. ‘That would be just the time to start.
The Moon herself, I grant, would be lost in the solar
rays and therefore invisible all the time of our trip,
but in compensation, we should have the Full Earth
262 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

in full view. Besides—and this is your-chief point,
no doubt, Ardan—if we should happen to be drawn
round the .Moon, just as we are at the present
moment, we should enjoy the inestimable advantage
of beholding her invisible side magnificently illu-
minated |’

“¢ My idea exactly, Captain,’’ said Ardan. ‘¢ What
is your opinion on this point, Barbican ?’”’

‘¢ My opinion is as follows: ’’ answered Barbican,
gravely. ‘If we ever repeat this journey, we shall
start precisely at the same time and under precisely
the same circumstances. You forget that our only
object is to reach the Moon. Now suppose we had
really landed there, as we expected to do yesterday,
would it not have been much more agreeable to: be-
hold the lunar continents enjoying the full light of
day than to find them plunged in the dismal obscur-
ity of night? Would not our first installation of
discovery have been under circumstances decidedly
extremely favorable? Your silence shows that you
agree with me. As to the invisible side, once landed,
we should have the power to visit it when we pleased,
and therefore’ we could always choose whatever
time would best suit our purpose. Therefore, if we
wanted to land in the Moon, the period of the Full
Moon was the best period to select. The period
was well chosen, the time was, well calculated, the
force was well applied, the Projectile was well aimed,
but missing our way spoiled everything.”’

“‘That’s sound logic, no doubt,’’ said Ardan;
‘still I can’t help thinking that all for want of a lit-
GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE. 263

tle light we are losing, probably forever, a splendid
opportunity of seeing the Moon’s invisible side.
How about the other planets, Barbican? Do you
think that their inhabitants are as ignorant regarding
their satellites as we are regarding ours? ’”’

“©On that subject,’’ observed M’ Nicholl, ‘‘I could
venture an answer myself, though, of course, with-
out pretending to speak dogmatically on any such
open question. ‘The satellites of the other planets,
by their comparative proximity, must be much
easier to study than our Moon. The Saturnians,
the Uranians, the Jovians, cannot have had very
serious difficulty ein effecting some communication
with their satellites. Jupiter’s four moons, for in-
stance, though on an average actually 214 times
farther from their planet’s centre than the Moon is
from us, are comparatively four times nearer to him
on account of his radius being eleven tinies greater
than the Earth’s. With Saturn’s eight moons, the
case is almost precisely similar. Their average dis-
tance is nearly three times greater than that of our
Moon; but as Saturn’s diameter is about 9 times
greater than the Earth’s, his bodyguards are really
between 3 and 4 times nearer to their principal than
ours isto us. As to Uranus, his first satellite, 4rzed,
half as far from him as our Moon is from the Earth,
is comparatively, though not actually, eight times
nearer.”

‘“* Therefore,’’ said Barbican, now taking up the
subject, ‘an experiment analogous to ours, starting
from either of these three planets, would have en-
264 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

countered fewer difficulties, But the whole question
resolves itself into this. Jf the Jovians and the rest
have been able to quit their planets, they have prob-
ably succeeded in discovering the invisible sides of
their satellites. But if they have wot been able to
do so, why, they’re not a bit wiser than ourselves
But what’s the matter with the Projectile? It’s cer-
tainly shifting !’’

Shifting it certainly was. While the path it de-
scribed as it swung blindly through the darkness,
could not be laid down by any chart for want of a
starting point, Barbican and his companions soon
became aware of a decided modification of its rela-
tive position with regard to the Moon’s surface. In-
stead of its side, as heretofore, it now presented its
base to the Moon’s disc, and its axis had become
rigidly vertical to the lunar horizon. Of this new
feature in their journey, Barbican had assured him-
self by the most undoubted proof towards four
o’clock in the morning. What was the cause?
Gravity, .of course. The heavier portion of -the
Projectile gravitated towards the Moon’s centre ex-
actly as if they were falling towards her surface.

But were they falling? Were they at last, con-
trary to all expectations, about to reach the goal
that they had been so ardently wishing for? No!
A sight-point, just discovered by M’Nicholl, very
soon convinced Barbican that the Projectile was as
far as ever from approaching the Moon, but was
moving around it in a curve pretty near concentric.

M’Nicholl’s discovery, a luminous gleam flicker-


GLIMPSES At THE INVISIBLE. 265

ing on the distant verge of the black disc, at etice
engrossed the complete attention of our travellers
and set them to divining its course. Tt conld not
possibly be confounded with 4 star. Its glare was
reddish, like that of a distant furnace on a dark
night; it kept steadily increasing in size and brights
ness, thus showing beyond a doubt how the Projectile
was moving—-in the direction of the luminous point,
and wot vertically falling towards the Moon’s surface,

“Tt’s a voleano!’’ cried the Captain, in great exe
citement; ‘fa volcano’ in full blast! An outlet of
the Moon’s internal fires! Therefore she can’t be a
burnt out cinder!”

“Tt certainly looks like a volcano,’’ replied. Bav-
bican, carefully investigating this new and puzzling
phenomenon with his night-glass. ‘If it is not one,
in fact, what can it be? ’”’

*©To maintain combustion,’? commenced Ardan
syllogistically and sententiously, ‘‘air is necessary.
An undoubted case of combustion lies before us.
Therefore, this part of the Moon mus¢ have an atmos-

phere! ’’
6c P

erhapsso,’’ observed Barbican, ‘ but not neces-
sirilyso. The volcano, by decomposing certain subs
stances, gunpowder for instance, may be able to fur-
nish its own oxygen, and thus explode iit a vacuum.
That blaze, in fact, seems to me to possess the ins
tensity and the blinding glare of objects burning in
pure oxygen. Let us therefore be not over hasty in
jumping at the conclusion of the existence of a
lunar atmosphere,’”’
266 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

This fire mountain was situated, according to the
most plausible conjecture, somewhere in the neigh-
borhood of the 45th degree, south latitude, of the
Moon’s invisible side. For a little while the travel-
lers indulged the fond hope that they were directly
approaching it, but, to their great disappointment,
the path described by the Projectile lay in a different
direction. Its nature therefore they had no oppor-
tunity of ascertaining. It began to disappear behind
the dark horizon within less than half an hour after
the time that M’ Nicholl had signalled it. Still, the
fact of the uncontested existence of such a pheno-
menon was a grand one, and of considerable im-
portance in selenographic investigations. It proved
that heat had not altogether disappeared from the
lunar world; ar: the existence of heat once settled,
who can say positively that the vegetable kingdom
and even the animal kingdom have not likewise re-
sisted so far every influence tending to destroy them?
If terrestrial astronomers could only be convinced,
by undoubted evidence, of the existence of this ac-
tive volcano on the Moon’s surface, they would cer-
tainly admit of very considerable modifications in
the present doubts regarding her inhabitability.

Thoughts of this kind continued to occupy the
minds of our travellers even for some time after the
little spark of light had been extinguished in the
black gloom. But they said very little; even Are
dan was silent, and continued to look out of the
window. . Barbican surrendered ‘himself up to a
reverie regarding the mysterious destinies of the
GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE, 267

luuar world. Was its present condition a fore-
shadowing of what our Eirth is to become? M’Ni-
choll, too, was lost in speculation. Was the Moon
older or younger than the Earth in the order of
Creation? Fad she ever been a, beautiful world of
life, and color, and magnificent variety? Ifso, had
her inhabitants

Great Mercy, what acry from Ardan! It hardly
sounded human, so seldom do we hear a shriek so
expressive at once of surprise and horror and even
terror! It brought back his startled companions to
their senses in a second. Nor did they ask him for
the cause of his alarm. It was only too clear. Right
in their verv path, a blazing bail of fire had suddenly
risen up before their eyes, the pitchy darkness all
round it rendering its glare still more blinding.
Its phosphoric coruscation filled the Projectile with
white streams of lurid light, tinging the contents with
a pallor indescribably ghastly. The travellers’ faces
in particular, gleamed with that peculiar livid and
cadaverous tinge, blue and yellow, which magicians
so readily produce by burning table salt in alcohol.

* Sacré/’’ cried Ardan who always spoke his
own language when much excited. ‘¢What a pair
of beauties you are! Say, Barbican! What thun-
dering thing is coming at us now?”

‘Another bolide,’’? answered Barbican, his eye
as calm as ever, though a faint tremor was quite per-
ceptible in his voice.

“‘Abolide? Burning zw vacuo? You are joking!”

‘*T was never more in earnest,’? was the Presi-
268 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

dent’s quiet reply, as he looked through his closed
fingers.

He knew exactly what he was saying. The daz-
zling glitter did not deceive Azim. Such a meteor
seen from the Earth could not appear much brighter
than the Full Moon, but here in the midst of the
black ether and unsoftened by the veil of the atmos-
phere, it was absolutely blinding. ‘These wandering
bodies carry in themselves the principle of their in-
candescence.. Oxygen is by no means necessary for
their combustion. Some of them indeed often take
fire as they rush through the layers of our atmosphere,
and generally burn out before they strike the Earth.
But others, on the contrary, and the greater number
too, follow a track through space far more distant
from the Earth than the fifty miles supposed to limit
our atmosphere. In October, 1844, one of these
meteors had appeared in the sky at an altitude cal-
culated to be at least 320 miles; and in August,
1841, another had vanished when it had reached the
height of 450 miles. A few even of those seen from
the Earth must have been several miles in diameter.
The velocity with which some of them have been
calculated to move, from east to west, in a direction
contrary to that of the Earth, is astounding enough
to exceed belief—about fifty miles in a second.
Our Earth does not move quite 20 miles in a second,
though it goes a thousand times quicker than the
fastest locomotive.

3arbican calculated like lightning that the .pre-
sent object of their alarm was only about 250 miles







































































GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE, 260

distant from them, and could not be less than a mile
and a quarter in diameter. It was coming on at the
rate of more than a mile a second or about 75 miles
aminute. It lay right in the path of the Projectile.
and in a very few seconds indeed a terrible collision
was inevitable. The enormous rate at which it grew
in size, showed the terrible velocity at which it was
approaching.

You can hardly imagine the situation of our poor
travellers at the sight of this frightful apparition.
I shall certainly not attempt to describe it. In
spite of their singular courage, wonderful coolness,
extraordinary fortitude, they were now breathless,
motionless, almost helpless; their muscles were
tightened to their utmost tension ; their eyes stared
out of their sockets; their faces were petrified with
horror, No wonder. Their Projectile, whose
course they were powerless as children to guide, was
making straight for this fiery mass, whose glare ina
few seconds had become more blinding than the
open vent of a reverberating furnace. Their own
Projectile was’ carrying them headlong into a bot-
tomless abyss of fire! .

Stull, even in this moment of horror, their presence
of mind, or at least their consciousness, never aban-
doned them, Barbican had grasped each of - his
friends by the hand, and all three tried a8 well as
they could to watch through half-closed eyelids the
white-hot asteroid’s rapid approach.. They could
utter no word, they could breathe no prayer. They
gave themselves up for lost—in the agony of terror
270 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

that partially interrupted the ordinary functions of
their brains, this was absolutely all they could do!
Hardly three minutes had elapsed since Ardan had
caught the first glimpse of it—three ages of agony!
Now it wason them! In a second—in less than a
second, the terrible fireball had burst like a shell!
Thousands of glittering fragments were flying around
them in all directions—but with no more noise than
is made by so many light flakes of thistle-down
floating about some warm afternoon in summer,
The blinding, blasting steely white glare of the ex-
plosion almost bereft the travellers of the use of
their eyesight forever, but no more report reached
their ears than if it had taken place at-the bottom
of the Gulf of Mexico. In an atmosphere like
ours, such a crash would have burst the ear-mem-
branes of ten thousand elephants !

In the middle of the commotion another loud cry
was suddenly heard. It was the Captain who called
this time.’ His companions rushed to his window
and all looked out together in the same direction.

What a sight met their eyes! What pen can de-
scribe it? What pencil can reproduce the magnifi-
cence of its coloring? It was a Vesuvius at his best
and wildest, at the moment just after the old cone
has fallen in. Millions of luminous fragments streaked
the sky with their blazing fires. All sizes and shapes
of light, all colors and shades of colors, were inex-
tricably mingled together. Irradiations in gold,
scintillations in crimson, splendors in emerald,
lucidities in ultramarine—a dazzling girandola of









GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE. 271

‘

every tint and of every hue. Of the enormous fire-
ball, an instant ago such an object of dread, noth-
ing now remained but these glittering pieces,
shooting about in all directions, each one an
asteroid in its turn. Some flew out straight and
gleaming like a steel sword; others rushed here and
there irregularly like chips struck off a red-hot rock ;
and others left long trails of glittering cosmical dust
behind them like the nebulous tail of Donati’s
comet.

These incandescent blocks crossed each other,
struck each other, crushed each other into still
smaller fragments, one of which, grazing the Projec-
tile, jarred it so violently that the very window at
which the travellers were standing, was cracked by
the shock. Our friends felt, in fact, as if they were
the objective point at which endless volleys of blaz-
ing shells were aimed, any of them powerful enough,
if it only hit them fair, to make as short work of
the Projectile as you could of an egg-shell. They
had many hairbreadth escapes, but fortunately the
cracking of the glass proved to be the only serious
damage of which they could complain.

This extraordinary illumination lasted altogether
only a few seconds ; every one of its details was of a
most singular and exciting nature—but one of its
greatest wonders was yet tocome. The ether, satu-
rated with luminous matter, developed an intensity
of blazing brightness unequalled by the Iime light,
the magnesium light, the electric light, or any other
dazzling source of illumination with which we are
272 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

acquainted on earth. It flashed out of these asteroids
in all directions, and downwards, of course, as well as
elsewhere, At one particular instant, it was so very
vivid that Ardan, who happened to be looking duwn-
wards, cried out, as if in transport:

“Oh!! The Moon! Visible at last!’’

And the three companions, thrilling with inde-
scribable emotion, shot a hasty glance through the
openings of the coruscating field beneath them. Did
they really catch a glimpse of the mysterious invisi-
ble disc that the eye of man had never before lit
upon? For asecond or so they gazed with enrap-
tured fascination at all they could see. What did
they see, what could they see at a distance so uncer-
tain that Barbican has never been able even to guess
at it? Not much, Ardan was reminded of the night
he had stood on the battlements of Dover Castle, a
few years before, when the fitful flashes of a thunder
storm gave him occasional and very uncertain
glimpses of the French coast at the opposite side of
the strait. Misty strips long and narrow, extend-
ing over one portion of the disc—probably cloud-
scuds sustained by a highly rarefied atmosphere—
permitted only a very dreamy idea of lofty moun-
tains stretching beneath them in shapeless propor-
tions, of smaller reliefs, circuses, yawning craters, and
the other capricious, sponge-like formations so com-
mon on the visible side. Elsewhere the watchers
became aware for an instant of immense spaces, cer-
tainly not arid plains, but seas, real oceans, vast and
calm, reflecting from their placid depths the dazzling
GLIMPSES AT THE INVISIBLE. 273

fireworks of the weird and wildly flashing meteors.
Farther on, but very darkly as if behind a screen,
shadowy continents revealed themselves, their sur-
faces flecked with black cloudy masses, probably
great forests, with here and there a

Nothing more! In less than a second the illu-
mination had come to an end, involving everything
in the Moon’s direction once more in pitchy dark-
ness.

But had the impression made on the travellers’
eyes been a mere vision or the result of a real-
ity? an optical delusion or the shadow of a solid
fact? Could an observation so rapid, so fleeting, so
superficial, be really regarded as a genuine scientific
affirmation? Could such a feeble glimmer of the
invisible disc justify them in pronouncing a decided
opinion on the inhabitability of the Moon? To such
questions as these, rising spontaneously and simul-
taneously in the minds of our travellers, they could
not reply at the moment; they could not reply to
them long afterwards; even to this day they can
give them no satisfactory answer. All they could do
at the moment, they did. ‘To every sight and sound
they kept their eyes and ears open, and, by observing
the most perfect silence, they sought to render their
impressions too vivid to admit of deception.

There was now, however, nothing to be heard, and
very little more to be seen. The few coruscations
that flashed over the sky, gradually became fewer
and dimmer ; the asteroids sought paths further and

further apart, and finally disappeared altogether.
8 :


274 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

The ether resumed its original blackness. The stars,
eclipsed for a moment, blazed out again on the
firmament, and the invisible disc, that had flashed
into view for an instant, once more relapsed forever
into the impenetrable depths of night.
CHAPTER XVI.
THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE,

EXCEEDINGLY narrow and exceedingly fortunate
had been the escape of the Projectile. And froma
danger too the most unlikely and the most unex-
pected. Who would have ever dreamed of even the
possibility of such an encounter? And was all
danger over? The sight of one of these erratic
bolides certainly justified the gravest apprehensions
of our travellers regarding the existence of others.
Worse than the sunken reefs of the Southern Seas
or the snags of the Mississippi, how could the Pro-
jectile be expected to avoid them? Drifting along
blindly through the boundless ethereal ocean, her
inmates, even if they saw the danger, were totally
powerless to turn her aside. Like a ship without a
rudder, like a runaway horse, like a collapsed bal-
loon, like an iceberg in an Atlantic storm, like a boat
in the Niagara rapids, she moved on sullenly, reck-
lessly, mechanically, mayhap into the very jaws of
the most frightful danger, the bright intelligences
within no more able to modify her motions even by
a finger’s breadth than they were able to affect Mer-
cury’s movements around the Sun. .

But did our friends complain of the new perils
now looming up before them? They never thought
of such a thing. On the contrary, they only con-

575)
276 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

sidered themselves (after the lapse of a few minutes
to calm their nerves) extremely Jucky in having wit-
nessed this fresh glory of exuberant nature, this
transcendent display of fireworks which not only
cast into absolute insignificance anything of the
kind they had ever seen on Earth, but had actually
enabled them by its dazzling illumination to gaze
for a second or two at the Moon’s mysterious in-
visible disc. This glorious momentary glance,
worth a whole lifetime of ordinary existence, had
revealed to mortal ken her continents, her oceans,
her forests. But did it also convince them of the
existence of an atmosphere on her surface whose
vivifying molecules would render “Ze possible?
This question they had again to leave unanswered —
it wili hardly ever be answered in a way quite satis-
factory to human curiosity. Still, infinite was their
satisfaction at having hovered even for an instant on
the very verge of such a great problem’s soiution.

It was now half-past three in the afternoon. ‘The
Projectile still pursued its curving but otherwise un-
known path over the Moon’s invisible face. Had
this path been disturbed by that dangerous meteor?
‘There was every reason to fear so—though, disturb-
ance or no disturbance, the curve it described
should still be one strictly in accordance with the
laws of Mechanical Philosophy. Whether it was a
parabola or a hyperbola, however, or whether it was
disturbed or not, made very little difference as, in
any case, the Projectile was bound to quit pretty
soon the cone of the shadow, at a point directly
THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE. : 277

opposite to where it had entered it. This cone
could not possibly be of very great extent, .con-
sidering the very slight ratio borne by the Moon’s
diameter when compared with the Sun’s. Still, to
all appearances, the Projectile seemed to be quite as
deeply immersed in the shadow as ever, and there
was apparently not the slightest sign of such a state
of things coming soon to an end, At what rate was
the Projectile now moving? Hard to say; but .cer-
tainly not slowly, certainly rapidly enough to be out
of the shadow by this time, if describing a curve
rigidly parabolic. Was the curve therefore zof para-
bolic? Another puzzling problem and sadly bewil-
dering to poor Barbican, who had now almost lost
his reason by attempting to clear up questions that
were proving altogether too profound for his over-
worked brains. ‘

Not that he ever thought of taking rest. Not that
his companions thought of taking rest. Far from
it. With senses as high-strung as ever, they still
watched carefully for every new fact, every unex-
pected incident that might throw some light on the
sidereal investigations. Even their dinner, or what
was called so, consisted of only a few bits of bread
and meat, distributed by Ardan at five o’clock, and
swallowed mechanically. They did not even turn on
the gas full head to see what they were eating; each
man stood solidly at his window, the glass of which
they had enough to do in keeping free from the
rapidly condensing moisture.

At about half-past five, however, M’Nicholl, who
278 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

had been gazing for some time with his telescope in a
particular direction, called the attention of his com-
panions tosome bright specks of light barely discerni-
ble in that part of the horizon towards which the Pro-
jectile was evidently moving. His words were hardly
uttered when his companions announced the same
discovery. They could soon all sce the glittering
specks not only becoming more and more numerous,
but also gradually assuming the shape of an ex-
tremely slender, but extremely brilliant crescent.
Rapidly more brilliant and more decided in shape
the profile gradually grew, till it soon resembled the
first faint sketch of the New Moon that we catch of
evenings in the western sky, or rather the first
glimpse we get of her limb as it slowly moves out
of eclipse. But it was inconceivably brighter than
either, and was furthermore strangely relieved by the
pitchy blackness both of sky and Moon. In fact,
it soon became so brilliant as to dispel in a moment
all doubt as to its particular nature. No meteor
could present such a perfect shape; no volcano,
such dazzling splendor.

“¢The Sun !’? cried Barbican.

“The Sun?’ asked M’Nicholl and Ardan in
some astonishment.

“Yes, dear friends; it is the Sun himself that you
now see; these summits that you behold him gilding
are the mountains that lie on the Moon’s southern
rim. Weare rapidly nearing her south pole.”’

“« After doubling her north pole!’ cried Ardan;
“why, we must be circumnavigating her!”
THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE, 279

‘exactly ; sailing all around her.’

“Turrah! Then we’re all right at last! -There’s
nothing more to fear from your hyperbolas or para-
bolas or any other of your open curves !”’

‘‘ Nothing more, certainly, from an open curve,
but every thing from a closed one.”’

«¢ A closed curve !~ What is it called? And what
is the trouble ?’’

“‘ An eclipse it is called; and the trouble is that,
instead of flying off into the boundless regions of
space, our Projectile will probably describe an ellip-
tical orbit around the Moon ” _

—‘What!’’ cried M’Nicholl, in amazement,
‘Cand be her satellite for ever!”’

‘©All right and proper,’’ said Ardan; ‘* why
shouldn’t she have one of her own?’’

“Only, my dear friend,’’ said Barbican to Ardan,
“this change of curve involves no change in the
doom of the Projectile. We are as infallibly lost by
an ellipse as by a parabola.”’

‘* Well, there was one thing I never could recon-
cile myself to in the whole arrangement,’’ replied
Ardan cheerfully ; *‘and that was destruction by an
open curve. Safe from that, I could say, ‘ Fate,
do your worst!’ Besides, I don’t believe in the
infallibility of your ellipsic, It may prove just as
unreliable as the hyperbola. -And it is no harm to
hope that it may!”

From present appearances there was very little to
justify Ardan’s hope. Barbican’s theory of the
elliptic orbit was unfortunately too well grounded to


280 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

allow a single reasonable doubt to be expressed re-
garding the Projectile’s fate. It was to gravitate for
ever around the Moon—a sub-satellite. It was a
new born individual in the astral universe, a micro-
cosm, a little world in itself, containing, however,
only three inhabitants and even these. destined to
perish pretty soon for want of air. Our travellers, |
therefore, had no particular reason for rejoicing
over the new destiny reserved for the Projectile in
obedience to the inexorable laws of the centripetal
-and centrifugal forces. They were soon, it is true,
to have the opportunity of beholding once more the
illuminated face of the Moon. They might even
live long enough to catch a last glimpse of the dis-
tant Earth bathed in the glory of the solar rays,
They might even have strength enough left to be
able to chant one solemn final eternal adieu to their
dear old Mother World, upon whose features their
mortal eyes should never again rest in love and long-
ing! Then, what was their Projectile to become?
An inert, lifeless, extinct mass, not a particle better
than the most defunct asteroid that wanders blindly
through the fields of ether. A gloomy fate to look
forward to. Yet, instead of grieving over the in-
evitable, our bold travellers actually felt thrilled
with delight at the prospect of even a momentary
deliverance from those gloomy depths of darkness
and of once more finding themselves, even if only
for a few hours, in the cheerful precincts illuminated
by the genial light of the blessed Sun!

The ring of light, in the meantime, becoming
THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE. 28F

brighter and brighter, Barbican was not long in dis-
covering and pointing out to his companions the
different mountains that lay around the Moon’s
south pole.

“There is Lerbuifz on your right,’’ said he, ‘¢and
on your left you can easily see the peaks of Doezfel.
Belonging rather to the Moon’s dark side than to
her Earth side, they are visible to terrestrial astrono-
mers only when she is in her highest northern lati-
tudes. Those faint peaks beyond them that you can
catch with such difficulty must be those of Vezoton
and Curtius.”’

“ How in the world can you tell?’’ asked Ardan.

“They are the highest mountains in the circum-
polar regions,’’ replied Barbican. ‘* They have
been measured with the greatest care; JVew/lon is
23,000 feet high.’”’

‘More or less!’? laughed Ardan. ‘ What
Delphic oracle says so?’”’

“Dear friend,’’ replied Barbican quietly, ‘the
visible mountains of the Moon have been measured
so carefully and so accurately that I should hardly
hesitate in affirming their altitude to be as well
known as that of Mont Blanc, or, at least, as those
of the chief peaks in the Himalayahs or the Rocky
Mountain Range.’

“I should like to know how people set about it,”’
observed Ardan incredulously.

“There are several well known methods of ap-
proaching this problem,’’ replied Barbican; ‘and
as these methods, though founded on different prin-
282 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

ciples, bring us constantly to the same result, we
may pretty safely conclude that our calculations are
right. We have no time, just now to draw diagrams,
but, if I express myself clearly, you will no doubt
easily catch the general principle.’’

“*Go ahead!’’ answered Ardan. ‘¢ Anything
but Algebra.’?

‘“*We want no Algebra now,’’ said Barbican,
«Tt can’t enable us to find principles, though it cer-
tainly enables us to apply them. Well. The Sun at
a certain altitude shines on one side of a mountain
and flings a shadow on the other. The length of
this shadow is easily found by means of a telescope,
whose object glass is provided with a micrometer,
This consists simply of two parallel spider threads,
one of which is stationary and the other movable.
The Moon’s real diameter being known and occupy-
ing a certain space on the object glass, the exact
space occupied by the shadow can be easily ascer-
tained by means of the movable thread. This
space, compared with the Moon’s space, will give us
the length of the shadow, Now, as under the same
circumstances a certain height can cast only a cer-
tain shadow, of course a knowledge of the one must
give you that of the other, and ace versa. This
method, stated roughly, was that followed by
Galileo, and, in our own day, by Beer and Maedler,
with extraordinary success.’’

“‘T certainly see some sense in this method,”’ said
Ardan, “if they took extraordinary pains to observe
correctly. The least carelessness would set them
THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE. 283

wrong, not only by feet but by miles. We have
time enough, however, to listen to another method
before we get into the full blaze of the glorious old
Sol.”

“The other method,’’ interrupted M’ Nicholl lay-
ing down his telescope to rest his eyes, and now join-
ing in the conversation to give himself something
to do, ‘‘is called that of the éangent rays. A solar
ray, barely passing the edge of the Moon’s surface,
is caught on the peak of a mountain the rest of which
lies in shadow. The distance between this starry
peak and the line separating the light from the dark-
hess, we measure carefully by means of our telescope.
Then 3

“Tsee it at a glance!’’ interrupted Ardan with
lighting eye; ‘‘the ray, being a tangent, of course
makes right angles with the radius, which is known:
consequently we have two sides and one angle—
quite enough to find the other parts of the triangle.
Very ingenious—but now, that I think of it—is. not
this method absolutely impracticable for every
mountain except those in the immediate neighbor-
hood of the light and shadow line? ’’

‘«That’s a defect easily remedied by patience,’’ ex-
plained Barbican-—the Captain, who did not like be-
ing interrupted, having withdrawn to his telescope—
‘As this line is continually changing, in course of
time all the mountains must come near it. A third
method—to measure the mountain profile directly
by means of the micrometer—is evidently applicable
only to altitudes lying exactly on the lunar rim.’’


284 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

‘“‘That is clear enough,’’ said Ardan, “and
another point is also very clear. In Full Moon no
measurement is possible. When no shadows are
made, none can be measured. Measurements, right
or wrong, are possible only when the solar rays
strike the Moon’s surface obliquely with regard to
the observer. Am I right, Signor Barbicani, maes-
tro illustrissimo?.”’

“Perfectly right,
an apt pupil.”

“Say that again,’
hear it.”

Barbican humored him by repeating the observa.
tion, but M’ Nicholl would only notice it by a grunt
of doubtful meaning.

“‘Was Galileo tolerably successful in his calcula-
tions?’’ asked Ardan, resuming the conversation.

Before answering this question, Barbican unrolled
the map of the Moon, which a faint light like that
of day-break now enabled him to examine. He
then went on: ‘* Galileo was wonderfully success-
ful—considering that the telescope which he em-
ployed was a poor instrument of his own construc+
tion, magnifying only thirty times. He gave the
lunar mountains a height of about 26,000 feet—an
altitude cut down by Hevelius, but almost doubled
by Riccioli. Herschel was the first to come pretty
close to the truth, but Beer and Maedler, whose
Mappa Selenographica now lies before us, have left
really nothing more to be done for lunar astronomy
except, of course, to pay a personal visit to the

9

replied Barbican. ‘‘ You are

* said Ardan. ‘*I want Mac to
THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE. 285

Moon—which we have tried to Kid but I fear with
a very poor prospect of success,”’

‘Cheer up! cheer up!’’ cried Ardan, ‘It’s
not all over yet by long odds. Who can say what is
still in store for us? Another bolide may shunt us

off our ellipse and even send us to the Moon’ S
surface.”

Then seeing Barbican shake his head ominously and
his countenance become more and more depressed,
this true friend tried to brighten him up a bit by
feigning to take deep interest in a subject that to
him was absolutely the driest in the world.

‘Meer and Baedler—-I mean Beer and Maedler,”’
he went on, ‘must have measured at least forty or
fifty mountains to their satisfaction.”

‘Forty or fifty !’’ exclaimed Barbican. ‘* They
measured no fewer than a thousand and ninety-five
lunar mountains and crater summits with a perfect
success, Six of these reach an altitude of upwards
of 18,000 feet, and twenty-two are more than 15,000
feet high.’’

‘“‘Which is the highest in the lot?’? asked Ar-
dan, keenly relishing Barbican’s earnestness.

‘* Doerfel in the southern hemisphere, the peak
of which I have just pointed out, is the highest of
the lunar mountains so far measured,’’ replied Bar-
bican. “It is nearly 25,000 feet high.”’

“Indeed! Five thousand feet lower than Mount
Everest—still for a lunar mountain, it is quite a re-
spectable altitude.’’

“Respectable! Why it’s an enormous altitude,
286 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

my dear friend, if you compare it with the Moon’s
diameter. The Earth’s diameter being more than
3% times greater than the Moon’s, if the Earth’s
mountains bore the same ratio to those of the Moon,
Everest should be more than sixteen miles high,
whereas it is not quite six.”

** How do the general heights of the Himalayahs
compare with those of the highest lunar moun-
tains?’? asked Ardan, wondering what would be
his next question.

‘* Fifteen peaks in the eastern or higher division
of the Himalayahs, are higher than the loftiest lunar
peaks,’’ replied Barbican. ‘‘ Even in the western,
or lower. section of the Himalayahs, some of the
peaks exceed Doerfel.”’

‘‘Which are the chief lunar mountains that ex-

ceed Mont Blanc in altitude?’’ asked Ardan,
bravely suppressing a yawn.
' “The following dozen, ranged, if my memory.
does not fail me, in the exact order of their respec-
tive heights ;’’ replied Barbican, never wearied in
answering such questions: ‘* WMewlou, Curtius,
Casatus, Rheita, Short, Huyghens, Blancanus,
Tycho, Kircher, Clavius, Endymion; and Cuatha-
rina.’

“‘Now those not quite up to Mont Blanc?”
asked Ardan, hardly knowing what to say.

‘‘Here they are, about half a dozen of them:
Moretus, Theophilus, Harpalus, Lratosthenes,
Werner, and Piccolomint,’’ answered Barbican as
ready as a schoolboy reciting his lesson, and pointe
THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE. 287

ing them out on the map as quickly as a compositor
distributing his type.

‘‘The next in rank?’’ asked Ardan, astounded
at his friend’s wonderful memory.

«The next in rank,’’ replied Barbican promptly,
«are those about the size of the Matterhorn, that is
to say about 234 miles in height. They are Afacro-
bius, Delambre, and Conon. Come,’’ he addcd,
seeing Ardan hesitating and at a loss what other
question to ask, ‘don’t you want to know what
lunar mountains are about the same height as the
Peak of Teneriffe? or as Aitna? or as Mount Wash-
ington? You need not be afraid of puzzling me.
I studied up the subject thoroughly, and therefore
know all about it.”

“Oh! Icould listen to you with delight all day
long!”’ cried Ardan, enthusiastically, though with
some embarrassment, for he felt a twinge of con-
science in acting so falsely towards his beloved
friend. ‘¢The fact is,’’? he went on, “such a
rational conversation as the present, on such an
absorbing subject, with such a perfect master——’’

“The Sun!”’ cried M’Nicholl starting up and
cheering. ‘“He’s cleared the disc completely, and
he’s now himself again! Long life to him! Hur-
rah!’?

‘‘Hurrah!’’ cried the others quite as enthusias-
tically (Ardan did not seem a bit desirous to finish
his sentence).

They tossed their maps aside and hastened, to the
window.
CHAPTER XVII.
TYCHO.

Ir was now exactly six o’clock in the evening.
The Sun, completely clear of all contact with the
lunar disc, steeped the whole Projectile. in his
golden rays. The travellers, vertically over the
Moon’s south pole, were, as Barbican soon ascer-
tained, about 30 miles distant from it, the exact
distance they had been from the north pole—a
proof that the elliptic curve still maintained itself
with mathematical rigor.

For some time, the travellers’ whole attention was
concentrated on the glorious Sun. His light was
inexpressibly cheering; and his heat, soon penetra-
ting the walls of the Projectile, infused a new and
sweet life into their chilled and exhausted frames.
The ice rapidly disappeared, and the windows soon
resumed their former perfect transparency.

“*Oh! how good the pleasant sunlight is!’’ cried
the Captain, sinking on a seat in a quiet ecstasy of
enjoyment. ‘* How I pity Ardan’s poor friends the
Selenites during that night so long and so icy!
How impatient they must be to see the Sun back
again 1”?

‘* Yes,’’ said Ardan, also sitting down the better
to bask in the vivifying rays, ‘“‘his light no doubt

brings them to life and keeps them alive. Without
(288)
TYCHO: 289

light or heat during all that dreary winter, they must
freeze stiff like the frogs or become torpid like the
bears. I can’t imagine how they could get through
it otherwise,’’

“Tm glad we're through it anyhow,’’ observed
M’Nicholl. ‘*I may at once acknowledge that I
felt perfectly miserable as long as it lasted. I can
now easily understand how the combined cold and
darkness killed Doctor Kane’s Esquimaux dogs, It
was near killing me. Iwas so miserable that at last
I could neither talk myself nor bear to hear others
talk.’

““My own case exactly,’’ said Barbican—.“ that
is,” he added hastily, correcting himself, ‘I tried
to talk because I found Ardan so interested, but in
spite of all we said, and saw, and had to think of,
Byron’s terrible dream would continually rise up
before me:

The bright Sun was extinguished, and the Stars
Wandered all darkling in the eternal space,
Rayless and pathless, and the icy Earth
Swung blind and blackening in the Moonless air.
Morn came and went, and came and brought no day !
And men forgot their passions in the dread
OF this their desolation, and all hearts
Were chilled into a selfish prayer for light!”

As he pronounced these words in accents at once
monotonous and melancholy, Ardan, fully apprecia-
tive, quietly gesticulated in perfect cadence with the

rhythm. Then the three men remained completely.
19
290 W@LL AROUND THE AIOON,

silent fot sevetal minutes. Buried in recollection,
or lost in thought, or magnetized by the bright Sun,
they seemed to be half asleep while steeping their
limbs in his vitalizing beams.

Barbican was the first to dissolve the reverie by
jumping up. His sharp eye had noticed, that the
base of the Projectile, instead of keeping rigidly
perpendicular to the lunar surface, turned away a lit-
tle, so as to render the elliptical orbit somewhat
elongated. This he made his companions imme-
diately observe, and also called their attention to
the fact that from this point they could easily have
seen the Earth had it been Full, but that now,
drowned in the Sun’s beams, it was quite invisible,
A more attractive spectacle, however, soon engaged
their undivided attention—that of the Moon’s
southern regions, now brought within about the
third of a mile by their telescopes. Immediately
resuming their posts by the windows, they carefully
noted every feature presented by the fantastic pano-
rama that stretched itself out in endless lengths
beneath their wondering eyes.

Mount Letbnits and Mount Doerfel form two
separate groups developed in the regions of the ex-
treme south. The first extends westwardly from the
pole to the 84th parallel; the second, on the south-
eastern border, starting from the pole, reaches the
neighborhood of the 65th. In the entangled val-
leys of their clustered peaks, appeared the dazzling
sheets of white, noted by Father Secchi, but their
peculiar nature Barbican could now examine with
i i I
ne
a

Rit ail S
et












TYCHO, 201

a greater prospect of certainty than the illustrious
Roman astronomer had ever enjoyed.

«¢ They’re beds of snow,”’ he said at last in a de-
cided tone.

“Snow !’? exclaimed M’ Nicholl.

‘*Yes, snow, or rather’ glaciers heavily coated
with glittering ice. See how vividly they reflect the
Sun’s rays. Consolidated beds of lava could never
shine with such dazzling uniformity. Therefore
there must be both water and air on the Moon’s
surface. Not much—perhaps very little if you in-
sist on it—but the fact that there is some can now
no longer be questioned.”

This assertion of Barbican’s, made so positively
by a man who never decided unless when thoroughly
convinced, was a great triumph for Ardan, who, as
the gracious reader doubtless remembers, had had a
famous dispute with M’Nicholl on that very subject
at Tampa.* His eyes. brightened and a smile of
pleasure played around. his lips, but, with a great
effort at self-restraint, he kept perfectly silent and
would not permit himself even to look in the direc-
tion of the Captain. As for M’Nicholl, he was ap-
parently too much absorbed in Doezfe/ and Leibniz
to mind anything else.

These mountains rose from plains of moderate
extent, bounded by an indefinite succession of walled
hollows ‘and ring ramparts. They are the only
chains met in this region. of ridge-brimmed craters



*BaLTimoreE GUN CLup, pp. 295 ¢éf seg.
292 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

and circles; distinguished by no particular feature,
they project a few pointed peaks here and _ there,
some of which exceed four miles and a half in
height. ‘This altitude, however, foreshortened as it
was by the vertical position of the Projectile, could
not be noticed just then, even if correct observa-
tion had been permitted by the dazzling surface.

Once more again before the travellers’ eyes the
Moon’s disc. revealed itself in all the old familiar
features so characteristic of lunar landscapes—no
blending of tones, no softening of colors, no
graduation of shadows, every line glaring in white
or black by reason of the total absence of refracted
light. And yet the wonderfully peculiar character
of this desolate world imparted to it a weird attrac-
tion as strangely fascinating as ever.

Over this chaotic region the travellers were now
sweeping, as if borne on the wings of a storm; the
peaks defiled beneath them; the yawning chasms re-
vealed their ruin-strewn floors; the fissured cracks
untwisted themselves ; the ramparts showed all their
sides ; the mysterious holes presented their impene-
trable depths; the clustered mountain summits and
rings rapidly decomposed themselves: but in a
moment again all had become more inexfricably en-
tangled than ever. Everything appeared to be the
finished handiwork of volcanic agency, in the utmost
purity and highest perfection. None of the mollify-
ing effects of air or water could here benoticed. No
smooth-capped mountains, no gently winding river
channels, no vast prairie-lands of deposited sediment,
TYCHO. 293

no traces of vegetation, no signs of agriculture, no
vestiges of a great city. Nothing but vast beds of glist-
ering lava, now rough like immense piles of scoriae
and ‘clinker, now smooth like crystal mirrors, and
reflecting the Sun’s rays with the same intolerable
glare. Not the faintest speck of life. A world ab-
solutely and completely dead, fixed, still, motion-
less—save when a gigantic land-slide, breaking off
the vertical wall of a crater, plunged down into the
soundless depths, with all the fury too of a crashing
avalanche, with all the speed of a Niagara, but,
in the total absence of atmosphere, noiseless as a

feather, as a snow flake, as a grain of impalpable
dust.

Careful observations, taken by Barbican and re-
peated by his companions, soon satisfied them that
the ridgy outline of the mountains on the Moon's
border, though perhaps due to different forces from
those acting in the centre, still presented a character
generally uniform. The same bulwark-surrounded
hollows, the same abrupt projections of surface.
Yet a different arrangement, as Barbican pointed
out to his companions, might be naturally expected.
In the central portion of the disc, the Moon’s crust,
before solidification, must have been subjected to
two attractions—that of the Moon herself and that
of the Earth—acting, however, in contrary direc-
tions and therefore, in a certain sense, serving to
neutralize each other. Towards the border of her
disc, on the contrary, the terrestrial attraction, hav-
‘ing acted in a direction perpendicular to that of the
204 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

lunar, should have exerted greater power, and there-
fore given a different shape to the general contour.
But no remarkable difference had so far been per-
ceived by terrestrial observers ; and none could now
be detected by our travellers. Therefore the Moon
must have found in herself alone the principle of
her shape and of her superficial development—that
is, she owed nothing to external influences. ‘‘ Arago
was perfectly right, therefore,’’ concluded Barbican,
‘*in the remarkable opinion to which he gave ex-
pression thirty years ago:

‘No external action whatever has contributed to
the formation of the Moon’s diversified surface.’ ”’

“¢ But don’t you think, Barbican,’’ asked the Cap-
tain, ‘that every force, internal or external, that
might modify the Moon’s shape, has ceased long
ago?”?

*¢T am rather inclined to that opinion,’’ said Bar-
bican ; ‘it is not, however, a new one. Descartes
maintained that as the Earth is an extinct Sun, so
is the Moon an extinct Earth. My own opinion at
present is that the Moon is now the image of death,
but I can’t say if she has ever been the abode of
life.’

‘The abode of life!’’ cried Ardan, who had
great repugnance in accepting the idea that the
Moon was no better than a heap of cinders and
ashes; “why, look there! If those are not as neat
a set of the ruins of an abandoned city as ever I saw,
T should like to know what they are!”’

He pointed to some very remarkable rocky forma-

TYCHO. : 205

tions in the neighborhood of Sor/, a ring mountain
rising to an altitude considerably higher than that of
Mont Blanc. ' Even Barbican and M’Nicholl could
detect some regularity and semblance of order in the
arrangement of these rocks, but this, of course, they
looked on as a mere freak of nature, like the Lurlei
Rock, the Giant’s Causeway, or the Old Man of the
Fyanconia Mountains. Ardan, however, would not
accept such an easy mode of getting rid of a diffi-
culty.

‘‘See the ruins on that bluff,’’ he exclaimed ;
‘ those steep sides must have been washed by.a great
river in the prehistoric times. That was the fortress.
Farther down lay the city. There are the dismantled
ramparts;. why, there’s the very coping ofa portico
still intact! Don’t yousee three broken pillars. lying
beside their pedestals? There! a little to the left of
those arches that evidently once bore the pipes of an
aqueduct! You don’t see them? Well, look a lit-
tle to the right, and there is something that you can
see! As I’m a living man I have no difficulty in
discerning the gigantic butments of a great bridge
that formerly spanned that immense river !’’

Did he really see all this? To this day he affirms
stoutly that he did, and even greater wonders be-
sides, His companions, however, without denying
that he had good grounds for. his assertion on this
subject or questioning the general accuracy. of his
observations, content themselves with saying that
the reason why they had failed to discover the
wonderful city, was that Ardan’s telescope was of a
296 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

strange and peculiar construction. Being somewhat
short-sighted, he had had it manufactured expressly
for his own use, but it was of such singular power
that his companions could not use it without hurt-
ing their eyes.

But, whether the ruins were real or not, the
moments were evidently too precious to be lost in
idle discussion. The great city of the Selenites
soon disappeared on the remote horizon, and, what
was of far greater importance, the distance of the
Projectile from the Moon’s disc began to increase so
sensibly that the smaller details of the surface were
soon lost in a confused mass, and it was only the
lofty heights, the wide craters, the great ring moun-
tains, and the vast plains that still continued to give
sharp, distinctive outlines, :

A little to their left, the travellers could now
plainly distinguish one of the most remarkable of
the Moon’s craters, JVecww/on, so well known to all
lunar astronomers, Its ramparts, forming a perfect
circle, rise. to such a height, at least 22,000 feet, as
to seem insurmountable,

“You can, no doubt, notice for yourselves,’’ said
Barbican, ‘‘that the external height of this moun-
tain is far from being equal to the depth of its
crater, The enormous pit, in fact, seems to be a
soundless sea of pitchy black, the bottom of-which
the Sun’s rays have never reached. There, as Hum-
boldt says, reigns eternal darkness, so absolute that
Earth-shine or even Sunlight is never able to dis-
pel it. Had Michael’s friends the old mythologists
TYCHO. 207

ever known anything about it, they would doubtless
have made it the entrance to the infernal regions.
On the whole surface of our Earth, there is no
mountain even remotely resembling it. It is a per-
fect type of the lunar crater. Like most of them,
it shows that the peculiar formation of the Moon’s
surface is due, first, to the cooling of the lunar
crust ; secondly, to the cracking from internal press-
ure; and, thirdly, to the violent volcanic action in
consequence. This must have been of a far fiercer
nature than it has ever been with us. The matter
was ejected to a vast height till great mountains
were formed; and still the action went on, until at
last the floor of the crater sank to a depth far lower
than the level of the external plain.””

“You may be right,’’ said Ardan by way ot re-
ply; ‘as for me, ’'m looking out for another city.
But I’m sorry to say that our Projectile is increasing
its distance so fast that, even if one Jay at my feet at
this moment, I doubt very much if I could see it a
bit better than either you or the Captain.’’

Newton was soon passed, and the Projectile fol-
lowed a course that took it directly over the ring
mountain AZoretus. A little to the west the travellers
could easily distinguish the summits of Blancanus,
17,000 feet high, and, towards seven o’clock in the
evening, they were approaching the neighborhood
of Clavius.

This walled-plain, one of the most remarkable on
the Moon, lies 55° S. by 15° E. Its height is esti-
mated at 16,000 feet, but it is considered to be about
298 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

a hundred and fifty miles in diameter. Of this vast
crater, the travellers now at a distance of 250 miles,
reduced to 23% by their telescopes, had a magnifi-
cent bird’s-eye view.

“Our terrestrial volcanoes,’’ said Barbican, ‘as
you can now readily judge for yourselves, are no more
than molehills when compared with those of the
Moon. Measure’ the old craters formed by the
early eruptions of Vesuvius and Aétna, and you
will find them litthe more than three miles in
diameter. The crater of Cantal in central France is
only about six miles in width ; the famous valley in
Ceylon, called the Cvazer, though not at all due to
volcanic action, is 44 miles across.and is considered
to be the greatest in the world. But even this is
very little in comparison to the diameter of Clavius
lying beneath us at the present moment.’’

“¢ How much is its diameter?” asked the Captain.

** At least one hundred and forty-two miles,’ re-
plied Barbican; ‘‘it is probably the greatest in the
Moon, but many others measure more than a hun-
dred miles across.’’

“Dear boys,’’ said Ardan, half to himself, half to
the others, ‘‘only imagine the delicious state of
things on the surface of the gentle Moon when these
craters, brimming over with hissing lava, were vomit-
ing forth, all at the same time, showers of melted
stones, clouds of blinding smoke, and sheets of
blasting flame! What an intensely overpowering
spectacle was here presented once, but now, how
are the mighty fallen! Our Moon, as at pre-
TYCHO, 299

sent beheld, seems to be nothing more than the
skinny spectre left after a brilliant display of fire-
works, when the spluttering crackers, the glittering
wheels, the hissing serpents, the revolving suns, and
the dazzling stars, are all ‘ played out’, and nothing
remains to tell of the gorgeous spectacle but a few
blackened sticks and half a dozen half burned bits of
pasteboard. I should like to hear one of you trying
to explain the cause, the reason, the principle, the
philosophy of such tremendous cataclysms | ’’

Barbican’s only reply was a series of nods, for in
truth he had not heard a single word of Ardan’s
philosophic explosion. His ears were with his eyes,
and these were obstinately bent on the gigantic ram-
parts of Clavius, formed of concentric mountain
ridges, which were actually leagues in depth. On
the floor of the vast cavity, could be seen hundreds
of smaller craters, mottling it like a skimming dish,
and pierced here and there by sharp peaks, one of
which could hardly be less than 15,000 feet high.

All around, the plain was desolate in the extreme.
You could not conceive how anything could be bar-
rener than these serrated outlines, or gloomier than
these shattered mountains—until you looked at the
plain that encircled them. Ardan hardly exag-
gerated when he called it the scene of a battle
fought thousands of years ago but still white with
the hideous bones of overthrown peaks, slaughtered
mountains and mutilated precipices!

‘* Hills amid the air encountered hills,
Hurled to and fro in jaculation dire,”
300 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

murmured M’Nicholl, who could quote you Milton
quite as readily as the Bible.

‘* This must have been the spot,’’ muttered Barbi-
can to himself, ‘‘ where the brittle shell of the cool-
ing sphere, being thicker than usual, offered greater
resistance to an eruption of the red-hot nucleus,
Hence these piled up buttresses, and these orderless
heaps of consolidated lava and ejected scorie.’’

The Projectile advanced, but the scene of desola-
tion seemed to remain unchanged. Craters, ring
mountains, pitted plateaus dotted with shapeless
wrecks, succeeded each other without interruption.
For level plain, for dark ‘‘sea,’’ for smooth plateau,
the eye here sought in vain. It was a Swiss Green-
land, an Icelandic Norway, a Sahara of shattered
crust studded with countless hills of glassy lava.

At last, in the very centre of this blistered region,
right too at its very culmination, the travellers came
on the brightest and most remarkable mountain of the
Moon. .In the dazzling Zycho they found it an easy
matter to recognize the famous lunar point, which
the world will for ever designate by the name of the
distinguished astronomer of Denmark.

This brilliant luminosity of the southern hemi-
sphere, no one that ever gazes at the Full Moon
in a cloudless sky, can help ‘noticing. Ardan,
who had always particularly admired it, now
hailed it as an old friend, and-almost exhausted
breath, imagination and vocabulary in the epithets
with which he greeted this cynosure of the lunar
mountains,
TYCHO. jor

“Hail!” he cried, ‘thou blazing focus of glit-
tering streaks, thou coruscating nucleus of irradia-
tion, thou starting point of rays divergent, thou
egress of - meteoric flashes! Hub of the silver
wheel that ever rolls in silent majesty over the
starry plains of Night! Paragon of jewels enchased
in a carcanet of dazzling brilliants! Eye of the
universe, beaming with heavenly resplendescence !

“*Who shall say what thou art? Diana’s nimbus?
The golden clasp of her floating robes? The blaz-
ing head of the great bolt that rivets the lunar
hemispheres in union inseverable? Or cans’t thou
have been some errant bolide, which missing its
way, butted blindly against the lunar face, and
there stuck fast, like a Minie ball mashed against a
cast-iron target? Alas! nobody knows. Not even
Barbican is able to penetrate thy mystery... But one
thing Zknow. Thy dazzling glare so sore my eyes
hath made that longer on thy light to gaze I do not
dare. Captain, have you any smoked glass?’’

In spite of this anti-climax, Ardan’s companions
could hardly consider his utterings either as ridicu-
lous or over enthusiastic. They could easily excuse
his excitement on the subject. And so could we, if
we only remember that Zycho, though nearly a
quarter of a million miles distant, is such a luminous
point on the lunar disc, that almost any moonlit
night it can be easily perceived by the-unaided ter-
restrial eye. What then must have been its splendor
in the eyes of our travellers whose telescopes brought
it actually four thousand times nearer! No wonder
Jj02 ALL AROUND 4HE MOON.

that with smoked glasses, they endeavored to soften
off its effulgent glare! Then in hushed silence, or
at most uttering at intervals a few interjections ex-
pressive of their intense admiration, they remained
for some time completely engrossed in the over-
whelming spectacle. For the time being, every
sentiment, impression, thought, feeling on their
part, was concentrated in the eye, just as at other
times under violent excitement every throb of our
life is concentrated in the heart.

Zycho belongs to the system of lunar craters that
is called radiating, like Aristarchus or Copernicus,
which had been already seen and highly admired by
our travellers at their first approach to the Moon.
But it is decidedly the most remarkable and con-
spicuous of them all. It occupies the great focus of
disruption, whence it sends out great streaks thou-
sands of miles in length; and it gives the most un-
mistakable evidence of the terribly eruptive nature of
those forces that once shattered the Moon’s solidi-
fied shell in this portion of the lunar surface.

Situated in the southern latitude of 43° by an
eastern longitude of 12°, Zycho’s crater, somewhat
elliptical in shape, is 54 miles in diameter and up-
wards of 16,000 feet in depth. Its lofty ramparts
are buttressed by other mountains, Mont Blanes in
size, all grouped around it, and all streaked with the
great divergent fissures that radiate from it as a
centre.

Of what this incomparable mountain really is,
with all these lines of projections converging
2YCHO. 50}?

towards it and with all these prominent points of
relief protruding within its crater, photography has,
so far, been able to give us only a very unsatisfac-
tory idea. The reason too is very simple: it is only
at Full Moon that Zycho reveals himself in all his
splendor. The shadows therefore vanishing, the per-
spective foreshortenings disappear and the views be-
come little better than a dead blank, This is the
more to be regretted as this wonderful region is well
worthy of being represented with the greatest possible
photographic accuracy. It is a vast agglomeration
of holes, craters, ring formations, a complicated in-
tersection of crests—in short, a distracting volcanic
network flung over the blistered soil. The ebulli-
tions of the central eruption still evidently preserve
their original form. As they first appeared, so they
lie. Crystallizing as they cooled, they have stereo-
typed in imperishable characters the aspect formerly
presented by the whole Moon’s surface under the in-
fluences of recent plutonic upheaval.

Our travellers were far more fortunate than the
photographers. The distance separating them from
the peaks of Zycho’s concentric terraces was not so
considerable as to conceal the principal details from
a very satisfactory view. They could easily dis-
tinguish the annular ramparts of the external cir-
cumvallation, the mountains buttressing the gigantic
walls internally as well as externally, the vast espla-
nades descending irregularly and abruptly to the
sunken plains all around. ‘They could even detect a
difference of a few hundred feet in altitude in favor
SO ALL AROUND THE MOON.

of the western or right hand side over the eastern,
They could also see that these dividing ridges were
actually inaccessible and completely unsurmount-
able, at least by ordinary terrestrian efforts. No
system of castrametation ever devised by Polybius
or Vauban could bear the slightest comparison with
such vast fortifications, A city built on the floor of
the circular cavity could be no more reached by the
outside Lunarians than if it had been built in
the planet Mars,

This idea set Ardan off again. ‘ Yes,’’ said he,
“‘such a city would be at once completely inaccessi-
ble, and still not inconveniently situated in a plateau
full of aspects decidedly picturesque. Even in the
depths of this immense crater, Nature, as you can
see, has left no flat and empty void. You can easily
trace its special oreography, its various mountain
systems which turn it into a'regular world on a small
scale. Notice its cones, its central hills, its valleys,
its substructures already cut and dry and therefore
quietly prepared to receive the masterpieces of
Selenite architecture. Down there to the left is a
lovely spot for a Saint Peter’s; to the right, a mag-
nificent site for a Forum; here a. Louvre could be
built capable of entrancing Michael Angelo himself;
there a citadel could be raised to which even Gib-
raltar would be amolehill! In the middle rises a
sharp peak which can hardly be less than a mile in
height—a grand pedestal for the statue of some
Selenite Vincent de Paul. or George Washington.
And around them all is a mighty mountain-ring at
TYCHO. 305

least 3 miles high, but which, to an eye looking
from the centre of our vast city, could not appear
to be more than five or six hundred feet. Enormous
circus, where mighty Rome herself in her palmiest
days, though increased tenfold, would have no rea-
son to complain for want of room!”’

He stopped’ for a few seconds, perhaps to take
breath, and then resumed :

‘*Oh what an abode of serene happiness could be
constructed within this shadow-fringed ring of the
mighty mountains! O blessed refuge, unassailable
by aught of human ills! What a calm unruffled lite
could be enjoyed within thy hallowed precincts, even
by those cynics, those haters of humanity, those dis-
gusted reconstructors of society, those misanthropes
and misogynists old and young, who are continually
writing whining verses in odd corners of the news-
papers !”? i

‘Right at last, Ardan, my boy!’’ cried M’Ni-
choll, quietly rubbing the glass of his spectacles ;
“‘T should like to see the whole lot of them carted
in there without a moment’s delay! ”’

**It couldn’t hold the half of them!’’ observed
Barbican drily.
CHAPTER XVIII.
PUZZLING QUESTIONS.

Ir was not until the Projectile had passed a little
beyond Zycho’s immense concavity that Barbican
and his friends had a good opportunity for observ-
ing the brilliant streaks sent so wonderfully flying in
all directions from this celebrated mountain as a
common centre. They examined them for some
time with the closest attention. ~

What could be the nature of this radiating
aureola? By what geological phenomena could
this blazing coma have been possibly produced?
Such questions were the most natural things in the
world for Barbican and his companions to pro-
pound to themselves, as indeed they have been to
every astronomer from the beginning of time, and
probably will be to the end.

What aid they see? What you can see, what
anybody can see on a clear night when the Moon is
full—only our friends had all the advantages of a
closer view. From Zycho, as a focus, radiated in
all directions, as from the head of a peeled orange,
more than a hundred luminous streaks or channels,
edges raised, middle depressed—or perhaps «vce
versa, owing to an optical illusion—some at least
twelve miles wide, some fully thirty. In certain
directions they ran for a distance of at least six

(500)
PUZZLING QUESTIONS. 307

hundred miles, and seemed—especially towards the
west, northwest, and north—to cover half the
southern hemisphere. One of these flashes ex-
tended as far as WWeander on the 4oth meridian ;
another, curving around so as to furrow the JZare
Nectaris, came to an end on the chain of the Pyre-
nees, after a course of perhaps a little more than
seven hundred miles. On the east, some of them
barred with luminous network the AZare Miubium
and even the Aare Humorum.

The most puzzling. feature of these glittering
streaks was that they ran their course directly on-
ward, apparently neither obstructed by valley, crater,
or mountain ridge however high. ‘They all started,
as said before, from one common focus, Zycho’s
crater. From this they certainly all seemed to
emanate. Could they be rivers of lava once vomited
from that centre by resistless volcanic agency and
afterwards crystallized into glassy rock? ‘This idea
of Herschel’s, Barbican had no hesitation in qualify-
ing as exceedingly absurd. Rivers running in per-
fectly straight lines, across plains, and wf as well as
down mountains !

“Other astronomers,’? he continued, ‘have
looked on these streaks as a peculiar kind of
moraines, that is, long lines of erratic blocks
belched forth with mighty power at the period of
Zycho's own upheaval,’?

‘“‘How do you like that theory, Barbican,’’ asked
the Captain.

**Tt’s not a particle better than Herschel’s,” was
308 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

the reply ; “no volcanic action could project rocks
to a distance of six or seven hundred miles, not to
talk of laying them down so regularly that we can’t
detect a break in them.”

“‘ Happy thought !’? cried Ardan suddenly; ‘it
seems to me that I can tell the cause of these radi-
ating streaks!’

“Let us hear it,’? said Barbican.

“ Certainly,’’ was Ardan’s reply; ‘these streaks
are all only the parts. of what we call a ‘star,’ as
made by astone striking ice; or by a ball, a pane
of glass.”’

“‘Not bad,’’ smiled Barbican aetna: “ only
where is the hand that flung the stone or threw the
ball ?”? :

“*The hand is hardly necessary,’’ replied Ardan,
by no means disconcerted; ‘‘but as for the ball,
what do you say to a comet?’

Here M’Nicholl laughed so loud that Ardan was
seriously irritated. However, before he could say
anything cutting enough to make the Captain mind
his manners, Barbican had quickly resumed :

‘Dear friend, let the comets alone, I beg of you;
the old astronomers fled to them on all occasions
and made them explain every difficulty— ”’

—‘‘The comets were all used up long ago—
terrupted M’ Nicholl.

—‘‘Yes,’? went on Barbican, as serenely as a
judge, ‘comets, they said, had fallen on the sur-
face in meteoric showers and crushed in the crater
cavities; comets had dried up the water; comets

” in-
PUZZLING QUESTIONS. 599

had whisked off the atmosphere; comets had done
everything. All pure assumption ! In your case,
however, friend Michael, no comet whatever is
necessary. The shock that gave rise to your great
‘star’ may have come from the interior rather
than the exterior. A violent contraction of the
lunar crust in the process of cooling may have given
birth to your gigantic ‘star’ formation.”

“‘Taccept the amendment,’ said Ardan, now in
the best of humor and looking triumphantly at
M’ Nicholl. .

‘An English scientist,’? continued Barbican,
‘‘Nasmyth by name, is decidedly of your opinion,
especially ever since a little experiment of his own
has confirmed him in it. He filled a glass globe
with water, hermetically sealed it, and then plunged
it into a hot bath. The enclosed water, expanding
at a greater rate than the glass, burst the latter, but,
in. doing so, it made a vast number of cracks all
diverging in every direction from the focus of dis-
ruption.” Something like this he conceives to have
taken place around Zycho. As the crust cooled, it
cracked. The lava from the interior, oozing out,
spread itself on both sides of the cracks. This cer-
tainly explains pretty satisfactorily why those flat
glistening streaks are of much greater width than
the feces through which the lava had at first made
its way to the surface.’’

‘Well done for an Englishman! ’? cried Ardan
in great spirits. ;

“‘He’s no Englishman,’’ said M’Nicholl, glad to
310 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

have an opportunity of coming off with some credit.
‘‘He is the famous Scotch engineer who invented
the steam hammer, the steam ram, and discovered
the ‘ willow leaves’ in the Sun’s disc.’’

‘* Better and better,’ said Ardan ‘¢but, powers
of Vulcan! What makes it so hot? I’m actually
roasting! ’’

This observation was hardly necessary to make
his companions conscious that by this time they felt
extremely ‘uncomfortable. The heat had become
quite oppressive. Between the natural caloric of
the Sun and the reflected caloric of the Moon, the
Projectile was fast turning into a regular bake oven,
This transition from intense cold to intense heat was
already about quite as much as they could bear.

‘‘What shall we do, Barbican?’’ asked Ardan,
seeing that for some time no one else appeared in-
clined to say a word.

“Nothing, at least yet awhile, friend Ardan,’’ re-
plied Barbican. ‘‘I have been watching the. ther-
mometer carefully for the last few minutes, and,
though we are at present at 38° centigrade, or 100°
Fahrenheit, Ihave noticed that the mercury is slowly
falling. You can also easily remark for yourself
that the floor of the Projectile is turning away more
and more from the lunar surface. From this I con-
clude quite confidently, and I see that the Captain
agrees with me, that all danger of death from intense
heat, though decidedly alarming ten minutes ago, is
over for the present and, for some time at least, it
may be dismissed from further consideration.”’


PUZZLING QUESTIONS. SIL

*¢Y’m not very sorry for it,’’ said Ardan cheer-
fully ; ‘‘ neither to be baked like a pie in an oven
nor roasted like a fat goose before a fire is the kind
of death I should like to die of.’’

‘Vet from such a death you would suffer no more
than your friends the Selenites are exposed to every
day of their lives,’’ said the Captain, evidently de-
termined on getting up an argument.

“‘T understand the full bearing of your allusion,
my dear Captain,’’ replied Ardan quickly, but not
at all in a tone showing that he was eepeces to
second M’Nicholl’s expectations.

He was, in fact, fast losing all his old habits of posi-
tivism. Latterly he had seen much, but he had re-
flected more. The deeper he had reflected, the more
inclined he had become to accept the conclusion that
the lesshe knew. Hence he had decided that if M’ Ni-
choll wanted an argument it should not be with him.
All speculative disputes he should henceforth avoid ;
he would listen with pleasure to all that could be urged
on each side; he might even skirmish a little here
and there as the spirit moved him; but a regular
pitched battle on a subject purely speculative he was
fully determined never again to enter into.

“Yes, dear Captain,”’ he continued, ‘ that pointed
arrow of yours has by no means missed its mark, but
Ican’t deny that my faith is beginning to be what you
call a little ‘shaky’ in the existence of my friends
the Selenites. However, I should like to have your
square opinion on the matter. Barbican’s also.
We have witnessed many strange lunar. phenomena
jil2 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

lately, closer and clearer than. mortal eye ever rested
on them before. Has what we have seen confirmed
any theory of yours or confounded any hypothesis?
Have you seen enough to induce you to adopt de-
-cided conclusions? I will put the question form-
ally. Do you, or do you not, think that the Moon
resembies the Earth in being the abode of animals
and intelligent beings? Come, answer, messteurs.
Yes, or no?”’

“I think we can answer your question categori-
cally,’’ replied Barbican, ‘if you modify its forma
little,”’

“‘Put the question any way you please,’’ said
Ardan.; ‘only you answer it! I’m not particular
about the form.”’

‘Good,’ said Barbican; ‘the question, being a
double one, demands a double answer. First: Js
the Moon inhabitable? Second: Has the Afoon
ever been inhabited 2”?

“¢That’s the way to go about it,’’ said the Cap-
tain. ‘‘ Now then, Ardan, what do yow say to the
first question? Yes, or no?’”’

“T really can’t say anything,’’ replied Ardan.
“‘In the presence of such distinguished scientists,
I’m only a listener, a ‘ mere looker on in Vienna’ as
the Divine Williams has it. However, for the sake
of argument, suppose I reply in the affirmative, and
say that che Moon is inhabitable.’’

“If you do, I shall most unhesitatingly contra-
dict you,’’ said Barbican, feeling just then in splendid
humor for carrying on an argument, not, of course,
PUZZLING QUESTIONS. 313

for the sake of contradicting or conquering or crush-
ing or showing off or for any other vulgar weakness:
of lower minds, but for the noble and indeed the
only motive that should impel a philosopher—that
of enlightening and convincing. ‘In taking the
negative side, however, or saying that the Moon is
not inhabitable, I shall not be satisfied with merely
negative arguments. Many words, however, are
not required. Look at her present condition: her
atmosphere dwindled away to the lowest ebb; her
‘seas’ dried up or very nearly so; her waters reduced
to next to nothing; her vegetation, if existing at all,
existing only on the scantiest scale; her transitions
from intense: heat to intense cold, as we ourselves
can testify, sudden in the extreme; her nights and
her days each nearly 360 hours long. With all this
positively against her and nothing at all that we
know of positively for her, I have very little hesita-.
tion in saying that the Moon appears to. me to be
absolutely uninhabitable. She seems to me not
only unpropitious to the development of the animal
kingdom but actually incapable of sustaining life at
all—that is, in. the sense that we usually attach to:
such a term,’

“That saving clause is well introduced, friend
Barbican,’’ said M’Nicholl, who, seeing no chance
of demolishing Ardan, had not yet made up his.
mind as to having another little bout with the Presi-
dent.. ‘For surely you would not venture to assert
that the Moon is uninhabitable by a race of beings
having an organization different from ours?’
og ALL AROUND THE MOON.

‘¢That question too, Captain,’’ replied Barbican,
‘*though a much more difficult one, I shall try to
answer. First, however, let us see, Captain, if we
agree on some fundamental points. How do we de-
tect the existence of life? Is it not by mozement?
Is not #o/ior its result, no matter what may be its
organization P”’

“‘Well,’’ said the Captain in a drawling way, ‘I
guess we may grant that.’’

‘*Then, dear friends,’? resumed Barbican, ‘I
must remind you that, though we have had the
privilege of observing the lunar continents at a dis-
tance of not more than one-third of a mile, we have
never yet caught sight of the first thing moving on
her surface. The presence of humanity, even of
the lowest type, would have revealed itself in some
form or other, by boundaries, by buildings, even by
ruins. Now what fave we seen? Everywhere and
always, the geological works of zafure,; nowhere
and never, the orderly labors of man. Therefore,
if any representatives of animal life exist in the
Moon, they must have taken refuge in those bottom-
less abysses where our eyes were unable to track
them. And even this I can’t admit. They could
not always remain in these cavities. If there is any
atmosphere at all in the Moon, it must be found in
her immense low-lying plains. Over those plains
her inhabitants must have often passed, and on those
plains they must in some way or other have left some
mark, some trace, some vestige of their existence,
were it even only aroad. But you both know well
PUZZLING QUESTIONS. OLS

that nowhere are any such traces visible: therefore,
they don’t exist; therefore, no lunar inhabitants
exist—except, of course, such a race of beings, if
we can imagine any such, as could exist without re-
vealing their existence by movement.”

‘*That is to say,’’? broke in Ardan, to give what
he conceived a sharper point to Barbican’s cogent
arguments, ‘‘such a race of beings as could exist
without existing!”

‘¢ Precisely,’’ said Barbican: ‘* Life without move-
ment, and no life at all, are equivalent expressions.”’

*¢Captain,’”’ said Ardan, with all the gravity he
could assume, ‘‘have you anything more to say be-
fore the Moderator of our little Debating Society
gives his opinion on the arguments regarding the
question before the house?’’

‘“No more at present,’’ said the Captain, biding
his time.

‘¢Then,’’ resumed Ardan, rising with much dig-
nity, ‘the Committee on Lunar Explorations, ap-
pointed by the Honorable Baltimore Gun Club,
solemnly assembled in the Projectile belonging to
the aforesaid learned and respectable Society, having
carefully weighed all the arguments advanced on
each side of the question, and having also carefully
considered all the new facts bearing on the case that
have lately come under the personal notice of said
Committee, unanimously decides negatively on the
question now before the chair for investigation—
namely, ‘Is the Moon inhabitable?’ Barbican, as
chairman of the Committee, I empower you to duly
316 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

record our solemn decision— Vo, the Afoon is not
inhabitable.”

Barbican, opening his note-book, made the proper
entry among the minutes of the meeting of Decem-
ber 6th.

“Now then, gentlemen,’’ continued Ardan, ‘if
you are ready for the second question, the necessary
complement of the first, we may as well approach it
at once. I propound it for discussion in the follow-
ing form: Has the Moon ever been inhabited ?
Captain, the Committee would be delighted to hear
your remarks on the subject.’’

“¢Gentlemen,’’ began the Captain in reply, ‘I had
formed my opinion regarding the ancient inhabita-
bility of our Satellite long before I ever dreamed of
testing my theory by anything like our present
journey. I will now add that all our observations,
so far made, have only served to confirm me in my
opinion. I now venture to assert, not only with
every kind of probability in my favor but also on
what I consider most excellent arguments, that the
Moon was once inhabited by a race of beings pos-
sessing an organization similar to our own, that she
once produced animals anatomically resembling our
terrestrial animals, and that all these living organiza-
tions, human and animal, have had their day, that
that day vanished ages and ages ago, and that, conse-
quently, Zzfe, extinguished forever, can never again
reveal its existence there under any form.’’

‘Is the Chair,’ asked Ardan, ‘to infer from the
honorable gentleman’s observations that he con-
PUZZLING QUESTIONS, 317

siders the Moon to be a world much older than the
Earth?”

‘“*Not exactly that,” replied the Captain without
hesitation ; ‘*I rather mean to say that the Moon is
a world that grew old more rapidly than the Earth ;
that it came to maturity earlier; that it ripened
quicker, and was stricken with old age sooner.
Owing to the difference of the volumes of the two
worlds, the organizing forces of matter must have
been comparatively much more violent in the in-
terior of the Moon than in the interior of the Earth.
The present, condition of its surface, as we see it
lying there beneath us at this moment, places this
assertion beyond all possibility of doubt. Wrinkled,
pitted, knotted, furrowed, scarred, nothing that we
can show on Earth resembles it. Moon and Earth
were called into existence by the Creator probably at
the same period of time. In the first stages of their
existence, they do not seem to have been anything
better than masses of gas. Acted upon by various
forces and various influences, all of course directed
by an omnipotent intelligence, these gases by de-
grees became liquid, and the liquids grew condensed
into solids until solidity could retain its shape. But
the two heavenly bodies, though starting at the same
time, developed at a very different ratio. Most un-
doubtedly, our globe was still gaseous or at most
only liquid, at the period when the Moon, already
hardened by cooling, began to become inhabitable.””

“* Most undoubtedly is good!"’ observed Ardan
admiringly.
318 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

** At this period,’’ continued the learned Captain,
*€an atmosphere surrounded her. The waters, shut
in by this gaseous envelope, could no longer evapo-
rate. Under the combined influences of air, water,
light, and solar heat as well as internal heat, vegeta.
tion began to overspread the continents by this time
ready to receive it, and most undoubtedly—I mean
—a—incontestably—it was at this epoch that 24%
manifested itself on the lunar surface. I say ¢ucon-
testably advisedly, for Nature never exhausts herself
in producing useless things, and therefore a world,
so wonderfully inhabitable, zzzs¢ of necessity have
had inhabitants.”’

“T like of necessity too,’’? said Ardan, who could
never keep still; ‘I always did, when I felt my
arguments to be what you call a little shaky.”’

‘¢But, my dear Captain,’’ here observed Barbi-
can, ‘‘have you taken into consideration some of
the peculiarities of our Satellite which are decidedly
opposed to the development of vegetable and animal
existence? Those nights and days, for instance,
354 hours long ?”’

*¢T have considered them all,’’ answered the brave
Captains ‘Days and nights of such an enormous
length would at the present time, I grant, give rise to
variations in temperature altogether intolerable to any
ordinary organization. But things were quite different
in the era alluded to. At that time, the atmosphere en-
veloped the Moon ina gaseous mantle, and the vapors
took the shape of clouds. By the screen thus formed
by the hand of nature, the heat of the solar rays
PUZZLING QUESTIONS. 319

was tempered and the nocturnal radiation retarded.
Light too,.as well as heat, could be modified, tem-
pered, and genialized if I may use’ the expression,
by the air. This produced a healthy counterpoise
of forces, which, now that the atmosphere has com-
pletely disappeared, of course exists no longer. Be-
sides—-friend Ardan, you will excuse me for telling
you someting new, something that will surprise
you—””

—‘‘ Surprise me, my dear boy, fire away” surpris-
ing me!’’ cried Ardan. ‘TI like dearly to be sur-
prised. All I regret is that you scientists have
surprised meso much already that I shall never have
a good, hearty, genuine surprise again !””

—‘‘JT am most firmly convinced,’’ continued the
Captain, hardly waiting for Ardan to finish, “ that,
at the period of the Moon’s occupancy by living
creatures, her days and nights were by no means 354
hours long.’”

‘Well! if anything could surprise me,’’ said
Ardan quickly, ‘‘such an assertion as that most
certainly would. On what does the honorable gen-
tleman base his most firm conviction ?””

‘¢We know,”’ replied the Captain, ‘‘that the rea-
son of the Moon’s present long day and night is the
exact equality of the periods of her rotation on her
axis and of her revolution around the Earth. When
she has turned once around the Earth, she has
turned. once around herself Consequently, her
back is turned to the Sun during one-half of the
month, and her face during the other half, Now, I
320 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

don’t believe that this state of things existed at the
period referred to.”’

“*The gentleman does not believe
Ardan. ‘The Chair must be excused for reminding
the honorable gentleman that it can not accept his
incredulity as a sound and valid argument. These
two movements have certainly equal periods now ;
why not always?”’

“For the simple reason that this equality of
periods. is due altogether to the influence of terres-
trial attraction,’’ replied the ready Captain. ‘‘ This
attraction at present, I grant, is so great that it ac-
tually disables the Moon from revolving on herself;
consequently she must always. keep the same face
turned towards the Earth. But who can assert that
this attraction was powerful enough to exert the
same influence at the epoch when the Earth herself
was only a fluid substance? In fact, who can even
assert that the Moon has always been the Earth’s
satellite?”

“Ah, who indeed?’’ exclaimed Ardan. ‘§ And
who can assert that the Moon did not exist long
before the Earth was called into being at all? In
fact, who can assert that the Earth itself is not a
great piece broken off the Moon? Nothing like
asking absurd questions! I’ve often found them
passing for the best kind of arguments !’’

‘*Friend Ardan,’’ interposed Barbican, who
noticed that the Captain was a little too disconcerted
to give a ready reply; ‘Friend Ardan, I must say
you are not quite wrong in showing how certain

!”? exclaimed
PUZZLING QUESTIONS, G2T

methods of reasoning, legitimate enough in them-
selves, may be easily abused by being carried too far.
I think, however, that the Captain might maintain
his position without having recourse to speculations
altogether too gigantic for ordinary intellect. By
simply admitting the insufficiency of the primor-
deal attraction to preserve a perfect balance be-
tween the movements of the lunar rotation and
revolution, we can easily see how the nights and
days could once succeed each other on the Moon
exactly as they do at present on the Earth.”’

*¢Nothing can be clearer!’’ resumed the brave
Captain, once more rushing to the charge. ‘* Be-
sides, even without this alternation of days and
nights, life on the lunar surface was quite possible.’’

“OF course it was possible,’’ said Ardan; ‘‘every-
thing is possible except what contradicts itself. It
is possible too that every possibility.is a fact; there-
fore, it zs a fact. However,’’ he added, not wish-
ing to press the Captain’s weak points too closely,
‘let all these logical niceties pass for the present.
Now that you have established the existence of your
humanity in the Moon, the Chair would respectfully
ask how it has all so completely disappeared ?’’

“It disappeared completely thousands, perhaps
millions, of years ago,’’ replied the unabashed Cap-
tain. ‘It perished from the physical impossibility
of living any longer in a world where the atmos-
phere had become by degrees too rare to be able to
perform its functions as the great resuscitating

medium of dependent existences. What took place
au
J22 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

on the Moon is only what is to take place some day
or other on the Earth, when it is sufficiently cooled
off.’

% Cooled off? ’’

“*Yes,’’ replied the Captain as confidently and
with as little hesitation as if he was explaining some
of the details of his great machine-shop in Philadel-
phia; ‘* You see, according as the internal fire near
the surface was extinguished or was withdrawn
towards the centre, the lunar shell naturally cooled
off. The logical consequences, of course, then
gradually took place: extinction of organized be-
ings; and then extinction of vegetation. The at-
mosphere, in the meantime, became thinner and
thinner—partly drawn off with the water evapor-
ated by the terrestrial attraction, and partly sink-
ing with the solid water into the crust-cracks caused
by cooling. With the disappearance of ait capable
of respiration, and of water capable of motion, the
Moon, of course, became uninhabitable. From that
day it became the abode of death, as completely as
it is at the present moment.’’

‘¢ That is the fate in store for our Earth ?’”’

“© In all probability.”

« And when is it to befall us?”?

** Just as soon as the crust becomes cold enough
to be uninhahitable.”’

‘‘Perhaps your philosophership has taken the
trouble to calculate how many years it will take our
unfortunate Zerra AZater to cool off 2”?

*¢ Well; I haye.’”’
PUZZLING QUESTIONS, 927

‘And you can rely on your figures ?”’

«Tmplicitly.”’

«¢ Why not tell it at once then to a fellow that’s
dying of impatience to know all about it? Cap-
tain, the Chair considers you one of the most tanta-
lizing creatures in existence!”

“Tf you only listen, you will hear,’’ replied
M’ Nicholl quietly. ‘By careful observations, ex-
tended through a series of many years, men have
been able to discover the average loss of tempera-
ture endured by the Earth in a century. Taking
this as the ground work of their calculations, they
have ascertained that our Earth shall become an un-
inhabitable planet in about——”’

‘*Don’t cut her life too short! Be merciful!”’
cried Ardan in a pleading tone half in earnest.
«©Come, a good long day, your Honor! A good
long day!”

“‘The planet that we call the Earth,’’. continued
the Captain, as grave as a judge, ‘‘ will become un-
inhabitable to human beings, after a lapse of 4oo
thousand years from the present time.’’ .

** Hurrah !’’ cried Ardan, much relieved. ‘ Vive
la Science WHenceforward, what miscreant will per-
sist in saying that the Savants are good for nothing?
Proudly pointing to this calculation, can’t they ex-
claim to all defamers: ‘Silence, croakers! Our
services are invaluable! Haven’t we insured the
Earth for 400 thousand years?’ Again I say wive
la Science !”’
S2g ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“¢ Ardan,’’ began the Captain with some asperity,
‘the foundations on which Science has raised w

“‘T’'m half converted already,’’ interrupted Ar-
dan in a cheery tone; ‘I do really believe that
Science is not altogether unmitigated homebogue !
Vive ne

——‘* But what has all this to do with the question
under discussion ?’’ interrupted Barbican, desirous
to keep his friends from losing their tempers in idle
disputation.

‘*True!’? said Ardan. <‘*The Chair, thankful
for being called to order, would respectfully remind
the house that the question before it is: gs the
Afoon been inhabited ? Affirmative has been heard.
Negative is called on to reply. Mr. Barbican has
the parole.”

But Mr. Barbican ‘was unwilling just then to enter
too deeply into such an exceedingly difficult subject.
‘*The probabilities,’? he contented himself with
saying, ‘‘would appear to be in favor of the Cap-
tain’s speculations. But we must never forget that
they are speculations—nothing more. Not the
slightest evidence has yet been produced that the
Moon is anything else than ‘adead and useless waste
of extinct volcanoes.’ No signs of cities, no signs of
buildings, not even of ruins, none of anything that
could be reasonably ascribed to the labors of intelli-
gent creatures. No sign of change of any kind has
been established. As forthe agreement between the
Moon’s rotation and her revolution, which compels
her to keep the same face constantly turned towards




PUZZLING QUESTIONS. S25
2

the Earth, we don’t know that it has not existed
from the beginning. As for what is called the effect
of volcanic agency upon her surface, we don’t know
that her peculiar blistered appearance may not have
been brought about altogether by the bubbling and
spitting that blisters molten iron when cooling and
contracting. Some close observers have even ven-
tured to account for her craters by saying they were
due to pelting showers of meteoric rain. Then
again as to her atmosphere—why should she have
lost her atmosphere? Why should it sink into
craters? Atmosphere is gas, great in volume, small
in matter; where would there be room for it?
Solidified by the intense cold? Possibly in the
night time. But would not the heat of the long
day be great enough to thaw it back again? The
same trouble attends the alleged disappearance of the
water. Swallowed up in the cavernous cracks, it is
said., But why are there cracks? Cooling is not
always attended by cracking. Water cools without
cracking; cannon balls cool without cracking.
Too much stress has been laid on the great differ-
ence between the zzc/eus and the crust: it is really
impossible to say where one ends and the other
begins. In fact, no theory explains satisfactorily
anything regarding the present state of the Moon’s
surface. In fact, from the day that Galileo com-
pared her clustering craters to ‘eyes on a peacock’s
tail’ to the present time, we must acknowledge that
we know nothing more than we can actually see, not
326 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

one particle more of the Moon’s history than our
telescopes reveal to our corporal eyes !”’

“In the lucid opinion of the honorable and
learned gentleman who spoke last,’’ said Ardan,
“the Chair is compelled to concur. Therefore, as
to the second question before the house for de.
liberation, Aas the Joon been ever inhabited ?
the Chair gets out of its difficulty, as a Scotch
jury does when it has not evidence en ough either
way, by returning a solemn verdict of Not
Proven!”

‘And with this conclusion,’’ said Barbican,
hastily rising, §‘ of a subject on which, to tell the
truth, we are unable as yet to throw any light worth
speaking of, let us be satisfied for the ‘present.
Another question of greater moment to us just now
is: where are we? It seems to me that we are in-
creasing our distance from the Moon very decidedly
and very rapidly.”’

It was easy to see that he was quite right in this ob-
servation. The Projectile, still following a northerly
course and therefore approaching the lunar equator,
was certainly getting farther and farther from the
Moon. Even at 30° S., only ten degrees farther
north than the latitude of Zycho, the travellers had
considerable difficulty, comparatively, in observing
the details of £zfatus, a walled mountain on the
south shores of the Afare Wubium. In the ‘‘sea”’
itself, over which they now floated, they could see
very little, but far to the left, on the 2zoth parallel,
they could discern the vast crater of Bu/ialdus,
PUZZLING QUESTIONS. 327

9,000 feet deep. On the right, they had just caught
a glimpse of Purbach, a depressed valley almost
square in shape with a round crater in the centre,
when Ardan suddenly cried ‘out :

A Railroad !”?

And, sure enough, right under them, a little
northeast of Purbach, the travellers easily dis-
tinguished a long line straight and black, really not
unlike a ‘railroad cutting through a low hilly
country.

This, Barbican explained, was of course no rail-
way, but a steep cliff, at least 1,000 feet high, cast-
ing a very deep shadow, and probably the result of
the caving in of the surface on the eastern edge.

Then they saw the immense crater of Arzachel
and in its midst a cone mountain shining with daz-
zling splendor. A little north of this, they could
detect the outlines of another crater, Ahonse, at
least 70 miles in diameter. Close to it they could
easily distinguish the immense crater or, as some
observers call it, Ramparted Plain, Pro/emy, so well
known to lunar astronomers, occupying, as it does,
such a favorable position near the centre of the
Moon, and having a diameter fully, in one direction
at least, 120 miles long.

The travellers were now in about the same latitude
as that at which they had at first approached the
Moon, and it was here that they began most unques-
tionably to leave her. They looked and looked,
readjusting their glasses, but the details were be-
coming more and more difficult to catch. The re-
528 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

liefs grew more and more blurred and the outlines
dimmer and dimmer, Even the great mountain
profiles began to fade away, the dazzling colors to
grow duller, the jet black-shadows greyer, and the
general effect mistier.

At last, the distance had become so great that, of
this lunar world so wonderful, so fantastic, so weird,
so mysterious, our travellers by degrees lost even the
consciousness, and their sensations, lately so vivid,
grew fainter and fainter, until finally they resembled
those of a man who is suddenly awakened from a
peculiarly strange and impressive dream,
CHAPTER XIX.
IN EVERY FIGHT, THE IMPOSSIBLE WINS.

No matter what we have been accustomed to, it is
sad to bid it farewell forever. The glimpse of the
Moon’s wondrous world imparted to Barbican and
his companions had been, like that of the Promised
Land'to Moses on Mount Pisgah, only a distant and
a dark one, yet it was with inexpressibly mournful
eyes that, silent and thoughtful, they now watched
her fading away slowly from their view, the convic-
tion impressing itself deeper and deeper in their
souls that, slight as their acquaintance had been, it
was never to be renewed again. All doubt on the
subject was removed by the position gradually, but
decidedly, assumed by the Projectile. Its base was
turning away slowly and steadily from the Moon,
and pointing surely and unmistakably towards the
Earth,

Barbican had been long carefully noticing this
modification, but without being able to explain it.
That the Projectile should withdraw a long distance
from the Moon and still be her satellite, he could
understand; but, being her satellite, why not pre-
sent towards her its heaviest segment, as the Moon
does towards the Earth? That was the point which
he could not readily clear up.

By carefully noting its path, he thought he could
G29)
330 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

see that the Projectile, though now decidedly Jeav-
ing the Moon, still followed a curve exactly analo-
gous to that by which it had approached her. It
must therefore be describing a very elongated
ellipse, which might possibly extend even to the
neutral point where the Junar and terrestrial attrac-
tions were mutually overcome. °

With this surmise of Barbican’s, his companions
appeared rather disposed to agree, though, of course,
it gave rise to new questions.

‘¢ Suppose we reach this dead point,’’ asked Ar-
dan; ‘‘what then is to become of us?’’

“Can’t tell!’? was Barbican’s unsatisfactory
reply.

«« But you can form a few hypotheses? ”’

“© Ves, two!’?

«Let us have them.”’

‘* The velocity will be either sufficient to carry us
past the dead point, or it will not: sufficient, we
shall keep on, just as we are now, gravitating for-
ever around the Moon——’’

—‘‘ Hypothesis number two will have at least one.
point in its favor,’’ interrupted as usual the incor-
rigible Ardan ; ‘‘it can’t be worse than hypothesis
number one !”’

—‘‘ Insufficient,”’? continued Barbican, laying
down the law, ‘‘ we shall rest forever motionless on
the dead point of the mutually neutralizing attrac-
tions.”’

‘©A pleasant prospect !’’ observed Ardan: ‘from
the worst possible to no better! Isn’t it, Barbican?”
THE IMPOSSIBLE WINS. 392

Nothing to say,’? was Barbican’s only re-
ply.

“Have you nothing to say either, Captain?’
asked Ardan, beginning to bea little vexed at the
apparent apathy of his companions.

‘‘Nothing whatever,’’ replied M’Nicholl, giving
point to his words by a despairing shake of his
head.

“You don’t mean surely that we’re going to sit
here, like bumps on a log, doing nothing until it
will be too late to attempt anything?’

«‘ Nothing whatever can be done,” said Barbican
gloomily. ‘It is vain to struggle against the im-
possible.’”

‘¢Impossible! Where did you get that word? I
thought the American schoolboys had cut it out of
their dictionaries ! ””

*¢That must have been since my time,’’ said Bar-
bican smiling grimly.

“Tt still sticks in a few old copies anyhow,”’
drawled M’Nicholl drily, as he carefully wiped his
glasses. ;

“Well! it has no business here /’’ said Ardan.
‘What! A pair of live Yankees and a Frenchman,
of the nineteenth century too, recoil before an old
fashioned word: that hardly scared our grand-
fathers!”

“What can we do?”

** Correct the movement that’s now running away
with us!”’

* Correct it?’?
352 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

“Certainly, correct it! or modify it! of clap
brakes on it! or take some advantage of it that
will be in our favor! What matters the exact term
so you comprehend me?”’

“¢ Rasy talking | ”’

“¢ As easy doing! ”’

“Doing what? Doing how?’’ P

‘The what, and the how, is your business, not
mine! What kind of an artillery man is he who
can’t. master his bullets? The gunner who. cannot
command his own gun should be rammed into it
head foremost himself and blown from its mouth!
A nice pair of savants you are! There you sit as
helpless as a couple of babies, after having inveigled
me *

“‘Inveigled!!’’ cried. Barbican and M’Nicholl
starting to their feet in an instant; ‘* WHAT!!!”

“*Come, come! ’’ went on Ardan, not giving his
indignant friends time to utter a syllable; ‘‘ I don’t
want any recrimination! JZ’m not the one to com-
plain! I’ll even let up a little if you consider the
expression too strong! I'll even withdraw it
altogether, and assert that the trip delights me! that
the Projectile is a thing after my own heart! that I
was never in better spirits than at ‘the present
moment! JI don’t complain, I only appeal to your
own good sense, and call upon you with all my
voice to do everything possible, so that. we may go
somewhere, since it appears we can’t get to the
Moon!”

‘But that’s exactly what we want to do ourselves,


THE IMPOSSIBLE WINS. SIF

friend Ardan,’’ said Barbican, endeavoring to give
an example of calmness to the impatient M’Ni-
choll; ‘*the only trouble is that we have not the
means to do it.”

«‘Can’t we modify the Projectile’s movement ?”’

No.”

‘‘Nor diminish its velocity? ’’ -

“No.”?

‘Not even by lightening it, as a heavily laden
ship is lightened, by throwing cargo overboard?”’

“What can we throw overboard? We have no
ballast like balloon-men.”’ .

“I should like to know,”’ interrupted M’Nicholl,
‘what would be the good of throwing anything at
all overboard. Any one with a particle of common
sense in his head, can see that the lightened Projec-
tile should only move the quicker !”’

“Slower, you mean,’’ said Ardan. -

‘Quicker, I mean,’’ replied the Captain.

“Neither quicker nor slower, dear friends,’’ in-
terposed Barbican, desirous to stop a quarrel; ‘‘ we
are floating, you know, in an absolute void, where
specific gravity never counts.’’

“Well then, my friends,’’ said Ardan in a re-
signed tone that he evidently endeavored to render
calm, ‘‘since the worst is come to the worst, there
is but one thing left for us to do!’’

‘* What’s that?’’ said the Captain, getting ready
to combat some new piece of nonsense.

“To take our breakfast !’? said the Frenchman
curtly.
SIF ALL AROUND THE MOON.

It was a resource he had often fallen back on in
difficult conjunctures. Nor did it fail him now.

Though it was not a project that claimed to affect
either the velocity or the direction of the Projec-
tile, still, as it was eminently practicable and not
only unattended by no inconvenience on the one
hand but.evidently fraught with many advantages on
the other, it met with decided and instantaneous
success. It was rather an early hour for breakfast,
two o’clock in the morning, yet the meal was keenly
relished, Ardan served it up in charming style and
crowned the dessert with a few bottles of a wine
especially selected. for the occasion from his own pri-
vate stock, It wasa Zokay JLmperial of 1863, the.
genuine Zssenz, from Prince Esterhazy’s own wine
cellar, and the best brain stimulant and brain clearer
in the world, as every connoisseur knows.

It was near four o’clock in the morning when our
travellers, now well fortified physically and morally,
once more resumed their observations with renewed
courage and determination, and with a system of
recording really perfect in its arrangements.

Around the Projectile, they could still see floating
most of the objects that had been dropped out of
the window. This convinced them that, during their
revolution around the Moon, they had not passed
through any atmosphere; had anything of the kind
been encountered, it would have revealed its presence
by its retarding effect on the different objects that
now followed close in the wake of the Projectile.
One or two that were missing had been probably
THE IMPOSSIBLE WINS. SIS

struck and carried off bya fragment of the exploded
bolide.

Of the Earth nothing as yet could be seen. She
was only one day Old, having been New the previous
evening, and two days were still to elapse before her
crescent would be sufficiently cleared of the solar rays
to be capable of performing her ordinary duty of
serving as a time-piece for the Selenites. Ffor, as
the reflecting reader need hardly be reminded, since
she rotates with perfect regularity on her axis, she
can make such rotations visible to the Selenites by
bringing some particular point on her surface once
every twenty-four hours directly over the same lunar
meridian.

Towards the Moon, the view though far less dis-
tinct, was still almost as dazzling as ever. ‘The
radiant Queen of Night: still glittered in all her
splendor in the midst of the starry host, whose pure
white light seemed to borrow only additional purity
and silvery whiteness from the gorgeous contrast.
On her disc, the ‘‘seas’’ were already beginning to
assume the ashy tint so well known to us on Earth,
but the rest of her surface sparkled with all. its former
radiation, Zycho glowing like a sun in the midst of
the general resplendescence.

Barbican attempted in vain to obtain even a toler-
able approximation of the velocity at which the
Projectile was now moving. He had to content
himself with the knowledge that it was diminishing
at a uniform rate—of which indeed a little reflec-
tion.on a well known law of Dynamics readily con-
336 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

vinced him. He had not much difficulty even in
explaining the matter to his friends.

“Once admitting,’’ said he, ‘‘the Projectile to
describe an orbit round the Moon, that orbit must
of necessity be an ellipse. Every moving body
circulating regularly. around another, describes
an ellipse. Science has proved this incontestably.
The satellites describe ellipses around the planets,
the planets around the Sun, the Sun himself de-
scribes an ellipse around the unknown star that serves
as a pivot for our whole solar system. How can our
Baltimore Gun Club Projectile then escape the uni-
versal law ?

‘Now what is the consequence of this law? If
the orbit were a czrc/e, the satellite would always
preserve the same distance from its primary, and its
velocity should therefore be constant. But the orbit
being an ed/fse, and the attracting body always
occupying one of the foci, the satellite must evi-
dently be nearer to this focus in one part of its orbit
than in another. The Earth when nearest to the
Sun, is in her perihelion ; when most distant, in her
aphelion. ‘Tie Moon, with regard to the Earth, is
similarly in her gerigee, and her apogee. Analogous
expressions denoting the relations of the Projectile
towards the Moon, would be periselene and afoselene.
At its aposelene the Projectile’s velocity would have
reached its minimum ; at the Zerise/ene, its maximum.
As it is to the former point that we are now moving,
clearly the velocity must keep on diminishing until
that point is reached. Then, 7 z¢# does not die out
THE IMPOSSIBLE WINS. : 357

altogether, it must spring up again, and even accel-
erate as it reapproaches the Moon. Now the great
trouble is this: If the Afose/enetic point should
coincide with the point of lunar attraction, our
velocity must certainly become wé/, and the Projec-
tile must remain relatively motionless forever !’’

‘What do you mean by ‘ relatively motionless’ ? ”’
asked M’Nicholl, who was carefully studying the
situation.

‘‘I mean, of course, not absolutely motionless,”’
answered Barbican; ‘‘absolute immobility is, as
you are well aware, altogether impossible, but
motionless with regard to the Earth and the~—»’’

““By Mahomet’s jackass!’’ interrupted Ardan
hastily, ‘*I must say we’re a precious set of zi-
béciles 1”

“YT don’t deny it, dear friend,’’ said Barbican
quietly, notwithstanding the unceremonious inter-
ruption; -“* but why do you say so just now?”

“Because though we are possessed of the power
of retarding the velocity that takes us from the
Moon, we have never thought of employing it!’’

“What do you mean?’”’

‘Do you forget the rockets ?”’

“It’s a fact!’’ cried M’Nicholl. ‘How have
we forgotten them???

“I’m sure I can’t tell,’? answered Barbican, ‘ un-
less, perhaps, because we had too many other things
to think about. Your thought, my dear friend, is a
most happy one, and, of course, we shall utilize it.’’

When? How soon?’

22
358 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

‘© At the first favorable opportunity, not sooner,
For you can see for yourselves, dear friends,” he
went on explaining, ‘that with the present obliquity
of the Projectile with regard to the lunar disc, a dis-
charge of our rockets would be more likely to send
us away from the Moon than towards her, Of
course, you are both still desirous of reaching the
Moon?” ”

“¢ Most emphatically so!’

‘¢ Then by reserving our rockets for the last chance,
we may possibly get there after all. In consequence
of some force, to me utterly inexplicable, the Pro-
jectile still seems disposed to turn its base towards
the Earth. In fact, it is likely enough that at the
neutral point its cone will point vertically to the
Moon. That being the moment when its velocity
will most probably be 7/2, it will also be the moment
for us to discharge our rockets, and the possibility
is that we may force a direct fall on the lunar disc,”’

“Good !’’ cried Ardan, clapping hands.

“*Why didn’t we execute this grand manceuvre
the first time we reached the neutral point? ’’ asked
M’ Nicholl a little crustily.

“ Projectile’s velocity at that time, as you no doubt
remember, not only did not need rockets but was
actually too great to be affected by them.”’

‘True!’ chimed in Ardan ; ‘‘a wind of four miles
an hour is very little use to a steamer going ten.”

«« That assertion,’’ cried M’Nicholl, ‘*I am rather

dis—— "?
THE IMPOSSIBLE IVINS. S59

—‘“Dear friends,” interposed Barbican, his pale
face beaming and his clear voice ringing with the
new excitement; ‘‘let us just now waste no time in
mere words.. We have one more chance, perhaps a
great one. Let us not throw it away! We have
been on the brink of despair %

—‘ Beyond it!’’ cried Ardan. .

— But Inow begin to see a possibility, nay, a
very decided probability, of our being able to attain
the great end at last !”’

‘Bravo !’’ cried Ardan.

‘Hurrah’ ’? cried M’ Nicholl.

‘’Ves! my brave boys!’’ cried Barbican as en-
thusiastically as his companions; ‘‘all’s not over
yet by along shot!”

What had brought about this great revulsion in
the spirits of our bold adventurers? The breakfast ?
Prince Esterhazy’s Tokay? ‘The latter, most: prob-
ably. What had become of the resolutions they had
discussed so ably and passed so decidedly a few hours
before? Tas the Aloon inhabited? No! Was
the Muon habitable? No! Yet in the face of all
this—or rather as coolly as if such subjects had
never been alluded to—here were the reckless scien-
tists actually thinking of nothing but how. to work
heaven and earth in order to get there |

One guestion more remained to be answered be-
fore they played their last trump, namely: ‘At
what precise moment would the Projectile reach the
neutral point ?”?

To this Barbican had very little trouble in finding


340 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

an answer. The time spent in proceeding from the
south pole to the dead point being evidently equal
to the time previously spent in proceeding from the
dead point to the north pole—to ascertain the former,
he had only to calculate the latter. This was easily
done. To refer to his notes, to check off the dif-
ferent rates of velocity at which they had reached
the different parallels, and to turn these rates into
time, required only a very few minutes’ careful cal-
culation, The Projectile then was to reach the
point of neutral attraction at one o’clock in the
morning of December 8th. At the présent time, it
was five o’clock in the morning of the 7th; therefore,
if nothing unforeseen should occur in the meantime,
their great and final effort was to be made about
twenty hours later.

The rockets, so often alluded to as an idea of
Ardan’s and already fully described, had been origi-
nally provided to break the violence of the Projec-
tile’s fall on the lunar surface ; but now the daunt-
less travellers were about to employ them for a
purpose precisely the reverse. In any case, having
been put in proper order for immediate use, nothing
more now remained to be done till the moment
should come for firing them off.

“¢ Now then, friends,’’ said M’ Nicholl, rubbing his
eyes but hardly able to keep them open, ‘I’m not
over fond of talking, but this time I think I may
offer a slight proposition.”’

‘* We shall be most happy to entertain it, my dear
Captain,” said Barbican.

THE IMPOSSIBLE WINS. SFL

“‘T propose we lie down and take a good
nap.”’

“Good gracious!’’. protested Ardan; ‘‘ What
next ?”’

“« We have not had a blessed wink for forty hours,”’
continued the Captain; ‘a little sleep would re-
cuperate us wonderfully.”’

‘No sleep now!’’ exclaimed Ardan. °

“Every man to his taste!’’ said M’Nicholl;
“‘mine at present is certainly to turn in!’’ and
suiting the action to the word, he coiled himself on
the sofa, and in a few minutes his deep regular
breathing showed his slumber to be as tranquil as
an infant’s.

Barbican looked at him in a kindly way, but only
for a very short time; his eyes grew so filmy that he
could not keep them open any longer. ‘‘ The Cap-
tain,’’ he said, ‘may not be without’ his little faults,
‘but for good practical sense he is worth a ship-load
like you and me, Ardan. By Jove, I’m going to
imitate him, and, friend Michael, you might do
worse !’?

In a short time he was as unconscious as the Cap-
tain.

Ardan gazed on the pair for a few minutes, and
then began to feel quite lonely. Even his animals
were fast asleep. He tried to look out, but observ-
ing without having anybody to listen to your obser-
vations, is dull work. He looked again at the
sleeping pair, and then he gave in.

“Tt can’t be denied,’’ he muttered, slowly nod-
342 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

ding his head, * that even your practical men some-
times stumble on a good idea.’’

Then curling up his long legs, and folding his
arms under his head, his restless brain was soon
forming fantastic shapes for itself in the mysterious
land of dreams.

But his slumbers were too much disturbed to last
long. After an uneasy, restless, unrefreshing at.
tempt at repose, he sat up at about half-past seven
o’clock, and began stretching himself, when he
found his companions already awake and discussing
the situation in whispers.

The Projectile, they were remarking, was still pur-
suing its way from the Moon, and turning its conical
point more and more in her direction. This fatter
phenomenon, though as puzzling as ever, Barbican
regarded with decided pleasure: the more directly
the conical summit pointed to the Moon at the
exact moment, the more directly towards her sur-
face would the rockets communicate their reactionary
motion,

Nearly seventeen hours, however, were still to
elapse before that moment, that all important
moment, would arrive.

The time began to drag. The excitement pro-
duced by the Moon’s vicinity had died out. Our
travellers, though as daring and as confident as ever,
could not help feeling a certain sinking of heart
at the approach of the moment for deciding either
alternative of their doom in this world—their fall
to the Moon, or their eternal imprisonment in a
THE IMPOSSIBLE WINS, SEF

changeless orbit. Barbican and M’Nicholl tried to
kill time by revising their calculations and putting
their notes in order; Ardan, by feverishly walk-
ing back and ‘forth from window to window, and
stopping for a second or two to throw a nervous
glance at the cold, silent and impassive Moon.

Now and then reminiscences of our lower world
would flit across their brains. Visions of the
famous Gun Club rose up before them the oftenest,
with their dear friend Marston always the central
figure. What was his bustling, honest, good-
natured, impetuous heart at now? Most probably
he was standing bravely at his post on the Rocky
Mountains, his eye glued to the great Telescope, his
whole soul peering through its tube. Had he seen
the Projectile before it vanished behind the Moon’s
north pole? Could he have caught a glimpse of it
at its reappearance? If so, could he have concluded.
it to be the satellite of a satellite! Could Belfast
have announced to the world such a startling piece
of intelligence? Was that all the Earth was ever
to know of their great enterprise? What were the
speculations of the Scientific World upon the sub-
ject? etc., etc.

In listless questions and desultory conversation of
this kind thé day slowly wore away, without the oc-
currence of any incident whatever to relieve its
weary monotony. Midnight arrived, December the
seventh was dead. As Ardan said: *‘ Ze Sept De-
cenbre est mort; vive le Huit/’’ In one hour more,
the neutral point would be reached. At what
SHS ALL AROUND THE MOON.

velocity was the Projectile now moving? Barbican
could not exactly tell, but he felt quite certain that
no serious error had slipped into his calculations
At one o’clock that night, 727 the velocity was to be,
and 27 it would be! :

Another phenomenon, in any case, was to mark
the arrival of theexact moment. At the dead point,
the two attractions, terrestrial and lunar, would again
exactly counterbalance. each other. For a few
seconds, objects would no longer possess the slightest
weight. This curious circumstance, which had so
much surprised and amused the travellers at its first
occurrence, was now to appear again as soon as the
conditions should become identical. During these
few seconds then would come the moment for strik-
ing the decisive blow.

They could soon notice the gradual approach of this
important instant. Objects began to weigh sensibly
lighter. The conical point of the Projectile had
become almost directly under the centre of the
lunar surface. This gladdened the hearts of the
bold adventurers. The recoil of the rockets losing
none of its power by oblique action, the chances
pronounced decidedly in their favor. Now, only
supposing the Projectile’s velocity to be absolutely
annihilated at the dead point, the slightest force
directing it towards the Moon would be certain to
cause it finally to fall on her surface.

Supposing ! but supposing the contrary !

—Even these brave adventurers had not the
courage to suppose the contrary !


THE (MPOSSIBLE WINS, SIT

«Five minutes to one o’clock,’’ said M’Nicholl,
his eyes never quitting his watch.

‘*Ready?’’ asked Barbican of Ardan.

«Ay, ay, sir!’’ was Ardan’s reply, as he made
sure that the electric apparatus to discharge the
rockets was in perfect working order.

‘Wait till I give the word,’’ said Barbican, pull-
ing out his chronometer.

The moment was now evidently close at hand.
The objects lying around had no weight. The
travellers felt their bodies to be as buoyant as a
hydrogen balloon. Barbican let go his chronometer,
but it kept its place as firmly in empty space before
his eyes as if it had been nailed to the wall!

“©Oneo’clock! ’’ cried Barbican in asolemn tone.

Ardan instantly touched the discharging key of
the little electric battery. A dull, dead, distant re-
port was immediately heard, communicated prob-
ably by the vibration of the Projectile to the internal
air. But Ardan saw through the window a long thin
flash, which vanished in a second. At the same
moment, the three friends became instantaneously
conscious of a slight shock experienced by the Pro-
jectile.

They looked at each other, speechless, breathless,
for about as long as it would take you to count five:
the silence so intense that they could easily hear the
pulsation of their hearts. Ardan was the first to
break it.

‘* Are we falling or are we not?’’ he asked ina
loud whisper,
346 ALL AROUND. THE MOON.

‘*We’re not!’’ answered M’ Nicholl, also hardly
speaking above his breath. ‘‘ The base of the Pro-
jectile is still turned away as far as ever from the
Moon!’’

Barbican, who had been looking out of the win-
dow, now turned hastily towards his companions.
His face frightened them. . He was deadly pale ; his
eyes stared, and his lips were painfully contracted.

‘‘We are falling! ’’ he shrieked huskily.

*“*Towards the Moon?’ exclaimed his com-
._panions.

‘“©No!’? was the terrible reply. ‘‘ Towards the
Earth !’’

‘¢ Sacré /”’ cried Ardan, as usually letting off his
excitement in French.

‘‘Fire and fury!’’ cried M’Nicholl, completely
startled out of his habitual sang frozd.

‘*Thunder and lightning!’’ swore the usually
serene Barbican, now completely stunned by the
blow. ‘I had never expected this! ’’

- Ardan was the first to recover from the deadening
shock: .his levity came to his relief.

‘¢ First impressions are always right,’’ he muttered
philosophically. ‘*The moment I set eyes on the
confounded thing, it reminded me of the Bastille;
it is now proving its likeness to a worse place: easy
enough to get into, but no redemption out of it!”’

There was no longer any doubt possible on the
subject. The terrible fall had begun. The Projec-
tile had retained velocity enough not only to carry
it beyond the dead point, but it was even able to
THE IMPOSSIBLE WINS, S47

completely overcome the feeble resistance offered by
the rockets. It was all clear now.’ The same
velocity that had carried the Projectile beyond the
neutral point on its way to the Moon, was still sway-
ing it on its return to the Earth. A well known law
of motion required that, in the path which it was
now about to describe, z¢ should repass, on its re-
turn through all the points through which it had
already passed during tts departure.

No wonder that our friends were struck almost
senseless when the fearful fall they were now about
to encounter, flashed upon them in all its horror.
They were to fall a clear distance of nearly 200 thou-
sand miles! To lighten or counteract such a de-
scent, the most powerful springs, checks, rockets,
screens, deadeners, even if the whole Earth were
engaged in their construction—would produce no
more effect than so many spiderwebs. According
to a simple law in Ballistics, the Projectile was to
strthe the Earth with a velocity equal to that by which
tt had been animated when issuing from the mouth
of the Columbiad—a velocity of. at least seven miles
a second |

To have even a faint idea of this enormous
velocity, let us make a little comparison. A body
falling from the summit of a steeple a hundred and
fifty feet high, dashes against the. pavement with
a velocity of fifty five miles an hour. Falling from
the summit of St. Peter’s, it strikes the earth at the
rate of 300 miles an hour, or five times quicker than
the rapidest express train. Falling from the neutral
348 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

point, the Projectile should strike the Earth with a
velocity of more than 25,000 miles an hour!

‘We are lost!’’ said M’Nicholl gloomily, his
philosophy yielding to despair.

“*One consolation, boys!’’ cried Ardan, genial
to the last. ‘* We shall die together!”’

“‘If we die,’’ said Barbican calmly, but with a
kind of suppressed enthusiasm, ‘it will be only to
remove to a more extended sphere of our investiga-
tions. In the other world, we can pursue our in-
quiries under far more favorable auspices. There
the wonders of our great Creator, clothed in brighter
light, shall be brought within a shorter range. We
shall require no machine, nor projectile, nor material
contrivance of any kind to be enabled to contem-
plate them in all their grandeur and to appreciate
them fully and intelligently. Our souls, enlightened
by the emanations of the Eternal Wisdom, shall
revel forever in the blessed rays of Eternal Knowl-
edge!”

“‘A grand view to take of it, dear friend Barbi-
can ;’’ replied Ardan, “and a consoling one too.
The privilege of roaming at will through God’s great
universe should make ample amends for missing the
Moon!”’

M’ Nicholl fixed his eyes on Barbican admiringly,
feebly muttering with hardly moving lips:

‘Grit to the marrow! Grit to the marrow !’’

Barbican, head bowed in reverence, arms folded
across his breast, meekly and uncomplainingly
uttered with sublime resignation :
THE IMPOSSIBLE WHINS, 349

6¢Thy will be done !’’
“‘Amen!’’ answered his companions, in a loud
and fervent whisper.

They were soon falling through the boundless re-
gions of space with inconceivable rapidity |
CHAPTER XxX.
OFF .THE PACIFIC COAST.

‘WELL, Lieutenant, how goes the sounding? ”’

“Pretty lively, Captain ; we’re nearly through ;”
replied the Lieutenant. ‘But it’s a tremendous
depth so near land. We can’t be more than 250
miles from the California coast.’’

‘“*The depression certainly is far deeper than I
had expected,’’ observed Captain Bloomsbury.
‘We have probably lit on a submarine valley chan-
nelled out by the Japanese Current.’’

‘¢The Japanese Current, Captain ?’’

‘Certainly; that branch of it which breaks on
the western shores of North America and then flows
southeast towards the Isthmus of Panama.”

“That may account for it, Captain,’’ replied
young Brownson ; ‘‘at least, I hope it does, for then
we may expect the valley to get shallower as we
leave the land. So far, there’s no sign of a Tele-
graphic Plateau in this quarter of the globe.’’

‘¢Probably not, Brownson. How is the line
now P”’

‘¢We have paid out 3500 fathoms already, Cap-
tain, but, judging from the rate the reel goes at, we
are still some distance from bottom.”’

As he spoke, he pointed to a tall derrick tem-

porarily rigged up at the stern of the vessel for the
G50)
OFF THE PACIFIC COAST. SSL

purpose of working the sounding apparatus, and
surrounded by a group of busy men. Through a
block pulley strongly lashed to the derrick, a stout
cord of the best Italian hemp, wound off a. large
reel placed amidships, was now running rapidly and
with a slight whirring noise.

«TI hope it’s not the ‘cup-lead’ you are using,
Brownson?”? said the Captain, after a few minutes
observation.

“‘Oh no, Captain, certainly not,’’ replied the
Lieutenant. ‘It’s only Brooke’s apparatus that is
of any use in such depths.’’

‘Clever fellow that Brooke,’’ observed the Cap-
tain; ‘served with him under Maury. His detach-
ment of the weight is really the starting point for
every new improvement in sounding gear. The
English, the French, and even our own, are nothing
but modifications of, that fundamental principle.
Exceedingly clever fellow!’’

‘Bottom!’’ sang out one of the men standing
near the derrick and watching the operations,

The Captain and the Lieutenant immediately ad-
vanced to question him.

“What's the depth, Coleman?’’ asked the
Lieutenant.

‘*21,762 feet,’’? was the prompt reply, which
Brownson immediately inscribed in his note-book,
handing a duplicate to the Captain.

‘All right, Lieutenant,’’ observed the Captain,
after a moment’s inspection of the figures. ‘* While
I enter it in the log, you haul the line aboard. To
S52 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

do so, I need hardly remind you, is a task involv-
ing care and patience. In spite of all our gallant
little donkey engine can do, it’s asix hours job at
least. Meanwhile, the Chief Engineer had better
give orders for firing up, so that we may be ready
to start as soon as you’re through. It’s now close
on to four bells, and with your permission I shall
turn in. Let me be called at three. Good night!”

“¢Good night, Captain!’? replied-Brownson, who
spent the next two hours pacing backward and for-
ward on the quarter deck, watching the hauling in
of the sounding line, and occasionally casting a
glance towards all quarters of the sky.

It was a glorious night. The innumerable stars
glittered with the brilliancy of the purest gems.
The ship, hove to in order to take the soundings,
swung gently on the faintly heaving ocean breast.
You felt you were in a tropical, clime, for, though no
breath fanned your cheek, your senses easily detected
the delicious odor of a distant garden of sweet roses.
The sea sparkled with phosphorescence. Not a
sound was heard except the panting of the hard-
worked little donkey-engine and the whirr of the
line as it came up taut and dripping from the ocean
depths. The lamp, hanging from the mast, threw a
bright glare on deck, presenting the strongest con-
trast with the black shadows, firm and motionless as
marble. The r1th day of December was now near
its last hour. ;

The steamer was the Susquehanna, a screw, of the
United States Navy, 4,000 in tonnage, and carrying
OFF THE PACIFIC COAST. S53

zo guns. She had been detached to take soundings
between the Pacific coast and the Sandwich Islands,
the initiatory movement towards laying down an
Ocean Cable, which the Pacific Cable Company
contemplated finally extending to China. She lay
just now a few hundred miles directly south of San
Diego, an old Spanish town in southwestern Cali-
fornia, and the point which is expected to be the
terminus of the great Zexas and Pacific Railroad.

The Captain, John Bloomsbury by name, but bet-
ter known as ‘ High-Low Jack’ from his great love
of that game—the only one he was ever known to
play—was a near relation of our old friend Colonel
Bloomsbury of the Baltimore Gun Club. Of a good
Kentucky family, and educated at Annapolis, he had
passed his meridian without ever being heard of,
when suddenly the news that he had run the gaunt-
let in a little gunboat past the terrible batteries of
Island Number Ten, amidst a perfect storm of shell,
grape and canister discharged at less than a hun-
dred yards distance, burst on the American nation
on the sixth of April, 1862, and inscribed his name
at once in deep characters on the list of the giants
of the Great War. But war had never been his
vocation. With the return of peace, he had sought
and obtained employment on the Western Coast
Survey, where every thing he did he looked on as
a labor of love. The Sounding Expedition he had
particularly coveted, and, once entered upon it, he
discharged his duties with characteristic energy.

He could not have had more favorable weather

23
5g ALL AROUND THE MOON.

than the present for a successful performance of the
nice and delicate investigations of sounding. His
vessel had’ even been fortunate enough to have lain
altogether out of the track of the terrible wind storm
already alluded to, which, starting from somewhere
southwest of the Sierra Madre, had swept away every
vestige of mist from the summits of the Rocky
Mountains and, by revealing the Moon in all her
splendor, had enabled Belfast to send the famous
despatch announcing that he had seen the Projec-
tile. Every feature of the expedition was, in fact,
advancing so favorably that the Captain expected to
be able, in a month or two, to submit to the P. C
Company a most satisfactory report of his labors,

Cyrus W. Field, the life and soul of the whole
enterprise, flushed with honors still in full bloom
(the Atlantic Telegraph Cable having been just laid),
could congratulate himself with good reason on hav-
ing found a treasure in the Captain. High-Low
Jack was the congenial spirit by whose active and
intelligent aid he promised himself the pleasure of
seeing before long the whole Pacific Ocean covered
with a vast reticulation of electric cables. The
practical part, therefore, being in such safe hands,
Mr, Field could remain with a quiet conscience in
Washington, New York or London, seeing after the
financial part of the grand undertaking, worthy of
the Nineteenth Century, worthy of the Great Re-
public, and eminently worthy of the illustrious
Cyrus W. himself ! :

As already mentioned, the Ssguehanna lay a few
OFF THE PACIFIC COAST, SIF

hundred miles south of San Diego, or, to be more
accurate, in 27° 7’ North Latitude and ‘118° 37’
West Longitude (Greenwich).

It was now a little past midnight.’ The Moon,
in her last quarter, was just beginning to peep over
the eastern horizon. Lieutenant Brownson, leaving
the quarter deck, had gone to the forecastle, where
he found a crowd of officers talking together
earnestly and directing their glasses towards her
disc. Even here, out on the ocean, the Queen of
the night, was as great an object of attraction as on
the North American Continent generally, where,
that very night and that very hour, at least 40 mil-
lion pairs of eyes were anxiously gazing at her.
Apparently forgetful that even the very best of their
glasses could no more see the Projectile than angulate
Sirius, the officers held them fast to their eyes for
five minutes at a time, and then took them away
only to talk with remarkable fluency on what they
had not discovered.

‘“‘Any sign of them yet, gentlemen?’’ asked
Brownson gaily as he joined the group. ‘It’s now
pretty near time for them to put in an appearance.
They’re gone ten days I should think.”’

“‘They’re there, Lieutenant ! not adoubt of it!”’
cried a young midshipman, fresh from Annapolis,
and -of course ‘throughly posted’’ in the latest
revelations of Astronomy. ‘I feel as certain of
their being there as I am of our being here on the
forecastle of the Susguehanna !”’ ;

“‘T must agree with you of course, Mr. Midship-
356 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

man,”’ replied Brownson with a slight smile; ‘TI
have no grounds whatever for contradicting you.”’

“Neither have I,’’ observed. another officer, the
surgeon of the vessel. ‘‘ The Projectile was to have
reached the Moon when at her full, which was at
midnight on the 5th. . To-day was the 11th. This
gives. them six. days of. clear light—time enough
in all conscience not only to land safely but to ins
stall themselves quite comfortably in their new home.
In fact, I see them there already. a

‘In my mind’s, eye, Horatio!’’ laughed one of
the group. ‘* Though the Doc wears glasses, he can
see more than any ten men on board.”’

~-‘* Already.’’—pursued the Doctor, heedless of
the interruption, ‘‘ Scewe, a stony valley near a
Selenite stream; the Projectile on the right, half
buried in volcanic scoriae, but apparently not much
the worse: for the wear;.ring mountains, craters,
sharp peaks,. etc. all around; old Mac discovered
taking observations with his levelling staff; Barut-
CAN perched on the summit of a sharp pointed rock,
writing. up his note-book; ARDAN, eye-glass on nose,
hat under arm, legs apart, puffing at his Jiperador,
like a——”’ .

—‘* A locomotive! ’’ interrupted the young Mid-
shipman, his excitable imagination so far getting the
better of him as to make him forget ‘his manners. He
had just finished Locke’s famous Moon Hoax, and
his brain was still full of its pictures. ‘*In the back-
ground’? he went ‘on, ‘‘can: be seen thousands of
Vespertiliones-Homines or . Afan-Bats, in all the



OFF THE PACIFIC COAST. 357

various attitudes of curiosity, alarm, or consterna-
tion ; some of them peeping around the rocks, some
fluttering from peak to peak, all gibbering a language
more or Jess resembling the notes of birds. Zxter
Lunatico, King of the Selenites ad

“Excuse us, Mr. Midshipman,” interrupted
Brownson with an easy smile, ‘‘ Locke’s authority
may have great weight among the young Middies at
Annapolis, but it does not rank very high at present in
the estimation of practical scientists.’’ This rebuff
administered to the conceited little Midshipman, a
rebuf which the Doctor particularly relished, Brown-
son continued: ‘‘ Gentlemen, we certainly know
nothing whatever regarding our friends’ fate; guess-
ing gives no information. How we ever are to hear
from the Moon until we are connected with it bya
lunar cable, I can’t even imagine, The probability
is that we shall never a A

“‘Excuse me, Lieutenant,’’ interrupted the unre-
buffed little Midshipman; ‘‘ Can’t Barbican write ?’’

Ashout of derisive comments greeted this ques-
tion. ‘

‘Certainly he can write, and_ send his letter by
the Pony Express!’’ cried one.

““A Postal Card would be cheaper!’’ cried
another,

“The Mew Vork Heraid will send a reporter
after it!’’ was the exclamation of a third.

‘* Keep cool, just keep cool, gentlemen,’’ persisted
the little Midshipman, not in the least abashed by
the uproarious hilarity excited by his remarks. ‘1





29
358 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

asked if Barbican couldn’t write. In that question I
see nothing whatever to laugh at. Can’t a man
write without being obliged to send his letters?”

‘« This is all nonsense,’’ saidthe Doctor, ‘* What's
the use of aman writing to you if he can’t send you
what he writes ?”’

‘‘What’s the use of his sending it to you if he
can have it read without that trouble?’ answered the
little Midshipman in a confident tone. ‘Is there
not a telescope at Long’s Peak? Doesn’t it bring
the Moon within a few miles of the Rocky Moun-
tains, and enable us to see on her surface, objects as
small as nine feet in diameter? Well! - What’s to
prevent Barbican and his friends from constructing
a gigantic alphabet? If they write words of even
a few hundred yards and sentences a mile or two
long, what is to prevent us from reading them?
Catch the idea now, eh?’”’

They did catch the idea, and heartily applauded
the little Middy for his smartness. Even the Doc-
tor saw a certain kind of merit in it, and Brownson
acknowledged it to be quite feasible.. In fact,
expanding on it, the Lieutenant assured his hearers
that, by means of large parabolic reflectors, lumi-
nous groups of rays could be dispatched from the
Earth, of sufficient brightness to establish direct
communication even with Venus or Mars, where
these rays would be quite as visible as the planet
Neptune is from the Earth. He even added that
those brilliant points of light, which have been
quite frequently observed in Mars and Venus, are
OFF THE PACIFIC COAST, 359

perhaps signals made to the Earth by the inhabi-
tants of these planets. He concluded, however, by
observing that, though we might by these means
succeed in obtaining news from the Moon, we could
not possibly send any intelligence back in return,
unless indeed the Selenites had at their disposal
optical instruments at least as good as ours.

All agreed that this was very true, and, as is
generally the case when one keeps all the talk to
himself, the conversation now assumed so serious a
turn that for some time it was hardly worth re-
cording,

At last the Chief Engineer, excited by some re-
mark that had been made, observed with much
earnestness :

«*You may say what you please, gentlemen, but I
would willingly give my last dollar to kno’ what
has become of those brave men! Have they done
anything? Have theyseen anything? I hope they
have.~ But I should dearly like to know. Ever so
little success would warrant a repetition of the great
experiment. The Columbiad is still to the good in
Florida, as it will be for many along day. ‘There
are millions of men to-day as curious as I am upon
the subject. ‘Therefore it will be only a question of
mere powder and bullets if a cargo of visitors is
not sent to the Moon every time she passes our

zenith.’
‘Marston would be one of the first of them,’’

observed Brownson, lighting his cigar.
‘¢Oh, he would have plenty of company!’ cried
360 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

the Midshipman. ‘I should be delighted to go if
he’d only take me.”’

“*No doubt you would, Mr.. Midshipman,’’ said
Brownson, ‘‘the wise men, you know, are not all
dead yet.’’ ;

‘*Nor the fools either, Lieutenant,”’ growled
old Frisby, the fourth officer, getting tired of the
conversation.

‘‘ There is no question at all about it,’’ observed
another; ‘‘every time a Projectile started, it would
take off as many as it could carry.”’

“T wish it would only start often enough to im-
prove the breed !’’ growled old Frisby.

‘*T have no doubt whatever,’’? added the Chief
Engineer, ‘‘that the thing would get so fashionable
at last that half the inhabitants of the Earth would
take astrip to the Moon.”

“*T should limit that privilege strictly to some of
our friends in Washington,”’ said old Frisby, whose
temper had been soured probably by a neglect to
recognize his long services; ‘‘and most of them I
should by all means insist on sending to the Moon.
Every month I would ram a whole raft of them into
the Columbiad, with a charge under them strong
enough to blow them all to the But Hey !—
what in creation’s that ?’’

Whilst the officer was speaking, his companions
had suddenly caught a sound in the air which re-
minded them immediately of the whistling scream
of a Lancaster shell. At first they thought the
steam was escaping somewhere, but, looking up-







OFF THE PACIFIC COAST: gOL

wards, they saw that the strange noise proceeded
from a ball of dazzling brightness, directly over
their heads, and evidently falling towards them with
tremendous velocity, Too frightened to say a word,
they could only see that in its light the whole ship
blazed like fireworks, and the whole sea glittered like
asilver lake. Quicker than tongue can utter, or mind
can conceive, it flashed before their eyes fora second,
an enormous bolide set on fire by friction with the
atmosphere, and gleaming in its white heat like a
stream of molten iron gushing straight from the fur-
nace. Fora second only did they catch its flash before
their eyes; then striking the bowsprit of the vessel,
which it shivered into a thousand pieces, it vanished
in the.sea in an instant witha hiss, a scream, and a
roar, all equally indescribable. For some time the
utmost confusion reigned on deck,. With eyes too
dazzled to-see, ears still ringing with the frightful
combination of unearthly sounds, faces splashed with
floods of sea water, and noses stifled with clouds of
scalding steam, the crew of the Susguehanna could
hardly realize that their marvellous escape by a few
feet from instant and certain destruction was an ac»
complished fact, not a frightful dream. They were
still engaged im trying to open their eyes and to get
the hot water out of their ears, when they suddenly
heard the trumpet voice of Captain Bloomsbury cry-
ing, as he stood half dressed on the head of the
cabin stairs:

““What’s up, gentlemen? In heaven’s name,
what’s up??? |
362 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

The little Midshipman had been knocked flat by
the concussion and stunned by the uproar. But be-
fore any body else could reply, his voice was heard,
clear and sharp, piercing the din like an arrow:

“It’s THEY, Captain! Didn’t I tell youso?”
CHAPTER XXI.
NEWS FOR MARSTON!

In a few minutes, consciousness had restored order
on board the Swsguehanna, but the excitement was
as great asever. ‘They had escaped by a hairsbreadth
the terrible fate of being both burned and drowned
without a moment’s warning, without a single soul
being left alive to tell the fatal tale; but on this
neither officer nor man appeared to bestow the
slightest thought. They were wholly engrossed with
the terrible catastrophe that had befallen the famous
adventurers. What was the loss of the Susguehanna
and all it contained, in comparison to the loss ex-
perienced by the world at large in the terrible tragic
dénouement just witnessed? The worst had now
come to the worst. At last the long agony was
over forever. Those three gallant. men, who had
not only conceived but had actually executed the
grandest and most daring enterprise of ancient or
modern times, had paid by the most fearful of deaths,
for their sublime devotion to science and their un-
selfish desire to extend the bounds of human knowl-
edge! Before such a reflection as this, all other
considerations were at once reduced to proportions
of the most absolute insignificance.

But was the death of the adventurers so very cer-
tain after all? Hops is hard to kill, Conscious-

(363)
304 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

ness had brought reflection, reflection doubt, and
doubt had resuscitated hope.

“*Tt’s they!’’ had exclaimed the little Midship-
man, and the cry had thrilled every heart on board
as with an electric shock. Everybody had instantly
understood it. Everybody had felt it to be true.
Nothing could be more certain than that the meteor
which had just flashed before their eyes was the
famous Projectile. of the Baltimore Gun Club.
Nothing could be truer than that it contained the
three world renowned men and that it now lay in
the black depths of the Pacific Ocean. /

But here opinions began to diverge. Some
courageous breasts soon refused to accept the preva-
lent idea,

**They’re killed by the shock! ’’ cried the crowd,

«Killed ?’? exclaimed the hopeful ones; ‘* Not
a bit of it! The water here is deep enough to break
a fall twice as great.”’

‘¢ They’re smothered for want of air!’’ exclaimed
the crowd,

“‘ Their stock may not be run ont yet!’? was the
ready reply. ‘* Their air apparatus is still on hand.”

‘*They’re burned to a cinder!’’ shricked the
crowd,

‘¢ They had not time to be burned !?? answered
the Band of Hope... ‘The Projectile did not get
hot till it reached the atmosphere, through which it
tore in a few seconds.’’

“If they’re neither burned nor smothered nor
killed by the shock, they’re sure to be drowned!”
NEWS FOR MARSTON. 96 5

persisted the crowd, with redoubled lamenta-
tions. '

“Fish ’em up first!’’ cried the Hopeful Band.
“*Come! Let’s lose no time! Let’s fish ’em up at
once!”?

The cries of Hope prevailed. The unanimous opin-
ion of a council of the officers hastily summoned to-
gether by the Captain was to go to work and fish up the
Projectile with the least possible delay. But was such
an operation possible ? asked adoubter. Yes! was the
overwhelming reply; difficult, no doubt, but still
quite possible. Certainly, however, such an attempt
was not immediately possible as the Swsguehanua
had no machinery strong enough or suitable enough
for a piece of work involving such a nicety of de-
tailed operations, not to speak of its exceeding diffi-
culty, The next unanimous decision, therefore, was
to start the vessel at once for the nearest port,
whence they could instantly telegraph the Projec-
tile’s arrival to the Baltimore Gun Club.

But what was the nearest port? A serious ques-
tion, to answer which in a satisfactory manner the
Captain had to carefully examine. his sailing charts.
The neighboring shores of the California Peninsula,
low and sandy, were absolutely destitute of good
harbors. San Diego, about a day’s sail directly
north, possessed an excellent harbor, but, not yet
having telegraphic communication with the rest of
the Union, it was of course not to be thought of.
San Pedro Bay was too open to be approached in
winter. The Santa Barbara Channel was liable to
306 ALL AROUND THE HOON.

the same objection, not to mention the trouble often
caused by kelp and wintry fogs.. The bay of San
Luis Obispo was still worse in every respect ; having
no islands to act as a breakwater, landing there in
winter was often impossible. The harbor of the
picturesque old town of Monterey was safe enough,
but some uncertainty regarding sure telegraphic
communications with San Francisco, decided the
council not to venture it. Half Moon Bay, a little
to the north, would be just as risky, and in moments
like the present when every minute was worth a
day, no risk involving the slightest loss of time
could be ventured. s

Evidently, therefore, the most advisable plan was
to sail directly for the bay of San Francisco, the
Golden Gate, the finest harbor on the Pacific Coast
and one of the safest inthe world. Here telegraphic
communication with all parts of the Union was as-
sured beyond a doubt. San Francisco, about 750
miles distant, the Susguchanna could probably make
in three days; with a little increased pressure, pos-
sibly in two days and a-half. The sooner then she
started, the better. :

The fires were soon in full blast. The vessel could
get under weigh at once. In fact, nothing delayed
immediate departure but the consideration that two
miles of sounding line were still to be hauled up
from the ocean depths. But the Captain, after a
moment’s thought, unwilling that any more time
should be lost, determined to cut it. Then mark-
NEWS FOR MARSTON. 967

ing its position by fastening its end toa buoy, he
cou'd haul it up at‘his leisure on his return,

“* Besides,’’ said he, ‘‘the buoy will show us the
precise spot where the Projectile fell.’”’ :

“« As for that, Captain,’’ observed Brownson, “ the
exact spot has been carefully recorded already: 27° 7’
north latitude by 41° 37’ west longitude, reckoning
from the meridian of Washington.”’

“ Allright, Lieutenant,’’ said the Captain curtly.
“Cut the line !”?

A large cone-shaped metal buoy, strengthened
still further by a couple of stout spars to which it
was securely lashed, was soon. rigged up on deck,
whence, being hoisted overboard, the whole apparatus
was carefully lowered to the surface of the sea. By
means of aring in the small end of the buoy, the
latter was then solidly attached. to the part of the
sounding line that still remained in the water, and
all possible precautions were taken to diminish the
danger of friction, caused by the contrary currents,
tidal waves, and the ordinary heaving swells of
ocean.

It was now a little after three o’clock in the morn-
ing. The Chief Engineer announced everything to
be in perfect readiness for starting. The Captain
gave the signal, directing the pilot to steer straight
for San Francisco, north-north by west. The waters
under the stern began to boil and foam; the ship
very soon felt and yielded to the power that animated
her; and in a few minutes she was making at least
twelve knots an hour. Her sailing powers were
568 ALL. AROUND THE MOON.

somewhat higher than this, but it was necessary to
be careful in the neighborhood of such a dangerous
coast as that of California.

‘Seven hundred and fifty miles of smooth waters
presented no very difficult task to a fast traveller
like the Swsgvehanna, yet it was not till two days
and a-half afterwards that she sighted the Golden
Gate. As usual, the coast was foggy; neither Point
Lobos nor Point Boneta could be seen. But Cap-
tain Bloomsbury, well acquainted with every portion
of this coast, ran as close along the southern shore
as he dared, the fog-gun at Point Boneta safely di-
recting his course. Here expecting to be able to
gain a few hours time by signalling to the outer tele-
graph station on Point Lobos, he had caused to be
painted on asail in large black letters: ‘* THE Moon-
MEN ARE BACK!’’ but the officers in attendance,
though their fog-horn could be easily heard—the
distance not being quite two miles—were unfortu-
nately not able to see it. Perhaps they did sce it,
but feared a hoax.

Giving the Fort Point a good wide berth, the
Susquehanna found the fog gradually clearing away,
and by half-past three the passengers, looking under
it, enjoyed the glorious view of the Contra Costa
mountains east of San Francisco, which had _ ob-
tained for this entrance the famous and well de-
served appellation of the Golden Gate. In another
half hour, they had doubled Black Point, and were
lying safely at anchor between the islands of Alca-
traz and Yerba Buena. In less than five minutes
NEWS FOR MARSTON. 309

afterwards the Captain was quickly lowered into his
gig, and eight stout pairs of arms were pulling him
rapidly to shore.

The usual crowd ot idlers had collected that even-
ing on the summit of Telegraph Hill to enjoy the
magnificent view, which for variety, extent, beauty
and grandeur, is probably unsurpassed on earth.
Of course, the inevitable reporter, hot after an item,
was not absent. The Szsguehanna had hardly
crossed the bar, when they caught sight of her. A
government vessel entering the bay at full speed, is
something to look at even in San Francisco. Even
during the war, it would be considered rather un-
usual. But they soon remarked that her bowsprit
was completely broken off. Very unusual. Some-
thing decidedly is the matter. See! The vessel is
hardly anchored when the Captain leaves her and
makes for Megg’s Wharf at North Point as hard as
ever his men can pull! Something sws¢ be the
matter—and down the steep hill they all rush as fast
as ever their legs can carry them to the landing at
Megg’s Wharf.

The Captain could hardly force his way through
the dense throng, but he made no attempt whatever
to gratify their ill dissembled curiosity.

‘Carriage!’ he cried, in a voice seldom heard
outside the din of battle.

In a moment seventeen able-bodied cabmen were
trying to tear him limb from limb.

‘To the telegraph office! Like lightning!”

were his stifled mutterings, as he struggled in the
24
370 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

arms of the Irish giant who had at last succeeded in
securing him.

“To the telegraph office. cried most of the
crowd, running after him like fox hounds, but the
more knowing ones immediately began questioning
the boatmen in the Captain’s gig. These honest
fellows, nothing loth to tell all that they knew and
more that they invented, soon had the satisfaction
of finding themselves the centrepoint of a wonder
stricken audience, greedily swallowing up every
item of the extraordinary news and still hungrily
gaping for more.

By this time, however, an important dispatch was
flying east, bearing four different addresses: To the
Secretary of the U. S. Navy, Washington; To
Colonel Joseph Wilcox, Vice-President fro /em.,
Baltimore Gun Club, Md.; To J. T. Marston, Esq.
Long’s Peak, Grand County, Colorado;. and To
Professor Wenlock, Sub-Director of the Cambridge
Observatory, Mass.

This dispatch read as follows :

‘¢In latitude twenty-seven degrees seven minutes
north and longitude forty-one degrees thirty-seven
minutes west shortly after one o’clock on the morn-
ing of twelfth instant Columbiad Projectile fell in
Pacific—send instructions—

BLOOMSBURY,
Captain, SUSQUEHANNA,”?

1,7?

In five minutes more all San “Francisco had the
news. An hour later, the newspaper boys were
NEWS FOR MARSTON. , o7t

shrieking it through the great cities of the States.
Before bed-time every man, woman, and child in
the country had heard it and gone into ecstasies
over it. Owing to the difference in longitude, the
people of Europe could not hear it till after mid-
night. But next morning the astounding issue of
the great American enterprise fell on them like a
thunder clap.

We must, of course, decline all attempts at de-
scribing the effects of this most unexpected intelli-
gence on the world at large.

The Secretary of the Navy immediately telegraphed
directions to the Susguehanna to keep a full head of
steam up night and day so as to be ready to give in-
stant execution to orders received at any moment.

The Observatory authorities at Cambridge held a
special meeting that very evening, where, with all
the serene calmness so characteristic of learned
societies, they discussed the scientific points of the
question in all its bearings. But, before commit-
ting themselves to any decided opinion, they unani-
mously resolved to wait for the development of
further details.

At the rooms of the Gun Club in Baltimore there
was a terrible time. The kind reader no doubt re-
members the nature of the dispatch sent one day
previously by Professor Belfast from the Long’s
Peak observatory, announcing that the Projectile
had been seen but that it had become the Moon’s
satellite, destined to revolve around her forever and
ever till time should be no more. The reader is
372 _ ALL AROUND THE MOON.

also kindly aware by this time that such dispatch
was not supported by the slightest foundations in
fact. The learned Professor, in a moment of tem-
porary cerebral excitation, to which even the greatest
scientist is just as liable as the rest of us, had taken
some little meteor or, still more probably, some little
fly-speck in the telescope for the Projectile. The
worst of it was that he had not only boldly pro-
claimed his’ alleged discovery to the world at large
but he had even explained all about it with the well
known easy pomposity that ‘ Science’’ sometimes
ventures to assume. The consequences of all this
may be readily guessed. The Baltimore Gun Club
had split up immediately into two violently opposed
parties. Those gentlemen who regularly conned the
scientific magazines, took every word of the learned
Professor’s dispatch for gospel—or rather for some-
thing of far higher value, and more strictly in ac-
cordance with the highly advanced scieutific develop-
ments of the day. But the others, who never read
anything but the daily papers and who could. not
bear the idea of losing Barbican, laughed the whole
thing to scorn. Belfast, they said, had seen as much’
of the Projectile as he had of the ‘Open Polar
Sea,” and the rest of the dispatch was mere
twaddle, though asserted with all the sternness of a
religious dogma and enveloped in the usual scien-
tific slang.

The meeting held in the Club House, 24 Monu-
ment Square, Baltimore, on the evening of the 13th,
had been therefore disorderly in the highest degree.
NEWS FOR MARSTON. S73

Long before the appointed hour, the great hall was
densely packed and: the greatest ‘uproar prevailed.
Vice-President Wilcox took the chair, and all was
comparatively quiet until Colonel Bloomsbury, the
Honorary Secretary in Marston’s absence, com-
menced to read Relfast’s dispatch. Then. the scene,
according to the account given in the next day’s Sux,
from whose columns we condense our report, ac-
tually ‘‘ beggared description.’’ Roars, yells, cheers,
counter-cheers, clappings, hissings, stampings, squal-
lings, whistlings, barkings, mewings, cock crowings,
all of the most fearful and demoniacal character,
turned the immense hall into aregular pandemonium.
In vain did President Wilcox fire off his detonating
"bell, with a report on ordinary occasions’as loud as
the roar of a small piece of ordnance. In the
dreadful noise then prevailing it was no more heard
than the fizz of a lucifer match.

Some cries, however, made themselves occasionally
heard in the pauses of the din. ‘Read! Read!”’
“Dry up!’’ “Sit down!’? “Give him an egg!’
“Fair play!’? ‘* Hurrah for Barbican!’? ‘¢ Down
with his enemies!’’ ‘*Free Speech!’’ ‘ Belfast
won’t bite you!’’ ‘*He’d like to bite Barbican,
but his teeth aren’t sharp enough!’? ¢ Barbican’s
‘a martyr to science, let’s hear his fate!’’ ‘* Martyr
be hanged; the Old Man is to the good yet!”
‘Belfast is the grandest name in Science!”’
‘* Groans for the grandest name!’’ (Awful groans.)
“Three cheers for Old Man Barbican!’? (The ex-
ceptional strength alone of the walls saved the build-
574. ALL AROUND THE MOON,

ing, from being blown out by an explosion in which
at least 5,000 pairs of lungs participated.)

‘“*Three cheers for M’Nicholl and the French-
man!’’ This was followed by another burst of
cheering so hearty, vigorous and long continued that
the scientific party, or De/fasters as they were now
called, seeing that further prolongation of the meet-
was perfectly useless, moved to adjourn. It was car-
ried unanimously. President Wilcox left the chair,
the meeting broke up in the wildest disorder—the
scientists rather crest fallen, but the Barbican men
quite jubilant for having been so successful in pre-
venting the reading of that detested dispatch.

Little sleeping was done that night in Baltimore,
and less business next day. Even in the public
schools so little work was done by the children that
S. T. Wallace, Esq., President of the Education
Board, advised.an anticipation of the usual Christ-
mas recess by a week. Every one talked of the
Projectile; nothing was heard at the corners but
discussions regarding its probable fate. All Balti-
more was immediately rent into two parties, the Be/-
Jasters and the Barbicanttes. The latter was the most
enthusiastic and noisy, the former decidedly the most
numerous and influential.

Science, or rather pseudo-science, always exerts a
mysterious attraction of an exceedingly powerful
nature over the generality—that is, the more igno-
rant portion of the human race. Assert the most
absurd nonsense, call it a scientific truth, and back
it up with strange words which, like potentiality,
NEWS FOR MARSTON. OTT

etc., sound as if they had a meaning but in reality
have none, and nine out of every ten men who read
your book will believe you. Acquire a remarkable
name in one branch of human knowledge, and
presto! you are infallible in all, Who can con-
tradict you, if you only wrap up your assertions in
specious phrases that not one man ina million at-
tempts to ascertain the real meaning of? We like
so much to be saved the trouble of thinking, that it is
far easier and more comfortable to be led than to
contradict, to fallin quietly with the great flock of
sheep that jump blindly after their leader than to re-
main apart, making one’s self ridiculous by foolishly
attempting to argue. Real argument, in fact, is very
difficult, for several reasons: first, you must under-
stand your subject qwe//, which is hardly likely ;
secondly, your opponent must also understand it
well, which is even less likely; thirdly, you must
listen patiently to his arguments, which is still less
likely ; and fourthly, he must listen to yours, the
least likely of all. If a quack advertises a panacea
for all human ills at a dollar a bottle, a hundred will
buy the bottle, for one that will try how many are
killed hy it. What would the investigator gain by
charging the quack with murder? Nobody would
believe him, because nobody would take the trouble
to follow his arguments. His adversary, first in the
field, had gained the popular ear, and remained the
unassailable master of the situation. Our love of
**Science’’ rests upon our adiniration of intellect,
376 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

only unfortunately the intellect is too often that’ of
other people, not our own.

The very sound of Belfast’s phrases, for instance,
*“satellite,’? ‘lunar attraction’? ‘* immutable
path of its orbit,’’? etc, convinced the greater
part of the ‘intelligent’? community that he who
used them so flippantly must be an exceedingly
great man. ‘Therefore, he had completely proved
his case. Therefore, the great majority of the
ladies and gentlemen that regularly attend the
scientific lectures of the Peabody Institute, pro-
nounced Barbican’s fate and that of his companions
to be sealed. Next morning’s newspapers con-
tained lengthy obituary notices of the Great Bal-
loon-attics as the witty man of the Mew York
flerald phrased it, some ot which might be con-
sidered quite complimentary. These, all indus-
triously copied into the evening papers, the people
were carefully reading over again, some with honest
regret, some deriving a great moral lesson from an
attempt exceedingly reprehensible in every point of
view, but most, we are sorry to acknowledge, with a
feeling of ill concealed pleasure. Had not they
always said how it was to end? ‘Was there anything
more absurd ever conceived? Scientific men too!
Hang such science! If you want a real scientific
man, no wind bag, no sham, take Belfast! He
knows what he’s talking about! No taking Az in!
Didn’t he by means of the Monster Telescope, see
the. Projectile, as large as life, whirling round and_
round the Moon? Anyway, what else could have
NEWS FOR MARSTON. 377

happened? Wasn’t it what anybody’s common
sense expected? Don’t you remember a conversa-
tion we had with you one day? etc., etc.

The Barbicanttes were very doleful, but they
never though of giving in. They would die sooner.
When pressed for a scientific reply to a scientific
argument, they denied that there was any argument
to reply to. What! Had not Belfast seen the Pro-
jectile? No! Was not the Great Telescope then
good for anything? Yes, but not for everything!
Did not Belfast know his business? No! Did they
mean to say that he had seen nothing at all? Well,
not exactly that, but those scientific gentlemen can
seldom be trusted ; in their rage for discovery, they
make a mountain out of a molehill, or, what is
worse, they start a theory and then distort facts to
support it. Answers of this kind either led directly
toa fight, or the Belfasters moved away thoroughly
disgusted with the ignorance of their opponents, who
could not see a chain of reasoning as bright as the
noonday sun. .

Things were in this feverish state on the evening
of the rath, when, all at once, Bloomsbury’s dis-
patch arrived in Baltimore. I need not say that it
dropped like a spark in a keg of gun powder. The
first question all asked was: Is it genuine or bogus?
real or got up by the stockbrokers ? But a few flashes
backwards and forwards over the wires soon settled
that point. The stunning effects of the new blow
were hardly over when the Bardicanites began to
perceive that the wonderful intelligence was de-
378 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

cidedly in their.favor. Was it not a distinct con-
tradiction of the whole story told by their opponents?
If Barbican and his friends were lying at the bottom
of the Pacific, they were certainly not circumgyrating
around the Moon. If it was the Projectile that had
broken off the bowsprit of the Swsguehanna, it could
not certainly be the Projectile that Belfast had seen
only the day previous doing the duty of a satellite.
Did not the truth of one incident render the other
an absolute impossibility? If Bloomsbury was right,
was not Belfast an ass? Hurrah!

The new revelation did not improve poor Barbi-
can’s fate a bit—-no matter for that! Did not the
party gain by itp What would the Le/fasters say
now? Would not they hold down their heads in
confusion and disgrace ?

The Bel/fasters, with a versatility highly credit-
able to human nature, did nothing of the kind.
Rapidly adopting the very line of tactics they had
just been so severely censuring, they simply denied
the whole thing. What! the truth of the Blooms-
bury dispatch? Yes, every word of it! Had not
Bloomsbury seen the Projectile? No! Were not
his eyes good for anything? Yes, but not for
everything! Did not the Captain know his busi-
ness? No! Did they mean to say that the bow-
sprit of the Susguehanna had not been broken off?
Well, not exactly that, but those naval’ gentlemen
are not always to be trusted; after a pleasant little
supper, they often see the wrong light-house,
or, what is worse, in their desire to shield their
NEWS FOR MARSTON. 379

negligence from censure, they dodge the blame by
trying to show that the accident was unavoidable.
The Susguehanna’s bowsprit had been snapped off,
in all probability, by some sudden squall, or, what
was still more likely, some little aerolite had struck
it and frightened the crew into fits. When answers
of this kind did not lead to blows, the case was an
exceptional one indeed. The contestants were so
numerous and so excited that the police at last be-
gan to think of letting them fight it out without
any interference. Marshal O’Kane, though ably
assisted by his i2 officers and S00 patrolmen, had a
terrible time of it. The most respectable men in
Baltimore, with eyes blackened, noses bleeding, and
collars torn, saw the inside of a prison that night
for the first time in all their lives. Men that even
the Great War had left the warmest of friends, now
abused each other like fishwomen. The prison caquld
not hold the half of those arrested. They were all,
however, discharged next morning, for the simple
reason that the Mayor and the aldermen had been
themselves engaged in so many pugilistic combats
during.the night that they were altogether disabled
from attending to their magisterial duties next day.
Our readers, however, may be quite assured
that, even in the wildest whirl of the tremendous
excitement around them, all the members of the
Baltimore Gun Club did not lose their heads. In
spite of the determined opposition of the Be/fas-
ters, who would not allow the Bloomsbury i
to be read at the special meeting called that evening
380 ALL AROUND THE HOON.

a few succeeded in adjourning to a committee-room,
where Joseph Wilcox, Esq., presiding, our old
friends Colonel Bloomsbury, Major Elphinstone,
Tom Hunter, Billsby the brave, General Morgan,
Chief Engineer John Murphy, and about as many
more as were sufficient to form a quorum, declared
themselves to he in regular session, and proceeded
quietly to debate on the nature of oan Blooms-
bury’s dispatch,

Was it of a nature to justify immediate action or
not? Decided unanimously in the affirmative.
Why so? Because, whether actually true or untrue,
the incident it announced was not impossible. Had
it indeed announced the Projectile to have fallen in
California or in South America, there would have
been good valid reasons to question its accuracy.
But by taking into consideration the Moon’s dis-
tance, and the time elapsed between the moment of
the start and that of the presumed fall (about 10 days),
and also the Earth’s revolution in the meantime, it
was soon calculated that the point at which the Pros
jectile should strike our globe, if it struck it at all,
would be somewhere about 27° north latitude, and
42° west longitude——the very identical spot given
in the Captain’s dispatch! ‘This certainly was a
strong. point in its favor, especially as there was
positively nothing valid whatever to urge against it.

A decided resolution was therefore immediately
taken. Everything that man could do was to be
done at once, in order to fish up their brave asso-
ciates from the depths of the Pacific: That very


NEWS FOR MARSTON. SEL

night, in fact, whilst the streets of Baltimore were
still resounding with the yells of contending Bed-
fasters and Barbicanites, a committee of four, Mor-
gan, Hunter, Murphy, and Elphinstone, were speed-
ing over the Alleghanies in a special train, placed at
their disposal by the Baltimore and Ohio Ratircad
Company, and fast enough to land them in Chicago
pretty early on the following evening.

Here a fresh locomotive and a Pullman car taking
charge of them, they were whirled off to. Omaha,
reaching that busy locality at about supper time on
the evening of December 16th. The Pacific Train,
as it was called though at that time running no
further west than Julesburg, instead of waiting for
the regular hour of starting, fired up that very
night, and was soon pulling the famous Baltimore
Club men up the slopes of the Nebraska at the rate
of forty miles an hour. They were awakened, be-
fore light next morning by the guard, who told
them that Julesburg, which they were just entering,
was the last point so far reached by the rails. But
their regret at this circumstance was most unex-
pectedly and joyfully interrupted by finding their
hands warmly clasped and their names cheerily cried
out by their old and beloved friend, J. T. Marston,
the illustrious Secretary of the Baltimore Gun Club.

At the close of the first volume of our entertain-
ing and veracious history, we left this most devoted
friend and admirer of Barbican established firmly at
his post on the summit of Long’s Peak, beside the
Great Telescope, watching the skies, night and day,
82 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

for some traces of his departed friends. ‘There, as
the gracious Reader will also remember; he had
come a little too late to catch that sight of the Pro-
jectile which Belfast had at first reported so con-
fidently, but of which the Professor by degrees had
begun to entertain the most serious doubts.

In these doubts, however, Marston, strange to say,
would not permit himself for one moment to share.
Belfast might shake his head as much as he pleased ;
he, Marston, wasno fickle reed to be shaken by every
wind ; he firmly believed the Projectile to be there
before him, actually in sight, if he could only see it.
All the long night of the 13th, and even for several
hours of the 14th, he never quitted the telescope for
asingle instant. The midnight sky was in magnifi-
cent order; not a speck dimmed its azure of an in-
tensely dark tint. The stars blazed out like fires;
the Moon refused none of her secrets to the scien-
tists who were gazing at her so intently that night
from the platform on the summit of Long’s Peak.
But no black spot crawling over her resplendent sur-
face rewarded their eager gaze. Marston indeed
would occasionally utter a joyful cry announcing
some discovery, but in a moment after he was con-
fessing with groans that it was all a false alarm.
Towards morning, Belfast gave up in despair and
went to take a sleep; but no sleep for Marston.
Though he was now quite alone, the assistants hav-
ing also retired, he kept on talking incessantly to
himself, expressing the most unbounded confidence
in the safety of his friends, and the absolute cer-
NEWS FOR MARSTON. SEF

tainty of their return. It was not until some hours
after the Sun had risen and the Moon had disap-
peared behind the snowy peaks of the west, that he
at last withdrew his weary eye from the glass through
which every image formed by the great reflector was
to be viewed. The countenance he turned on Bel-
fast, who had now come back, was rueful in the ex-
treme. It was the image of grief and despair.

“Did you see nothing whatever during the night,
Professor? ’? he asked of Belfast, though he knew
very well the answer he was'to get.

** Nothing whatever.”’

But you saw them once, didn’t you?”

*‘Them! Who???

“Our friends.”

“Oh! the Projectile—well—I think I must have
made some oversight."’

“Don’t say that! Did not Mr. M’Connell see it
also?’’

““No. He only wrote out what I dictated.’’

“Why, you must have seen it! Ihave seen it
myself!’

“© You shall never see it again! It’s shot off into
space.”’

“Vou’re as wrong now as you thought you were
right yesterday.’’

“‘T’'m sorry to say I was wrong yesterday; but I
have every reason to believe I’m right to-day.”

“We shall see! Wait till to-night! ”’

“To-night! Too late! As far as the Projectile
is concerned, night is now no better than day.’”’
984 ALL AROUND. THE MOON.

The learned Professor was quite right, but in a
way which he did not exactly expect. That very
evening,. after a weary day, apparently a month
long, during which Marston sought in vain for a few
hours’ repose, just as all hands, well wrapped up in
warm furs, were getting ready to assume their posts
once more near the mouth of the gigantic Teles-
cope, Mr, M’Connell hastily presented himself with
a dispatch for Belfast.

The Professor was listlessly breaking the envelope,
when he uttered a sharp cry of surprise.

“Hey !’’ cried Marston quickly. ‘ What's up
now?”’

“Oh!! The Pro—pro—projectile!!’’

“What of it? What? Oh what?? Speak!!”

Tr’s pacn ! 1”? vie

Marston uttered a wild yell of mingled horror,
surprise, and joy, jumped a little into the air, and
then fell flat and motionless on the platform. Had
Belfast shot him with a ten pound weight, right be-
tween the two eyes, he could not have knocked him
flatter or stiffer. Having neither slept all night, nor
eaten all day, the poor fellow’s system had become
so weak that such unexpected news was really more
than he could bear. Besides, as one of the Cam-
bridge men of the party, a young medical student,
remarked: the thin, cold air of these high moun-
tains was extremely enervating. _

The astronomers, all exceedingly alarmed, did
what they could to recover their friend from his fir,
but it was nearly ten minutes before they. had the
NEWS FOR MARSTON. 385

satisfaction of seeing his limbs moving with a slight
quiver and his breast beginning to heave. At last
the color came back to his, face and: his eyes opened.
He stared around for a few seconds at his friends,
evidently unconscious, but his senses were not long
in returning.

‘*Sayl’? he uttered at last in a faint voice.

“Well!’’ replied Belfast.

“Where is that infernal Pro—pro—jectile ?’’

“In the Pacific Ocean,”’

ce What ???? ,

He was on his feet in an instant.’ »

“Say that again 1”?

“In the Pacific Ocean.”

“Hurrah! Allright! Old Barbican’s ndt made
into mincemeat yet! No, sirree! Let’s start!’

“Where for?’?

‘San Francisco

“When?”

“ This instant !”?

“Tn the dark?”

“We shall ‘soon have the light of the Moon!
Curse her! it’s the least she can do after all the
trouble she has given us!”?
CHAPTER XXIf.
ON THE WINGS OF THE WIND.

Leavinc M’Connell and a few other Cambridge
men to take charge of the Great Telescope, Marston
and Belfast, in little more than an hour after the re-
ceipt of the exciting dispatch, were scudding down
the slopes of Long’s Peak by the only possible route
=the inclined railroad. This mode of travelling,
however, highly satisfactory as far as it went, ceased
altogether at the mountain foot, at the point where
the Dale River formed a junction with Cache la Poudre
Creek. But Marston, having already mapped out the
whole journey with some care and forethought, was
ready for almost -every emergency. Instinctively
feeling that the first act of the Baltimore Gun Club
would be to send a Committee to San Francisco to
investigate matters, he had determined to meet this
deputation on the route, and his only trouble now
was to determine at what point he would be most
likely to catch them, His great start, he knew per-
fectly well, could not put him more than a day in
advance of them: they having the advantage of a
railroad nearly all the way, whilst himself and Bele
fast could not help losing much time in struggling
through ravines, canyons, mountain precipices, and
densely tangled forests, not to mention the possi-
bility of a brush or two with prowling Indians, be-

(388)
ON THE WINGS OF THE WIND. 387

fore they could strike the line of the Pacific Railroad,
along which he knew the Club men to be approach-
ing. After a few hours’ rest at La Porte, a little
settlement lately started in the valley, early in the
morning they took the stage that passed through
from Denver to Cheyenne, a town at that time
hardly a year old but already flourishing, with a
busy population of several thousand inhabitants.

Losing not a moment at Cheyenne, where they
arrived much sooner than they had anticipated, they
took places in Wells, Fargoand Co.’s Overland Stage
Mati bound east, and were soon flying towards Jules-
burg at the rate of twelve miles an hour. Here Mars-
ton was anxious to meet the Club men, as at this point
the Pacific Railroad divided into two branches—one
bearing north, the other south of the Great Salt Lake
—and he feared they might take the wrong one.

But he arrived in Julesburg fully 10 hours before
the Committee, so that himself and Belfast had not
only ample time to rest a little after their rapid
flight from Long’s Peak, but also to make every
possible preparation for the terrible journey of more
than fifteen hundred miles that still lay before them.

This journey, undertaken at a most unseasonable
period of the year, and over one of the most terrible
deserts in the world, would require a volume for
itself. Constantly presenting the sharpest points of
contrast between the most savage features of wild
barbaric nature on the one hand, and the most
touching traits of the sweetest humanity on the
other, the story of our Club men’s adventures, if
388 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

only well told,-could hardly fail to be highly in-
teresting. But instead of a volume, we can give it
only a chapter, and that a short one.

From Julesburg, the last station on the eastern
end of the Pacific Railroad, to Cisco, the last
station.on its western end, the distance is probably
about fifteen hundred miles, about as far as Constan-
tinople is from London, or Moscow from Paris.
This enormous stretch of country had to be travel-
led all the way by, at the best, a six horse stage
tearing along night and day at a uniform rate, road
or no road, of ten miles an hour.. But this was the
least of the trouble. Bands.of hostile Indians were a
constant source of watchfulness and trouble, against
which even a most liberal stock of rifles and re-
volvers were not always a reassurance. Whirlwinds
of dust often overwhelmed the travellers so com-
pletely that they could hardly tell day from night,
whilst blasts of icy chill, sweeping. down from the
snowy peaks of the Rocky Mountains, often made
them imagine themselves in the midst of the horrors
of an Arctic winter. .

The predominant scenery gave no pleasure to the
eye or exhilaration to the mind. It was of the
dreariest description. Days and days passed with
hardly a house to be seen, or a tree or a biade of
grass. I might even add, or a mountain or a river,
for the one was. too often-a heap of agglomerated
sand and clay cut into.unsightly chasms by the rain,
and the other generally degenerated. into a mere
stagnant swamp, its shallowness and dryness increas-
ON THE WINGS OF TIE IVIND. 389

ing regularly with its length. The only houses were
log ranches, called Relays, hardly visible in their
sandy surroundings, and separate from each other by
a mean distance of ten miles. The only trees were
either stunted cedars, so far apart, as to be often de-
nominated Lone Trees; and, besides wormwood,
the only plant was the sage plant, about two feet
high, gray, dry, crisp, and emitting a sharp pungent
odor by no means pleasant.

In fact, Barbican and his companions had seen
nothing drearier or savager in the dreariest and
savagest of lunar landscapes than the scenes occa-
sionally presented to Marston and his friends in their
headlong journey on the track of the great Pacific
Riilroad. Here, bowlders, high, square, straight and
plumb as an immense hotel, blocked up your way;
there, lay an endless level, flat as the palm of your
hand, over which your eye might roam in vain in
search of something green like a meadow, yellow like
a cornfield, or black like plouglied ground—a mere
boundless waste of dirty white from the stunted
wormwood, often rendered misty with the clouds of
smarting alkali dust.

Occasionally, however, this savage scenery de-
cidedly changed its character. Now, a lovely glen
would smile before our travellers, traversed by tink-
ling streams, waving with sweet grasses, dotted with
little groves, alive with hares, antelopes, and even
elks, but apparently never yet trodden by the foot
of man. Now, our Club men felt like travelling on
clouds, as they careered along the great plateau west
390 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

of the Black Hills, fully 8,000 feet above the level
of the sca, though even there the grass was as green
and fresh as if it grew in some sequestered valley of
Pennsylvania. Again,

“Tn this untravelled world whose margin fades
For ever and for ever as they moved,”

they would find themselves in an immense, tawny,
treeless plain, outlined by mountains so distant as to
resemble fantastic cloud piles. Here for days they
would have to skirt the coasts of a Lake, vast, un-
ruffled, unrippled, apparently of metallic consistency,
from whose sapphire depths rose pyramidal islands to
aheight of fully three thousand feet above the sur-
face.

In a few days all would change. No more sand
wastes, salt water flats, or clouds of blinding alkali
dust. The travellers’ road, at the foat of black
precipitous cliffs, would wind along the brink of a
roaring torrent, whose devious: course would lead
them into the heart of the Sierras, where misty
peaks solemnly sentinelled the nestling vales still
smiling in genial summer verdure. Across these
they were often whirled through immense forests of
varied character, here dense enough to obscure the
trick, there swaying in the sweet sunlight and vocal
with joyous birds of bright and gorgeous plumage.
Then tropical vegetation would completely hide the
trail, crystal lakes would obstruct it, cascades shoot-
ing down from perpendicular rocks would obliterate
it, mountain passes barricaded by basaltic columns
ON THE WINGS OF THE WIND. SOT

would render it uncertain, and on one occasion it
was completely covered up bya fall of snow to a
depth of more than twenty feet.

But nothing could oppose serious delay to our
travellers. Their motto was ever ‘‘onward!’’ and
what they lost in one hour by some mishap they
endeavored to recover on the next by redoubled
speed. ‘They felt that they would be no friends of
Barbican’s if they were discouraged by impossibili-
ties. Besides, what would have been real impossi-
bilities at another time, several concurrent circum-
stances now rendered comparatively easy.

The surveys, the gradings, the cuttings, and the
other preliminary labors in the great Pacific Rail-
road, gave them incalculable aid. Horses, help,
carriages, provisions were always in abundance.
Their object being well known, they had the best
wishes of every hand on the road. People remained
up for them all hours of the night, no matter at
what station they were expected. The warmest and
most comfortable of meals were always ready for
them, for which no charge would be taken on any
account. In Utah, a deputation of Mormons
galloped alongside them for forty miles to help them
over some points of the road that had been often
found difficult. The season was the finest known
for many years. In short, as an old Californian said
as he saw them shooting over the rickety bridge that
crossed the Bear River at Corinne: ‘they had
everything in their favor—/vck as well as pluck /”

The rate at which they performed this terrible
S92 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

ride across the Continent and the progress they
made each day,:some readers may consider worthy
of a few more items for the sake of future reference,
Discarding: the- ordinary overland mail stage as
altogether too slow for their purpose, they hired at
Julesburg a strong, well built carriage, large enough
to hold them all comfortably ; but this they had to
replace twice before they came to their journey’s
end. Their team always consisted of the best six
horses that could be found, and their driver was the
famous Hank Monk of California, who, happening
to be in Julesburg about that time, volunteered to
see them safely landed in Cisco on the summit of
the Sierra Nevada. They were enabled to change
horses as near as possible every hour, by telegraph-
ing ahead in the morning, during the day, and often
far into the hours of night.

Starting from Julesburg early in the morning of
the 17th, their first resting place for a few hours at
night was Granite Canyon, twenty miles west of
Cheyenne, and just at the foot of the pass over the
Black Hills. On the 18th, night-fall found them
entering St. Mary’s, at the further end of the pass
between Rattle Snake Hills and Elk Mountain.
It was after 5 o’clock and already dark on the roth,
when the travellers, hurrying with all speed through
the gloomy gorge of slate formation. leading to the
banks of the Green River, found the ford too deep
to be ventured before morning. The z2oth was a
clear cold day very favorable for brisk locomotion,
and the bright sun had not quite disappeared behind
ON THE WINGS OF THE WIND O93

the Wahsatch Mountains when the Club men, hav-
ing crossed the Bear River, began to leave the lofty
plateau of the Rocky Mountains by the great in-
clined plane marked by the lines of the Echo and
the Weber Rivers on their way to. the valley of
the Great American Desert.

Quitting Castle Rock early on the morning of
the 21st, they soon. came in sight of the Great Salt
Lake, along the northern shores of which they sped
all day, taking shelter after night-fall at.Terrace, in
a miserable log cabin surrounded by piles of drifting
sand. The 22d was-a terrible day. The sand was
blinding, the alkali dust choking, the ride for five or
six hours was up considerable grade; still they had
accomplished their 150 miles before resting for the
night at Elko, even at this period a flourishing little
village on the banks of the Humboldt. After another
smothering ride on the 23d, they rested at Winne-
mucca, another flourishing village, situated at the
precise point in the desert where the Little Hum-
boldt joins Humboldt River, without, however,
making the channel fuller or wider. The 24th was
decidedly the hardest day, their course lying through
the worst part of the terrible Nevada desert. But
a glimpse of the Sierras looming in the western
horizon gave them courage and strength enough to
reach Wadsworth, at their foot, a little before mid-
night. Our travellers had now but one day’s
journey more to make before reaching the railroad
at Cisco, but, this being a very steep ascent nearly
SOF ALL AROUND THE AIOON.

all the way up, each mile cost almost twice as much
time and exertion.

At last, late in the evening of Christmas Day,
amidst the most enthusiastic cheers of all the inhabi-
tants of Cisco, who welcomed them with a splendid
pine brand procession, Marston and his friends,
thoroughly used up, feet swelled, limbs bruised,
bones aching, stomachs seasick, eyes bleared, ears
ringing, and brains on fire for want of rest,. took
their places in the State Car waiting for them, and
started without a moment’s delay for Sacramento,
about a hundred miles distant. How delicious was
the change to our poor travellers! Washed, re-
freshed, and lying at full length on luxurious sofas,
their sensations, as the locomotive spun them down
the ringing grooves of the steep Sierras, can be
more easily imagined than described. ‘They were all
fast asleep when the train entered Sacramento, but
the Mayor and the other city authorities who had
waited up to receive them, had them carried caré-
fully, so as not to disturb their slumbers, on board
the Yo Semite, a fine steamer belonging to the Cali-
fornia Navigation Company, which landed them
safely at San Francisco about noon on the 26th,
after accomplishing the extraordinary winter journey
of 1500 miles over land in little more than nine
days, only about 200 miles being done by steam,

Half-past two Pp. M. found our travellers bathed,
dressed, shaved, dined, and ready to receive com-
pany in the grand parlor of the Occidental Hotel.
Captain Bloomsbury was the first to call,
ON THE WINGS OF THE WIND. SOS

Marston hobbled eagerly towards him and asked :

“«What have you done towards fishing them up,
Captain ?’’

«©A good deal, Mr. Marston; indeed almost
everything is ready.”

‘Is that really the case, Captain?’’ asked all,
very ‘agreeably surprised.

“Yes, gentlemen, I am most happy to state that I
am quite in earnest,’’

“¢Can we start to-morrow? ’’ asked General Mor-
gan,“ We have not a moment to spare, you
know.”

‘We can start at noon to-morrow at latest,’’ re-
plied the Captain, ‘‘if the foundry men doa little
extra work to-night.’’

‘We must start this very day, Captain Blooms-
bury,’’ cried Marston resolutely ;. ** Barbican has
been lying two weeks and thirteen hours in the
depths of the Pacific! If he is still alive, no thanks
to Marston! He must by this time have given me
up! The grappling irons must be got on board at
once, Captain, and let us start this evening !”’

At half-past four that very evening, a shot from
the Fort and a lowering of the Stars and Stripes from
its flagstaff saluted the Susguehanna, as she steamed
proudly out of the Golden Gate at the lively rate
of fifteen knots an hour.
CIYAPTER XXIII.
THE CLUB MEN GO A FISHING.

Captain Bloomsbury was perfectly right when he
said that almost everything was ready for the com-
mencement of the great work which the Club men
had to accomplish. Considering how much was re-
quired, this was certainly saying a great deal; but
here also, as on many other occasions, fortune hal
singularly favored the Club men.

San Francisco Bay, as everybody knows, though
one of the finest and safest harbors in the world, is

‘not without some danger from hidden rocks. One
of these in particular, the Anita Rock as it was cal-
led, lying right in mid channel, had become so
notorious for the wrecks of which it was the cause,
that, after much time spent in the consideration of
the subject, the authorities had: at last determined
to blow it up. This undertaking having been very
satisfactorily accomplished by means of dyxaztive or
giant powder, another improvement in the harbor
had been also undertaken with great success. The
wrecks of many vessels lay scattered here and there
pretty numerously, some, like that of the /jzxg
Dragon, in spots so shallow that they could be
easily seen at low water, but others sunk at least
twenty fathoms deep, like that of the Caroline,
which had gone down in 1831, not far from Blos-
395)
THEY GO A FISHING. S97

som Rock, with.a treasure on board of 20,000
ounces of gold. The attempt to clear away these
wrecks had also turned out very well; even suffi-
cient treasure had been recovered to repay all the
expense, though the preparations for the purpose by
the contractors, IM’Gowan and Co. had been made
on the most extensive scale, and in accordance with
the latest improvements in the apparatus for sub-
marine operations.

Buoys, made of huge canvas sacks, coated with
India rubber, and guarded by a net work of strong
cordage, had been manufactured and provided by the
ew York Submarine Company. These buoys, when
inflated and working in pairs, had-a lifting capacily
of 30 tonsa pair. Reservoirs of air, provided with
powerful compression pumps, always accompanied
the buoys. To attach the latter, in a collapsed condi-
tion, with strong chains to the sides of the vessels
which were to be lifted, a diving apparatus was neces-
sary, This also the Mew York Company had pro-
vided, and it was so perfect in its way that, by means
of peculiar appliances of easy management, the diver
could walk about on the bottom, take his own bedar-
ings, ascend to the surface at pleasure, and open his
helmet without assistance. A few sets likewise of
Rouquayrol and Denayrouze’s famous submarine
armor had been provided. These would prove of
invaluable advantage in all operations performed at
great sea depths, as its distinctive feature, ‘the
regulator,’ could maintain, what is.not. done by
any other diving armor, a constant. equality of
598 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

pressure on the lungs between the external and the
internal air.

But perhaps the most useful article of all was a
new form of diving bell called the Mau¢zdus, a kind
of submarine boat, capable of lateral as well as ver-
tical movement at the will of its occupants. Con-
structed with double sides, the intervening chambers
could be filled either with water or air according as
descent or ascent was required. water enabled the machine to descend to depths im-
possible to be reached otherwise; this water could
then be expelled by an ingenious contrivance,
which, replacing it with air, enabled the diver to
rise towards the surface as fast as he pleased.

All these and many other portions of the sub-
marine apparatus which had been employed that
very year for clearing the channel, lifting the wrecks
and recovering the treasure, lay now at San Fran-
cisco, unused fortunately on account of the season
of the year, and therefore they could be readily ob-
tained for the asking. They had even been gene-
rously offered to Captain Bloomsbury, who, in
obedience to a telegram from Washington, had- kept
his crew*busily employed for nearly two weeks night
and day in transferring them all safely on board
the Susquehanna.

Marston was the first to make a careful inspection
of every article intended for the operation,

“Do you consider these buoys powerful enough
to lift the Projectile, Captain?’’ he asked next

morning, as the vessel was briskly heading south-

oc?
FHEY GO A FISHING. S92

ward, at a distance of ten or twelve miles from the
coast on their left.

*€You can easily calculate that problem yourself,
Mr. Marston,’’ replied the Captain.. ‘¢It presents
no difficulty. The Projectile weighs about 20 thou-
sand pounds, or ro tonsP’”?

“Correct !”?

“Well, a pair of these buoys when inflated can
raise a weight of 30 tons.’’

**So far so good But how do you propose at-
taching them to the Projectile? ”’

“We simply let them descend in a state of col-
lapse; the diver, going down with them, will have
no difficulty in making a fast connection. As soon
as they are inflated the Projectile will come up like
a cork.”’

‘Can the divers readily reach such depths ? ”’

«That remains to be seen Mr, Marston.’’

“¢Captain,’? said Morgan, now joining the party,
“you are a worthy member of our Gun Club. You
have done wonders, Heaven grant it may not be
all in vain! Who knows if our poor friends are
still alive? ”?

“Hush !’? cried Marston quickly. ‘¢ Have more
sense than to ask such questions. Is Barbican alive!
Am falive? They’re all alive, I tell you, only we
must be quick about reaching them before the air
gives out. That’s what’s the matter! Air! Pro-
visions, water—abundance! But air—oh! that’s
their weak point! Quick, Captain, quick—They’re
throwing the reel—I must see her rate!’’ So say-
4O0o ALL AROUND THE MOON.

ing, he hurried off to the stern, followed by General
Morgan. Chief Engineer Murphy and the Captain of
the Susguehanna were thus left for awhile together.

Tnese two men had a long talk on the object of
their journey and the likelihood of anything satis-
factory being accomplished. The man of the sea
candidly acknowledged his apprehensions. Me had
done everything in his power towards collecting
suitable machinery for fishing up the Projectile, but
he had done it-all; he said, more as a matter of
duty than because he believed. that any good could
result. from it; ‘in fact, he never expected to see
the bold adventurers. again: either living or dead.
Murphy, .who well. understood not only what
machinery was capable of effecting, but also what it
would surely fail in, at first expressed the greatest
confidence in the prosperous issue of the under-
taking. But when he learned, as he now did for the
first time, that the ocean bed on which the Projec-
tile was lying could be: hardly less than 20,000 feet
below the surface, he assumed a countenance as
grave as the Captain’s, and at once confessed that,
unless their usual luck stood by them, his poor
friends had not the slightest possible chance of ever
being fished up from the depths of the Pacific.

The conversation maintained among the officers
and the others on board the Swsguchanna, was
pretty much of the same nature. It is almost need-
less to'say that all heads—except Belfast’s, whose
scientific mind rejected the Projectile theory with
the most’ serene contempt—were filled with the
THEY GO A FISHING, gor

same idea, all hearts throbbed with the same
emotion. Wouldn’t it be glorious to fish them up
alive and well? What were they. doing just now?
Doing? Doing / Their bodies most probably
were lying in a shapeless pile on the floor of the Pro-
jectile, like a heap of clothes, the uppermost man
being the last smothered; or perhaps floating about
in the water inside the Projectile, like dead gold fish
in an aquarium; or perhaps.burned to a-cinder,
like papers in a ‘* champion’? safe after a great fire ;
or, who: knows? perhaps at that’ very moment the
peor fellows were making their last and almost
superhuman struggles to burst their watery prison
and ascend once more into the cheerful regions of
light and air! Alas! How vain must such puny
efferts prove! Piunged into ocean depths of three
or four miles beneath the surface, subjected to an
inconceivable pressure of millions and millions of
tons of sea water, their metallic shroud was utterly
unassailable from within, and utterly unapproach-
able from without !

Early on the morning of December 2gth, the
Captain calculating from his log that they must now
be very near the spot where they had witnessed the
extraordinary. phenomenon, the Sysgvehanna hove
to. . Having to wait till noon to find his exact posi-
tion, he ordered the steamer to take a short circular
course of a few hours’ duration, in hope of sighting
the buoy. But though at least a hundred telescopes
scanned the calm ocean breast for many miles in all

directions, it was nowhere to be seen.
26
4o2 ALL AROUND THE BOON

Precisely at noon, aided by his officers and in the
presence of Marston, Belfast, and the Gun Club
Committee, the Captain took his observations,
After a moment or two of the most profound in-
terest, it was a great gratification to all to learn that
the Susguehanna was on the right parallel, and only
about-15 miles west of the precise spot where the
Projectile had disappeared beneath the waves. The
steamer started at once in the direction indicated,
and a minute or two before one.o’clock the Captain
said they were ‘‘there.’’ No sign of the buoy
could yet be seen in any direction ; it had probably
been drifted southward by the Mexican coast current
which slowly glides along these shores from Decem-
ber to April.

«© At last!’? cried Marston, with a sigh of great
relief.

«¢ Shall we commence: at once?’’ asked the Cap-
tain. ,

‘© Without losing the-twenty thousandth part of a
second!’’ answered Marston; ‘‘life or death de-
pends upon our dispatch!’

The Susguehanna again hove to, and this time all
possible precautions were taken to keep her in a state
of perfect immobility—an operation easily accom-
plished in these pacific latitudes, where cloud and
wind and water are often as motionless as if all life
had died out of the world. In fact, as the boats
were quietly lowered, preparatory for beginning the
operations, the mirror like calmness of sea, sky, and
ship so impressed the Doctor, who was of a poetical
THEY GO A FISHING. 40?

turn of mind, that he could not help ‘exclaiming to
the little Midshipman, who was standing nearest :
“* Coleridge realized, with variations:

The breeze drops down, the sail drops down,
All’s still as still can be;

If we speak, it is only to break
The silence of the sea.

Still are the clouds, still are the shrouds, *
No life, no breath, no motion 5

Idle are all as a painted ship
Upon a painted ocean!”

Chief Engineer Murphy now took ‘command.
Before letting down the buoys, the first thing evi-
dently to be done was to find out, if possible, the
precise point where the Projectile lay. For this pur-
pose, the Nautilus was clearly the only part of the
machinery that could be employed with advantage.
Its chambers were accordingly soon filled with
water, its air reservoirs were also soon completely
charged, and the Nautilus itself, suspended by chains
from the end of a yard, lay quietly on the ocean
surface, its manhole on the top remaining open for
the reception of those who were willing to encounter
the dangers that awaited it in the fearful depths of
the Pacific. Every one looking on was well aware
that, after a few hundred feet below the surface, the
pressure would grow more and more enormous, until
at last it became quite doubtful if any line could
bear the tremendous strain. It was even possible
that at a certain depth. the walls of the Nautilus
might be crushed in like an eggshell, and the whole
fOd ALL AROUND TIE SOOR,

machine made as flat as two leaves of paper pasted
together.

‘Perfectly conscious of the nature of the tremen-
dous risk they were about to run, Marston, Morgan,
and Murphy quietly bade their friends a short fare-
well and were lowered into the manhole. The
Nautilus having room cnough for four, Belfast had
been expected to be of the party but, feeling a little
sea sick, the Professor backed out at the last moment,
to the great joy of Mr. Watkins, the famous res
porter of the W. VY. Herald, who was immediately
allowed to take his place,

Every provision against immediate danger had
been mide. By means of preconcerted signals, the
inmates could have themselves drawn up,.let down,
or carried laterally in whatever direction they
pleased. By barometers and other instruments they
could readily ascertain the pressure of the air and
water, also. how far they had descended and at what
rate they were moving. ‘The Captain, from his bridge,
earefully superintended every detail of the operation.
All signals he insisted on attending to himself per-
sonally, transmitting them instantly by his bell to the
engineer below. The whole power of the steam en-
gine had been brought to bear on the windlass; the
chains could withstand an enormous strain. The
wheels had been carefully oiled and tested before-
hand; the signalling apparatus had been subjected
to the rigidest examination ; and every portion of
the machinery had been proved to be in admirable
working order.
THEY GO A FISHING, fOF

The chances of immediate and unforescen dan-
ger, it is true, had been somewhat diminished by all
these precautions, The risk, nevertheless, was fear-
ful. The slightest accident or even carelessness
might easily lead to the most disastrous corisequence.

Five minutes after two o’clock, the manhole be-
ing closed, the lamps lit, and everything pronounced
all right, the signal for the descent was given, and
the Nautilus immediately disappeared beneath the
waters. A double anxiety now possessed all on
board the Swsguehanna; the prisoners in the
Nautilus were in danger as well as the prisoners in
the Projectile. Marston and his friends, however,
were anything but disquieted on their own account,
and, pencil in hand and noses flattened on the glass
plates, they examined carefully. everything they
could see in the liquid masses through which they
were descending,

For the first five hundred feet, the descent was
accomplished with little trouble. The Nautilus
sank rather slowly, at a uniform rate of a foot to
the second. It had not been two minutes under
water when the light of day completely disappeared.
But for this the occupants were fully prepared, hav-
ing provided themselves with powerful lamps, whose
brilliant light, radiating from polished reflectors,
gave them an opportunity of seeing clearly around
it fora distance of eight or ten feet in all direc«
tions. Owing to the superlatively excellent con-
struction of the Nautilus, also on account of the
scaphanders, or suits of diving armor, with which
406 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

Marston and his friends had clothed themselves, the
disagreeable sensations to which divers are ordi-
narily exposed, were hardly felt at all in the begin-
ning of the descent.

Marston was about to congratulate his companions
on the favorable auspices inaugurating their trip, when
Murphy, consulting the instrument, discovered to his
great surprise that the Nautilus was not making its
time. In reply to their signal ¢ faster !’’ the downs
ward movement increased a little, but it soon relaxed
again. Instead of less than two minutes, as at the
beginning, it now took twelve minutes to make a
hundred feet. They had gone only seven hundred
feet in thirty-seven minutes. In spite of repeated
signalling, their progress during the next hour was
even still more alarming, one hundred feet taking
exactly 59 minutes. ‘To shorten detail, it required
two hours more to make another hundred feet; and
then the Nautilus, after taking ten minutes to crawl
an inch further, came to a perfect stand still. The
pressure of the water had evidently now become
too enormous to allow further descent.

The Clubmen’s distress was very great ; Marston’s,
in particular, was indescribable. In vain, catching
at straws, he signalled ‘‘eastwards!’’ ‘* westwards!”
“northwards! '? ‘or ‘southwards!’’ the Nautilus
moved readily every way but downwards.

“©Oh! what shall we do?” he cried in despair;
‘‘Barbican, must we really give you up though
separated from us by the short distance of only a
few miles ?’*
THEY GO A FISHING, 407

At last, nothing better being to be done, the un*
willing signal ‘*heave upwards!’’ was given, and
the hauling up commenced.. It was done very
slowly, and with the greatest care. A sudden jerk
might snap the chains; an incautious twist might
put a kink on the air tube; besides, it was well
known that the sudden remoyal of heavy pressure
resulting from rapid ascent, is attended: by very dis-
agreeable sensations, which have sometimes even
proved fatal.

It was near midnight when the Clubmen were
lifted out of the manhole. Their faces were pale,
their eyes bloodshot, their figures stooped. Even
the “/era/d Reporter seemed to have got enough of
exploring. But Marston was as confident as ever,
and tried to be as brisk.

He had hardly swallowed the refreshment so posi-
tively enjoined in the circumstances, when he ab-
ruptly addressed the Captain :

‘¢What’s the weight of your heaviest cannon
balls???’

“* Thirty pounds, Mr. Marston.’’

«Can’t you attach thirty of them to the Nautilus
and sink us again ?”’

“Certainly, Mr. Marston, if you wish it. It
shall be the first thing done to-morrow.”’

“To-night, Captain! At once! Barbican has
not an instant to lose.”

“*At once then be it, Mr. Marston. Just as you
say.”

The new sinkers were soon attached to the Nauti-
408 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

lus, which disappeared once more with all its former
occupants inside, except the Heraf? Reporter, who
had fallen asleep over his notes, or at least seemed
to be. He had probably made up his mind as to
the likelihood of the Nautilus ever getting back
again.

The second descent was quicker than the first,
but just as futile. At rr52 feet, the Nautilus posi-
tively refused to go a single inch further. Mars-
ton looked like a man in a stupor. He made no
objection to the signal given by the others to re-
turn ; he even helped to cut the ropes by which the
cannon balls had been attached. Not a single word
was spoken by the party, as they slowly rose to the
surface. Marston seemed to be struggling against
despair. For the first time, the impossibility of
the great enterprise seemed to dawn upon him. Ile
and his friends had undertaken a great fight with the
mighty Ocean, which now played with them as a
giant with a pigmy. To reach the bottom was evi-
dently completely out of their power ; and what was
infinitely worse, there was. nothing to be gained by
reaching it. The Projectile was not on the bottom ;
it could not even have got toa the bottom. Marston
suid it all in a few words to the Captain, as the
Clubmen stepped on deck a few hours later :

*‘Barbican is floating midway in the depths of
the Pacific, like Mahomet in his coffin !’”’

Blindly yielding, however, to the melancholy hope
that is born of despair, Marston and his friends re-
newed the search next day, the 3oth, but they were
THEY GO A FISHING. $09

all too worn out with watching and excitement to be
able to continue it longer than a few hours. After a
night’s rest, it was renewed the day following, the
gist, with some vigor, and a good part of the ocean
lying between Guadalupe and Benito islands was
carefully investigated to a depth of seven or eight
hundred feet. No traces whatever of the Projectile.
Several California steamers, plying between San
Francisco and Panama, passed the Swsguehanna
within hailing distance. But to every question, the
invariable reply-one melancholy burden bore:

© No luck!”

All hands were now in despair. Marston could
neither eat nor drink. He never even spoke the
whole day, except on two occasions.- Once, when
somebody.heard him muttering :

**« He’s now seventeen days in the ocein

The second time he spoke, the words seemed to
be forced out of him. Belfast admitted, for the
sake of argument, that the Projectile had fallen into
the ocean, but he strongly denounced the absurd
idea of its occupants being still alive. ¢* Under
such circumstances,’’ went on the learned Professor,
“further prolongation of vital energy would be
simply impossible. Want of air, want of food,
want of courage -

‘No, sir!’?’ interrupted Marston quite savagely.
“Want of air, of meat, of drink, as much as yon
like! But when you speak of Barbican’s want of
courage, you don’t know what you are talking
about! No holy martyr ever died at the stake


gio ALL AROUND THE MOON,

with a loftier courage than my noble friend Duarbi-
can !??

That night he asked the Captain if -he would not
sail down as far as Cape San Lucas.. Bloomsbury saw
that further, search was all labor lost, but he re-
spected such heroic grief too highly to give a posi-
tive refusal. He consented to devote the following
day, New Year’s, to an exploring expedition as. far
as Magdalena Bay, making the most diligent in-
‘quiries in all directions,

But. New Year’s was just as barren of results as
any of its predecessors, and, a little before sunset,
Captain Bloomsbury, regardless of further entreaties
and unwilling to risk further delay, gave orders to
* bout ship and return to San Francisco.

The Susguchanna was slowly turning around in
obedience to her wheel, as if reluctant to abandon
forever a search in which humanity at large was in-
terested, when the look-out man, stationed in the
forecastle, suddenly sang out: _

‘*A buoy to the nor’east, not far from shore !”’

All telescopes were instantly turned in the direc-
tion indicated. The buoy, or whatever object it
was, could be readily distinguished. It certainly
did look like one of those buoys used to mark out
the channel that ships follow when entering a
harbor. But as the vessel slowly approached it, a
small flag, flapping in the dying wind—a strange
feature in a buoy—was seen to surmount its cone,
which a nearer approach showed to be emerging
four or five feet from the water. And for a buoy too
THEY GO A FISHING. git.

jt was exceedingly bright and shiny, reflecting the
red rays of the setting sun as strongly as if its sura
face was crystal or polished metal!

‘Call Mr. Marston on deck at once!’’ cried the
Captain, ‘his voice betraying unwonted excitement
as he put the glass again to his eyes

Marston, thoroughly worn out by his incessant
anxiety during the day, had been just carried below
by his friends, and they were now trying to make
him take a little refreshment and repose, But. the
Captain’s order brought themall on deck like a flash.

‘They found the whole crew gazing in one direc-
tion, and, though speaking in little more than
whispers, evidently in a state of extraordinary ex
citement. :

What could all this mean? Was there any
ground for hope? The thought sent a pang of
delight through Marston’s wildly beating heart that
almost choked him,

The Captain beckoned to the Club mien to take a
place on the bridge beside himself. They instantly
obeyed, all quietly yielding them a passage.

The vessel was now only about a quarter of a mile
distant from the object and therefore near enough to
allow it to be distinguished without the aid of a glass.

What! The flag bore the well known Stars and
Stripes !

An electric shudder of glad surprise shot through
the assembled crowd. They still spoke, however,
in whispers, hardly daring to utter their thoughts
aloud.
¢l2 MLL AROUND THE MOON.

The silence was stiddenly startled by a howl of
mingled ecstasy and rage from Marstom

Tie would have fallen off the bridge, had not the
others held him firmly. Then he burst Into a laugh
loud and long, and quite as formidable as his howl.

Then he tore away from his friends, and began
beating himself over the head.

*©Oh!”? he cried in accents between a yell and
a groan, ‘what chuckleheads we are! What
numskulls! What jackasses! What double-treble-
barrelled gibbering idiots!’’ Then he fell to beat.
ing himself over the head again.

**What’s the mattet, Marston, fot heaven’s sake
cried his friends, vainly trying to hold him.

‘Speak fot yourself !’? cried’others, Belfast among
the number,

** Noexception, Belfast! You're as bad as the rest
of us! We’re all a set of unmitigated, demoralized,
dog-goned old lunatics! Ha! Ha! Ha!’’

“Speak plainly, Marston! .Tell us what. you
mean |”?

“I mean,’’ roared the terrible Secretary, ‘that
we are no better than alot of cabbage heads, dead
beats, and frauds, calling ourselves scientists! O
Barbican, how you must -blush for us! If we were
schoolboys, we should all be skinned alive for out
ignorance! Do you forget, you herd of ignoramuses,
that the Projectile weighs only ten tons?”

‘“*We don’t forget it! We know it. well! What
of it?’

‘«This of itt it can’t sink in water without dis-

1?
THEY GO A FISHING. $13

placing its own volume in water; its own volume in
water weighs thirty tons! Consequently, it can’t
sink; more consequently, it hasn’t sunk; and, most
consequently, there it is before us, bobbing up and
down all the time under our very noses! O Barbi-
can, how can we ever venture to look at you straight
in the face again !°”

Marston’s extravagant manner of showing it did
not prevent him from being perfectly right. With
all their knowledge of physics, not a single one of
those scientific gentlemen had remembered the great
fundamental law that governs sinking or floating
bodies. Thanks to its slight specific gravity, the
Projectile, after reaching unknown depths of ocean
through the terrific momentum of its fall, had been
at last arrested in its course and even obliged to re-
turn to the surface,

By this time, all the passengers of the Susgue-
wanna could easily recognize the object of such
weary longings and desperate searches, floating
quietly a short distance before them in the last rays
of the declining day !

The boats were out in an instant. Marston and
his friends took the Captain’s gig. The rowers
pulled with a will towards the rapidly nearing Pro-
jectile. What did it contain? The living or the
dead? The living certainly ! as Marston whispered
to those around him; otherwise how could they
have evef run up that flag?

The boats approached in perfect silence, all hearts
throbbing with the intensity of newly awakened
gle ALL AROUND THE MOON.

hope, all eyes eagerly watching for sonie sign to
confirm it. No part of the windows appeared over
the water, but the trap hole had been thrown open,
and through it came the pole that bore the Ameri-
can flag. Marston made for the trap hole and, as it
was only a few feet above the surface, he had no
difficulty in looking in.

At that moment, a joyful shout of triumph rose
from the interior, and the whole: boat’s crew heard
a dry drawling voice with a nasal twang exclaiming :

“Queen! How is that for high?’’

It was instantly answered by another voice,
shriller, louder, quicker, more: joyous and irjum-
phant in tone, but slightly tinged with a foreign
accent :

‘King! My brave Mac! Howis that for high?”

The deep, clear, calm voice that spoke next thrilled
the listeners outside with an emotion.that we shall not
attempt to portray. Except that their ears could de-
tect-in it.the faintest possible emotion of triumph, it
was in all respects as cool,.-resolute, and self-pos-’
sessed as ever:

“‘Ace! Dear friends, how is that-for high ?’?

They were quietly enjoying a little game of High-
Low-Jack !

How they must have been startled by the wild
cheers that suddenly rang around their ocean-prison!
How madly were these cheers re-echoed from the
decks of the Susquehanna! Who can describe the
welcome that. greeted’ these long lost, long beloved,
long despaired of Sons of Earth, now so suddenly



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THEY GO A FISHING, GIs

and unexpectedly rescued from destruction, and re-
stored once more to the wonderstricken eyes of ad-
miring humanity? Who can describe the scenes
of joy and exuberant happiness, and deep felt
gratitude, and roaring rollicking merriment, that
were witnessed on board the steamer that night and
during the next three days !

As for Marston, it need hardly be said that he was
simply ecstatic, but if may interest both the psy-
chologist and the philologist to learn that the expres-
sion How is that for high ? struck him at once as.
with a kind of frenzy. It became immediately such
a favorite tongue morsel of his that ever since he has
been employing it on all occasions, appropriate or
otherwise. Thanks to his exertions in its behalf all
over the country, the phrase is now the most popular
of the day, well known and relished in every part of
the Union, If we can judge from its present hold
on the popular ear it will continue to live and flourish
for many a long day to come; it may even be ac-
cepted as the popular expression of triumph in those
dim, distant, future years when the memory not
only. of the wonderful occasion of its formation but
also of the illustrious men themselves who originated
it, has been consigned forever to the dark tomb of
oblivion !
CHAPTER XXIV.
FAREWELL TO THE BALTIMORE GUN: CLUB.

THE intense interest of our extraordinary but
most veracious history having reached its culmina-
tion at the.end of the last chapter, our absorbing
chronicle might with every propriety have been then
and there concluded; but we can’t part from our
gracious and most indulgent reader before giving
him a few more details which may be instructive per-
haps, if not amusing.

No doubt he kindly remembers the world-wide
sympathy with which our three famous travellers
had started on their memorable trip to the Moon.
If so, he may be able to form some idea of the en-
thusiasm universally excited by the news of their
safe return. Would not the millions of spectators
that had thronged Florida to witness their departure,
now rush to the other extremity of the Union to
welcome them back? Could those innumerable
Europeans, Africans and Asiatics, who had visited
the United States simply to have a look at M’Ni-
choll, Ardan and Barbican, ever think of quitting
the country without having seen those wonderful
men again? Certainly not! Nay, more—the re-
ception and the welcome that those heroes would
everywhere be greeted with, should be on a scale
fully commensurate with the grandeur of their own

(476)
FAREWELL TO THE GUN CLUB, 417

gigantic enterprise. The Sons of Earth who had
fearlessly quitted this terrestrial globe and who had
succeeded in returning after accomplishing a journey
inconceivably wonderful, well deserved to be re-
ceived with every extremity of pride, pomp and
glorious circumstance that the world is capable of
displaying. .

To catch a glimpse of these demi-gods, to hear
the sound of their voices, perhaps even to touch their
hands—these were the only. emotions with which
the great heart of the country at large was now
throbbing.

To gratify this natural yearning of humanity, to
afford not only to every foreigner but to every
native in the land an. opportunity of beholding the
three heroes who had reflected such indelible glory
on the American name, and to do it all in a manner
eminently worthy of the great American Nation, in-
stantly became the desire of the American People.

To desire a thing, and to have it, are synonymous
terms with the great people of the American Re-
public.

A little thinking simplified the matter consider-
ably: as all the people could not go to the heroes,
the heroes should go to all the people.

So decided, so done.

It was nearly two months before Barbican and his
friends could get back to Baltimore. The winter
travelling over the Rocky Mountains had been very
difficult on account. of the heavy snows, and, even
when they found themselves in the level country,

27
4i8 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

though they tried to travel as privately as possible,
and for the present positively declined all public re-
ceptions, they were compelled to spend some time in
the houses of the warm friends near whom they
passed in the course of their long journey.

The rough notes of their Moon adventures—the
only ones that they could furnish just then—cir-
culating like wild fire and devoured with universal
avidity, only imparted a keener whet to the public
desire to feast their eyes on such men. These notes
were telegraphed free to every newspaper in the coun-
try, but thelongest and best account of the ‘‘ Journey
to the Afoon’’ appeared in the columns of the ew
York Herald, owing to the fact that Watkins the re-
porter had had the adventurers all to himself during
the whole of the three days’ trip of the Swsgue-
hanna back to San Francisco. In a week after their
return, every man, woman, and child in the United
States knew by heart some of the main facts and in-
cidents in the famous journey; but, of course, it is
needless to say that they knew nothing at all about
the finer points and the highly interesting minor de-
tails of the astounding story. These are now all
laid before the highly favored reader for the first
time. ‘I presume it is unnecessary to add that they
are worthy of his most implicit confidence, having
been industriously and conscientiously compiled from
the daily jourhals of the three travellers, revised, cor-
rected, and digested very carefully by Barbican him-
self.

It was, of course, too early at this period for the
FAREWELL TO THE GUN CLUB, ‘GIO

critics to pass a decided opinion on the nature of
the information furnished by our travellers. Be-
sides, the Moon is an exceedingly difficult subject.
Very few newspaper men in the country are capable
of offering a single opinion regarding her that is
worth reading. This is probably also the reason
why half-scientists talk so much dogmatic nonsense
about her.

Enough, however, had appeared in the notes to
warrant the general opinion that Barbican’s explora-
tions had set at rest forever several pet theories
lately started regarding the nature of our satellite.
He and his friends had seen her with their own
eyes, and under such favorable circumstances as to
be aitogether exceptional. Regarding her forma-
tion, her origin, her inhabitability, they could easily
tell what system shoudd be rejected and what m/oht
be admitted. Her past, her present, and her future,
had been alike laid bare before their eyes. How can
you object to the positive assertion of a conscien-
tious man who has passed within a few hundred miles
of Zycho, the culminating point in the strangest of
all the strange systems of lunar oreography? What
reply can you make to a man who has sounded the
dark abysses of the //azo crater? How can you
dare to contradict those men whom the vicissitudes
of their daring journey had swept over the dark, In-
visible Face of the Moon, never before revealed to
human eye? It was now confessedly the privilege
and the right of these men to set limits to that
selenographic science which had till now been mak-
420 ALL AROUND THE HOON.

ing itself so very busy in reconstructing the lunar
world. They could now say, authoritatively, like
Cuvier lecturing over a fossil skeleton: ‘Once the
Moon was this, a habitable world, and inhabitable
long before our Earth! And now the Moon is
that, an uninhabitable world, and uninhabitable
ages and ages ago!”

We must not even dream of undertaking a de-
scription of the grand /é¢e by which the return of
the illustrious members of the Gun Club was to be
adequately celebrated, and the natural curiosity of
their countrymen to see them was to be reasonably
gratified. It was one worthy in every way of its re-
cipients, worthy of the Gun Club, worthy of the
Great Republic, and, best of all, every man, woman,
and child in the United States could take part in it.
Tt required at least three months to prepare it: but
this was not to be regretted as its leading idea could
not be properly carried out during the severe colds
of winter.

All the great railroads ef the Union had been
closely united by temporary rails, a uniform gauge
had been everywhere adopted, and every other
necessary arrangement had been made to enable a
splendid palace car, expressly manufactured for the
occasion by Pullman himself, to visit every chief
point in the United States without ever breaking
connection. Through the principal street in each
city, or streets if one was not large enough, rails
had been laid so as to admit the passage of the
triumphal car. In many cities, as a precaution
FAREWELL 10 THE GUN CLUB. 421

against unfavorable weather, these streets had been
arched over with glass, thus becoming grand
arcades, many of which have been allowed to re-
main so to the present day. The houses lining these
streets, hung with tapestry, decorated with flowers,
waving with banners, were all to be illuminated at
night time in a style at once both the most brilliant
and the most tasteful. On the sidewalks, tables had
been laid, often miles and miles long, at the public
expense ; these were to be covered with every kind
of eatables, exquisitely cooked, in the greatest pro-
fusion, and free to everyone for twelve hours before
the arrival of the illustrious guests and also for
twelve hours after their departure. The idea mainly
aimed at was that, at the grand national banquet
about to take place, every inhabitant of the United
States, without exception, could consider Barbican
and his companions as his own particular guests
for the time being, thus giving them a welcome the
heartiest and most unanimous that the world has
ever yet witnessed.

Evergreens were to deck the lamp-posts; trium-
phal arches to span the streets; fountains, squirting
eau de cologne, to perfume and cool the air; bands,
stationed at proper intervals, to play the most in-
spiring music; and boys and girls from public and
private schools, dressed in picturesque attire, to sing
songs of joy and glory. The people, seated at the
banquetting tables, were to rise and cheer and toast’
the heroes as they passed ; the military companies,
in splendid uniforms, were to salute them with pre-
G22 ALL AROUND THE MOON,

sented arms; while the bells pealed from the church
towers, the great guns roared from the armories,
jeux de ole resounded from the ships in the harbor,
until the day’s wildest whirl of excitement was con-
tinued far into the night by a general illumination
and a surpassing display of fireworks. Right in the
very heart of the city, the slowly moving triumphal
car was always to halt long enough to allow the Club
men to join the cheering citizens at their meal,
which was to be breakfast, dinner or supper accord-
ing to that part of the day at which the halt was
made.

The number of champagne bottles drunk on these
occasions, or of the speeches made, or of the jokes
told, or of the toasts offered, or of the hands shaken,
of course, I cannot now weary my kind. reader by
detailing, though I have the whole account lying be-
fore me in black and white, written out day by day
in Barbican’s own bold hand, Yet I should like
to give a few extracts from this wonderful journal.
Tt is a perfect model of accuracy and system.
Whether detailing his own doings or those of the
innumerable people he met, Czesar himself never
wrote anything more lucid or more pointed. But
nothing sets the extraordinary nature of this great
man in a better light than the firm, commanding,
masterly character of the handwriting in which these
records are made. The elegant penmanship all
through might easily pass for copper plate engraving
—except on one page, dated ‘‘ Boston, after din-
ner,’? where, candor compels me to acknowledge, the
FAREWELL TO THE GUN CLUB. $23.

‘* Solid: Men’? appear to have succeeded in render-
ing his iron nerves the least bit wabbly. ,

The palace car had been so constructed that, by
turning a few cranks and pulling out a few bolts, it
was transformed at once into a highly decorated and
extremely ‘comfortable open barouche. Marston
took the seat usually occupied by the driver: Ardan
and M’Nicholl sat immediately under him, face to
face with Barbican, who, in order that everyone
might be able to distinguish him, was to keep all
the back seat for himself, the post of honor.

On Monday morning, the fifth of May, a month
generally the pleasantest in the United States, the
grand national. banquet commenced in Baltimore,
and lasted twenty-four hours. The Gun Club in-
sisted on paying all the expenses of the day, and
the city compromised by being allowed to celebrate
in whatever way it pleased the reception of the
Club men on their return.

They started on their trip that same day in the
midst of one of the grandest ovations possible to
conceive. They stopped for a little while at Wil-
mington, but they took dinner in Philadelphia,
where the splendor of Broad Street (at present the
finest boulevard in the world, being 113 feet wide
and five miles long) can be more easily alluded to
than even partially described.

The house fronts glittered with flowers, flags,
pictures, tapestries, and other decorations; the
chimneys and roofs swarmed with men and boys
cheerfully risking. their necks every moment to get
J2g ALL AROUND THE MOON,

one glance at the “Moon men’’; every window
was a brilliant bouquet of beautiful ladies waving
their scented handkerchiefs and ‘showering their
sweetest smiles; the elevated tables on the side-
walks, groaning with an abundance of excellent and
varied food, were lined with men, women, and
children, who, however occupied in eating and
drinking, never forgot to salute the heroes, cheere
ing them lustily as they slowly moved along; the
spacious street itself, just paved from end to end with
smooth Belgian blocks, was a living moving pano-
rama. of soldiers, temperance men, free masons, and
other societies, radiant in gorgeous uniforms, bril-
liant in flashing banners, and simply perfect in the
rhythmic cadence of their tread, wings of delicious
music seeming to bear them onward in their proud
and stately march,

A vast awning, spanning the street from ridge to
ridge, had been so prepared and arranged that, in
case of rain or too strong a glare from the summer
sun, it could be opened out wholly or partially in
the space of a very few minutes. There was not,
however, the slightest occasion for using it, the
weather being exceedingly fine, almost paradisiacal,
as Marston loved to phrase it.

_ The ‘Moon men” supped and spent the night
in New York, where they were received with even
greater enthusiasm than at Philadelphia. But no de-
tailed description can be given of their majestic pro-
gress from city to city through all portions of the
mighty Republic. It is enough to say that they















































































































































































































































































































FAREWELL TO THE, GUN CLUB. 423

visited évery important town from Portland to San
Francisco, from ‘Salt Lake City to New Orleans, from
Mobile to Charleston, and from Saint Louis to Bal-
timore; that, in every section of the great country,
preparations for their reception were equally as en-
thusiastic, ‘their arrival was welcomed with equal
furore, and their departure accompanied with an
equal amount of affectionate and touching sympathy,

The New York Herald reporters Mr. Watkins,
followed them closely everywhere in a palace car of
his own, and kept the public fully enlightened re-
garding every incident worth regarding along the
route, almost as soon as it happened. He was
enabled to do this by means of a portable. tele-
graphic machine: of new and most: ingenious con-
struction, ‘Though its motive power was electricity,
it could dispense with the ordinary instruments and
even with wires altogether, yet it managed to trans-
mit messages to, most parts of the world with an
accuracy that, considering how seldom it failed, is
almost miraculous. The principle actuating it,
though guessed at by many shrewd scientists, is still
a profound secret and will probably remain ‘so for
some time longe?, the Herald having purchased the
right to its sole and exclusive use for fifteen years, at
an enormous costs

Who shall say that the spethegsts of our three
heroes.was hot worthy of them, or that, had they
lived in the old prehistoric times, they would not
have taken the loftiest places among the demi-gods?

As the tremendous whirl of excitement. began
726 _ ALL AROUND THE MOON,

slowly to die away, the more thoughtful heads of.
the Great Republic began asking each other a few
questions ¢

Can this wonderful journey, unprecedented in the
annals of wonderful journeys, ever lead to any prac
tical result?

Shall we ever live to see direct ‘communication
established with the Moon?

Will any Air Line of space navigation ever under-
take to start a system of locomotion between the
different members of the solar system ?

Have we any reasonable grounds for ever expect«
ing to see trains running between planet and planet,
as from Mars to Jupiter and, possibly afterwards,
from star to star, as from Polaris to Sirius P

Even to-day these are exceedingly puzzling ques
tions, and, with all our.much vaunted scientific
progress, such as “no fellow can make out.’’ But
if we only reflect a moment on the audacious go-a-
headiveness of ‘the Yankee branch of the Anglo
Saxon race, we shall easily conclude that the Ameri-
can people will never rest quietly until they have
pushed to its last result and to every logical conse-
quence the astounding step so daringly conceived
and so wonderfully carried out by their great coun-
tryman Barbican.

In fact, within a very few months after the return
of-the Club men from the Continental Banquet, as
it was called in the papers, the country was flooded
by a number of little ‘books, like Insurance pamph-
lets, thrust into every letter box and pushed: under
FAREWELL TO THE GUN CLUB. 427

every door, announcing the formation of a new
company called Zhe Grand Interstellar Communica-
Yion Soctety. The Capital was to be 100 million
dollars, at a thousand dollars a share: J. P. Barst-
can, Esq., P. G. C. was to be President ; Colonel
Josnua D. M’Nicuott, Vice-President ; Hon. J. T.
Marston, Secretary; Chevalier MicuaEL ARDAN,
General Manager; Joun Murpuy, Esa., Chief En-
gineer; H. Puruips Coteman, Esq. (Philadelphia
lawyer), Legal Adviser; and the Astrological Ad-
viser was to be Professor Henry of Washington.
(Belfast’s blunder had injured him so much in pub-
lic estimation, his former partisans having become
his most merciless revilers, that. it was considered
advisable to omit his name altogether even in the list
of the Directors.)

From the very beginning, the moneyed public
looked on the G.I. C. S, with decided favor, and
its shares were bought up pretty freely. Conducted
on strictly honorable principles, keeping carefully
aloof from all such damaging connection as the
Credit Mobilier, and having its books always thrown
open for public inspection, its reputation even to
day is excellent and continually improving in the
popular estimation. Holding out no utopian in-
ducements to catch the unwary, and making no
wheedling promises to blind the guileless, it states
its great objects with all their great advantages,
without at the same time suppressing its enormous
and perhaps insuperable difficulties. People know
exactly what to think of it, and, whether it ever
428 ALL AROUND THE MOON.

meets with perfect success or proves a complete
failure, no one in the country will ever think of
casting a slur on the bright name of its peerless
President, J. P. Barbican.

For a few years this great man devoted every
faculty of his mind to the furthering of the Com-
pany’s objects. But in the midst of his labors, the
rapid approach of the CENTENNIAL surprised him.
After a long and careful consultation on the subject,
the Directors and Stockholders of the G. I. C. S.
advised him to suspend all further labors in their be-
half for a few years, in order that he might be freer
to devote the full energies of his giant intellect
towards celebrating the first hundredth anniversary
of his country’s Independence—as all true Ameri-
cans would wish to see it celebrated—in a manner
every way worthy of the Great RepueLic of THE
West!

Obeying orders instantly and with the single-
idea’d, unselfish enthusiasm of his nature, he threw
himself at once heart and soul into the great enter-
prise. Though possessing no official prominence—
this he absolutely insists upon—he is well known to
be the great fountain head whence emanate all the
life, order, dispatch, simplicity, economy, and
wonderful harmony which, so far, have so eminently
characterized the magnificent project. With all
operations for raising the necessary funds—further
than by giving some sound practical advice—he
positively refused to connect himself (this may be
the reason why subscriptions to the Centennial stock
FAREWELL 7O 1HE GUN CLUB. g29

are so slow in coming in), but in the proper appor-
tionment of expenses and the strict surveillance of
the mechanical, engineering, and architectural de-
partments, his services have proved invaluable. His
experience in the vast operations at Stony Hill has
given him great skill in the difficult art of managing
men. His voice is seldom heard at the meetings,
but when it is, people seem to take a pleasure in
readily submitting to its dictates.

In wet weather or dry, in hot weather or cold, hé
may still be seen every day at Fairmount Park,
Philadelphia, leisurely strolling from building to
building, picking his steps quietly through the bust-
ling crowds of busy workmen, never speaking a
word, not even to Marston his faithful shadow, often
pencilling something in his pocket book, stopping
occasionally to look apparently nowhere, but never,
you may ‘be sure, allowing a single detail in the rest-
less panorama around him to escape the piercing
shaft of his eagle glance.

He is evidently determined on rendering the great
CENTENNIAL of his country a still greater and more
wonderful success than even his own world-famous
and never to be forgotten JourNEy through the
boundless fields of ether, and ALL AROUND THE
Moon!
THE

MOON HOAX;

OR,

A DISCOVERY THAT THE

MOON

HAS A VAST POPULATION OF
HUMAN BEINGS.

BY
RICHARD ADAMS LOCKE.

(437)
GREAT

ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES ~

LATELY MADE

BY SIR JOHN HERSCHEL, LL.D., F.R.S., &¢.,

AT THE

CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.

FIRST PUBLISHED IN THE NEW YORK SUN, IN AUGUST
AND SEPTEMBER, 1835, FROM THE SUPPLEMENT
TO THE EDINBURGH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE,

In this unusual addition to our Journal, we have the
happiness of making known to the. British public, and
thence to the whole civilized world, recent discoveries in
Astronomy which will build an imperishable monument to
the age in which we live, and confer upon the present
generation of the human race a proud distinction through
all future time. It has been poetically said, that the stars
of heaven are the hereditary regalia of man, as the intel-
lectual sovereign of the animal creation. He may now
fold the Zodiac around him with a loftier consciousness
of his mental supremacy.

It is impossible to contemplate any great Astronomical
discovery without feelings closely allied to a sensation of

28 (433)
454 ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.

awe, and nearly akin to those with which a departed spirit
may be supposed to discover the realities of a future state.
Bound by the irrevocable laws of nature to the globe on
which we live, creatures “close shut up in infinite ex-
panse,” it seems like acquiring a fearful supernatural power
when any remote mysterious works of the Creator yield
tribute to our curiosity. It seems almost a presumptuous
usurpation of powers denied us by the divine will, when
man, in the pride and confidence of his skill, steps forth,
far beyond the apparently natural boundary of his privi-
leges, and demands the secrets and familiar fellowship of
other worlds. We are assured that when the immortal
philosopher to whom mankind is indebted for the thrilling
wonders now first made known, had at length adjusted his
new and stupendous apparatus with a certainty of success,
he solemnly paused several hours before he commenced his
observations, that he might prepare his own mind for dis-
coveries which he knew would fill the minds of myriads of
his fellow-men with astonishment, and secure his name a
bright, if not transcendent conjunction with that of his
venerable father to all posterity. And well might he
pause! From the hour the first human pair open their eyes
to the glories of the blue firmament above them, there has
been no accession to human knowledge at all comparable
in sublime interest to that which he has been the honored
agent in supplying; and we are taught to believe that,
when a work, already preparing for the press, in which his
discoveries are embodied in detail, shall be laid before the
public, they will be found of incomparable importance to
some of the grandest operations of civilized life. Well
might he pause! He was about to become the sole de-
pository of wondrous secrets which had been hid from the
eyes of all men that had lived since the birth of time. He
was about to crown himself with a diadem of knowledge
THE MOON HOAX 455

which would give him a conscious pre-eminence above
every individual of his species who then lived, or who had
lived in the generations that are passed away. He paused
ere he broke the seal of the casket which contained it.

To render our enthusiasm intelligible, we shall state at
once, that by means of a telescope of vast dimensions and
an entirely new principle, the younger Herschel, at his obs
servatory in the Southern Hemisphere, has already made
the most extraordinary discoveries in every planet of our
solar system ; has discovered planets in other solar systems 3
has obtained a distinct view of objects in the moon, fully
equal to that which the unaided eye commands of terres-
trial objects at the distance of a hundred yards; has af
firmatively settled the question whether this satellite be in-
habited, and by what order of beings; has firmly established
a new theory of cometary phenomena; and has solved or
corrected nearly every leading problem of mathematical
astronomy.

For our early and almost exclusive information concern-
ing these facts, we are indebted to the devoted friendship
of Dr. Andrew Grant, the pupil of the eldet, and for
several years past the inseparable coadjutor of the younger
Herschel. The amanuensis of the latter at the Cape of
Good Hope, and the indefatigable superintendent of his
telescope during the whole period of its construction and
operation, Dr. Grant has been enabled to supply us with-in.
telligence equal, in general interest at least, to that which
Dr. Herschel himself has transmitted to the Royal Society.
Indeed our correspondent assures us that the voluminous
documents now before a committee of that institution contain
little more than details and mathematical illustrations of the
facts communicated to us in his own ample correspondence,
For permission to indulge his friendship in communicating
this invaluable information to us, Dr. Grant and ourselves
936 ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES,
¢

are indebted to the magnanimity of Dr, Herschel, who, far
above all mercenary considerations, has thus signally
honored and rewarded his fellow-laborer in the field of
science. The engravings of lunar animals and other ob-
jects, aud of the phases of the several planets, are accurate
copies of drawings taken in the observatory by Herbert
Home, Esq., who accompanied the last powerful series of
reflectors from London to the Cape, and superintended their
erection; and he has thus recorded the proofs of their
triumphant success. The engravings of the belts of Jupiter
is a reduced copy of an imperial folio drawing by Dr. Her-
schel himself, and contains the results of his latest observa-
tion of that planet. The segment of the inner ring of
Saturn is from a large drawing by Dr. Grant.

We first avail ourselves of the documents which contain
a description and history of the instrument by which these
stupendous discoveries have been made. A knowledge of
the one is essential to the credibility of the other,

THE YOUNGER HERSCHEL'S TELESCOPE.

It is well known that the greater reflecting telescope of
the late elder Herschel, with an object-glass four feet in
diameter, and a tube forty feet in length, possesses a mag-
nifying power of more than six thousand times, But a
small portion of this power was ever advantageously ap-
plied to the nearer astronomical objects; for the deficiency
of light from objects so highly magnified, rendered them
less distinct than when viewed with a power of a third or
fourth of this extent. Accordingly the powers which he
generally applied when observing the moon or planets, and
with which he made his most interesting discoveries, ranged
‘rom 220, 460, 750, and goo times; although, when ine
THE MOON HOAX. $37

specting the doubie and treble fixed stars, and the more
distant nebula, he frequently applied the full capacity of
his instrument. The law of optics, that an object becomes
dim in proportion as it is magnified, seemed, from its ex-
emplification in this powerful telescope, to form an in-
superable boundary to further discoveries in our solar
system, Several years, however, prior to the death of this
venerable astronomer, he conceived it practicable to con-
struct an improved series of parabolic and spherical reflec-
tors, which, by uniting all the meritorious points in the
Gregorian and Newtonian instruments, with the highly in-
teresting achromatic discovery of Dolland, would, to a
great degree, remove the formidable obstruction. His plan
evinced the most profound research in optical science, and
the most dexterous ingenuity in mechanical contrivance ;
but accumulating infirmities, and eventually death, pre-
vented its experimental application. His son, the present
Sir John Herschel, who had been nursed and cradled in the
observatory, and a practical astronomer from his boyhood,
was so fully convinced of the value of the theory, that he
determined upon testing it, at whatever cost. Within two
years of his father’s death he completed his new apparatus,
and adapted it to the old telescope with nearly perfect suc-
cess. He found that the magnifying power of 6,000 times,
when applied to the moon, which was the severest criterion
that could be selected, produced, under these new reflec-
tors, a focal object of exquisite distinctness, free from every
achromatic obscurity, and containing the highest degree of
light which the great speculum could collect from that
luminary.

The enlargement of the angle of vision which was thus
acquired, is ascertained by dividing the moon’s distance
from the observatory by the magnifying power of the in-
strument; and the former being 240,000 miles, and the
438 ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.

latter 6,000 times, leaves a quotient of 40 miles as the ap-
parent distance of that planet from the eye of the observer.
Now it is well known that no terrestrial objects can be seen
at a greater distance than this, with the naked eye, even
from the most favorable elevations. The rotundity of the
earth prevents a more distant view than this with the most
acute natural vision, and from the highest eminentces ; and,
generally, objects seen at this distance are themselves ele-
vated on mountainous ridges. It is not pretended, more-
over, that this forty miles telescopic view of the moon pre-
sented its objects with equal distinctness, though it did in
equal size to those of this earth, so remotely stationed.
The elder Herschel had nevertheless demonstrated, that
with a power of 1,000 times, he could discern objects in
this satellite of not more than 122 yards in diameter. If
therefore the full capability of the instrument had been
elicited by the new apparatus of reflectors constructed by
his son, it would follow, in mathematical ratio, that objects
could be discerned of not more than 22 yards in diameter.
Yet in either case they would be seen as mere feeble, shape-
less points, with no greater conspicuity than they would ex-
hibit upon earth to the unaided eye at the distance of forty
miles. But although the rotundity of the earth presented
no obstruction to a view of these astronomical objects, we
believe Sir John Herschel never insisted that he had carried
out these extreme powers of the telescope in so full a ratio.
The deficiency of light, though greatly economized and
concentrated, still maintained some inverse proportion to
the magnitude of the focal image. The advance he had
made in the knowledge of this planet, though magnificent
and sublime, was thus but partial and unsatisfactory. He
was, it is true, enabled to confirm some discoveries of
former observers, and to confute those of others. The ex-
istence of volcanoes discovered by his father and by Schroeter
THE MOON HOAX, 439

of Berlin, ahd the changes observed by the latter in the vol-
cano in the Mare Crisium or Lucid Lake, were corroborated
and illustrated, as was also the prevalence of far more ex-
tensive volcanic phenomena. The disproportionate height
attributed to the lunar mountains was corrected from care-
ful admeasurement;* whilst the celebrated conical hills,
encircling valleys of vast diameter, and ‘surrounding the
lofty central hills, were distinctly perceived. The forma-
tion which Professor Frauenhofer uncharitably conjectured
to be a lunar fortification, he ascertained to be a tabular
buttress of a remarkably pyramidical mountain; lines
which had been whimsically pronounced roads and canals,
he found to be keen ridges of singularly regular rows of
hills; and that which Schroeter imagined to be a great city
in the neighborhood of Marius, he determined to be a
valley of disjointed rocks seattered in fragments, which
averaged at least a thousand yards in diameter. Thus the
general geography of the planet, in its grand outlines of
cape, continent, mountain, ocean, and island, was surveyed
with greater particularity and accuracy than by any pre-
vious observer; and the striking dissimilarity of many of
its local features to any existing on our own globe, was
clearly demonstrated. ‘The best enlarged maps of that
luminary which have been published were constructed from
this survey; and neither the astronomer nor the public
ventured to hope for any great accession to their develop-
ments. The utmost power of the largest telescope in the
world had been exerted in a new and felicitous manner to
obtain them, and there was no reasonable expectation that
a larger one would ever be constructed, or that it could be
advantageously used if it were. A law of nature, and the
finitude of human skill, seemed united in inflexible opposi-
tion to any further improvement ‘in telescopic science, as
applicable to the known planets and satellites of the solar
$40 ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.

systein, For unless the sun could be prevailed“ upon to ex-
tend a more liberal allowance of light to these bodies, and
they be induced to transfer it, for the generous gratification
of our curiosity, what adequate substitute could be ob-
tained? ‘Telescopes do not create light, they cannot even
transmit unimpaired that which they receive. That any-
thing further could be derived from human skill in the con-
struction of instruments, the labors. of his illustrious prede-
cessors, and his own, left the son of Herschel no reason to
hope. Huygens, Fontana, Gregory, Newton, Hadley,
Bird, Short, Dolland, Herschel, and many others, all prac-
tical opticians, had resorted to every material in any wise
adapted to the composition either of lenses or reflectors,
and had exhausted every law of vision which study had
developed and demonstrated. In the construction of his
last amazing specula, Sir John Herschel had selected the
most approved amalgams that the advanced stage of metal-
lic chemistry had combined ; and had watched their grow-
ing brightness under the hands of the artificer with more
anxious hope than ever lover watched the eye of his mis-
4ress ; and he had nothing further to expect than they had
accomplished. He had the satisfaction to know that if he
could leap astride a cannon ball, and travel upon its wings
of fury for the respectable period of several millions of
years, he would not obtain a more enlarged view of the dis-
tant stars than he could now possess in a few minutes of
time; and that it would require an ultra-railroad speed of
fifty miles an hour, for nearly the live-long year, to secure
him a more favorable inspection of the gentle luminary of
night. The interesting question, however, whether this
light of the solemn forest, of the treeless desert, and of the
deep blue ocean as it rolls; whether this object of the lonely
turret, of the uplifted eye on the deserted battle-field, and
of all the pilgrims of love and hope, of misery and despair,
THE MOON HOAX. 441

that have journeyed over the hills and valleys of this earth,
through all the eras of its unwritten history to those of its
present voluminous record; the exciting question, whether
this “‘ observed” of all the sons of men, from the days of
Eden to those of Edinburgh, be inhabited by beings like
ourselves, of consciousness and curiosity, was left for solu-
tion to the benevolent index of natural analogy, or to the
severe tradition that it is tenanted only by the hoary solitaire
whom the criminal code of the nursery had banished thither
for collecting fuel on the Sabbath-day.

The limits of discovery in- the planetaty bodies, and in
this one especially, thus seemed to be immutably fixed ;
and no expectation was elevated for a period of several
years. But, about three years ago, in the course of a con-
versational discussion with Sir David Brewster upon the
merits of some ingenious suggestions by the latter, in his
article on optics in the Edinburgh Encyclopedia (p. 644),
for improvements in the Newtonian Reflectors, Sir John
Herschel adverted to the convenient simplicity of the old
astronomical telescopes that were without tubes, and the
object-glass of which, place upon a high pole, threw its
focal image to a distance of 150, and even 200 feet. _Dr.
Brewster readily admitted that a tube was not necessary,
provided the focal image were conveyed into a dark apart-
ment, amd there properly received by reflectors. Sir John
then said that, if his father’s great telescope, the tube alone
of which, though formed of the lightest suitable materials,
weighed 3,000 lbs., possessed an easy and steady mobility
with its heavy observatory attached, an observatory move-
able without the incumbrance of such a tube, was obviously
practical, This also was admitted, and the conversation
became directed to that all-invincible enemy, the paucity
of light in powerful magnifiers, After a few moments’
silent thought, Sir John diffidently inquired whether it
442 . ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.

would not be possible to effect a transfusion of artificial
ligtt through the focal object of visior! Sir David, some-
what startled at the originality of the idea, paused awhile,
and then hesitatingly referred to the refrangibility of rays,
and the angle of incidence. Sir John, grown more conf-
dent, adduced the example of the Newtonian Reflector, in
which the refrangibility was corrected by the second specu-
lum, aud the angle of incidence restored by the third.
‘‘ And,” continued he, ‘* why cannot the illuminated micro-
scope, say the hydro-oxygen, be applied to render distinct,
and, if necessary, even to magnify the focal object?” Sir
David sprung from his chair in an ecstacy of conviction, and
leaping half-way to the ceiling, exclaimed, ‘Thou art the
man!” Each philosopher anticipated the other in present-
ing the prompt illustration that if the rays of the hydro-
oxygen microscope, passed through a drop of water con-
taining the larve of a gnat-and other objects invisible to
the naked eye, rendered them not only keenly but firmly
magnified to dimensions of many feet ; so could the same
artificial light, passed through the faintest focal object of a
telescope, both distinctify (to coin a new word for an extra-
ordinary occasion) and magnify its feeblest component
members. ‘The only apparent desideratum was a recipient
for the focal image which should transfer it, without re-
franging it, to the surface on which it was to be viewed
under the revivifying light of the microscopic reflectors.
In the various experiments made during the few following
weeks, the co-operative philosophers decided that a medium
of the purest plate glass (which it is said they obtained, by
consent, be it observed, from the shop window of Mons,
Desanges, the jeweller to his ex-majesty Charles X., in
High street) was the most eligible they could discover. It
answered perfectly with a telescope which magnified 100
times, and a microscope of about thrice that power.
THE MOON HOAX. 443

Sir John Herschel then conceived the stupendous fabric
of his present telescope. The power of his father’s in-
strument would still leave him distant from his favorite
planet nearly forty miles, and he resolved to attempt a
greater magnifier. Money, the wings of science as the
sinews of war, seemed the only requisite, and even the ac-
quisition of this, which is often more difficult than the task
of Sisyphus, he determined to achieve. Fully sanctioned
by the high optical authority of Sir David Brewster, he
laid his plan before the Royal Society, and particularly di-
rected to it the attention of His Royal Highness the Duke
of Sussex, the ever munificent patron of science. and the
arts. It was immediately and enthusiastically approved by
the committee chosen to investigate it, and the chairman,
who was the Royal President, subscribed his name for a
contribution of £10,000, with a promise that he would
zealously submit the proposed.instrument as a fit object for
the patronage of the privy purse. He did so without delay,
and his Majesty, William IV., on being informed that the
estimated expense was £70,000, naively inquired if the
costly instrument would conduce to any improvement in
navigation? On being informed that it undoubtedly
would, the sailor King promised a carte blanche for the
amount which might be required.

Sir John Herschel had submitted his plans and calcula-
tions ‘in adaptation to an object-glass of twenty-four feet in
diameter : just six times the size of his venerable father’s.
For casting this ponderous mass, he selected the large glass-
house of Messrs. Hartly and Grant (the brother of our in-
valuable friend Dr. Grant), at Dumbarton. The material
chosen was an amalgamation of two parts of the best crown
with one of flint glass, the use of which, in separate lenses,
constituted the great achromatic discovery of Dolland. Jt
had been found, however, by accurate experiments, that the
444. ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES,

amalgam would as completely triumph over every impediment,
both from refrangibility and discoloration, as the separate
lenses. Five furnaces of the metal, carefully collected from
productions of the manufactory, in both the kinds of glass,
and known to be respectively of nearly perfect homogenous
quality, were united, by one grand conductor, to the
mould; and on the third of January, 1833, the first cast
was effected. After cooling eight days, the mould was
opened, and the glass found to be greatly flawed within
eighteen inches of the centre. Notwithstanding this failure,
a new glass was more carefully cast on the 27th of the same
month, which on being opened during the first week of
February, was found to be immaculately perfect, with the
exception of two slight flaws so near the line of its circum-
ference that they would be covered by the copper ring in
which it was designed to be enclosed.

The weight of this prodigious lens was 14,826 ths. or
nearly seven tons after being polished; and its estimated
magnifying power 42,000 times. It was therefore pre-
sumed to be capable of representing objects in our lunar
satellite of little more than eighteen inches in diameter,
provided its focal image of them could be rendered dis-
tinct by the transfusion of artificial light. It was not, how-
ever, upon the mere illuminating power of the hydro-oxygen
microscope, as applied to the focal pictures of this lens, that
the younger Herschel depended for the realization of his am-
bitious theories and hopes. He calculated largely upon the
almost illimitable applicability of this instrument asa second
magnifier, which would supersede the use, and infinitely
transcend the powers of the highest magnifiers in reflecting
telescopes.

So sanguinely indeed did he calculate upon the advan-
tages of this splendid alliance, that he expressed confidence
in his ultimate ability to study even the entomology of the
THE MOON HOAX, G45

moon, in case she contained insects upon her surface.
Having witnessed the completion of this great lens, and its
safe transportation to the metropolis, his next care was the
construction of a suitable microscope, and of the mechani-
cal frame-work for the horizontal and vertical action of the
whole. His plans in every branch of his undertaking hav-
ing been intensely studied, even to their minutest details,
were easily and rapidly executed. He awaited only the ap.
pointed period at which he was to convey his magnificent
apparatus to its destination.

A correspondence had for some time passed between the
Boards of England, France, and Austria, with a view to
improvements in the tables of longitude in the southern
hemisphere ; which are found to be much less accurate
than those of the northern, The high opinion entertained
by the British Board of Longitude of the principles of the
new telescope, and of the profound skill of its inventor,
determined the government to solicit his services in obsery-
ing the transit of Mercury over the sun’s disk, which will
take place on the 7th of November in the present year:
and which, as it will occur at 7h. 47m. 55s. night, conjunc-
tion, meantime ; and at 8h. 12m. 22s, middle, true time,
will be invisible to nearly all the northern hemisphere, The
place at which the transits of Mercury and Venus have gen-
erally been observed by the astronomers of Europe, when
occurring under these circumstances, is the Cape of Good
Hope; and no transit of Venus having occurred since the
year 1769, and none being to occur before 1874, the accu-
rate observation of the transits of Mercury, which occur
more frequently, has been found of great importance both
to astronomy and navigation. To the latter useful art, in-
deed, the transits of Mercury are nearly as important as
those of Venus; for although those of the latter planet
have the peculiar advantage of determining exactly the
446 ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.

great solar parallax, and thence the distances of all the
planets from the sun, yet the transits of Mercury, by ex-
actly determining the place of its own node, independently
of the parallax of the great orb, determine. the parallax of
the earth and moon; and are therefore especially valuable
in lunar observations of Longitude. The Cape of Good
Hope has been found preferable, in these observations, to
any other station in the hemisphere. The expedition which
went to Peru, about the middle of the last century, to ascer-
tain, in conjunction with another in Lapland, the true figure
of the earth, found the attraction of the mountainous regions
so strong as to cause the plum-line of one of their large in-
struments to deflect seven or eight seconds from the true
perpendicular ; whilst the elevated plains at the Cape unite
all the advantages of a lucid atmosphere with an entire
freedom from mountainous obstruction. Sir John Herschel,
therefore, not only accepted the appointment with high satis-
faction, but requested that it might commence at least a
year before the period of the transit, to afford him time to
bring his ponderous and complicated machinery into per-
fect adjustment, and to extend his knowledge of the
southern constellations.

His wish was immediately assented to, and his arrange-
ments being completed, he sailed from London on the qth
of September, 1834, in company with Dr. Andrew Grant,
Lieutenant Drummond, of the Royal Engineers, F.R.A.S.,
and a large party of the best English mechanics. ‘They
arrived, after an expeditious and agreeable passage, and im-
mediately proceeded to transport the lens, and the frame
of the large observatory, to its destined site, which was a
piece of table-land of great extent and elevation, about
thirty-five miles to the north-east of Capetown; and which
is said to be the very spot on which De la Caille, in 1750,
constructed his invaluable solar tables, when. he measured a
THE MOON HOAX. 447

degree of the meridian, and made a great advance to ex-
actitude in computing the solar parallax from that of Mars
and the Moon. Sir John accomplished the ascent to the
plains by means of two relief teams of oxen, of eighteen
each, in about four days; and, aided by several coimpanies
of Dutch boors, proceeded at once to the erection of his
gigantic fabric.

The ground plan of the stricture is in some respects
similar to that of the Herschel telescope in England, except
that instead of circular foundations of brickwork, it con-
sists of parallel circles of railroad iron, upon wooden
framework; so constructed that the turn-outs, or rather
turn-ins, from the largest circle, will conduct the observa-
tory, which moves upon them, to the innermost circle,
which is the basis of the lens-works; and to each of the
circles that intervene. The diameter of the smallest circle
is twenty-eight feet: that of the largest our correspondent
has singularly forgotten to state, though it may be in some
measure computed from the angle of incidence projected
by the lens, and the space occupied by the observatory.
The latter is a wooden building fifty feet square and as
many high, with a flat roof and gutters of thin copper.
Through the side proximate to the lens, is an aperture four
feet in diameter to receive its rays, and through the roof
another for the same purpose in meridional observations.
The lens, which is inclosed in a frame of wood, and braced
to its corners by bars of copper, is suspended upon an axis
between two pillars which are nearly as high as those which
supported the celebrated quadrant of Uleg Beg, being one
hundred and fifty feet. -These are united at the top and
bottom by cross-pieces, and strengthened by a number of
diagonal braces; and between them is a double capstan for
hoisting the lens from its horizontal line with the observa-
tory to the height required by its focal distance when turned
448 ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES,

to the meridian; and for elevating it to any intermediate de.
gree of altitude that may be needed. This last operation is
beautifully regulated by an immense double sextant, which
is connected and moves with the’ axis of the lens, and is
regularly divided into degrees, minutes, and seconds; and
the horizontal circles of the observatory being also divided
into 360 degrees, and minutely subdivided, the whole in-
strument has the powers and regularity of the most im-
proved theodolite. Having no tube, it is connected with
the observatory by two horizontal levers, which pass under-
neath the floor of that building from the circular basis of
the pillars; thus keeping the lens always square with the
observatory, and securing to both a uniform and simple
movement. By means of these levers, too, a rack and
windlass, the observatory is brought to any degree of ap-
proximation to the pillars that the altitude of an observa-
tion may require; and although, when at its nearest station
it cannot command an observation with the great lens
within about fifteen degrees of the meridian, it is supplied
with an excellent telescope of vast power, constructed by
the elder Herschel, by which every high degree can be sur-
veyed. The field of view, therefore, whether exhibted on
the floor or on the wall of the apartment, has a diameter of
nearly fifty feet, and, being circular, it has therefore an
area of nearly 1875 feet. The place of all the horizontal
movements having been accurately levelled by Lieut. Drum-
mond, with the improved level of his invention which bears
his name, and the wheels both of the observatory and of
the lens-works being facilitated by friction-rollers in patent
axle-boxes filled with oil, the strength of one man applied
to the extremity of the levers is sufficient to propel the whole
structure upon either of the railroad circles; and that of
two men applied to the windlass is fully adequate to bring
the observatory to the basis of the pillars. Both of these
THE MOON HOAX. 449

movements, however, are now effected by a locomotive ap-
paratus commanded within the apartment -by a single per-
son, and showing, by means of an ingenious index, every
inch of progression or retrogression.

We have not thus particularly described the telescope of
the younger Herschel because we consider it the most mag-
nificent specimen of philosophical mechanism of the present
or any previous age, but because we deemed an explicit de-
scription of its principles and powers an almost indispens-
able introduction to a statement of the sublime expansion
of human knowledge which it has achieved. It was not
fully completed until the latter part of December, when the
series of large reflectors for the microscope arrived from
England; and it was brought into operation during the
first week of the ensuing month and year. But the secrecy
which had been maintained with regard to its novelty, its
manufacture, and its destination, was not less rigidly pre-
served for several months respecting the grandeur of its
success. Whether the British Government were sceptical
conceruing the promised splendor of its discoveries, or
wished them to be scrupulously veiled until they had accu-
mulated a full-orbed glory for the nation and reign in
which they originated, is a question which we can only
conjecturally solve. But certain it is that the astronomer’s
royal patrons enjoined a masonic taciturnity upon him and
his friends until he should have officially communicated the
results of his great experiment. Accordingly, the world
heard nothing of him or his expedition until it was announced
a few months since in the scientific journals of Germany,
that Sir John Herschel, at the Cape of Good Hope, had
written to the astronomer-royal of Vienna, to inform him
that the portentous comet predicted for the year 1835,
which was to approach so near this trembling globe that we
might hear the roaring of its fires, had turned upon another

29
4jO ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.

scent, and would not even shake a hair of its tail upon our
hunting grounds, At a loss to conceive by what extra
authority he had made so bold a declaration, the men of
science in Europe who were not acquainted with his secret,
regarded his “ postponement,” as'his discovery was termed,
with incredulous contumely, and continued to terrorize
upon the strength of former predictions.

NEW LUNAR DISCOVERIES,

Until the roth of January, the observations were chiefly
directed to the stars in the southern signs, in which, with-
out the aid of the hydro-oxgen reflectors, a countless num-
ber of new stars and nebulz were discovered, But we
shall defer our correspondent’s account of these to future
pages, for the purpose of no longer withholding from our
readers the more generally and highly interesting discoveries
which were made in the lunar world, And for this purpose,
too, we shall defer Dr. Grant’s elaborate mathematical de-
tails of the corrections which Sir John Herschel has made in
the best tables of the moon’s tropical, sidereal, and synodic
revolutions, and of those phenomena of syzygies on which
a great part of the established lunar theory depends.

It was about half-past nine o’clock on the night of the
roth, the moon having then advanced within four days of
her mean libration, that the astronomer adjusted his instrus
ments for the inspection of her eastern limb, The whole
immense’ power of his telescope was applied, and to its
focal image about one-half of the power of his microscope.
On removing the screen of the latter, the field of view was
covered throughout its entire area with a beautifully dis-
tinct, and even vivid representation of basaltic rock, Its
color was a greenish brown, and the width of the columns,
THE MOON HOAX, gst

as defined by their interstices on the canvass, was invariably
twenty-eight inches, No fracture whatever appeared in the
mass first presented, but in a few seconds a shelving pile
appeared of five or six columns width, which showed their
figure to be hexagonal, and their articulations similar to
those of the basaltic formation at Staffa. This precipitous
shelf was profusely covered with a dark red flower, “ pre-
cisely similar,” says Dr. Grant, ‘to the Papaver Rhoeas, or
rose-poppy of our sublunary cornfields; and this was the
first organic production of nature, ina foreign world, ever
revealed to the eyes of men.”

The rapidity of the moon’s ascension, or rather of the
earth’s diurnal rotation, being nearly equal to five hundred
yards in a second, would have effectually prevented the in-
spection, or even the discovery of objects so minute as
these, but for the admirable mechanism which constantly
regulates, under the guidance of the sextant, the required
altitude of the lens. But its operation was found to be so
consummately perfect, that the observers could detain the
object upon the field of view for any period they might de-
sire, The specimen of lunar vegetation, however, which
they had already seen, had decided a question of too ex-
citing an interest to induce them to retard its exit. It had
demonstrated that the moon has an atmosphere constituted
similarly to our own, and capable of sustaining organized,
and therefore, most probably, animal life, ‘The basaltic
rocks continued to pass over the inclined canvass plane,
through three successive diameters, when a verdant de-
clivity of great beauty appeared, which occupied two more.
This was preceded by another mass of nearly the former
height, at the base of which they were at length delighted
to perceive that novelty, a lunar forest. “The trees,” says
Dr.:Grant, “for a period of ten minutes, were of one un-
varied kind, and unlike any I have seen, except the largest
$52 : ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES,

kind of yews in the English churchyards, which they in
some respects resemble. These were followed by a level
green plain, which, as measured by the painted circle on
our canvass of forty-nine feet, must have been more than
half a mile in breadth; and then appeared as fine a forest
of firs, unequivocal firs, as I have ever seen cherished in
the bosom of my native mountains, Wearied with the
long continuance of these, we greatly reduced the magnify-
ing power of the microscope, without eclipsing either of
the reflectors, and immediately perceived that we had been
insensibly descending, as it were, a mountainous district of
a highly diversified and romantic character, and that we
were on the verge of a lake, or inland sea; but of what
relative locality or extent, we were yet too greatly magnified
to determine. On introducing the feeblest acromatic lens
we possessed, we found that the water, whose boundary we
had just discovered, answered in general outline to the
Mare Nubium of Riccioli, by which we detected that, in-
stead of commencing, as we supposed, on the eastern longi-
tude of the planet, some delay in the elevation of the great
lens-had thrown us nearly upon the axis of her equator.
However, as she was a free country, and we not, as yet,
attached to any particular province, and moreover, since we
could at any moment occupy our intended position, we
again slid in our magic lenses to survey the shores of the
Mare Nubium. Why Riccioli so termed it, unless in ridi-
cule of Cleomedes, J know not; for fairer shores never
angels coasted on a tour of pleasure. A beach of brilliant
white sand, girt with wild castellated rocks, apparently of
green marble, varied at chasms, occurring every two or
three hundred feet, with grotesque blocks of chalk or
gypsum, and feathered and festooned at the summit with
the clustering foliage of unknown trees, moved along’ the
bright wall of our apartment until we were speechless with
THE MOON HOAX. G53

admiration. The water, wherever we obtained a view of it,
was nearly as blue as that of the deep ocean, and broke in
large white billows upon the strand. The action of very
high tides was quite manifest upon the face of the cliffs for
more than a hundred miles; yet diversified as the scenery
was during this and a much greater distance, we perceived
no trace of animal existence, notwithstanding we could
command at will a perspective or a foreground view of the
whole. Mr. Holmes, indeed, pronounced some white ob-
jects of a circular form, which we saw at some distance in
the interior of a cavern, to be bona fide specimens of a
large cornu ammonis ; but to me they appeared merely large
pebbles, which had been chafed and rolled there by the
tides, Our chase of animal life was not yet to be rewarded.

Having continued this close inspection nearly two hours,
during which we. passed over a wide tract of country,
chiefly of a rugged and apparently volcanic character; and
having seen few additional varieties of vegetation, except
some species of lichen, which grew everywhere in great
abundance, Dr. Herschel proposed that we should take out
all our lenses, give a rapid speed to the panorama, and search
for some of the principal valleys known to astronomers, as
the most likely method to reward our first night’s observa-
tion with the discovery of animated beings. The lenses
being removed, and the effulgence of our unutterably
glorious reflectors left undiminished, we found, in accord-
ance with our calculations, that our field of view compre-
hended about twenty-five miles of the lunar surface, with
the distinctness both of outline and detail which could be
procured of a terrestrial object at the distance of two and
a-half miles; an optical phenomenon which you will find
demonstrated in Note 5. ‘This afforded us the best land.
scape views we had hitherto obtained, and although the
accelerated motion was rather too great, we enjoyed them
G54 ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES,

with rapture. Several of those famous valleys, which are
bounded by lofty hills of so perfectly conical a form as to
render them less like works of nature than of art, passed
the canvass before we had time to check their flight; but
presently a train of scenery met our eye, of features so en-
tirely novel, that Dr. Herschel signalled for the lowest con-
venient gradation of movement. It was a lofty chain of
obelisk-shaped, or very slender pyramids, standing in irregu-
lar groups, each composed of about thirty or forty spires,
every one of which was perfectly square, and as accurately
truncated as the finest specimens of Cornish crystal. They
were of a faint lilac hue, and very resplendent. I now
thought that we had assuredly fallen on productions of art ;
but Dr. Herschel shrewdly remarked, that if the Lunarians
could build thirty or forty miles of such monuments as
these, we should ere now have discovered others of a less
equivocal character. He pronounced them quartz forma-
tions, of probably the wine-colored amethyst species, and
promised us, from these and other proofs which he had ob-
tained of the powerful action of the laws of crystallization
in this planet, a rich field of mineralogical study, On intro-
ducing a lens, his conjecture was fully confirmed; they
were monstrous amethysts, of a diluted claret color, glow-
ing in the intensest light of the sun! They varied in
height from sixty to ninety feet, though we saw several of
a still more incredible altitude. They were observed in a
succession of valleys divided by longitudinal lines of round-
breasted hills, covered with verdure and nobly undulated ;
but what is most remarkable, the valleys which contained
these stupendous crystals were invariably barren, and
covered with stones of a ferruginous hue, which were prob-
ably iron pyrites. We found that some of these curiosities
were situated in a district elevated half a mile above the
valley of the Mare Feecunditatis, of Mayer and Riccioli ;
THE MOON HOAX. 455

the shores of which’ soon hove in view. But never was a
name more inappropriately bestowed. From “ Dan to
Beersheba” all was barren, barren—the sea-board was en-
tirely composed of chalk and flint, and not a vestige of
vegetation could be discovered with our strongest glasses.
The whole breadth of the northern extremity of this sea,
which was about three hundred miles, having crossed our
plane, we entered upon a wild mountainous region abound-
ing with more extensive forests of larger trees than we had
betore seen—the species of which I have no good analogy
to describe. In general contour they resembled our forest
oak ; but they were much more superb in foliage, having
broad glossy leaves like that of the laurel, and trusses of
yellow flowers which hung, in the open glades, from the
branches te the ground. These mountains passed, we
arrived at a region which filled us with utter astonishment.
Tt was an oval valley, surrounded, except at a narrow open-
ing towards the south, by hills, red as the purest vermilion,
and evidently crystallized; for wherever a precipitious
chasm appeared—and these chasms were very frequent, and
of immense depth—the perpendicular sections presented
conglomerated masses of polygon crystals, evently fitted to
each other, and arranged:in deep strata, which grew darker
in color as they descended to the foundations of the preci-
pices. Innumerable cascades were bursting forth from
the breasts of every one of these cliffs, and some so near
their summits, and with such great force, as to form arches
many yards in diameter. I never was so vividly reminded
of Byron’s simile, “The pale courser’s tail, as told in the
Apocalypse.” At the foot of this boundary of hills was
a perfect zone of woods surrounding the whole valley,
which was about eighteen or twenty miles wide, at its
-greatest breadth, and about thirty in length. Small collec-
tions of trees, of every imaginable kind, were scattered
450 ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.

about the whole of the luxuriant area; and here our mags
nifiers blest our panting hopes with specimens of con-
scious existence. In the shade of the woods on the south-
eastern side, we beheld continous herds of brown quadrupeds,
having all the external characteristics of the bison, but more
diminutive than any species of the bos genus in our natural
history. Its tail is like that of our bos grunniens 3 but in
its semi-circular horns, the hump on its shoulders and the
depth of its dewlap, and the length of its shaggy hair,
it closely resembled the species to which I first compared
it. It had, however, one widely distinctive feature, which
we afterwards found common to nearly every lunar quad-
ruped we have discovered ; namely, a remarkable fleshy ap-
pendage over the eyes, crossing the whole breadth of the
forehead and united to the ears, We could most distinctly
perceive this hairy veil, which was shaped like the upper
front outline of a cap known to the ladies as Mary Queen
of Scots’ cap, lifted and lowered by means of the ears. It
immediately occurred to the acute mind of Dr, Herschel,
that this was a providential contrivance to protect the eyes
of the animal from the great extremes of light and dark-
ness to which all the inhabitants of our side of the moon
are periodically subjected.

The next animal perceived would be classed on earth as
a monster. It was of a bluish lead color, about the size of
a goat, with a head and beard like him, and a single horn,
slightly inclined forward from the perpendicular. The
female was destitute of the horn and beard, but had a
much longer tail. It was gregarious, and chiefly abounded
on the acclivitous glades of the woods, In elegance of
symmetry it rivalled the antelope, and like him it seemed
an agile sprightly creature, running with great speed, and
springing from the green turf with all the unaccountable
antics of a young Jamb or kitten. This beautiful creature
Til MOON HOAX, 457

afforded us the most: exquisite amusement, The mimicry
of its movements upon our white painted canvass was as
faithful and luminous as that of animals within a few yards
of the camera obscura, when seen pictured upon its tympan.
Frequently when attempting to put our fingers upon its
beard, it would suddenly bound away into oblivion, as if
conscious of out earthly impertinence; but then others
would appeat, whom we could not prevent nibbling the
herbage, say or do what we would to them.

On examining the centre of this delightful valley, we
found a large branching rivet, abounding with lovely
islands, and water-birds of numerous kinds. A species of
gray pelican was the most numerous; but a black and
white ‘crane, with unreasonably long legs and bill, were
also quite common, We watched their pisciverous ex.
periments a long time, in hopes of catching sight of a
lunar fish} but although we were not gratified in this re«
spect, we could easily guess the purpose with which they
plunged their long necks so deeply beneath the water.
Near the upper extremity of one of these islands we ob.
tained a glimpse of a strange amphibious creature, of a
spherical fotm, which rolled with great velocity across the
pebbly beach, and was lost sight of in the strong current
which set off from this angle of the island. We were com.
pelled, however, to leave this prolific valley unexplored, on
account of clouds which were evidently accumulating in
the lunar atmosphere, our own being perfectly translucent.
But this was itself an interesting discovery, for more dis«
tant observers had questioned or denied the existence of
any humid atmosphere in this planet.

The moon being now low on her descent, Dr. Herschel
inferred that the increasing refrangibility of her rays would
prevent any satisfactory protraction of our labors, and our
minds being actually fatigued with the excitement of the
ay ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.

high enjoyments we had partaken, we mutually agreed to
call in the assistants at the lens, and reward their vigilant
attention with congratulatory bumpers of the best ‘ East
India Particular.” It was not, however, without regret
that we left the splendid valley of the red mountains, which,
in compliment to the arms of our royal patron, we de-
nominated “the Valley of the Unicorn;” and it may be
found in Blunt’s map, about midway between the Mare
Feecunditatis and the Mare Nectaris. ,
The nights of the r1th'and 12th being cloudy, were un-
favorable to observation 3 but on those of the 13th and 14th
further animal discoveries were made of the most exciting
interest to every human being. We give them in the
graphic language of our accomplished correspondent :—
‘*The astonishing and beautiful discoveries which we
had made during our first night’s observation, and the bril.
liant promise which they gave of the future, rendered every
moonlight hour too precious to reconcile us to the depriva-
tion occasioned: by these @wo -cloudy evenings; and they
were borne with strictly philosophical patience, notwith-
standing that our attention was closely occupied in super-
intending the erection of additional props and braces to the
twenty-four feet jens, which we found had somewhat vibrated
in a high wind that arose on the morning of the 11th, The
night of the 13th (January) was one of pearly purity and
loveliness. The moon ascended the firmament in gorgeous
splendor, and the stars, retiring around her, left her the un-
rivalled queen of the hemisphere. This being the last night
but one, in the present month, during which we should have
an opportunity of inspecting her western limb, on account
of the libration in longitude which would thence immediately
ensue, Dr, Herschel informed us that he should direct our
researches to the parts numbered 2, 11, 26, and 20 in Blunt’s
map, and which are respectively known in the modern cata»
ME MOON HOAX, 459

logue by the names of Endymion, Cleomedes, Langrenus,
and Petavius. To the careful inspection of these, and the
regions between them and the extreme western rim, he pro-
posed to devote the whole of this highly favorable night.
Taking then our twenty-five miles breadth of her surface
upon the field of view, and reducing it toa slow movement,
we soon found the first very singularly shaped object of our
inquiry. It is a highly mountainous district, the loftier
chains of which form three narrow ovals, two of which ap-
proach each other in slender points, and are united by one
mass of hills of great length and elevation ; thus presenting
a figure similar to that of a long skein of thread, the bows
of which have been. gradually spread open from their con-
necting knot. The third oval looks also like a skein, and
lies as if carelessly dropped from nature’s hand in connec-
tion with the other: but that which might fancifully be sup-
posed as having formed the second bow of this second skein
is cut open, and lies in scattered threads of smaller hills which
cover a great extent of level territory, The ground plan
of these mountains is so remarkable that it has been ac-
curately represented in almost every lineal map of the moon
that has been drawn; and in Blunt's, which is the best, it
agrees exactly with my description, Within the grasp, as
it were, of the broken bow of hills last mentioned, stands
an oval-shaped mountain, enclosing a valley of an immense
area, and having on its western ridge a volcano in a state
of terrific eruption. To the northeast of this, across the
broken, or what Mr. Holmes called ‘the vagabond moun-
tains,’ are thiee other detached oblong formations, the
largest and last-of which is marked F in the catalogue, and
fancifully denominated the Mare Mortuum, or more com-
monly the ‘Lake of Death.’ Induced by a curiosity to
divine the reason. of so sombre a title, rather than by any
more philosophical motive, we here first applied our hydro.
g0o ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.

oxygen magnifiers to the focal image of the great lens.
Our twenty-five miles portion of this great mountain circus
had comprehended the whole of its area, and of course the
two conical hills -which rise in it about five miles from each
other; but although this breadth of view had theretofore
generally presented its objects as if seen within a terrestrial
distance of two and a-half miles, we were, in this instance,
unable to discern these central hills with any such degree
of distinctness. There did not appear to be any mist or
smoke around them, as in the case of the volcano which
we had left in the southwest, and yet they were compara-
tively indistinct upon the canvass. On sliding in the gas-
light lens the mystery was immediately solved.. They were
old craters of extinct volcanoes, from which still issued a
heated though transparent exhalation, that kept them in an
apparently oscillatory or trembling motion, most unfavorable
to examination, The craters of both these hills, as nearly
as we could judge under this obstruction, were about fifteen
fathoms deep, devoid of any appearance of fire, and of
nearly a yellowish white. color throughout. The diameter
of each was about nine diameters of our painted circle, or
nearly 450 feet; and the width of the rim surrounding
them about 1000 feet; yet notwithstanding their narrow
mouths, these two chimneys of the subterranean deep had
evidently filled the whole area of the valley in which they
stood with the lava and ashes with which it was encum-
bered, and even added to the height, if not indeed caused
the existence of the oval chain of mountains which sur-
rounded it. These mountains, as subsequéntly measured
from the level of some large lakes around them, averaged
the height of 2,800 feet; and Dr. Herschel conjectured
from this and the vast extent of their abutments, which ran
for many miles into the country around them, that these
volcanoes must have been in full activity for a million of
TUE MOON HOAX. gol

years. Lieut. Drummond, however, rather supposed that
the whole area of this oval valley was but the exhausted
crater of one vast volcano, which in expiring had left only
these two imbecile representatives of its power. I believe
Dr. Herschel himself afterwards adopted this probably
theory, which is indeed confirmed by the universal geology
of the planet. There is scarcely a hundred miles of her
surface, not even excepting her largest seas and lakes, in
which circular or oval mountainous ridges may not’ be
easily found; and many, very many of these having
numerous enclosed hills in full volcanic operation, which
are now much lower than the surrounding circles, it- admits
of no doubt that each of these great formations is the re-
mains of one vast mountain which has burnt itself out, and
left only these wide foundations of its ancient grandeur. A
direct proof of this is afforded in a tremendous volcano,
now in its prime, which I shall hereafter notice. What
gave the name of ‘The Lake of Death* to the annular
mountain I have just described, was, I suppose, the dark
appearance of the valley which it encloses, and which, to
a.more distant view than we obtained, certainly exhibits
the general aspects of the waters on this planet. The sur-
rounding country is fertile to excess: between this circle
and No, 2 (Endymion), which we proposed first to examine,
we counted not less than twelve luxuriant forests, divided
by open plains, which waved in an ocean’ of verdure, and
were probably prairies like those of North America, In
three of these we discovered numerous herds of quadrupeds
similar to our friends the bisons in the Valley of the Uni-
corn, but of much larger size; and scarcely a piece of
woodland occurred in our panorama which did not dazzle
our vision with flocks of white or red birds upon the wing.

“ At lensth we carefully explored the Endymion. We
found each of the three ovals volcanic and sterile within ;
‘fO2 ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES,

but, without, most rich, throughout the level regions around
them, in every imaginable production of a bounteous soil.
Dr. Herschel has classified not less than thirty-eight species
of forest trees, and nearly twice this number of plants,
found in this tract alone, which are widely different from
those found in more equatorial Jatitudes. Of animals, he
classified nine species of mammalia, and five of ovipara.
Among the former is a small kind of rein-deer, the elk, the
moose, the horned bear, and the biped beaver. The last
resembles the beaver of the earth in every other respect
than in its destitution of a tail, and its invariable habit of
walking upon only two feet. It carries its young in its
arms like a human being, and moves with an easy gliding
motion, Its huts are constructed better and higher than
those of many tribes of human savages, and from the ap-
pearance of smoke in nearly all of them, there is no doubt
of its being acquainted with the use of fire. Still its head
cand body differ only in the points stated from that of the
beaver, and it was never seen except on the borders of lakes
and rivers, in which it has been observed to immerse for a
period of several seconds,

“ Thirty degrees farther south, in No, 11, or Cleomedes,
an immense annular mountain, containing three distinct
craters, which have been so long extinguished that the
whole valley around them, which is eleven miles in extent,
is densely crowded with woods nearly to the summits of
the hills. Not a rod of vacant land, except the tops of
these craters, could be descried, and no living creature, ex-
cept a large white bird resembling the stork. At the
southern extremity of this valley is a natural archway or
cavern, 200 feet high, and 100 wide, through which runs a
river which discharges itself over a precipice of gray rock
80 feet in depth, and then forms a branching stream through
a beautiful campaign district for many miles. Within twenty
THE MOON HOAX. 463

miles of this cataract is the largest lake, or rather inland sea,
that has been found throughout the seven and a half millions
of square miles which this illuminated side of the moon
contains. Jts width, from east to west, is 198 miles, and
from north to south, 266 miles. Its shape, to the north-
ward, is not unlike that of the bay of Bengal, and it is
studded with small islands, most of which are volcanic.
‘I'wo of these, on the eastern side, are now violently erup-
tive; but our lowest magnifying power was too great to
examine them with convenience, on account of the cloud
ot smoke and ashes which beclouded our field of view: as
seen by Lieut. Drummond, through our reflecting telescope
of 2,000 times, they exhibited great brilliancy. Ina bay,
on the western side of this sea, is an island 55 miles long,
of a crescent form, crowded through its entire sweep with
the most superb and wonderful natural beauties, both of
vegetation and geology. Its hills are pinnacled with tall
quartz crystals, of so rich a yellow and orange hue that we
at first supposed them to be pointed flames of fire; and
they spring up thus from smooth round brows of hills
which are covered as with a velvet mantle. Even in the
enchanting little valleys of this winding island we could
often see these splendid natural spires, mounting in the
midst of deep green woods, like church steeples in the
vales of Westmoreland. We here first noticed the lunar
palm-tree, which differs from that of our tropical latitudes
only in the peculiarity of very large crimson flowers, in-
stead of the spadix protruded from the common calyx.
We, however, perceived no fruit on any specimens we saw:
a cirgumstance which we attempted to account for from the
great (theoretical) extremes in the lunar climate. On a
curious kind of tree-melon we nevertheless saw fruit in
great abundance, and in every stage of inception and
maturity. The general color of these woods was a dark
46g ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.

green, though not without occasional admixtures of every
tint of our forest seasons, The hectic flush of autumn was
often seen kindled upon the cheek of earliest spring 5; and
the gay drapery of summer in some places surrounded trees
leafless as the victims of winter. It seemed as if all the
seasons here united hands in a circle of perpetual harmony.
Of animals we saw only an elegant striped quadruped about
three feet high, like a miniature zebra ; which was always in
small herds on the green sward of the. hills; and two or
three kinds of long-tailed birds, which we judged to be
golden and blue pheasants, On the shores, however, we
saw countless multitudes of univalve shell-fish, and among
them some huge flat ones, which all three of my associates
declared to be cornu ammoniz ; and I confess I was here
compelled to abandon my sceptical substitution of pebbles.
The cliffs all along these shores were deeply undermined
by tides; they were very cavernous, and yellow crystal
stalactites larger than a man’s thigh were shooting forth on
all sides. Indeed every rood of this island appeared to be
crystallized ; masses of fallen crystals were found on every
beach we explored, and beamed from every fractured head-
land. It was more like a creation of an oriental fancy than
a distant variety of nature brought by the powers of science
to ocular demonstration. The striking dissimilitude of
this island to every other we had found on these waters, and
its.near proximity to the main land, led us to suppose that
it must at some time have been a part of it; more especially
as its crescent bay embraced the first of a chain of smaller
ones which ran directly thither. The first one was a pure
quartz rock, about