Citation
Service and regulatory announcements

Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Animal Industry
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat inspection ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Summary:
Contains Insecticide decisions and Notices of judgment under the Insecticide Act formerly issued only as a separate publication, now published in both forms.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format
Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
No. 81 (1914)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
004884120 ( ALEPH )
17762165 ( OCLC )
AA00005308_00017 ( sobekcm )
Classification:
HD9000.9.U5 A14 ( lcc )
630.61 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service announcements

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|yj ||i9~kSS Jtl iU eed montebl for the dissemination of information, Instructions, rulings, etc,,
lhim ,Bureau of Animal Induatry. Free distribution is limited to persons in the
te tablish t at which the ledral meat inspection is conducted, public off oers
.i f. desirable for them to have such information, and journals especially concerned.
qopl may obtain them from the Superintendent of Docunt, Governments, Printing
0., at 5 eants eanhj or 50 cents a year. A supply will be sent to each official in charge
if.the bureau service, who should promptly distribute copies to members of his
S. 0 l ibei kipt at eah station for retfeenoe.
... "


:4.:.
?,.. i 7
Apl I '.4:k J


-. 1
tn directory..........................
ge natlspecla-n.............
Alot............. K ............
.uls slaughtered under Federal meat in-
-----.........-----......................
pgtt of. food anhial and.ot meats and&
.p.rad duots.....................
ll-ffilsauthfiild td gn Inspection
Uhb for meat and products for Im-
pto nattbtl uAit States...........
ib and ting of animals for Can-
..... ........ .. ...............
--n-siyBh ythetabercultatesting
I.,. lDie' prttfonto andimportation
nm .. ............................
A,$ iDt 7br veterinary biological


CONwNTS.


Pare
17
1A


18


:'E


Blological-products manufactured by licensed
establishments and placedin final contain-
ers during the calendar year4920..........
Quantities of antihog-choleri serum and hog-
cholera virus produced during the month of
January, 1921............................
Summary of tuberculosis-eradication work in
cooperation with States, January, 1921.....
Results ofprosecutions for violations oflaws..
Dr.C. W. Larson appointed Chief of the Dairy
Division.................................
Employees requested to assist the depart-
ment's press-clipping service.............
r Contact clubs of department employees......
Amendment to Administrative Regulations.
New publications of the bureau............
Organization of the Bureau of Animal Indus-
try........................................


CHANGES IN DIRECTORY.

: Meat In-peia IIaug n rated.

*4 T s Nut Butter Co., 3702-3712 Iron Street, Chicago, Il.
" :..4 ,..... :... .** : .... ... ". ..
W. .t uw. .a t. :el MmguAtatd oIwmaing Sumapenue.

. 42t. ,. d .,O. RBobbins Co., Dover, De. (substation of Philadelphia).
Imes Ina Nasmes of Establihema.

MMP.L iaVi ani., sBd ?T. 0 Co. and Kingan & Co., Baltimore,
A, ,ii;..ti:.,a.:.. ,A .on ., P. T. George & Co., and Kingan

i''. Co., Ohicago, Ill., instead of


S. :.,... .:" =.


Page.


*. .


* '** ***

















Phoenix, Ariz., hog-cholera control. -
Change of Inspeck.r in Charge. I
Little Rock, Ark., Dr. W. A. McDonald (a&ng), instead of Dr. G. W. Rosen
Change in Address of Inspector in Charge.
Dr. R. M. Mullings, 6 Federal Building, Jersey City, N. J., instead of 20 F
Building.
Notes.
Meat inspection extended at Establishment 20-B, Wilson & Co., Cambridge,
to include T. M. Sinclair & Co. (Ltd.); and at Establishment No. 20, Wilson&'
(Inc.), New York, N. Y., to include Wilson-Martin Co.
The work of tuberculosis eradication at Atlanta, Ga., will hereafter be condu
under Dr. A. L. Hirleman instead of Dr. W. M. MacKellar.


NOTICE REGARDING MEAT INSPECTION. '
CLEANING TANK CARS.

Reports indicate that inspectors are meeting opposition in their efforts to v'lt
tank cars properly cleaned before being loaded at official establishments with e.''
fat.
Attention is directed to the regulation which requires that the interiors of all
cars about to be used for the transportation of any meat food product shall bW.
fully inspected by bureau employees, who shall enter each tank with a liglt
examine all parts of the interior. Such examination is necessary even t*oflh-
last previous content was edible. Tanks found to be unclean shall be made dl*a4
determined by reinspection before any meat food product is placed t1prein. *


ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL MEAT INSi-CTION
JANUARY, 1921.

Station. Cattle. Calves. Sheep. goats.

Chicago.... ............................ 154,508 48,083 279,979 389
Fort Worth............................... 15,659 16,425 5,820 11
Kansas City............................... 75,096 19.341 12,76.......
National Stock Yards.................... 31,251 7,938 32,55 .............
Omaha................................ 73,251 6,470 136,270 8 a:
St. Louiis................................ 15,489 3,113 5,062 ............
Sioun City............................... 28,b5. 2,373 20, 46 ..... ....
South St. Joseph........................ 27,042 5,406 70,465
South St. Pa ............... .......... 19,05 27,580 20,821 ..... ..... ,
All other establishments................... 849,600 145,314 373,172 1
Total: January, 1921 ................ 689,506 282,043 1,068,34 "'250
January, 1920................ 32,231 305,)25 9546 1 5
7 months ended January, 19. 5,231,351L 2,180,070 7, 277,l .34
7monthsended January, 192. 6,474,1 2, 2,7332 8B10,8 1 2 499S' kO

Horses slaughtered, at all establishments, January, 1921,19L .


*. "m

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...TS OF FOOD ANIMALS AND OF MEATS AND MEAT FOOD
:.. '. PRODUCTS.

be statements following show the imports of food animals and of meats and meat
ad products inspected by the Bureau of Animal Industry during January, 1921,
th figure for other periods for comparison.

T'ivinrlm nf nffn,.) n *-' 7r.ao


Country of export. Cattle. Swine. Sheep. Goats.

Wi-M-."........................................................ 3, 52 1 902 .........
amncn......................... .................... 9,695 15 3,311 10
Britain ................................................. 266 ..............................
STota: January, 1921..................................... 13,543 16 4,213 10
January, 19211.................................... 22, 31 22 7,057 645
7 months ended January, 1921.................. 264,758 647 149, 338 3. 155
7 months ended January, 1920.................. 497,041 4,108 150, 467 5, P31


S. Imports of meats and meat food products.
..." '* *'*


1, Fresh and refrigera
. C. country of export.
; -I"


Beef.


ted.


Other.


Canned
and cured.


Other
products.


Tota.
weight.


Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds.
Argentina................................ 785,187 1,265,504 ........................ 2,050,691
Australia.................................. ............ 100,368 ....... ..... ........ 100,368
.Cnada...=................................ 1,987,891 288,751 19, 874 100 2,296,616
NeW Zeiland.............................. ............ 20,911,864 23,832 ............ 20,935,696
: runguay................................ 363,515 83,160 18,471 49,050 514, 196
Other countries............................ ............ ............ 24,899 47,933 72,832
Total: January, IS21 ............... 3,136,593 22,649,647 87,076 97,083 25,970,399
January, 1920 ............... 1,438,676 830,525 101,179 1,616,013 3, 98,393
7 months ended January,1921. 23,204,923 85 677,254 4,726,284 5,276,610 121, 85,071
7 months ended January, 1920. 20,342,315 9,014,362 1, 173,842 4,221,855 34,752,374

Condemned in January, 192L: Mutton, 750 pounds.
Refused entry: Park, 1,087 pounds.

FOREIGN OFFICIALS AUTHORIZED TO SIGN INSPECTION CERTIFI-
CATES FOR MEAT AND PRODUCTS FOR IMPORTATION INTO THE
UNITED STATES.

The following are additional names, addresses, and facsimile signatures of foreign
national Government officials authorized to sign and issue certificates of inspection
for meat and meat food products offered for importation into the United States:


Country, name, and address. Signature.

L inA


Waite J. E. Mackenzie.

PA.Vitor Barr
Victor Barron.


pc'- #^j p, 1 .


:. ... .. ...
! '.,,i: : ., :.. : .. 1'. : ':,:, .: ;.*. ? ,i:. "..i..; ..:,


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ut jLU u .Lu I.V LU& ua auU.JUI JALUtU ]JUU. pu. umigJ.CLAu rti UL U A U LIut amtuo eUtinA.M
revoked by his national Government. "

Dr. Adam Gibson.

INSPECTION AND TESTING OF ANIMALS FOR CANADAl
The following change has been made in the list of practicing veterinaria.na
tered by the bureau and authorized to inspect and test with mallein, horses,
and asses intended for export to Canada:
Name Added to ULIt. "
Dr. Peter T. Tweed, Union Stock Yards, Spokane, Wash.


INSTRUCTIONS CONCERNING THE TUBERCULIN TESTING OF CATTl:I
FOR EXPORTATION TO AND IMPORTATION FROM CANADA. -,
The attention of bureau inspectors engaged in Canadian import and export ip
tion and others concerned is directed to Amendment 6 of B. A. I. Order 266. Thi(
amendment, which is to become effective May 1, 1921, makes a material change&|
in paragraph 2, Regulation 37, of B. A. I. Order 266, as now operative under Amla;nd!-
ment 4. Such modification of the regulations has been made with the understandiiig1
that the Canadian veterinary director general is to maintain a list of veterinariae
practicing in Canada, selected through special examination and authorized to apply"
the tuberculin test to dairy and breeding cattle in Canada for shipment to the UfiteiSi
States. It is not intended by the Canadian authorities to furnish the bureau'with a.
list of the names of such veterinarians. The endorsement of a salaried veternarin0aiiBg
of the Canadian department of agriculture on a satisfactory test certificate is to beW.
accepted by the bureau as a guaranty that the veterinarian applying the test ha|'.
been duly authorized by Canada.
The following reciprocal change has been made by the Canadian authorities as. :
amendment to section 39 of the Canadian regulations: .
Cattle for breeding purposes and milk production, six montheaold or over, it'
unaccompanied by a satisfactory tuberculin test chart dated not more than. 60 d]ij:p i
prior to the date of entry and signed or indorsed by a veterinarian of the United Statnei!
Bureau of Animal Industry, must be detained in quarantine for such period asn 'W
be deemed necessary, and subjected to the tuberculin test; cattle reacting theretWi
must be returned to the United States or slaughtered without compensation. 'A
It is understood that this amendment becomes effective May 1, 1921, simultaneously
with bureau Amendment 6.
It is thus provided that in addition to tests applied by bureau inspectors or.
Canadian Government veterinarians at border ports of entry, dairy and bre6 -'
cattle for shipment to Canada may be accompanied by certificates indorsed byH'l:l|
bureau inspector. '
Veterinarians whose test certificates will be eligible for endorsement are rga
employed State inspectors and other veterinarians approved for testing -acretdi
herds. Practicihg veterinarians authorized to test cattle for interstate skipoi.
but who have not qualified to test cattle in accordance with the..aedited- l
plan will not be eligible for testing cattle for shipment to Canada. Tuberculin :
may be applied by any bureau inspector whose name has been placed upon a
of bureau inspectors maintained by the Canadian department of agriculture


..1
.. ,: .. l







I. SlRVTOR AN D REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 21

t;ted in Service MAnounementa for March, 1919, and any such bureau inspector
be eligible to indome tuberculin-test certificates of veterinarians approved for
."accredited herds in accordance with this recent amendment to the Canadian



C UICNSES AND PERMITS FOR VETERINARY BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS.

i ,ea for the manufacture and permits for the importation of veterinary biological
Sp oducti'have been issued as follows for the year 1921, under the act of Congress of
.atch 4, 1918 (37 Stat., 832), the regulations made thereunder (B. A. I. Order 265
pd amendments thereto):


Name, location, and address of firm.


Lederde Antitoxin Laboratories, Mid-
dletown Road near Pearl River
N. Y. (Mailing address, Pearl
River.)
Peters Serum Co., northwest corner
South Second and Myers Avenue,
Kansas City, Kans. (Mailing ad-
dress, 1612 West Sixteenth Street,
Kansas City, Mo.)
Ralston Serum Co., Seventy.eighth
and Serum Avenue, Ralston, Nebr.
Jenson-Salsbery Laboratories (Inc.),
520 West Pennway, Kansas City,
Mo.
Fort Dodge Serum CC' (Inc.), 6001
Central Avenue, Fort Dodge, Iowa.
Ohio Vaccine Co., near Woodruff and
Neil Avenues, Columbus, Ohio.
(Mading address, Station B.)


Products.


Blackleg aggression.


Antihog-cholera serum; Hog-cholera virus.


Antihog-cholera serum; Hog-cholera virus.
Bovine-abortion vaccine.

Normal horse serum.
Mixed-infection bacterin (for fowls).


.i 8. Veterinary License No. 160, issued January 31, 1921, to the Ohio State Uni-
: i, ty, College of Veterinary Medicine, Columbus, Ohio, was terminated on February
: 2, 1921, and reissued under the name of the Ohio Vaccine Co.
U S. Veterinary Permit No. 2 was issued on February 5, 1921, to the Pasteur Labora-
I aie of America, 366 West Eleventh Street, New York, N. Y., covering the importa-
tion of antianthrax serum, antistreptococcic serum, and antitetanic serum produced
'Iy Labpasteur Veterinary Department, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France, for the
year 1921.

BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS MANUFACTURED BY LICENSED ESTABLISH-
SIENTS AND PLACED IN FINAL CONTAINERS DURING THE CALENDAR
YEAR 1920.
SAggressins.
lacklegaggressin................................cubic centimeters.. 19,346,973
itmckleg filtrate.............................................. do.... 4,907,021

Antisera.
;'" ntiabortions era (bovine)........................ cubic centimeters.. 35,946
Antiabortion. ers (equine).....................................do.... 20,659
.... Aiathax per..............................................do.... 12,159,019


Antiblackleg.sera............................................ do....
.a titolinup.sesa.............................................do....
.Atidit emp.er era (canine) .......... ..................do....
Antidistemper sera (equine).................................. do....
An; tihemorrhagic-septicemia sera (bovine)......................do....
h. Antihemorrhagic-septicemia sera (equine) ..................... do....


308,390
121,560
262, 074
14,740
804, 621
67,580


I:" "l... "
.* ,U.m
No.*
9.
:,* .. 9






* :. ." 0




* j: 414
101

112:, ... 1
1110 .


Date.


b-I


Feb. 8


...do.....


Feb. 15
Feb. 12


Feb.
Feb.










Antihemorrhagic-septicemia sera (porcine) ....................... do-...
Anti-influenza sera (equine)....................................do....
Antimixed-infection sera (porcine) ............................... do....
Antiscours sera (bovine)........................................do...
Antiscours sera (porcine).................. .-...................do...
Antistreptococcic sera (equine) ................................. do.....
Antitetanic sera................................................. do.....
Normal sera.................................................... do-....

Bacterial filtrates.
Bacterial filtrates (phylacogens)...................... cubic centimeters..


Barterins (killed organisms).


Abortion bacterins (bovine)....................... cubic centimeters..
Abortion bacterins (equine).........---........................do....
Abortion bacterins (porcine) .................................... do.....
Autogenous bacterins...........................................do....
Colon bacterins (bovine)........................................do-...
Colon bacterins (equine)........................................ do....
Distemper bacterins (canine)................................... do....
Distemper bacterins (equine)....................................do... -
Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (avian) .....................do....
Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (bovine).... ............... do....,
Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (equine)..................... do....
Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (lepinel .......................do....
Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (ovine)....................... do....
Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (porcine).......................do....
Influenza bacterins (equine)....................................doses..
Influenza bacterins (equine)........................ cubic centimeters..
Keratitis bacterins (bovine)..................................... do....
Mastitis bacterins (bovine) ..................................... do....
Metritis bacterins (bovine)..................................... do....
Mixed-infection bacterins (avian')..............................d....
Mixed-infection bacterins (bovine)............................ ....
Mixed-infection bacterins (canine)..............................do....
Mixed-infection bacterin (equine)..............................doses..
Mixed-infection bacterin (equine).................... cubic centimeters..
Mixed-infection bacterins (lepine).............................. do ....
Mixed-infection bacterins (ovine)...............................do....
Mixed-infection bacterins (porcine).............................do....
Navel-infection bacterins (equine)............................... do....
Pneumonia bacterins (equine).................................. do... -
Rhinitis mixed bacterins (porcine)............................. do....
Scours bacterins (bovine)....................................... do....
Scours bacterins (porcine)..................................... do....
Staphylococcic bacterins (canine).............................. do....
Staphylococcic bacterins (equine).............................. do....
Streptococcic bacterins (equine).................................do....
Suipestifer bacterins............................................do....


. 13,.,. I
3, 062,226..;

4,000
26, 10


356, 691
14,542 Is
427, 860 .i
2, 768,464
196,698..
11, 265
991,087
4, 002, 90
19, iet" :
1,155,414H
99,000M
253, 81
87, 69-
98,148
294,604:!
15, 8',
25;4
572,O

4, 20
5,705,..
164,
46,445
25-010


.1,5 3,
575,
1,050j-(

148,
1,810fli
19, B


388,





.I

H i SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 28

Diagnostic agents.
lein(dia ), ..................................... ........ doses. 36,400
Mallein (solition)................................cubic centimeters.. 36, 994
i Tuberculin (disks)...........................................doses.. 98, 660
a uberculin (solution).............................cubic centimeters.. 1,963,909

:Serobacterins and serovaccines.
Abortion serobacterins and serovaccines (bovine) .... cubic centimeters.. 140,733
I bortion serobacterins (equine).................................do.... 12,261
F. 7Distemper serobacterine (canine)............................ do.... 41, 781
gif: Iflenza serobacterins (equine)...............................do.... 1, 215, 905
SPyogenes bacillus serobacterins (bovine).... ..................do.... 6,126

Vaccines, viruses, and toxins.

Abortion vaccines (bovine) (living organisms) .......cubic centimeters.. 299, 167
.- Anthrax vaccines............................................ doses.. 613, 760
( Anthrax vaccines................................ cubic centimeters.. 2, 549, 394
i Blackleg vaccines (pellets and powder)........................doses.. 2,701, 844
Blackleg vaccines (liquid)........................ cubic centimeters.. 598,339
Chicken-pox vaccine.........................................do.. 198,371
Chicken-pox virus...................................... doses.. 11,310
I Hemorrhagic-septicemia vaccines bovinei (attenuated organisms), cubic
centimeters....................................................... 410,055
S Hemorrhagic-septicemia vaccines (porcine) (attenuated organisms), cubic
1 centimeters......................................................... 70, 270
Rabies vaccine (virus)....... ...............................doses.. 2, 672
Rabies vaccine (virus).............................cubic centimeters.. 5,169
Tetanus toxin ................................................ do.... 3,800


QUANTITIES OF ANTIHOG-CHOLERA SERUM AND HOG-CHOLERA VIRUS
PRODUCED DURING JANUARY, 1921.

Serum. Simultaneous virus.
Mots .___ Hyperim-
SMonths. munizing
Ordinary. Clear. Total. Ordinary. Clear. virus.


auinary...................


e.c. c. c. C.C. c.c. c. c. e.
6,983,284 1,994,371 8,977,655 1, 002, 252 None. 3,509,493


SUMMARY OF TUBERCULOSIS-ERADICATION WORK IN COOPERATION
WITH STATES, JANUARY, 1921.

Tuberculin tests. Total Total
________ once- as-
tested cred-
Stations. States. Hords free ited Inspector in charge. State official.
Herds Cattle Re- herds herds
lots. tested. acted. in the in the
State. State.

iS ny............ N. Y.. 192 5,759 1,012 770 67 H. B. Leonard.... D. W. McLaury,
: Albany.
tlant............ Ga.... 54 1,818 3 977 8 W. M. MacKellar P. F. Bahnsen, At-
lanta.
ugust............ Me.... 117 1,707 87 1,487 271 J. B. Reidy ...... W. H. Lynch, Au-
gusta.
ti ore.......... Md.... 138 1,932 111 562 125 T. A. Ladson..... R. C. Reed, Balti-
more.











Summary of


tuberculois-eradication -pork Vi coopnad sit1 itis,
1921-CoDtinued.
i ..+- :


Tuberculin tests. Total Total ".
-- -- one- so- .
Tested cred-
StationL. States. Herds free ited Inspector n ehwage. Stateoflt
er Cattle Re- herds herds
lots tested. acted. in the in the
lots- State. State.


Birmingham.......
Bismarck..........
Boise...............
Boston.............
Do.............
Do.............
Charleston.........
Cheyenne..........
Chicago............
Columbia..........
Columbus..........
Des Moines.........
Fort Worth........
Frankfort...........
Harrisburg.........
Hartford............
Helena..............
Indianapolis.......
Jackson............
Jefferson City......
Lansing.............
Lincoln............
Little Rock........
Madison............
Montpelier.........
Nashville..........
New Orleans.......
Oklahoma..........
Olympia...........
Pierre..............
Portland...........
Richmond.........
Do.............
St. Paul............
Salt Lake City.....
Do..............
Tallahassee.........
Topeka............
Trenton............
Do..............
Washington........
Do.............


Ala. ..
N.Dak.
Idaho.
Mass..
R. I...
N. H..
W.Va.
Wyo..
m.....
8. C...
Ohio..
Iowa..
Tex...
Ky....
Pa....
Conn..
Mont..
Ind...
Miss...
Mo....
Mich..
Nebr..
Ark...
Wis...
Vt....
Tenn..
La....
Okla..
Wash.
B.Dak.
Oreg..
Va....
N. C..
Minn..

Utah..
Nev...
Fla....
Kans..
N. J...
. Del..
D.C..
Miscel.


1,6838

1,601

I
S3
841

SC

315
1,014
746
251
441
564
121
141
1,478
331
861
39!
529


1,208


27.
177
304


25M
1,09S
654
98E
1,184
1,239

1,78E
223



11


7,0451117.305l 4,6571 28,1081 5,502


34
187
14
30
6
15
66


162
52
289
131
1
97
444
30
77
235
67
78
179
67
22
524
292
122
30
12
23
29
52
413
187
744
42
1
'I
48
156
209
36
a


C. J. Becker.......
H. H. Cohenour...
W. A. Sullivan....
E. A. Crossman...
.....do..........
.....do.............
Geo. W. Neff......
Jno. T. Dallas.....
J. J. Lintner......
W. K. Lewis......
Leo E. Davis......
F. H. Thompson..
H. Grafke.........
W. F. Biles.......
P. E. Quinn......
E. I. Smith .......
R. Snyder.......
E. B. Haskin.....
J. A. Barger.......
Ralph Graham....
T. S. Rich........
C. H. Hays........
J. H. Bux .........
J. L Healy........
A. J. DeFasset....
Robert Jay........
R. W. Tuck.......
C. F. Harring8at..C
B. 0. Fladness....
J. O. Wilson......
B. B. Faster.......
R. E. Brookbank.
....,do-...- .....
W. J. Frets.......
F. E. Murray.....
.....do.............
0 G. Fish.........
H. M. Graefe......
W. G. MiddIptWn..
.....do.............
J. A. Kiernan.....
.....do.............


C. A.
W. PF.
marck.
J. D. Adam,
L. H. How.at
ton.
J. a. Pol aid,


tJ.H.StwartOa 4
B. F. Darel,
enne.
A. T. PeteBafeS
field. -,
W. K. Lewa%&
lumbil. .:j
T. A. Burned
lumbus. iL'
P. nMalcm
Moines. .
L. 0. Clond, xI .
Worth.
W. C. Ni.m.Aun,
Frankfort.
T. E. Muane, n3 i


W.J. Butler, Heheln.
Indianapolia. C'
H. ChdwNoriatt
son.
D. F. Luckey, J3f
fersan City.. 2
H. H. flaUad
Lansing.
W. T. Spencer, I
cola. -.
R. M. Gow, LIsai.
Rock.
C. P. Norgord, Ma$,
son. ':.
E.S. Brigham, M 't-
MrJacob NaI1kW
E. P. Flower, BagD
Roe ..
Oklahoma. -
L. OC. P1elt K
Olympi. ..
A. B. B
Pierre. :
W. DMi.Ly

Wm. Moore,T
C. E. CottoqP
P a l .. + *; : .:.*i,
R. W.H
Edw. Rerd
J. W.De Hil
Y. if. Mercer
ton.
We ldeyr Wei


Total......... ......






i .iRVIC AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 25

RESULTS OF PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OP LAWS.
S[P"Ialties have been imposed in prosecutions for violations of regulatory laws,
kSepcnsd to the bureau, as follows:
Live-Stock Quarantine Law.
I.:t. Louis-San Francisco Railway Co. (2 cases), $200 fines and costs.
Twenty-Eight-Honr Law.
.P*.ittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway Co. (43 cases), $4,300 fines
i TIew York Central Railroad Co. (8 cases), $800 fines.
S~ ;:Philadelphia & Reading Railway Co., $100 fine and $17.62 costs.
| Mimouri Pacific Railway System, $100 fine and costs.
i.. Wabash Railway Co. (2 cases), $100 fines and costs.
:Norfolk & Western Railway Co., $125 fine and costs.
.. St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad (3 cases), $300 fines and costa.
aA eo nMeat-Imnpection Law.
SMax Anderson and Leo Tarlow, New York, N. Y., $25 fine.


i DR. C. W. LARSON APPOINTED CHIEF OF THE DAIRY DIVISION.
a Effective February 15, 1921, B. H. Rawl relinquished his direct responsibilities
* as Chief of the Dairy Division to devote his entire time to his work as assistant chief
/ of the bureau. Mr. Rawl has been Chief of the Dairy Division since 1909, and in
addition has served as Assistant Chief of the Bureau of Animal Industrysince October,
1018.
Dr. 0. W. Larson, Assistant Chief of the Dairy Division, is Mr. Rawl's successor as
chief of that division. Dr. Larson is a graduate of the Iowa State College of Agri-
culture, has a master's degree from the Pennsylvania State College, and a doctor's
degree from Columbia University. He came to the department in May, 1917.


I EMPLOYEES REQUESTED TO ASSIST THE DEPARTMENT'S PRESS-
CLIPPING SERVICE.
To obtain a more adequate press-clipping service for the bureau and for the depart-
ment as a whole, employees are requested to forward promptly to the chief of the
bureau any press items they may see pertaining to the work of the bureau or to other
branches of the department. Keeping department workers fully informed of what
ithe press is publishing about various branches of official work is highly desirable.
Many times such items furnish information and suggestions, obtainable in no other
Sway, which enable the department to plan its work and increase its service.
The clippings likely to be most useful are those found in newspapers, agricultural
ju arals, trade publications, magazines, or other periodicals, and employees are
trequested to remember that the department is interested in the entire field of agri-
lturd and allied fields, such as forestry, good roads, and other lines of work covered
'Ar.the department's activities.
i:'jtis requested that you simply clip the items, indicate the name of the publication
Okm which taken and the date of issue, and forward the items to the chief of the bureau.
*0o letter of transmittal is necessary. For convenience Form A-2 nmay be used.
Iome duplication of items will result, of course, but in the case of notices affecting the
k of more than one branch of the department, this will be advantageous. The
iQrpabwtion. of all employees is earnestly requested in the development of this service.


h. .9:












a number of cities-San Francisco; Denver; 1Albuquerque; Portland, Oreg.;and.
York-for the purpose of bringing about closer contact and cooperation be .
representatives of the different branches of the department. The deptmi4ai l
much interested in the possibilities of such organizations among its employees
inclined to encourage their formation. It is thought that they not only cat."
interests that will strengthen the department from within but that they alo
effective in bringing about better understanding and appreciation of the de
work on the part of people in the cities. Attention is called to these club wit. .
idea that officers in charge of stations may find it desirable to promote local or...
nations of this character.

AMENDMENT TO ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS.
LEAVE OF ABSENCE. : ..
Memorandum 303 of the Office of the Secretary, dated February 4, 1920, effeoat
January 2, 1920, amending the fiscal. regulations, was published in part in SrvI
and Regulatory Announcements for February, 1920, page 26, but in that publicatid
one paragraph was omitted. The amendments are given in full below, the paragu
in question being shown in italics.
Paragraph 93 of the Administrative Regulations is amended to read as follows
"93. Leave confined to current calendar year.-Except as provided in paragraph I
as amended by Memorandum No. 283, leave of absence is not cumulative. '"
unused leave of one calendar year may not be taken in a subsequent year. Le
may not be granted to be used in one year and charged to a subsequent year."
Paragraph 118 is amended by the addition of the following paragraph:
"An employee who, at the end of the calendar year, has exhausted all dick
annual leave, is on indefinite leave without pay on account of illness, and is p
cally unable to report for duty, may be granted sick leave, and, also if necessary, a
leave, because of continued illness, beginning with January 2 of the succeeding
dar year without actually reporting for duty in person. Thereafter all leave
tions shall apply to such employees except that no retroactive deduction will'be .
from such annual leave. An employee thus restored to a pay status, who in the
leave period again exhausts all sick and annual leave on account of tckness eouiti"
ing over from the preceding year will -have no leave-with-pay privileges du]iirg4i
remainder of the calendar year, and any further absence will be without pay.:
without retroactive deduction.
"Each such case shall be considered on its merits and be submitted to the .SeererftS
approval through the chief clerk of the department. This regulation shall not app
employees who, at the end of the calendar year, are on leave without pay for any other rat
than sickness."
Paragraph 136 is amended to read as follows:
"136.. Basis for deduction from annual leave.-Except as otherwise provided ifl
graph 118, a proportionate deduction from allowance of annual leave shall ba.:'
in the District of Columbia at the rate of 1 day for each 12 days or multiples t
for furlough or leave without pay during the calendar year; and outside of the D'I
of Columbia at the rate of 1 day for each 24 days or multiples thereof. In ever
an application for leave without pay to modify the excess of leave taken -wil
required."

NEW PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU. ,
[The bureau keeps no general mailing list for sending publications to individual employees. w
new publication is issued one or more copies are usually sent to each officer in charge of a statseoff. teJU
tonal copies are desired for distribution to members of the force or for other use they will baeseat obf












r4ont. By J. B. Bain, R. J. Poseon, and Ralph P. Hotia, Dairy Division. Pp. 18,
lg.. 2.
pjOFarmers' Bulletin 767. Goose Raising. Revision by Alfred R. Lee and George W.
'tstett, Animal Husbandry, Division. Pp. 22, figs. 12.
: &anners' Bulletin 834. Hog Cholera. Revision by M. Dorset, Biochemic
*1ilon, and U. G. Houck, Division of Hog-Cholera Control. Pp. 31, figs. 11.
rvestigations of the Germicidal Value of Some of the Chlorin Disinfectants. By
Wi. Tilley, Biochemic Division. In Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. XX,
2. A-63. Pp. 85-110.
niubentonia longifolia (Coffee Bean), a Poisonous Plant. By C. Dwight Marsh
I.A. B. Clawson, Pathological Division. In Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol.
No. 8. A-54. Pp. 507-513, pl. 1.
lation and Causation. By Sewall Wright, Animal Husbandry Division. In
of Agricultural Research, Vol. XX, No. 7. A-55. Pp. 557-585, figs. 16.


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY.
t JoHN R. MOHLER.
J* tant Chief: B. H. RAwL.
to the Chief: CHARLES C. CARROLL.
f w Clerk: J. R. ComnAN.
BAi : D. S. BURCH.
Asimal Husbandry Division: GEORGE M. ROMMEL, chief.
iodhemic Division: M., DORSET, chief.
oiry Division: C. W. LARSON, chief.
ion of Hog-Cholera Control: U. G. Houcx, chief.
vision oJ Virus-Serum Control: D. 1. SKIDMORE, chief.
AlId Inspection Division: A. W. MILLER, chief.
est Inspection Division: R. P. STEDDOM, chief.
ileaneous Division A. M. FARRINGTON, chief.
%Ithological Division: JoNw S. BUCKLEY, chief.
'Quarantine Division: RICHARD W. HICKMAN, chief.
tick Eradication Division: R. A. RAMSAY, chief.
:Tuwculosis Eradication Division: J. A. KIERNAN,. Chief.
Soologial Division: B. H. RaNSOM, chief.
*wriaent Station: E. C. SCHROEDER, superintendent.
Jtwof Accounts: A. C. DAVIS in charge.
P:paintment Section: GEORGE H. RUSSELL in charge.



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PAGE 1

i. R. A.-13. A. I. 166. BUREAU OF AN IMAL INDUST Y. JOHN R MOHLER, CmEF 01' BUREAU. SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. FEBRUARY, 1921. [This publication il!I issued monthly for the dissemination of information, instructions, rulings, etc., concerning the work of the Bureau of Animal Industry. Free distribution is limited to persons in the service of the bureau, establishments at which the Federal meat inspection is conducted, public officers whose duties make it desira ble for them to have such information, and journals especially concerned. Others desiring copies may obt ain them from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., at 5 cents each, or 50 cents a year. A supply will be sent to each official in charg e of a station or branch of the bureau service, who should promptly distribute copies to mem bers of his force. A file should be kept at each station for reference.] CONTENTS. Pa?e Changes in directory......................... 17 Notice regarding meat inspection. . • . . . . • • • • • 18 Cleaning tank cars.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . . 18 Animals slaughtered under Federal meat inspection. . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Imports of food animals and of meats and meat food products........................ 19 Foreign officials authorized to sign inspection certificates for meat and products for im-portationinto the United States........... 19 Inspection and testing of animals for Can-ada....................................... 20 Instructions concerning the tuberculin testing of cattle for exportation to and importation from Canada.............................. 20 Licenses and permits for veterinary biological products. • • • • • . • •• • •• • • . • • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 21 Biological-products manufactured by licensed establishments and p laced in final containPage. ers during the calendar yea 1920.. . . . . . . . . 21 Quantities of antihog-cholera serum and hog cholera virus produced during the month of January, 1921.............................. 23 Summary of tuberculosis-eradication work in cooperation with States, January, 1921..... 23 Results of prosecutions for violations oflaws.. 25 Dr.C. w. Larson appointed Chief of the Dairy Division....... . . . . . . . • . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Employees requested to assist the de p art-ment's press-clipping service.. . . . . . . . . . • . . 25 Contact clqbs o! department employees...... 2& Amendment to Administrative Regulations. 26 New publications of the bureau.............. 26, Organization of the Bureau of Animal Indus-try........................................ 27 CHANGES IN DIRECTORY. Meat Inspection Inaugurated. 402. Troco Nut Butter Co., 3702-3712 Iron Street, Chicago, Ill. Meat Inspection Reinaugurated Following Suspension, 427. Richardson & Robbin s Co., Dover, Del. (substation of Philadelphia). Changes in Names of Official Establishments. 12-D. Kingan Provision Co., and P. T. Geo rge & Co. and Kingan & Co. , Baltimorer Md., in.stead of Kingan Provision Co., and P. T. George & Co., and K:ingan & Co. ( ~-----~~. 5. Central F0~ Ill., instead of Eney S 37598-21 I I II I ... ___ ._ 17 U.S. DE

PAGE 2

18 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [February, Change in Address of Official Establishment. 314. C. Hollenbach, 2653 Ogden Avenue, Chicago, Ill., instead of 1317 South Oakley Avenue. Station Added. Dover, Del., meat inspection (substation of Philadelphia, Pa.). Station Discontinued. Phoenix, Ariz., hog-cholera control. Change of Inspect or in Charge. Little Rock, Ark., Dr . W. A. McDonald (acting), instead of Dr. G. W. Rosenberger. Change in Address of In spector in Charge. Dr. R. M. Mullings, 6 Federal Building, Jersey City, N. J., instead of 20 Federal Building. N o tes. Meat inspection extended at Establishment 20-B, Wilson & Co., Cambridge, Mass., to include T. :M. Sinclair & Co. (Ltd.); and at Establishment No. 20, Wilson& Co. (Inc.), New York , N. Y., to include Wilson-Martin Co. The work of tuberculosis eradication at Atlanta, Ga., will h e reafter be conducted under Dr. A. L. Hirleman instead of Dr. W. M. MacKellar. NOTICE REGARDING MEAT INSPECTION. CLEANING TANK CARS. Reports indicate that inspectors are meeting opposition in their efforts to have tank cars properly cleaned before being loaded at official establishments with edible fat. Attention is directed to the regulation which requires that the interiors of all tank cars about to be used for the transportation of any meat food product shall be care fully inspected by bmeau employees, who shall enter each tank with a light and examine all parts of the interior. Such examination is necessary even though the last preYious content was edible. Tanks found to be unclean shall be made clean as determined by reinspection before any meat food product is placed therein. ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL MEAT INSPECTION, JA~UARY, 1921. Station. Cattle. Calves. Sheep . Goats. Swine. Chicago .................................... 154,508 48,0S3 279,979 39 77i.137 Fort "'Yorth ............................... 15,659 16,425 5 20 11 2.'i, 504 Kansas City ............................... 75,096 19,341 12:i:~6 -24!,n2 -. -... -... Nationa! Stock Yards .....•................ :n,2s1 7,938 32,~55 -liO, 711 Omaha .................................... 73,251 6,470 136,270 33 215. i-16 St. Louis .................................. 15,489 3,113 .5,0G2 --190,?38 Sion'< City .............•................... 2R,b.'>8 2,373 20,426 -.... . ....... 111,~a1 South St. Joseph .......................... 27,042 5,406 70,465 3 13-1, 701 South St. Paul ...........•................ 19,052 27,580 20,821 ......... 220,719 All other establishments ................... 249,600 145,314 373,172 153 2,249,328 --Total: January, 1921. ......••••.•.... 689,506 282,043 1,068,346 239 4,347,306 Januarv, 1920 ................. 832,231 30.'i,125 954,607 1,581 5,078,521 7 months ended January, 1921. 5,231 ,35 1 2,180.070 7,277,603 17,341\ 20,961,1P9 7 monihs ended January, 1920. 6,474,104 2,372,332 8,516,512 53,480 22,655,644 Horses slaughtered, at all establishments, January, 1921, 191,

PAGE 3

1():.! 1.] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUN El\fENTS. 19 IMPORTS OF FOOD ANIMALS AND OF MEATS AND MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS. The statements following show the imports of food animals and of meats and meat food products inspected by the Bureau of Animal Industry during January, 1921, with :figures for other periods for comparison. Imports of jood animals. Country of export. C a ttle. Swine. S heep. Goat~. Mexico ........••.•..... ••.••••• 3 ,5~ 2 1 902 -......... Canada .......•....................................... . ......... !l, 695 15 3 ,311 10 Great Britain .................................................. 266 ------------Total: Janu:i.ry, 1921 ....•.•••••........••.•.............. 13,5-t3 16 4,213 January, 1920 ...................•................ . 22,~ 3 1 22 7,0 5 7 7 months ended January, 1921. .................... 2f\4, 75 647 149,338 7 months ended January, 1920 .•••.........•....... 4!l7,041 4,108 150,467 Imports of meats and meat food products. Fresh and refrigerated. Country of export. Beef. Other. Pounds. Poun-ts. Arientina ............•.........•.•.••.•.•. 78.5, 187 1,265,504 Australia ..•••.............................. ------100,368 Canada ................................. •• 1,987,891 288,751 New Zealand .•..••........................ ---20,911,864 Uruguay .................................. 363,515 83,160 Other countries .•....................•..... . -...... -. -............ -.. Total: January, ll''.?l. ...•.•••••••.••. 3,136,593 22,649,647 Januarh, 1920 ................. 1,433,676 830,525 7 mont 1s ended January, l!l21. 31,204,923 85 677,254 7 months ended January, 1920. 20,342,315 9,014,362 Condemned m January, 1921: Mutton, 750 pounds. Refused entry: Pork, 1,087 pounds. Canned and cured. Pounds. -.............. ig;s14 23,8:i2 18,471 24,899 87,076 101,179 4,726,284 1,173,842 Other prriducts. Pounds. .. . . . . . . . . . . . ....... . .... 100 ............... 49,050 47,933 97,0 8 3 1,61 6 ,013 5,270,610 4,221,855 10 61.5 3 , I S 5 5 ,~31 Tota, weight. Pound.~. 2,0 50,691 100,368 2 ,296,616 20,935,696 514,190 72,832 25,970,399 3,98fi,393 121,885,071 34,752,374 FOREIGN OFFICIALS CATES FOR MEAT UNITED STATES. AUTHORIZED TO SIGN INSPECTION CERTIFI AND PRODUCTS FOR IMPORTATION INTO THE The following are additional names, addresses, and facsimile signatures of foreign national Government officials authorized to sign and issue certificates of inspection for meat and meat food products offered for importation into the United States : Country, name, and address. Signature. cm:-.A. Walter J.E. Mackenzie. SPAIN. '1/" .._d;.,/-fl ~Victor Barron. /Jr~u->------------------------------------

PAGE 4

20 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [February, Name Removed from List. Name of a foreign official whose authority to sign and issue foreign meat-inspection certificates for meat and meat food products exported to the United States has been revoked by his national Government. CHINA. Dr. Adam Gibson. INSPECTION AND TESTING OF ANIMALS FOR CANADA. The following change has been made in the list of practicing veterinarians regis tered by the bureau and authorized to inspect and test with mallein, horses, mules, and asses intended for export to Canada: Name Added to List. Dr. Peter T. Tweed, Union Stock Yards, Spokane, Wash. INSTRUCTIONS CONCERNING THE TUBERCULIN TESTING OF CATTLE FOR EXPORTATION TO AND IMPORTATION FROM CANADA. The attention of bureau inspectors engaged in Canadian import and export inspec tion and others concerned is directed to Amendment 6 of B. A. I. Order 266. This amendment, which is to become effective May 1, 1921, makes a material change in paragraph 2, Regulation 37, of B. A. I. Order 266, as now operative under Amendment 4. Such modification of the regulations has been made with the understanding that the Canadian veterinary director general is to maintain a iist of veterinarians practicing in Canada, selected through special examination and authorized to apply the tuberculin test to dairy and breeding cattle in Canada for shipment to the United States. It is not intended by the Canadian authorities to furnish the bureau with a list of the names of sueh veterinarians. The indorsement of a salaried veterinarian of the Canadian department of agriculture on a satisfactory test certificate is to be accepted by the bureau as a guaranty that the veterinarian applying the test has been duly authorized by Canada. The following reciprocal change has been made by the Canadian authorities as an amendment to section 39 of the Canadian regulations: Cattle for breeding purposes and milk production, six months old or over, if unaccompanied by a satisfactory tuberculin test chart dated not more than 60 days prior to the date of entry and signed or indorsed by a veterinarian of the United States Bureau of Animal Industry, must be detained in quarantine for such period as may be deemed necessary, and subjected to the tuberculin test; cattle reacting thereto must be returned to the United States or slaughtered without compensation. It is understood that this amendment becomes effective May 1, 1921, simultaneously with bureau Amendment 6. It is thus provided that in addition to tests applied by bureau inspectors or by Canadian Government veterinarians at border ports of entry, dairy and breeding cattle for shipment to Canada may be accompanied by certifl:cates indorsed by a bureau inspector. Veterinarians whose test certificates will be eligible for indorsement are regularly employed State inspectors and other veterinarians approved for testing a-ccredited herds. Practicing veterinarians authorized to test cattle for interstate shipment but who have not qualified to test cattle in accordance with the accredited-herd plan will not be eligible for testing cattle for shipment to Canada. Tuberculin tests may be applied by any bureau inspector whose nama has been pl~ed upon a list of bureau inspectors m,aintained by the Canadian department of agriculture, as

PAGE 5

1921.] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 21 indicated in Service Announcements for March, 1919, and any such bureau inspector will be eligible to indorse tuberculin-test certificates of veterinarians approved for testing accredited herds in accordance with this recent amendment to the Canadian regulations. LICENSES AND PERMITS FOR VETERINARY BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS. Licenses for the manufacture and permits for the importation of veterinary biological products have been issued as follows for the year 1921, under the act of Congress of March 4, 1913 (37 Stat., 832), the regulations made thereunder (B. A. I. Order 265 and amendments thereto): License Date . Name, location, and address of firm. Products. No. 9 Feb. 8 Lederde Antitoxin Laboratorie~ MidBlackleg aggressin. dletown Road, near Pearl iveri N. Y. (Malling address, Pear 34 ... do ..... River Ji Peters erum Co., northwest corner South Second and Myers A venue, Antihog-cholera serum; Hog-cholera virus. Kansas Citv Kans. (Mailing address, 1612 -West Sixteenth Street, Kansas City, Mo.) 74 Feb. 15 Ralston Serum Co., Seventy-e:Mhth Antihog-cholera serum; Hog-cholera virus. and Serum Avenue, Ralston, ebr. 107 Feb. 12 Jenson-Salsbery Laboratories (Inc.), Bovine-abortion vaccin e. 520 West Pennway, Kansas City, Mo. 112 Feb. 24 Fort Dodge Serum Co. (Inc.), 600 Central Avenue, Fort Dodge, Iowa. Normal horse serum. 160 Feb. 28 Ohio Vaccine Co., near Woodrui! and Mixed-infection bacterin ( nr fowls). Neil A venues, Columbus, Ohio. (Mailing add re ss, Station B.) U. S. Ve~rinary License No. 160, issued January 31, 1921, to the Ohio State Uni versity, College of Veterinary Medicine, Columbus, Ohio, was terminated on February 28, 1921, and reissued under the name of the Ohio Vaccine Co. U.S. Veterinary Permit No. 2 was issued on February 5, 1921, to the Pasteur Labora tories of America, 366 West Eleventh Street, New York, N. Y., covering the importa tion of antianthrax serum, antistreptococcic serum, and antitetanic serum produced by Labpasteur Veterinary Department, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France, for the year 1921. BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS MANUFACTURED BY LICENSED ESTABLISH MENTS AND PLACED IN FINAL CONTAINERS DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 1920. Aggr essins. Blackleg aggressin .•••••• __ ..• ___ •• ____ •.....•. _ .... cubic centimeters .. 19, 346, 973 Blackleg filtrate •.• _ ••••..•.•.•...............•..........•.•... do.... 4, 907, 021 Antisera. Antiabortion sera (bovine) ......................... cubic centimeters .• Antiabortion sera (equine) ...................................... do .. _. Antianthrax sera .....•••....................................... do ...• Anti blackleg sera .•.•••••...................................... do ...• Antibotu1inus sera ............................................. do ..•• Antidistemper sera (canine) .................................... do ...• An tidistem per sera (eq uine ) .................................... do ...• Antihemorrhagic-septicemia sera (bovine) ....................... do ..•• Antihemorrhagic-septicemia sera (equine) ........•.....•...•.... do ...• 35,946 20,659 12,159,019 308,390 121,560 262,074 14,740 804,621 67,580

PAGE 6

22 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. Antihemorrhagic-septicemia sera (lepine ) ............ cubic centimeters .. Antihemorrhagic-septicemia sera ( ovine) .......................... do ... . Antihemorrhagic-septicemia sera (porcin e) ........................ do ... . Anti-influen z a sera ( equine) .................................... do ... . Antimixed-infection sera (porcine ) ............................... do ... . Antiscours sera (bovine) ......................................... do ... . Antis cours sera ( porcine ) ........................................ do ... . Antj stre ptococcic sera (equine) ................................. do ...• Antitetanic s e ra ................................................ do ...• Normal sera .................................................... do ...• Bac terial filtrates. Bacterial filtrates (phylacogens ) ...................... cubic centimeters .• B a ~ terins ( k i lled organisms). Abortion bacterins (bovine ) ........................ cubic centimeters .. Abortion bacterins (equine) ..................................... do ... . Abortion bacterins ( porcine ) .................................... do ... . Autogenous bacterins ........................................... do ...• Colon bacterins (bovine ) ........................................ do ... . Colon bacterins (equine) ........................................ do ... . Distemper bacterins (canine ) ................................... do ... . Distemper bacterins (equine) ................... : ................ do ... . Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (avian ) ....................... d o ... . Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (bovine) ............. . ....... do .... , Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (equine) ...................... d o ... . Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (lepine ) ....................... do ... . Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins ( ovine) ....................... do ...• Hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterins (porcine ) ....................... do ... . Influenza bacterins (equine) .................................... dose 3 .. Influenza bacterins (equine) ........................ cubic centimeters .. Keratitis bacterins (bovin e) ..................................... do ... . Mastitis bacterins (bovine ) ...................................... d o ... . Metritis bacterins (bovine ) ...................................... do ... . Mixed-infection bacterins (avian) ............................... d o ... . Mixed-infection bactedns (bovin e) .............................. do ...• Mixed-infection bacterins (canine) .............................. do ...• Mixed-infection bacterin (equine) .............................. doses .• Mixed-infection bacterin (equine) .................... cubic centime ters .• Mixed-infection bacterins (lepine ) ............................... d o ...• Mixed-infection bacterins (ovine ) ............................... do ... . Mixed-infection bacterins (porcine) ............................. do ... . Navel-infection bacterins (equine) ............................... d o ... . Pneumonia bacterins (equine) .................................. d o ... . Rhinitis mixed bacterins ( porcin e) ........................... -... d o ... . Scours bacterins (bovine) ............•.......................... d o ...• Scours bacterins (porcine ) ...•.................................. do ...• Staphylococcic bacterins (canine) ............................... do ...• Staphylococcic bacterins (equine) .........•..................... do ...• Streptococcic bacterins (equine) ................................. do ...• Suipestifer bacterins .•.......•.•.•.••••....................••••. do ...• [February, 16,370 52,100 595,576 1,575,176 575,720 1,050,040 32,300 148,732 1,810,553 19,940 388,260 3,062,325 13,516 4,000 26,604 16,596 18,838 356,691 16,542 427,869 2,768,464 196,698 11,265 991,087 4,002,952 19,160 1,155,414 I 99,000 253,814 87,692 98,168 294,604 15,858 25,400 572,330 135,670 4,200 5,705,187 164,907 46,448 25,600 190,255 257,758 16,748 18,855 138,914 3,540

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1921.) SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. Diagnostic agents. Mallein (disks) ...•.....................................•..••.. doses .• Mallein (sol11tion) .................................. cubic centimeters .• Tuberculin (disks) ............................................. doses .• Tuberculin (solution) ............................... cubic centimeters .• Seroba c l e rins and s e rovaccines. Abortion serobacterins and serovaccines (bovine) .... cubic centimeters •• Abortion serobacterins (equine) ................................. do ..•• Distemper sero bacterins ( canine) ................................ do .••• Influenza serobacterins (equine) ................................. do ..•• Pyogenes bacillus sero bacterins (bovine) .......................... do .••• Vaccines, virus es, and lox 1 : ns. Abortion vaccines (bovine) (living organisms) ....... cubic centimeters .. Anthrax vaccines .............................................. doses .• Anthrax vaccines .................................. cubic centimeters .. Blackleg vaccines (pellets and powder) ......................... doses .. Blackleg vaccines (liquid) .......................... cubic centimeters .• Chicken-pox vaccine ............................................ do ...• Chicken-pox virus ............................................. doses .• Hemorrhagic-septicemia vaccines (bovine) (attenuated organi s ms), cubic centimeters ............................................... _ ........• Hemorrhagi c -septicemia vaccines (porcine ) (attenuated organisms), cubic centimeters .......................................................•• Rabies vaccine (virus) .......................................... doses •• Rabies vaccine (virus) .............................. cubic centimeters .• Tetanus toxin ..•.••....................................•...... do ...• 23 36,400 36,994 98,660 1,963,909 140,733 . 12,261 41,781 1,215,905 6,126 299,167 613,760 2,549,394 2,701,844 598,339 198,371 11,310 410,055 70,270 2,672 5,169 3,800 QUANTITIES OF ANTIHOG-CHOLERA SERUM AND HOG-CHOLERA VIRUS PRODUCED DURING JANUARY, 1921. Serum. Simultaneous virus. H y p e rimMonths. muniz ing Ordinary. Clear. Total. Ordinary. Clear. viru s . c. c. c. c. c. c. c. c. c. c. C . C . January ...••••.••••••••••••••. 6,983,284 1,994,371 8,977,655 1,002,252 None. 3,509,493 SUMMARY OF TUBERCULOSIS-ERADICATION WORK IN COOPERATION WITH STATES, JANUARY, 1921. Tuberculin tests. Total Total onceactested credStations. States. Herds free ited Inspector in charge. State official. Cattle Reherd s herds or tested. acted. in the in the lots. State. State. ------Albany .•.•.•..•••• N.Y .. 192 5,759 1,012 770 67 H.B. Leonard .... D. w. M c Laury, Albany. Atlanta ..•.••••.••. Ga ...• 54 1,818 3 977 8 W. M. MacKellar . P. F. Bahns en, At-lanta. Augusta ....•••••••• Me ...• 117 1,707 87 1,487 271 J.B. Reidy .•••••• w. H. Lynch, Augusta. Baltimore .......•.. Md .... 138 1,932 111 562 125 T. A. Ladson ..•.. R. C. Reed, Bal ti-more.

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24 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [February, Summary of tuberculosis-eradication work in cooperation with States, January, 1921-Continued. Tuberculin tests. Total Total onceac-tested credStations. States. Herds free ited Inspector in chapge. State officials. Cattle Reherds herds or tested. acted. in the in the lots. State. State. -------Birmingham-...•.. Ala ... 16 772 19 69 34 C. J. Becker ...•... C. A. Cag, Auburn. Bi smarck •.•..••... N.Dak. 250 4,758 87 1,638 187 H. H. Cohenour ... W. F. rewe, Bismarck. Boise ..•.•••••...•.. Idaho. 189 1, 751 22 1,697 14 W. A. Sullivan .... J. D. Adams, Boise. Boston ..•••••••.... Mass .. 22 713 72 38 30 E. A. Crossman ..• L. H. Howard, Boston. Do •••••••••••.. R.I... 9 159 7 7 6 .•... do .•.•••••••••. J. S. Pollard, idence. Prov-Do •••••••••••.. N.H .. 20 561 62 39 15 ..•.. do ....•••••••.. A. L. Felker, Concord. Charleston •••••••.. W.Va. 268 3,167 79 847 66 Geo. W. Neff .••••• J.H.Stewart,Charleston. Cheyenne .•••••••.. Wyo .. 19 366 10 6 •••••• Jno. T. Dallas .•••• B. F. Davis, Chey-enne. Chicago ...•••••••.. Ill ....• 171 2,788 224 442 162 J. J. Lintner •••••. A. T. Peters, Springfield. Columbia •••••••... s. c ... 43 1,340 28 315 52 W. K. Lewis ..•••• W. K. Lewis, Columbia. Columbus .•••••••.. Ohio .. 182 3,432 200 1,014 289 Leo E. Davis ..••.. T. A. Burnett, Columbus. Des Moines •••••••.. Iowa .. 139 2,895 143 746 131 F. H. Thompson .. P. Malcolm, Des Moines. Fort Worth •••••... Tex .•• 86 2,099 36 251 1 H. Grafke ....••••. L. G. Cloud, Worth. Fort Frankfort •••••••••. Ky ..•• 88 1,425 38 441 97 W. F. Biles •••••.. W. C. Simmons, Frankfort. Harrisburg ..••••••. Pa .•.• 204 3,253 225 564 444 P. E. Quinn .•••.. T. E. Munce, Harrisb~f Hartford •••••••.•.. Conn .. 29 951 50 121 30 E. I. Smith .•••••. J. . Whittlesey, Hartford. Helena ......•.•.••. Mont .. 166 3,M5 37 141 77 R. Snyder ....••••. W. J. Butler, Helena. Indianapolis .•...•. Ind .•. 244 4,006 126 1,476 235 E . B. Haskin ••••• L. E. Northrup, Indiana polis. Jackson •.•••••••.•. Miss •.. 1,146 8,629 18 335 67 J. A. Barger ...••.. H. Chadwick, Jackson. Jefferson City •••.•. Mo •.•• 204 4,632 78 868 78 Ralph Graham .... D. F. Luckey, Jefferson City. Lansing .•••••••••.. Mich .. 120 3,268 116 395 179 T. S. Rich .••••••. H. H. Halladay, Lansing. Lincoln .•.•••••••.. Nebr .. 111 2,230 89 529 67 C.H. Hays .••••••. W. T. Spencer, Lin-coin. Little Rock •••••••. Ark .•. 2 32 2 83 22 J. H. Bux .•••••••. R. M. Gow, Rock. Little Madison .•••••••••.. Wis .•. 492 8,628 291 1,206 524 J. S. Healy .••••••. C. P. N orgord, Madison. Montpelier ••••••••• Vt ..•. 248 5,783 131 1,356 292 A. J. DeFosset .... E. S. Brigham, Montpelier. Nashville .•.•.••••. Tenn .. (6 1,389 29 279 122 Robert Jay ........ M. Jacob, Nashville. New Orleans .•.••.• La .... 10 435 16 177 30 R. W. Tuck ..••... E. P. Flower, Baton Oklahoma ..••••••.• Okla .. 107 2,622 92 304 12 C. F. Harrington .. Rouge. J. A. Whitehurst, Oklahoma. Olympia .••••••••.• Wash. 187 2,113 40 662 23 S. 0. Fladness ••.. L. C. Pelton, Olympia. Pierre .•••••••••.••. S.Dak. 113 2,202 180 256 29 J. 0. Wilson ••••.. A. E. Beaumont, Pierre. Portland ..••••••••. Oreg .. 289 4,316 209 1,092 52 S. B. Foster .....•. W. H. Lytle, Salem. Richmond ••••••••• Va .... 172 3,909 85 654 413 R. E. Brookbank . J. G. Ferneyhough, Richmond. Do ..••••••••••• N.C .. 48 1,100 30 985 187 • •••• do ......•••••.. Wm. Moore, Raleigh. St. Paul .•••.•.••••. Minn .. 312 7,681 320 1,184 744 W. J. Fretz ••••••• C. E. Cotton, St. Paul. Salt Lake City •••.• Utah •• 247 1,866 6 1,239 42 F. E. Murray •••.• R. W. Hoggan, Salt Lake City. Do ...••.••••••. Nev .•. 77 794 15 505 1 ..... do .....••••••.. Edw. Records, Reno. Tallahassee ••••••••. Fla .••. 181 2,583 60 1,788 48 J. G. Fish ••••••.•. J. W.De Milly,Talla hassee. Topeka .••••••••••• Kans .. 83 2,270 17 223 156 H. M. Graefe ...••• J. H. Mercer, Topeka. Trenton .•.•••••••.. N .J... 11 40! 18 39 29 W. G. Middleton .. J. H. McNeil, Tren-ton. Do ••..••••••... . Del.. 137 923 134 290 '36 .••.. do •..••••••••.. Wesley Webb, Dover. Washington ...•••.. D . C .. 41 272 -..... 11 8 J. A. Kiernan .•... Do ......••••... Miscel. 15 27 --. -. . ..••• do ..•••••••••.. -----------Total ...••.... ....... 7,04 5 117.305 4,657 28,10 8 5,502

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1921.) SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 25 RESULTS OF PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF LAWS. Penalties have been imposed in prosecutions for violations of regulatory laws, as reported to the bureau, as follows : Live-Stock Quarantine Law. St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Co. ( 2 cases), $200 fines and costs. Twenty-Eight-Hour Law . Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chic ago & St. Loui s R ai l way Co. ( 4 3 c ases), $4,300 fines. New York Central Railroad Co. (8 cases), $800 fin es. Philadelphia & Reading Railway Co., $100 fin e and $ 17.62 cos ts. Missouri Pacific Railway System, $100 fine and costs. Wabash Railway Co. (2 cases), $100 :fines and costs. Norfolk & Western Railway Co., $125 fine and costs. St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad (3 cases), $300 :fine s and costs. Meat-Inspection Law. Max Anderson and Leo Tarlow, New York, N. Y . , $25 fine. DR. C. W. LARSON APPOINTED CIDEF OF THE DAIRY DIVISION. Effective February 15, 1921, B. H . Rawl relinquished his direct responsibilities as Chief of the Dairy Division to devote his ent ire time t o his work as assistant c hief of the bureau. Mr. Rawl has been Chi e f of the Dairy Divi s ion since 1909, and in addition has served as Assistant Chief of the Bureau of Anim a l Industry-ciince Octob er, 1918. Dr. C. W. Larson, Assistant Chief of the Dairy Divis ion, is Mr. Rawl 's succe ssor a s chief of that division. Dr. Larson is a graduate of the Iowa Stat e C oll e ge of Agriculture, has a master's degree from the Pennsylvania State C oll e ge, and a doc t o r ' s degree from Columbia University. He came to the department in May, 1917. EMPLOYEES REQUESTED TO ASSIST THE DEPARTMENT'S PRESS CLIPPING SERVICE. To obtain a more adequate press-clipping service for the bureau and for the department as a whole, employees are requested to forward promptly to the chief o f the bureau any press items they may see pertaining to the work of the bureau or to other branches of the department. Keeping department workers fully informed of what the press is publishing about various branches of official work is highly desira b le . Many times such items furnish information and suggestions, obtainable in no o ther way, which enable the department to plan its work and increase its service. The clippings likely to be most useful are those found in newspapers, agri c ultural journals, trade publications, magazines, or other periodicals, and emplo y ees a re requested to remember that the department is interested in the entire field of agri culture and allied :fields, such as forestry, good roads, and other lines of work covered by the department's activities. It is requested that you simply clip the items , indicate the name of the public ation from which taken and the date of issue, and forward the items to the chief of the bure au. No letter of transmittal is necessary. For convenience Form A-2 may be used. Some duplication of items will result, of course, but in the case of notices affe c ting the work of more than one branch of the department, this will be advantageo u s . The cooperation, of all employees is earnestly requested in the development of this s ervi c e.

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BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [Febrnary, CONTACT CLUBS OF DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES. The attention of inspectors in charge is c alled to the so-called Contact Clubs among employees of the Department of Agriculture at c ities where two or more bureaus of the department have stations. Several such clubs already have been organized in a number of cities-San Francisco; Denver; Albuquerque; Portland, Oreg.; and New York-for the purpose of bringing about closer contact and cooperation between representatives of the different branches of the department. The department is much interested in the pos sibilities of such organizations among its employees and is inclined to encourage their formation. It is thought that they not only can promote interests that will strengthen the department from within but that they also can be effective in bringing about better understanding and appreciation of the department's work on the part of people in the cities. Attention is called to these clubs with the idea that officers in charge of stations may find it desirable to promote local organi zations of this character. AMENDMENT TO ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS. LEA VE OF ABSENCE. Memorandum 303 of the Office of the Secretary, dated February 4, 1920, effective January 2, 1920, amending the fiscal regulations, wa s published in part in Service and Regulatory Announcements for February, 1920, page 26, but in that publication one paragraph was omitted. The amendments are given in full below, the paragraph in que3tion being shown in italics. Paragrap h 93 of the Admini trative Regulations is amended to read as follows: "93. Leave confined to current calendar year.-Except a s provided in paragraph 104, a amended by Memorandum No. 283, leave of absence is not cumulative. The unuse d leave of one calendar year may not be taken in a subsequent year. Leave may not be grante d to be used in one year and charged to a subsequent year." Paragraph 118 is amended by the addition of the following paragraph: "An employee who, at the end of the calendar year, has exhausted all sick and annual leave, i s on indefinite l e ave without pay on account of illness, and is physi cally unable to report for duty, may be granted s i c k leave, and, also if necessary, annual leave, because of continued illness, beginning with January 2 of the succeeding calen dar year without actually reporting for duty in person. Thereafter all leave regula tions shall apply to such employees except that no retroactive deduction will be made from s uch annual leave. An employee thus restored to a pay status, who in the new leave period again exhausts all s i c k and a~nual leave on a ccount of sickne3s continuing over from the preceding year will have no leave-with-pay privileges during the remainder of the calendar year, and any further absence will be without pay and without retroactive deduction. "Each such case shall be considered on its merits and be submitte d to the Secretary for approval through the chief clerk of the d e partment. This r egulation shall not apply to employees who, at the end of the calendar year, are on leave without pay for any other reaso11 than sickness.' ' Paragraph 136 is a.mended to read as follows: "136. Basis for deduction/ram annual leave.-Except as otherwise provided in para graph 118, a proportionate deduction from allowance of annual_ leave shall be made m the District of Columbia at the rate of 1 day for each 12 days or multiples thereof, for furlough or leave without pay during the calendar year; and out'3ide of the District of Columbia at the rate of 1 day for each 24 days or multiples thereof. In every ca e an application for leave without pay to modify the excess of leave taken will be required." NEW PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU. [The bureau keeps no general mailing list for sending publications to individual employees. When a new publication is issued one or more copies are usually sent to each officer in charge of a station. If addi tional copies are desired for distribution to members of the force or for other use they will be sent on request

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1921.] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 27 1f possible. Individual employees who wish to obtain any of the publications listed here should apply first to the local officer in charge. If he has no extra copies, application may then be made to the w a b ington office.] Department Bulletin 923. Unit Requirements for Producing Market Milk in Ver mont. By J. B. Bain, R. J. Posson , and Ralph P. Hotis, Dairy Division. Pp. 18, figs. 2. Farmers' Bulletin 767. Goose Raising. Revision by Alfred R. Lee and George W. Hackett, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 22, figs. 12. Farmers' Bulletin 834. Hog Cholera. Revision by M. Dorset, Biochcmic Division, and U. G. Houck, Division of Hog-Cholera Control. Pp. 31, figs. 11. Investigations of the Germicidal Value of Some of the Chlorin Disinfectants. By F. W. Tilley, Biochemic Division. In Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. XX, No. 2. A-53. Pp. 85-110. Daubentonia longifolia (Coffee Bean), a Pois o nous Plant. By C. Dwight Marsh and A. B. Clawson, Pathological Division. In Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. XX, No. 6. A-54. Pp. 507-513, pl. 1. Correlation and Causation. By Sewall Wright, Animal Husbandry Divis ion. In Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol. XX, No. 7. A-55. Pp. 557-585, fig1'. lh. ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. Chief: JOHN R. MOHLER. Assistant Chief: B. H. RA wL. Assistant to the Chief: CHARLES C. CARROLL. Chief Cl~k: J. R. CoHRAN. Editor: D. S. BURCH. Animal Husbandry Division: GEORGE M. ROMMEL, chief. Bwchemic Division: M. DORSET, chief. Dairy Division: C. W. LARSON, chief. Division of Hog-Cholera Control: U. G. HoucK, chief. Division o f Virus-Serum Control: D. I. SKIDMORE, chief. Field Inspe ction Division: A. W. MILLER, chi ef. Meat Inspection Division: R. P. STEDDOM, chief. Miscellaneous Division: A. M. FARRINGTON, chief. Pathological Division: JoHN S. BucKLEY, chief. Quarantin e Division: RICHARD W. HrCKi\1AN, chief. Tick Eradication Division: R. A. RAMSAY, chief. Tuberculosis Eradication Division: J. A. KIERNAN, chief. Zoological Division: B. H. RANSOM, chief. Experiment Station: E. C. SCHROEDER, superintendent. Office of Accounts: A. C. DAVIS in charge. Appointment Section: GEORGE H. RussELL in charge. ADDITIONAL COPI JJ:S OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROH THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE W ASRINGTON, D. C, AT 5 CENTS PER COPY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, 50 CENTS PER YEAB v WASHINGTON: GOVERXME!'iT PRINTING OFFICID: 1921

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111. 3 1262 08853 7104