Citation
Service and regulatory announcements

Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Animal Industry
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat inspection ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Summary:
Contains Insecticide decisions and Notices of judgment under the Insecticide Act formerly issued only as a separate publication, now published in both forms.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format
Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
No. 81 (1914)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
004884120 ( ALEPH )
17762165 ( OCLC )
AA00005308_00017 ( sobekcm )
Classification:
HD9000.9.U5 A14 ( lcc )
630.61 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service announcements

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




r; 8. R. A.-B. A. I. 232 IUIssud Gaed 8 er, 192a6



United States Departme (P f Agricult



SERVICE AND REGULATORY A NTS~SN~~IET



BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY

AUGUST, 1926


[This publication is issued monthly for the dissemination ot information, instructions, rulings, etc., con-
cerning the work of the Bureau of Animal Industry. Free distribution is limited to persons in the service
of the bureau, establishments at which the Federal meat inspection is conducted, public officers whose
duties make it desirable for them to have such information, and journals especially concerned. Others
desiring copies may obtain them from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Ofice,
Washington, D. C., at 5 cents each, or 25 cents a year. A supply will be sent to each on~cial in charge of
a station or branch of the bureau service, who should promptly distribute copies to members of his force.
A file should be kept at each station for reference.]


CONTENTS
Page
Changes in directory _...-..~ --..... -.~. ... ..... -~-..................... ...... .. ....~....... ........ 63
Notices regarding meat inspection:
L abels on sausage .... .. .................................-- .................... ................. 646
Inedible-product certificate....---~-~-~-~. ......................................~_............... 64
Definitionsand standards of meats and meat food products. ~..~ -~....................._.. __...... 64
Animals slaughtered under Federal meet inspection, July', 1926--....-.~. ..~.-.._.-.................. 66
Causes of condemnation of careass-ss June, 1926............~...~.....~................. ....... ...... 66
Imports of meats and food animals, July, 1926._._....~. __._.~........___.__.. ...............~....._ 66
Foreign meat-inspection officials~.~---. ....~.~...............~...........................~........... 67
Anti-hog-cholera serum and hog-cholera virus produced under veterinary licenses, July, 1926. ...... 67
Results of prosecutions for violations of laws..~. ~~~___.......... .~. ____. ...... _~................... 67
Summary of tuberculosis-eradication work in cooperation with States, July, 1926._--._. ............ 68
Political setivity ................... ................~~-~--~..... .. .. .. .. .. 69
New publications of the bureau..~ ~~..~..~.-.......... ~... ...~~ .......... ..~.... ....... ... -........ 7
Organization of the Bureau of Animal Industry..-.-~_. .........................................~_~ 70


CHANGES IN DIRECTORY

Meat Inspection Granted

19-M. The Cudahy Packing Co., 225 W~est Tazewell Street, Norfolk, Va.
Meat Inspection Withdrawn

1. Armour &1 Co., Chicago, Ill.
3--Az. Swift & Co., Salt ~Lake City, Utah.
827. Reliable Sausage Co., Chicago, Ill.
Meat Inspection Extended

6-;B. Swift & Co.,. Chicago, Ill., to include Underwood Packing Co.
460. Guckenheimer &G Hess (Inc.), New York, N. Y'., to include the Goldstein
Kosher Provision Corporation.
545. Republic Food Products Co., Chicago, Ill., to include the Examart Food
Products Co.
Change In Name of Oflcial Esfablishment

1-H1. Armour &1 Co., a'nd M~orris & Co.,' The North American Provision Co.,
10 North Street, Bayonne, N. J., instead of Morris & Co.
229. V. WT. Joy~ner & Co. Smithfield, Va., instead of V. W. Joyner & Co. (Inc.).
373. F. Schenkr & Sons Co., Wheeling, WT. Va., and Allied Packers (Inc.), W. S.
Forbes & Co. (Inc.), Klinck P~acki Parker Webb Co.,
Parker WCebb & gns Co, WTestern Packing &
Provision Co., C les ed f present name and
subsidiaries.
.aeo-as I I 6 O




T


64 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY [August,

Change in Address of Inspector in Charge
Dr. J. S. Healy, tuberculosis eradication, 110 East Washington Avenue, Madison,
Wis., instead of 11 East State Capitol.
Change in Name of Official in Charge
J. T. Sarvis, Ardmore field station, Ardmore, S. Dak., instead of F. L. Kelso.


NOTICES REGARDING MEAT INSPECTION
LABELS ON SAUSAGE
In view of the diffculty experienced in securely affixing band labels to sau- I
sage, such labels should not bear the inspection legend. H~owever, band labels I
securely pasted on wrappers on sausage may bear the inspection legend. Estab-
lishments having on hand band labels which bear the inspection legend and
which have been applied direct to sausage may continue this practice for a rea-
sonable period, in order to afford an opportunity for the use of supplies on hand.
In such cases information should be furnished through the inspector in charge i
concerning the approval numbers assigned to such labels, the quantity on hand,
and the length of time estimated to exhaust the supply. It should be under-
stood that the labels must be securely affixed and that this may~ involve the 5
application of the labels to the easing by means of an adhesive in cases where
the labels are affixed to sausage which may be expected to undergo appreelable
shrinkage following its removal from the establishment. It has been determined '
that band labels become readily detached when applied to sausage previous to
the normal shrinkage of the product.
INEDIBLE-PRODUCT CERTIFICATE
The inedible-product export certificate for bladders, boofs, horns, grease, and
similar inedible animal products other thanl casings has been printed in the form
indicated in Cirethlar Letter No. 1379 and is now available for distribution.
Inspectors in charge who have need for this certificate should make requisition
for the new form and destroy the old certificates when the new ones are received.
DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF MEATS AND MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS
The following definitions and standards for meats and the principal meat
products were adopted by the Secretary of Agriculture July 3, 1926, and pub-
lished as Food Inspection Decision 205:
Flesh is any1~ clean, sound, edible part of the striated muscle of an animal.
The term "'animal," as herein used, indicates a mammal, a fowl, a fish, a crusta-
cean, a mollusk, or any other animal used as a source of food.
Meat I is the properly dressed flesh derived from cattle, from swine, from
sheep, or from goats, sufficiently mature and in good health at the time of
slaughter, but is restricted to that part of the striated muscle which is skeletal
or that which is found in the tongue, in the diaphragm, in the heart, or in the
esophagus, and does not include that found in the lips, in the snout, or in the
ears; with or without the accompanying and overlying fat, and the portions of
bone, skin, sinew, nerve, and blood vessels which normally accompany the flesh
and which may not; have been separated from it in the process of dressing it for
sale.
Fresh meat is meat which has undergone no substantial change in character
since the time of slaughter.
Beef is meat derived from cattle nearly 1 year of age, or older.
Veal is meat derived from young cattle 1 year or less of age.
Mutton is me t derived from sheep nearly 1 year of age, or older.
Lamb is meat derived from young sheep 1 year or less of age.
Pork is meat derived from swine.
Venison is flesh derived from deer.
Meat by-products are any clean, sound, and properly dressed edible parts,
other than meat, which have been derived from one or more carcasses of cattle,
of swine, of sheep, or of goats, sufficiently mature and in good health at the time
of slaughter.

I The term "'meat"' when used in a qualified form, as, for exam ple, "horse meat,''" reindeerr meat," crab
meat,"' etc., is then, and then only, properly applied to the corresponding portions of animasl other than
cattle, swine, sheep, and goats. "








19261 SERVICE ANhD REGULATORY' ANNOUNCEM~ENTs 65

Prepared meat is the clean, sound product obtained by subjecting meat to a
process of commninuting, of drying, of curin-g, of smoking, of cooking, of seasoniing,
or of flavoring, or t~o any combination of such processes.
Cured meat is the clean, sound product obtained by subjecting mneat to a
process of salting, by the empploymenit of dry common salt or of brine, w~ith or
without the use of one or more of the following: Sodiumr nitrite, sodium nitrate,
potassium nitrate, suigar, a siruip, honrey, Ipice.
Dry salt meat is t~he prepared meat wrhic~h has been cured by~ the application.
of dry common salt., w~ith or without the use of one or more of the following:
Sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, sugar, a sirup, honey, spice;
wcith or without the injections into it. of a solution of commron salt to which may\
have been added one or more of the followving: Sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate,
potassium nitrate, sugar, a sirup, hone.
Corned meat is the prepared meat which hals been cured by soaking in, w~ith
or without injecting into it., a solution of common sallt, w~ith or without one or
more of the following, each in its proper proportion: Sodium nitrite, sodiulm
nitrate, potassium nitrate, sugar, a Sirup, honey, anid with or without the use of
spice.
Sweet pickled meat is the prepared meat which has been cured by soaking
in, with or without injecting into it, a solution of common salt with sugar, a
sirup, and/or honey, together with one or more of the following, each in its
proper proportion: Sodium nitrite, sodiumn nitrate, potassium nitrate, and w~ith
or without the use of spice.
Dried meat is the clean, sound product. clbtained by subjecting fresh meat or
cured meat to a process of drying, w~ith or without the aid of artificial heat,
until a substantial portion of the waster has been removed.
Smoked meat is the clean, sound product obtained by subjecting fresh meat,
dried meat, or cured meat to t~he direct action of the smoke either of burning .
wood or of similar burning material.
Canned meat is fresh meat. or prepared meat, packed in hermeticallyr sealed
containers, with or without subsequent heating for the purpose of sterilization.
Hamburg steak, "Hamburger steak," is comminuted fresh beef, with or
without the addition of suet and/or of seasoning.
Potted meat, deviled meat, is the cleani, sound product obtained by coma-
minuting and cooking fresh meat andj'or prepared meat, with or without spice,
and is usually packed in hermetically sealed containers.
Sausage meat is fresh meat or prepared meat, or a mixture of fresh meat
and prepared meat, and is sometimes commuinuted. The term "sausage meat"
is sometimes applied to bulk sausage containing no meat. by-products.
M~eat food products are azny articles of food or any articles that enter into
the composition of food which are not prepared meats but which are derived or
prepared, in whole or inl part, by a process of manufacture from any portion of
the carcasses of cattle, swine, sheep, or goats, if such manufactured portion be
all, or a considerable and definite portion, of the article, except such prepara-
tions as are for medicinal purposes only.
1Meat loaf is the product consisting of a mixture of comminuted meat with
spice and/or w'ith cereals, with or without milki and/or eggs, pressed into the
form of a loaf and cooked.
Pork sausage is chopped or ground pork, w~ith or without one or more of the
following: Herbs, spice, common salt, sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, potas-
sium nitrate, sugar, a sirup, water, vinegar; and may be fresh, dried, smoked,
or cooked.
Brawn is the product made from chopped or ground anld cooked edible parts
of swine, chiefly from the head, feet, and/or legs, w~ith or without the chopped
or ground tongue.
Head cheese, mock brawn, differs from braw~n in that other mneat and/or
meat by-products are substituted, in whole or in part, for corresponding parts
derived from swine.
Souse is the product consisting of meat and/or meat by-products; after cook-
ing, the mixture is commonly packed into containers and covered with vinegar.
Scrapple is the product consisting of meat. and/or meat by)-products mixed
with meal or the flour of grain, and cooked with seasoning materials, after which
it is poured into a mold.













ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION, JULY, 1926


HorsesC slaughteredl~ at al estabbahments, July-, 1926, 3,~42
Inspections of lird :it all1 estabhlshments, luly, 192?.. 14.1,414,850 inspection pounds; compound and other
substlintes, 29,267,135 Inspec~tion poundsi; suslLg~e chlopped, li;.1;3,643j inspection pounds; corresponding
inspe-ctions for July. 1925. Lord,. 115,0103,32.3 inspection puouds: compound and other substitutes, 46,218,591
inspiration pounds; sluszge ebopped, 68,003, 117 uspection pounds.
(Thlese tot rls of inspection pounds do not represent actual production, as the same product may~ have
been usplec~ted Jnd rl. cordled more th~an once In the pro-eis of majnufac~turre.


CAUSES OF CONDEMNATION OF CARCASSES, JUNE, 1926


Cause Cattle Ccl ves Sheep Sw-ine


Emaciiationu......... ....... ................... .............1 5;9 151 269 1 8
Bog cholerat.................... .........._...................... ..~...~.......... .....87
Infla~mmatory~ distjease................... ....... ...............1 845 20f. 306 1, 862
Immaturit).......................~..... 189...........
Tu berculosis ..... ~... ~...... .. .................... ......... .1 4, 162 70 1....~.~.... 6, 536
AlI ot her ca uses ~................... ..... ...... ..........~........ 914L 242 361 3,405

Total.......~...........~......................... 6, 503 858 936 12, 688



IMPORTS OF MEATS AND FOOD ANIMALS, JULY, 1926

Imrports of meal anld meat food products


Fresh and refrigerated
Canned Other Total
Country of export and cured products weight

SBreef Other

Pou nds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds
A4rgentina___~...~~~~~.................... 129, 011 231, 714 862, 844 ..~_.......... 1, 223, 569
Aust~ralia~..~~. .__~....................~.... 18, 283 2, 522 .......... ............--- 20,8056
Canada..~...............~................... :49, 143 882, 013 1 50, 021 31, 584 1, 812, 761
U~ruguay...~...~.. .........._............. 111,201 .......~.....1 1,075,155 152, 700 1, 330, 059
Other countries~.~....~....._.~._........... I............ ..........~.. 32, 043 187, 159 219, 202

Total: July,1926~f........_............ ,0,1 1,116,2491 2,120,063 371,443 4, 615, 396
July, 1925.~.~...~.~_......... 759, 711 1, 036, 152 4 113, 966 184, 123 2, 393, 952
7 mont bs ended July, 1926.......... 4, 953, 135 ;, 330,635 16, 60;, 155 2, 334, 510 31, 225, 435
7 months ended July, 192.5...~........ 2, 749, 585 6, 719, 861 ;, 352, 940 1,8480 362 18, 302, 7571


Condemned in July, 1926: Beef, 142 pounds; pork, 2,795 pounds; total 2,937 pounds.
Refused entry: Pork, 37 pounds.


L*~' ~~"'


BUREAU OF AN~IMAL INDUSTRY


[August,


Station


Cattle






11.347
8, 501

II, SS.=.

3,892

12,8.1 1
39.3r2
24, 52( 1

9, 186

1845
33, ;j

13t., 133

8.3,ri;2

556, B 331
5, 321. 6.30


Cal es



5, 003
3,837
49S,398
8, 166
10,4123
1, 506
7,982

3,~188
;, 291
32,409
27,680
12,4192
45, 010
8, 351
11, 015
8,046
6.951
9,6r55
fi0,388



3,073,600
3, 161,808


Sheep


1,860 O
25, 862
11, 507
231, 295
5, 94
9,910
5, 678
3,752
14,257
3,981
25,012
90,974
5,062
65,412
148, 066
132, 925
19,730
11,672
11, 807
76,992
12,455
12;,583

1, 041,693
1,071,074
;,265, 163
6,941,323


Goats


Swine


Baltimore.-... ......... ....
Brooklyn..
B u ffslo .. . . .
Chicago........ ... ......... ~
C inemn n at i.. .. .. .. .. .
Dl~envro...... .................
D~etroit .
F o rt e l .. .. .. .. .
Indian apolis. .. . .
Jersey City'. ..... .........................
K~ansas Cita............. ................... .
M! il woukk e e .. .. .. .. .. .
National S'tock Yards.. .... .. ....
Newcr York~..
Oma ha .. ..
Philadelphii . . .
S t. Louis .. . . .
Siouxi City. .
South St. Joseph....~.. .
Sourb St. P~aul..... .. . .
All other est blishments. .. .... ....

T otil. Jull:., 11 2*: .. . .
July,. 1925. . .
;monthsended July, l196.. .. ...
I mo t hse ended J ulyl19,5.~............


&1,233

66,479
446,238
51, 514
57, 604
15, 692
81,681
11,258
94, 064
27, 6341
188,7141
91,396
111, 619
50, 704
158, 321
60, 835
123,883
159. 958
98,069
224, 525
943, 851

3,127,302
2,819,385
21, 206,4108
26,498,628


1



31


7580
191
177 1
. .
12 7












Imports of food alnimals

Count ry of export Cattle Swine Sheep Goaclts


Calnada.................~.............. ............. 8,3 58 284 I '1'
M ~exico..................................... .~.... ... 7,2?51 i 230j -2J !...~.......

"New Zeal and................... ~.~~........... .~~.......... J..... :::........ 1... ..
Venezuela (to Porto Rico)............. .... ................... ...I............. ... .~....I.....I
Virgin Islands (to Porto Hico) ................... ...~............ 94 .........

.,Total: Julyv, 1928r;...~............................. ....~... 16j, 159 9b88 13
July, 1925................................. ........ 15,796 15,425 16B s~
; mont hs ended J uly., 1926..~................... ........... 139,50 8,47 1625
; mont hs ended Jul, 1925................ ................ 93, 375 bi0,83 44.9~, 36 175


FOREIGN MEAT-INSPECTION OFFICIALS

The bureau has been officially advised that Dr. Al. B. Peter, w~hose certificates
for meat originating in Germany have heretofore been acceptable, has severed
his connection with the German Governmenit.
Dr. W'ilhelm Stodter, of Hamburg, is the only official now authorized to issue
certificates for meat from Germany intended for importation into the United
States.

ANTI-HOG-CHOLERA SERUM AND HOG-CHOLERA VIRUS PRODUCED
UNDER VETERINARY LICENSES, JULY, 1926
0.c.
O rdinary serum ......... ........ ........ ........ ........ 35, 953, 336
Clear serum____ ____ _... .. ._ .._.. --............. 30, 67i0, 960

2 :Total..._ __._ __ ___ ____ _... ..._ -,_ _......... 66, 624, 296

Simultaneous virus................ ..................~--------. 6, 467, 550
Hyperimmunizing virus _____________.._._._._______...- 15, 787, 422


RESULTS OF PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF LAWS

Penalties and fines have been imposed in prosecutions for violations of regula-
tory laws, as reported to t~he bureau during August, as follows:
Livestock Quarantine Law

Num-
bergol Defendant Nature of violation Fine
cases

1 Atchison, Topeka &r Santa Fe Ry. Co... Interstate transportation of I dead hog in same $100
car with live animals.
I ___o...~..do~~.-.-~-.................. .. Failure to placard cars "outhern cattle"... 100
2 Chicago, Burlington&d Quincy R. R.Co......-do..........___________ ........... 200
I Pennsylvania R. R. Co.................. Interstate movement of infectious car without 100
cleaning and disinfection.
T ota L .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ._ __ __ __ __ ___ __. .. .. .. 500


Twenty-Eight-Hour Law



berlof Defendant Penalty
cases


2 Baltimore &r Ohio Railroad Co~____-.. ~ __~-_-.........................____... $200
2 Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago &r St. Louis Ry. Co______------- __ ______......_........ 200
3 Delaware, Lackawanna &r Western Railroad Co.--...-....... _________________ ...... 300
SII Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Co................................................------- 100
1 M issouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Co. of Texas-_ ._ --_----- __----- _~---- __________ .. 0
28 New Y'ork Central Railroad Co_ ___________________ ________________.......... 2, 800
113 Pennsylvania Railroad Co ..... .... .... .... ..... .... .... .... ..... .... ..-- ---- 11,300
2 Wabash Railwfay Co.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... __ __ __ __ __.. ... 200
T otal.... ... .... ... ... .... ... .... ... ... .... ... .... ... ... .... --- 15, 200


~-IC1


19261


SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS




p~T-rl~~~~ ~X: XXXI~~--I- ;XXII~-Xala~ ~~::::~


65, 60 6658, 058 25, 353 1, 329, 020 98, 533 1, 501, 434


[August,


68


BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY


Tuberculin tests
during month


Total to date


State





Ala......
Ariz......

Colo..~...
Conn....



Fla.......
Ga.......
Idaho..~..
Ill........
Ind.~.....
Iowa..~...

Kans...~..





Md..~....

M~ass..~...
M~ich._....
Minn....
M~iss_.....


Mlont..~..
Nebr.....
Net.....
N. H8._..
N. J......
N. M~ex~..

N. Y.~....
N. C~.....
N. Dak..
Ohio~.~...
Okla.~....

Oreg.....
Pa. ......
R. 1......

S. C..._..
S. Dak~...
Tenn....
Tex~.....

Utab~._...

Vt_~._....


Wash....
W~. Va...

Wis......

Wyo.~.~..

Total..


Inspector incharge





R. E. Jackson.....
F. L. Schneider~...


W. E. Howe~. ...
R. L. Smith......

W. G. Middleton.
.1. A. Kiernan._...
J. O. Fish.........
A. L. Birleman-...
W. A. Sullivan ...
J. J. Lintner.~.....
J. E. Gibson......
J. A. Barger-......

N. L. Townsend..




0. R. Caldwell....
E. B. Simonds.~...

E. A. Crossman~...
T. S. Rich........

B. Robbins~.......
Ralph Graham....

J. WV. M~rurdoch...
W. C. Herrold_....
L. C. Butterfield_..
E. A. Crossmaln...
W. O. Muiddleton.
F. L. Schneider~...

B. B. Leonard....
W. U. Dendinger .
H. H. Cohenour..
A. J. De Fosset ... ~


S. B. Foster.......
J. B. Reidy.......
E. A. Crossman...

W'. K. Lewis.._....
J. O. Wilson~~.....
H. MI. O'Rear_.....
H. L. Darby......

F. E. M~urray.....

L. H. Adams...~...

R. E. Brookbank.
J. C. Edline.......
B. MI. Newton....

J. S. Healy.~.~.~...

John T. Dallas....


State official





C. A. Cary, Auburn.
S. E. Douglas, Phoenix.
J. B. Blu, Little Rock.
J. P. Iverson, Baeramento.
C. O. Lamb, Denver.
J. M. Whittlesey, Hart-
ford.
O. A. Newton, Bridg[eville.

J. V. Knapp, Tallahassee,
P. F. Bahnsen, Atlanta.
W. C. Nye, Boise.
F. A. Laird, Springfield.
R. C. Julien, Indianapolis.
MI. G. Thornburg, Des
Mloines.
J. H. Mercer, Topeka.
D. E. Westmorland,
Frankfort.
E. P.Flower, Baton
Rouge.
H. MC. Tucker, Augusta.
James B. George, Balti-
more.
L. B. Howard, Boston.
H. W. Norton, jr., Lansing.
C. E. Cotton, St. Paul.
P. P. Garner, Jackson.
H. A. Wilson, JetIerson
City.
WV. J. Butler, Helena.
C. H. Bays, Lincoln.
Edward Records, Reno.
A. L. Fether, Concord.
J. H. M.cNeil, Trentdon.
Mat. Keenan, Albuquet-
que.
E. T. Faulder, Albany.
Wm. Moore, Raleigh.
WN. F. Crewe, Bismarek.
F. A. Zimmer, Columbus.
J. A. Whitehurst, Okla-
homa City.
W. H. Lytle, Salem.
T. E. M~une, Harrisburgl.
T. E. Robinson, Provi-
dence.
W. K. Lewis, Columbia.
M. W. Ray, Pierre.
W. B. Lincoln, Nashville.
N. F. Williams, Fort
Worth.
W. H. Hendricks, Balt
Lake City.
Edward H. Jones, Mont-
pelier.
H. C. Givens, Richmond.
Robert Prior, Olympia.
John W. Smith, Charles-
too.
John D. Jones, jr., Mdadi-
son. ,I
A. W. French, Cheyenne.


Cat-
tle
re-
acted


;14
2
80
21
358

136

30

71;
3,691
325
1, 400

37

50

108
235

1, 359

3, 141
3
7

47
138
5
309
41
0

7, 501
101
134
1, 262
1

43
2, 292
154

6
34
14
7 1

52



41
151
46

1, 225
1


Once-
tested
free
herds


3,369
6, 866
2, 894
3, 264
1, 784
824

2,327

6.271
9,841
23, 700
95,219
67,359
70, 138

29, 532
61,048

4,147

14, 269
8,478

984
92, 295
21, 341
2,066
56, 538

22,321
37, 281
2, 365
2, 208
1,903
3,510

36, 476
198, 161
28, 810
74, 384
97

81, 209
68, 454
54

11,571
5,345



10, 356

2, 332

6, 148
44, 694
11, 681

68, 256

6,7159


Herds
under
super-
vision


4,315
8. 131
3,944
3, 512
2, 033
2, 510

4, 174
286
7,101
10,751
26, 896
105, 943
93,478
125, 630

31, 197
61, 197

4,433

23, 307
14, 536

2, 260
08, 255
31, 566
2, 359
59, 884

23,109
38, 865
3, 833

4, 702


75, 304
211, 681
36, 862
81, 444
3144

B2, 460
83, 150
181

11,817
6,207
20, 187
407

11, 336

8, 722

8, 398
48, 097
12, 484

70, 753

7,476


Ac- I
cred-
ited
herds


216
22
27
85
88




1,2 1
26 :


39



67
1,88






31




4, 521
2,277

1819







70


Herds | Cattle
or lots Itested


332
525
30
82

236



93
72
410
6, 263
4,121
4, 125

98
1, 663

213

1, 957
878

27
5, 181
4, 769
52
248

350
1, 541
79
401
283
I

7, 697
2, 523
326
6, 349
21

1, 769
4, 401
40

1,265

435
32

683

273

207
Bl6
1, 116

3, 275

96


4,549
2, 826
450
4,053
1,391
3, 506

1,051


857
4, 885
61,079
30,772
66, 749




3, 338

11, 835
9,338

4,272
41, 157
92, 739
1,053
2, 582

3, 175
18, 303
1, 379
3, 815
3,401
22

77, 377
8, 194
5, 885
41, 715
961

11, 683
0,278
874 ~

3, 095
3,179
1,423
1, 0714

5, 820

4, 642

3,070
8, 81
5, 045

62, 807

1,004


SUMMARY OF TUBERCULOSIS-ERADICATION WORK IN COOPERA-
TION WITH STATES, JULY, 1926





1926] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEM6ENTB 69

POLITICAL ACTIVITY

Competitive employees, while retaining the right to vote and to express pri-
vately their opinions on political subjects, are forbidden to take an active part
in political management or in political campaigns. This also applies to temporary
employees, employees on leave of absence with or without pay, substitutes, andl
laborers. Political activity in city, county, State or national elections, whether
primary or regular, or in behalf of any party or candidate, or any measure to be
voted upon, is prohibited.
Employees are accountable for political activity by persons other than them-
selves, including wives or husbands, if, in fact, the employees are thus accom-
plishing by collusion and indirection what they may not lawfully do directly and
openly. Political activity, in fact, regardless of t~he methods or means used by
the employee, constitutes the violation.
POLITICAL ASSESSMENTS, SOLICITATIONS, AND DISCRIMINATION
Sections 118, 119, 120, and 121 of the Criminal Code (see 35 Stat. 1110) pro-
vide that no legislative, executive, or judicial- officer or employee shall solicit or
be concerned in soliciting or receiving any money or contribution for political
purpose from any other officer or employee of the Government; that no solicita-
tion or receipt of political assessments shall be made by any person in any room
or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by any officer or employee
of the United States; that no officer or employee shall be discharged or demoted
for refusing to make any contribution for political purposes; and that no officer
or employee of the Govlernment shall directly or indirectly give or hand over to
any other oflieer or employee in the service of the United States or to any M~ember
or Delegate to Congress any money or other valuable thing for the promotion
of any political object whatever.
Section 122 of the Criminal Code provides that whoever shaUl violate any pro-
vision of the four sections shall be fined not more than $5,000, or imprisoned
not more than three years, or both.
PRESIDENTIAL OFFICERS
Presidential appointees are forbidden by statute to use their official authority
or influence to coerce the political action of any person or body, to make any con-
tribution for a political object to any other officer of the United States, or to
solicit or receive contributions for political purposes from other Federal officers
or employees, or to discriminate among their employees or applicants for political
reasons.
Otherwise, a presidential appointee will be allowed to take such a part in
political campaigns as is taken by any private citizen, except that under depart.-
mental regulations issued by the Stat~e, Treasuryr, War, Navy, Interior, Agricul-
ture, and Commerce Departments, and by~ the Interstate Commerce Commission,
the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, and the Public Printer, he will
not be permitted--
1. To hold a position as a member or officer of any political committee that
solicits funds.
2. To display such obtrusive partisanship as to eause public scandal.
3. To attempt to manipulate party primaries or conventions.
4. To use his position to bring about his selection as a delegate to conventions.
5. To act as chairman of a political convention.
6. To assume the active conduct of a political campaign.
7. To use his position to interfere with an election or to affect the result thereof.
8. To neglect his public duties.
It, is the duty of any person having knowledge of the violation of any of the
foregoing provisions of the civil-service rules or Criminal Code to submit the
facts to the United States Civil Service Commission, Washington, D. C.
At the request of the Civil Service Commission, the above is published for the
information and guidance of employees of the Department of Agriculture.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IlllIllllii I Ilillll iiIilllll llilllllliI I
70O BURBEAU OF ANIMAL IND~UE 3 1262 08852 7980

NEW PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU

[The bureau keeps no mailing list for sending publications to individual employees, but publications -
are sent in bulk to oncers in charge for distribution to members of their forces. The number of copies
sent varies with the subject or nature of the publication and the number and class of employees. Of~eerit
in charge will use their judgment and distribute publications to best advantage. So far al possible
additional copies wriU be furnished on request.] l%
Farmers' Bullet~in.920 (revised). Milk Goats. By Edwatrd L. Shaw, An~n
Husbandry Division. Pp. 32, figs. 18.
Farmers' Bulletin 1068 reviseded. Judging Beef Cattle. By E. H. Thomp- :
son, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 13, figs. 9. ,
Farmers' Bulletin 1455 reviseded. Fitting, Showing, and Judging Hogs.
By E. Z. Russell, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 22, figs. 13.
Farmers' Bulletin 14190 (revised). Hog-Lot Equipment. By E. Z. Russell,`
Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 22, figs. 26.
Mimeographed pamphlet. M1eat Production, Consumption, and Foreign Trade
in United States, Calendar Years 1907-1925. (Revised)l


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY

Chief: JouN R. M~OHLER.
Administrative Assistant: CHARLES C. CARROLL.
Chief Clerk: J. R. COHRAsN.
Editor: D. S. Bbnes.
Animal Husbandry Division: E. W. SHEETS, chief.'
Biochemic Division: M. DORSET, chief.
Division of Hog-Cholera Control: U. G. HOUCK, chief.
Division of VTirus-Serum Control: D. I. SKIDMORE, chief.
Field Inspection Division: A4. W. MILLER, chief.
Mleat Inspection Division: R. P. STEDDOMr, chief.
Pathological Division: JoAN S. BUCKLEY, chief.
Tick Eradication Div~isilon: R. A\. RAMhSAYr chief.
Tubercu~losis Eradication Divrision: J. A. K~IERNAN, Chief.
Zoological Division: M~AUTRICE C. HALL, Chief.
Experimentl Station: E. C. SCHIROEDER, superintendent.
Oftice of Accounts: GEORGE F. TUJCKER, in charge.
Ofi~ce of Personnel: GEORGE H. RUSSE~LL, in charge..









ADDITIONAL COPIES
OF THIS PUBLICATION MAdY BE PROCURLED FROM
THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMYENTS ::
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
ABHIBNGTON, 'D. C.
ATI
5 CENTS PER COPY.:
SuUBCIMPTIONr PRICE, 25 CENTS PER YEAR I'




Full Text

PAGE 1

S. R. A.-B. A. I. 232 SERVICE AND REGULATORY A BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY AUGUST, 1926 [This publication is issued monthly for the dissemination of inform ation, instructions, rulings, etc., con • cern in g the work of the Bureau of Anim a l Indus try. Free distribution is limited to persons in the service of the bureau, establishments at which the Federal meat insp ectio n is conduc t ed, public officers whose duties make it desirable for them to have such information, and journals especially concerned . Others desiring cop ies may obtain them from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., at 5 cents each, or 25 cents a year. A s uppl y w ill be sent to each offic i al in charge of a station or branch of the bure a u service, who should promptly distribute copies to members of his force. A file sho uld be kept at each sta tion for reference.] CONTENTS Changes in directory ______________________________________________________________________________ _ Notices regarding meat inspection: Labels on sausage _____________________________________________________________________________ _ Ine dibl e-product certificate ______________ --__________________________________________________ _ Definitions and standards of me a ts and meat food p rod u cts_-------------------------------------Anima ls s l aughtered under Federa l me a t insp ect ion , July, 1926 ____________________________________ _ Causes of condemnation of carcas~~s , June, 1926 _ _ --------------------------------------------------Imports of meats and f ood animals, J1.1ly, 1926 _____________________________________________________ _ Foreign meat-inspection officials _______________________________ . _____________________ ---__________ _ Anti-hog-cholera serum and hog cholera virus produced under veterinary lic enses, July, 1926-_____ _ Results of prosecutions for vio l atio ns of laws ___________________________________ ____________________ _ Summary of tuberculosis-er a dication work in cooperation with States, July, 1926 __________________ _ Political activity __________________________________________________________________________________ _ New publications of the bureau_-----------------------------------------------------------------Organization of the Burea u of Anima l Industry_---------------------------------------------------CHANGES IN DIRECTORY Meat Inspection Granted 19-M. The Cudahy Packing Co., 225 West Tazewell Street, Norfolk, Va. Meat Inspection Withdrawn 1. Armour & Co., Chicago, Ill. 3-AZ. Swift & Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. 827. Reliable Sausage Co., Chicago, Ill. Meat Inspection Extended 6-B. Swift & Co., Chicago, Ill., to in clude Underwood Packing Co. P age 63 64 64 64 66 66 ()6 6i 67 67 68 69 70 70 460. Guckenheimer & Hess (Inc.), N ew York, N. Y., to include the Goldstein Kosher Provision Corporation. 545. Republic Food Products Co ., Chicago, Ill., to i~clude the Emmart Food Products Co . Change in Name of Official Establishment 1-H. Armour & Co ., and Morris & Co. ; The North American Provision Co., 10 North Street, Bayonne, N. J., instead of Morris & Co. 229. V. W. Joyner & Co;., Smithfi e ld , Va., instead of V. W. Joyner & Co. (Inc.). 373. F. Schenk & Sons \Jo., Wheeling, W. Va., and Allied Packers (Inc. ), W. S. Forbes & Co. (Inc.), Klinck Packin C lnc.-: Parker Webb Co. , Parker Webb & , fl ef~ ns Co., Western Packing & Provision Co., C arles a _ ki.ng. tead f present name and subsidiaries. D ' ..:.. 8891-26 #. , 63 I A ' U.S. OE ---\

PAGE 2

64 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY [August, Change in Address of Inspector in Charge Dr. J. S. Healy, tuberculosis eradication, 110 East Washington Avenue, Madison, Wis., instead of 11 East State Capitol. Change in Name of Official in Charge J. T. Sarvis, Ardmore field station, Ardmore, S. Dak., instead of F. L. Kelso. NOTICES REGARDING MEAT INSPECTION LABELS ON SAUSAGE In view of the difficulty experienced in securely affixing band labels to sausage, such labels should not bear the inspection legend. However, band labels securely pasted on wrappers on sausage may bear the inspection legend. Establishments having on hand band labels which bear the inspection legend and which have been applied direct to sausage may continue this practice for a reasonable period, in order to afford an opportunity for the use of supplies on hand. In such cases informa,tion should be furnished through the inspector in charge concerning the approval numbers assigned to such labels, the quantity on hand, and the length of time estimated to exhaust the supply. It should be understood that the labels must be securel , y affixed and that this may involve the application of the labels to the casing by means of an adhesive in cases where the labels are affixed to sausage which may be expected to undergo appreciable shrinkage following its removal from the establishment. It has been determined that band labels become readily detached when applied to sausage previous to the normal shrinkage of the product. INEDIBLE-PRODUCT CERTIFICATE The inedible-product export certificate for bladders, hoofs, horns, grease, and similar inedible animal products other than casings has been printed in the form indicated in Circular Letter No. 1379 and is now available for distribution. Inspectors in charge who have need for this certificate should ma'ke requisition for the new form and destroy the old certificates when the new ones are received. DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF MEATS AND MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS The following definitions and standards for meats and the principal meat products were adopted by the Secretary of Agriculture July 3, 1926, and published as Food Inspection Decision 205: Flesh is any clean, sound, edible part of the striated muscle of an animal. The term "animal," as herein used, indicates a mammal, a fowl, a fish, a crustacean, a mollusk, or any other animal used as a source of food. Meat 1 is the properly dressed flesh derived from cattle, from swine, from sheep, or from goats, sufficiently mature and in good health at the time of slaughter, but is restricted to that part of the striated muscle which is skeletal or that which is found in the tongue, in the diaphragm, in the heart, or in the esophagus, and does not include that found in the lips, in the snout, or in the ears; with or without the accompanying and overlying fat, and the portions of bone, skin, sinew, nerve, and blood vessels which normally accompany the flesh and which may not have been separated from it in the process of dressing it for sale. Fresh meat is meat which has undergone no substantial change in character since the time of slaughter. Beef is meat derived from cattle nearly 1 year of age, or older. Veal is meat derived from young cattle 1 year or less of age. Mutton is me t derived from sheep nearly 1 year of age, or older. Lamb is meat derived from young sh~p 1 year or less of age. Pork is meat derived from swine. Venison is flesh derived from deer. Meat by-products are any clean, sound, and properly dressed edible parts, other than meat, which have been derived from one or more carcasses of cattle, of swine, of sheep, or of goats, sufficiently mature and in good health at the time of slaughter. 1 The term" meat" when used in a qualified form, as, for example, "horse meat," "reindeer meat," "crab meat," etc., is then, and then only, properly applied to the corresponding portions of animals other than cattle, swine, sheep, and goats.

PAGE 3

1!)26] SERVICE AKD REGUL A TO RY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65 Prepared meat is the clean, sound p roduct obtained by subjecting mea t to a process of comminuting, of dry ing, o f curi n g , o f smoking, of cooking, of s e a oning, or of flavoring, or to any combination o f such processe s. Cured meat is the clean , sound product o btained b y subjecting mea t to a process of salting, by the employ ment of dry common salt or of brine, with or without the use of one or more o f the fo ll owing: Sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, sugar, a sirup, honey, p i c e. Dry salt meat is the pre p a red meat whic h h a s b een cure d b y the applicati o n of dry common salt, with or without t h e use of one or more of the foll owing: Sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, pota sium n itrate, sugar, a sirup, hone y , pice; with or without the injection into it o f a solution of common salt to whi c h may have been added one or more o f the foll owing: Sodium nitrite, sodium n i t r ate, potassium nitrate, sugar, a sirup , h o ney. Corned meat i s the prepared meat w h i c h has bee n cure d by soaking in , with or without injecting into it, a olution o f common salt, with or without o n e or more of the following, eac h in its prope r proportion: Sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, suga r , a irup, h oney , and with o r without the u se of spice. Sweet pickled meat is the prepared meat which has been cured by s oaking in, with or without injecting into it, a solution of common salt with sugar, a sirup, and/or honey, together with one o r more of the following, each in its proper proportion: Sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, and with or without the use of spice. Dried meat is the clean, sound product obtained by subjecting fresh meat or cured meat to a proces s of drying, with o r without the aid of artificial heat, until a substantial portion of the water has been removed. Smoked meat is the clean, sound product obtained by subjecting fresh meat, dried meat, or cured meat to the direct action of the smoke either of burning. wood or of similar burning material. Canned meat is fresh meat or prepared meat, packed in hermetically sealed containers, with or without subsequent heat.ing for the purpose of steriii7,ation. Hamburg steak, "Hamburger steak," is comminuted fresh beef, with or wit.hout the addition of suet and/or o f seasoning. Potted meat, deviled meat, is the clean, sound product obtained b y comminuting and cooking fresh meat and/or prepared meat, with or without spice, and is usually packed in hermetically sealed containers. Sausage meat is fresh meat or prepared meat, or a mixture of fresh meat and prepared meat, and is sometimes comminuted. The term "sausage meat" is sometimes applied to bulk sausag e containing no meat by-products. Meat food products are a n y articles of food or any articles that ente r into the composition of food which are not prepared meats but which are derive d or prepared, in whole or in part, by a process of manufacture from any portion of the carcasses of cattle, swine, sheep, or g oats , if such manufactured portion be all, or a considerable and definite portion, of the article, except such preparations as are for medicinal purposes only. Meat loaf is the product consi sting o f a mixture of comrilinuted meat with spice and/or with cereals, with or without milk and/or eggs, pressed into the form of a loaf and cooked. Pork sausage is chopped or ground p ork, with or without one or more of the following: Herbs, spice, common salt, sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, sugar, a sirup, water, vinegar; and may be fresh, dried, smoked, or cooked. Brawn is the product made from chopped or ground and cooked edible parts of swine, chiefly from the head, fe et, a n d /or legs, with or without the chopped or ground tongue. Head cheese, mock brawn, differs fro m brawn in that other meat and/or meat by-products are substituted, in whole or in part, for corresponding parts derived from swine. Souse is the product consisting of meat and/or meat by-products; after cooking, the mixture is commonly packed into containers and covered with vinegar. Scrapple is the product consisting of meat and/or meat by-products mixed with meal or the flour of grain, and cooke d with seasoning materials, after which it is poured into a mold.

PAGE 4

66 BUREAU OF ANTiV[AL INDUSTRY [August, ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL INSPECTION, JULY, 1926 Station Cattle Calves Sheep Goats Swine Baltimore __ ---------------------------------7, 151 1 ,679 1,3 6 0 ----------54,233 Brooklyn ____________________________________ ~ .9213 8,603 25,862 ---------------------Buffalo ______________________________________ 9,162 3,837 11, 507 ----------66,479 C hicago _____________________________________ 188,34 1 49,39 8 231,295 ----------446,233 C in cinn ati__ _________________________________ 11,347 , 166 5,594 1 51,544 Cleveland ___________________________________ 8,501 10,423 9,910 ----------57,604 Denver ______________________________________ 6, 8 5 1 ,506 5,675 ----------15,692 Detroit. ___ __________________________________ 7,419 7,982 3,752 ---------81,681 Fort Worth __________________________________ 44,995 26,124 14,257 391 11,258 Indianapolis _________________________________ 1 6,283 3,488 3,981 ----------94,064 Jersey City __________________________________ 3,892 7,291 25,012 ---------27,634 Kansas City _________________________________ 97,571 32,409 90,974 580 188, 714 Milwaukee __________________________________ l2 , 861 27,680 5,062 1 9 1 ,396 National Stoc k Yards _______________________ 39,38i 12,492 65,412 177 111,619 N cw York ___________________________________ I 2-1,529 45,010 148,066 ----------59,704 Omaha ______________________________________ 92,894 8,351 1 32,925 12 1 58,321 Philadelphia _________________________________ 9. 188 11,018 19,730 ----------60,835 St. Louis ____________________________________ 1 8,487 8,046 11,672 1 123,883 Sioux City ____ _ ______________________________ 40,49 C 6,951 11,807 ----------159, 958 South St. Jo seph _____________________________ 33,7 3 2 9,655 76,992 ----------98,069 South t. P a uL ______________________________ 48,798 60,388 12,455 ----------224,525 All other est 1blishments _____________________ 136, 33 74,909 127,883 758 943,851 Tota l : July , 1925 ______________________ 853,672 425,406 1,041,683 1 ,921 3,127,302 July. 1925 _______________________ 862,053 472,819 1,071 ,074 1,181 2,319 ,385 7 months ended July, 1926 _____________ 5,568,331 3,073,608 7,265, 163 13,389 2-1, 206, 408 7 months ended July, 1925 _____________ 5,321,630 3,161,808 6,94 1 ,323 8,879 26,498,628 Horses slaughtered at all estab lishm ents, July, 1926, 3,-182. Inspections of l ard at all establishment , July, 1926, 142,414,850 inspection pounds; compound and other substitutes, 29,267,435 inspection pounds; sausage c hopp ed, 67,173,643 inspection pounds; corresponding inspections for July, 1925: L ard, 115,003,323 inspection pounds; compound and other substitutes, 46,218,591 insp ection pounds; sausage chopped, 68,003, 117 inspection pounds. (Th ese tota l s of in spect ion pounds do not represent actua l production, as the same product may h ave been inspected and recorded more than once in the pro::ess of manufacture.) CAUSES OF CONDEMNATION OF CARCASSES, JUNE, 1926 Cause Cattl e Calves Sheep Swine Emaciation________ ____________________________________________ 579 151 269 ,8 Hog cholera____________________________________________________ _ _ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ ___ __ _ _ _ _ _ _______ _ 807 Inflammatory diseases_________________________________________ 848 206 306 1,862 Immaturity_ _ _ _________________________________________________ _ _ _ __ __ _ __ 189 ___________________ _ Tuberculosis___________________________________________________ 4,162 70 __________ 6,536 All other causes________________________________________________ 914 242 361 3,405 Total ____________________________________________________ _ 6,503 858 936 12,688 IMPORTS OF MEATS AND FOOD ANIMALS, JULY, 1926 Imports of meat and meat food products ' Fresh and refrigerated Country of export Cann ed Other and c ured products Beef Other Pounds Pounds P ounds Po unds Argentina _________________________________ 129,011 231,714 862,844 ------------Australia __________________________________ 18,283 2,522 ------------------------Canada ____________________________________ 749,143 882,0 1 3 150,021 31,584 Uruguay __________________________________ 111,204 ------------1,075, 155 152,700 Other countries ____________________________ ---------------------32,043 187, 159 Total: July, 1926 ____________________ 1 ,007,641 1 , 116,249 2,120,063 371,443 July, 1925 ____________________ 759, 711 1,036 ,152 413,966 184,123 7 months ended July, 1926 ___________ 4,953,135 7,330,635 16,607, 155 2,334,510 7 months ended July, 1925 ___________ 2,749,585 6,719,861 7,352,949 1,480,362 Condemned in July, 1926: Beef, 142 pounds; pork, 2,795 pounds; total 2,937 pounds. Refus ed entry: Pork, 37 pounds. Tota l weight Pounds 1,223,569 20,805 1 ,812, 761 1 ,339 ,059 219,202 4,615,396 2,393,952 31,225,435 1 8 ,302, 757

PAGE 5

19 26] SERVIC E AND R EGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Imports off ood animals 67 Country of export Ca t t l e S wine S heep I Goats I ----------------------1----1-----1--------Can a d a________________________________________________________ 8,732 758 2841 1 12 M e xico__________________________ __________ ___________ __________ 7,251 2 30 429 ,----------Great Britain____________ _ _ _______________ _ __________ __________ 82 _____________________ _ _______ _ N e w Z ea l and________________________ _ ______ __ _____________________________ ________ _ 1 _________ _ Ve n ezue l a (t o Port o R ico) ____________ _ _ _ _ ____________ ______________ _ _______________ ---------! 1 Vir g in I s l an ds ( to P o rto Rico)________________________________ __ 94 _______ ______ ____ ____________ _ Total : Jul y, 1 926 _________________ _ ____ __________________ _ July, 1925 _________________ ___ ______ __________ _ _ _ _ _ 7 m onths e nd ed Jul y , 1926 _____________________ __________ _ 7 months end e d July, 192 5 ________ ____ _________ _ _________ _ 16, 1 5 9 15, 796 139,50 6 93,3 7 5 988 1 5,425 8,247 80,854 FOREIGN MEAT-INSPECTION OFFICIALS 714 1 186 1 6,282 44,93 6 1 3 7 32 175 The bureau has been officially advised that Dr. A. B. Peter, whose certifi cates for meat originating in Germany have heretofore b een acceptable, has se vered his connection with the German Government. Dr. Wilhelm Stodter, of Hamburg, is the only official now authorized to issue certificates for meat from Germany intended for importation into the United States. ANTI-HOG-CHOLERA SERUM AND HOG-CHOLERA VIRUS PRODUCED UNDER VETERINARY LICENSES, JULY, 1926 O.c. Ordinary serum__ _ ___________________________________________ 35, 953, 336 Clear serum _________________________________________________ 30, 670, 960 I '.J Total_________________________________________________ 66, 624, 296 t ;, Simultaneous virus_________________________________ _ _________ 6,467,550 Hyperimmunizing virus _______________________________________ 15, 787, 422 RESULTS OF PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF LAWS .. Penalties and fines have been imposed in prosecutions for violations of regulatory laws, as reported to the bureau during August, as follows: Number!<)f cases 1 1 2 1 Number[of cases Livestock Quarantine Law Defend ant Nature of violation Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry. Co ___ Interstate tra nsport a tion of 1 dead bog in same c a r with live anim a ls. _____ do __________________________________ Failure to placard c a rs "Southern cattle" _____ C hicago , Burlington & Quincy R.R. Co_ _____ do ________________________________________ Pennsylvania R. R. Co __________________ Intersta te movement of infectious car without cleaning and disinfection. Total ______________________________ ------------------------------------------------Twenty-Eight-Hour Law Defendant 2 Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co __________________________________________________________ _ 2 Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Ry. Co _____________________________________ _ 3 Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Co _________________________________________ _ 1 Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Co _____________________________________________________ _ 1 Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad Co. of Texas ___ -----------------------------------------28 New York Central Railroad Co _________________________________________________________ _ 113 Pennsylvania Railroad Co ______________________________________________________________ _ 2 Wabash Railway Co ____________________________________________________________________ _ Fine $100 100 200 100 500 Penalty $200 200 300 100 100 2,800 11, 300 200 1---Total _____________________________________________________________________________ _ 15,200

PAGE 6

68 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY [ A u g u s t , SUMMARY OF TUBERCULOSIS-ERADICATION WORK IN COOPERA TION WITH STATES, JULY, 1926 Tuberculin tests Total to date I during month State CatOnceAc-Herds Inspector in charge Sta te offic ial Herds Cattle tle tested cred• under or lots tested re• fr e e ite d super• acted h e rds herds vision ' ---Ala ...... 332 4,549 14 3,369 216 4,315 R. E . Jackson ..... C. A. C ary, Auburn. Ariz ...... 525 2,826 74 6 ,866 22 8,131 F. L. S c hneid er. .. S. E . Dougl a s , Phoenix. Ark ...... 39 450 2 2 ,894 27 3,944 H. L. Fry ....•.... J. H . Bux, Little Rock. Calif.. ... 82 4,0 5 3 80 3,264 85 3 ,512 R. Snyder. ....... J.P. Iverson, S a cr a mento. Colo ..... 44 1,391 21 1,784 8 8 2,033 W. E. Howe ...... C. G. L amb, Denver. Conn .... 236 3,506 358 824 919 2,510 R. L. Smith ...... J. M. Whittlesey, Hart ford. Del. ..... 104 1,051 136 2,327 1,241 4,174 W. G. Middleton. 0. A. Newton, Bridgeville. D. C ..... -----------------2 5 3 26 286 J. A. Kiernan ..... Fla . . ..... 93 2 ,578 30 6,271 397 7,101 J . G . Fish ....•.... J. V. Knapp, Tallahassee. G a ....... 72 857 2 9,841 39 10,751 A. L. Hirleman ... P. F. B a hnsen, Atlanta. Ida ho .... 410 4 ,88 5 17 23,709 67 26,896 W. A. Sullivan ... W . C. Nye, Boise. Ill ........ 6,263 61,079 3 ,691 95,219 1 ,838 105,943 J . J . Lintner. ..... F. A. Laird, Springfield. Ind ...... 4, 121 30,772 325 67,359 18,370 93,478 J.E. Gibson ...•.. R. C. Julien, Indianapolis. Iowa ..... 4,125 66, 749 1,400 70,138 6, 716 125,630 J. A. Barger. ..... M. G . Thornburg, Des Moine s. K a ns ..... 98 2,787 18 29,532 1,074 31,197 N. L. Townsend .. J. H. M e rcer, Topeka . Ky ....... 1 ,663 7,609 37 61,048 54 61,197 W. F. Biles ....... D. E. Westmorland, Fra nkfort. La ......• 213 3,338 50 4,147 31 4,433 G .T.Cole ........ E. P. Flower, B aton Rouge. Me ...... 1,957 11,835 108 14,269 4 ,521 23,307 G. R. Caldwell.. .. H . M. Tucker, Augusta. Md ...... 878 9,33 8 235 8 ,478 2,277 14,536 E. B. Simonds .... J a mes B. George, Bal timore. Mass . . ... 27 4,272 1,359 954 429 2,260 E . A . Crossman ... L. H. Howard, Boston. Mic h ..... 5 ,181 41,157 417 92,295 119 98,255 T. S. Rich ........ H. W. Norton,jr., Lansing. Minn .... 4,769 92,739 3,141 21,341 7,534 31,566 W. J. Fretz ....... C. E. Cotton, St. Paul. Miss ..... 52 1,053 3 2,066 143 2,359 H . Robbins ....... P. P . G arne r, J a ckson. Mo ...... 248 2,582 7 56,538 922 59,884 Ralph Graham . ... H. A. Wilson, Jefferson City. Mont .... 3 5 0 3,175 47 22,321 70 23,109 J. W. Murdoch ... W. J. Butler, H e lena. Nebr. .... 1 ,541 18,303 138 37,281 123 38,865 W. C. Herrold .... C.H. H a ys, Lincoln . Nev ...... 79 1,379 5 2,365 12 3,8 3 3 L. C. Butterfield .. Edward Records, Reno. N. H ..... 401 3,815 309 2 ,208 2 ,324 4, 7G2 E . A. Crossman ... A. L . F e 1k e r, Concord. N. J.. .... 283 3,401 241 1 ,903 969 3,119 W. G . Middleton. J. H. McNeil, Trenton. N. M e x .. 1 2 2 0 3 ,510 13 3,798 F. L. Schneider. .. M at. Keenan, Albuquer que. N. Y ..... 7,697 77,377 7,501 36,476 20,964 75,304 H. B. Leonard .... E.T. Faulder, Albany. N. C ..... 2,523 8,194 10 198,161 261 211,681 W. v. D e ndinger . Wm. Moore, R a leigh. N . Dak .. 326 5 ,885 134 28,810 4,026 36,862 H. H . Cohenour.. W . F. Crewe, Bismarck. Ohio ..... 6,349 41,715 1,262 74,384 842 81,444 A. J . DeFosset .... F. A . Zimmer, Columbus. Okla ..... 21 961 1 97 225 344 H. Gra fke ......... J . A. Whitehurst, Okla homa City. Oreg .... . 1,769 11,683 43 81,209 1,218 82,460 S. B. Foster. ...... W . H. Lytle, Salem. P a ....... 4,401 30,278 2,292 68,454 4,274 83,150 J .B. Reidy ....... T. E. Munce, Harrisburg. R. L .... 40 874 154 54 38 181 E. A. Crossman ... T. E. Robinson, Provi-deuce. S. C ..... 1 ,265 3,095 6 11,571 181 11,817 W. K. Lewis ..... . W . K . Lewis , Columbi a . S. D a k ... 129 3,179 34 5,345 580 6 ,207 J . 0. Wilson . ..... M . W . R a y, Pierre . Tenn .... 435 1,423 14 19,779 238 20,187 H . M. O 'Rear. . . . . W. B. Lincoln, N as hville. Tex ...... 32 1,074 17 80 263 407 H. L. Darby ...... N. F. Willi a ms, Fort Worth. Uta h ..... 683 5,320 52 10,356 97 11, 3 3 6 F. E. Murra y .... . w . H . Hendricks, Salt L ake City. Vt. ...... 273 4,642 104 2,332 4,016 8,722 L. H. Adams ...... Edward H. Jone s, Mont peli e r . Va . ...... 207 3,070 41 6,148 1,999 8,398 R. E . Brookbank. H . C. Givens, Richmond. Wash .... 816 8,881 151 44,694 106 4 8,09 7 J. C. Exlin e . . . . ... Robert Prior, Olympi a. W. Va ... 1,116 5,045 46 11,681 780 12,484 H. M. Newton .... John W. Smith, Cha rles• ton . Wis ....•. 3,275 62,807 1,225 68,256 7,754 79,753 J. S. Healy ....... . John D. Jones, jr., Madi-son. J Wyo ..... 96 1,004 1 6,759 5 7,476 John T. Dall a s .... A. W. French, Che yenne . -----Total.. 65,640 668,058 25,353 1, 329, 020198, 533 1,591,434

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1926] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS POLITICAL ACTIVITY 69 Competitive employees, while retaining the right to vote and to express privately their opinions on political subjects, are forbidden to take an active part in political management or in political campaigns. This also applies to temporary employees, employees on leave of absence with or without pay, substitutes, and laborers. Political activity in city, county, State or national elections, whether primary or regular, or in behalf of any party or candidate, or any measure to be voted upon, is prohibited. . Employees are accountable for political activity by persons other than themselves, including wives or husbands, if, in fact, the employees are thus accomplishing by collusion and indirection what they may not lawfuUy do directly and openly. Political activity, in fact, regardless of the methods or means used by the employee, constitutes the violation. POLITICAL ASSESSMENTS, SOLICITATIONS, AND DISCRIMINATION Sections 118, 119, 120, and 121 of the Criminal Code (see 35 Stat. 1110) provide that no legislative, executive, or judicial officer or employee shall solicit or be concerned in soliciting or receiving any money or contribution for political purpose from any other officer or employee of the Government; that no solicitation or receipt of political assessments shall be made by any person in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by any officer or employee of the United States; that no officer or employee shall be discharged or demoted for refusing to make any contribution for political purposes; and that no officer or employee of the Government shall directly or indirectly give or hand over to any other officer or employee in the service of the United States or to any Member or Delegate to Congress any money or other valuable thing for the promotion of any political object whatever. Section 122 of the Criminal Code provides that whoever shall violate any provision of the four sections shall be fined not more than $5,000, or imprisoned not more than three years, or both. PRESIDENTIAL OFFICERS Presidential appointees are forbidden by statute to use their official authority or influence to coerce the political action of any person or body, to make any contribution for a political object to any other officer of the United States, or to solicit or receive contributions for political purposes from other Federal officers or employees, or to discriminate among their employees or applicants for political reasons. Otherwise, a presidential appointee will be allowed to take such a part in political campaigns as is taken by any private citizen, except that under departmental regulations issued by the State, Treasury, War, Navy, Interior, Agriculture, and Commerce Departments, and by the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, and the Public Printer, he will not be permitted-1. To hold a position as a member or officer of any political committee that solicits funds. 2. To display such obtrusive partisanship as to cause public scandal. 3. To attempt to manipulate party primaries or conventions. 4. To use his position to bring about his selection as a delegate to conventions. 5. To act as chairman of a political convention. 6. To assume the active conduct of a political campaign. 7. To use his position to interfere with an election or to affect the result thereof. 8. To neglect his public duties. It is the duty of any person having knowledge of the violation of any of the foregoing provisions of the civil-service rules or Criminal Code to submit the facts to the United States Civil Service Commission, Washington, D. C. At the request of the Civil Service Commission, the above is published for the information and guidance of employees of the Department of Agriculture.

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70 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUf 111111111 1~im~1im1'II ~11ll1i11111lm111111111111111 3 1262 0~852 7980 NEW PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU [The bureau keeps no mailing list for sending publications to individua l employees, but publications are sent in bulk to officers in charge for distribution to members of their forces. The number of copies sent varies with the subject or nature of the publication and the number and class of emoloyees. Officers in c h arge will u se their judgment and distribute publications to best advantage. So far as possible additiona l copies wi!J be furnished on request.] Farmers' Bulletin 920 (revised). Milk Goats. By Edward L. Shaw, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 32, figs. 18. Farmers' Bulletin 1068 (revised). Judging Beef Cattle. By E. H. Thompson, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 13, figs. 9. Farmers' Bulletin 1455 (revised). Fitting, Showing, and Judging Hogs. By E. Z. Russell, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 22, figs. 13. Farmers' BuUetin 1490 (revised). Hog-Lot Equipment. By E. Z. Russell, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 22, figs. 26. Mimeographed pamphlet. Meat Production, Consumption, and Foreign Trade in United States, Calendar Years 1907-1925. (Revised)1 ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ANIMAL IND USTRY Chief: JOHN R. MOHLER. Administrative Assistant: CHARLES C. CARROLL. Chief Clerk: J. R. COHRAN. Editor: D. S . BURCH. Animal Husbandry Division: E. W. SHEETS, chief. Biochemic Division: M. DORSET, chief. Division of Hog-Cholera Control: U. G. HoucK, chief. Division of Virus-Serum Control: D. l. SKIDMORE, chief. Field Inspection Division: A. W. MILLER, chief. Meat Inspection Division: R. P. STEDDOM, chief. Pathological Division: JoHN S. BucKLEY, chief. Tick Eradication Division: R. A. RAMSAY, chief. Tuberculosis Eradication Division: J. A. KIERNAN, chief. Zoological Division: MAURICE C. HALL, chief. Experiment .Station: E. C. SCHROEDER, superintendent. Offi9e of Accounts: GEORGE F. TucKER, in charge. Office of Personnel: GEORGE H. RussELL, in charge. ADDITIONAL COPIES OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON, D. C. AT 5 CENTS PER COPY SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, 25 CENTS PER.YEAR V


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