Citation
Service and regulatory announcements

Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Animal Industry
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat inspection ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Summary:
Contains Insecticide decisions and Notices of judgment under the Insecticide Act formerly issued only as a separate publication, now published in both forms.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format
Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
No. 81 (1914)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
004884120 ( ALEPH )
17762165 ( OCLC )
AA00005308_00017 ( sobekcm )
Classification:
HD9000.9.U5 A14 ( lcc )
630.61 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service announcements

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text



UNIV. OF FL LIA. 0






.R .I A.--B. A. I. 2 e ovmbr 12
Unied taes eprtmntof grculur
BUREU OFANIML INUSTR
Ir
SERVICE AN EUAOY NONEET









Othersite deiigcplsmyotanthem ro the Baprinennt of DorcmnltsGoernetPitn






chacrige oasaton wor ba of the bureau sernice, who should promtl distributeoI copites to members ofth


his force. A file should be kept at seac stablon for reference.



CONTENTS
Changes in dire ctary.... ...._.............................................. 79
Noti~ces regasrding meat in~spection............................................ 80
Animal casings of foreign origin.......... ..... ................................ tD
Import meat crti fiar tes-........,,_,,,___................................. 80
Amimal casings exported to Poland.... .......... ............................... 80
Animals slaughtered under Federal meat inspection, Baptember, 1927.-.,,...........-............ 81
Exten~t of tuberenaslos in animals slaughtered at important mark~ets, September, 1027~............... 81
Cadigeds of condenmaution of enrouesse August, 1927___,....,_,_,,--.......................... at
Imports of food animals and of meats and meatfood praodcts, September, 1027.................... 82
Summary of tubercurlosis-eradication work in cooperation with States, September, 1927............. 83
Anti-hog-cholera serum and hog-cholera virus produced under licenses. ............................ M
Permitted dip for cables at cattle and sheep...................-,,-~......... .................. 84
Permitted dislatectants..,,,,_._... ......... ...... ....... ........ .... ...... ................. 84
Discontinuance of manufacture of disinfectant...~ ..............................,,............ 84
Change of prod net .......-,,,. _.. _,, .......... .......... ,........... .............. 86
Change of firm name and addre~ss.......,,................ ................................... 86
Permitted dip for cattle for ticks.__.......... ,................................... 85
Proceedings under packers and stooksards act,................................ --............ 85
D emodeatic mange.... ,........................ .................................................. 8 0
Use of the frank _...,.,......................... ..... ......... ... ..... ......... ............. 87
Results of prosecultions for violations of laws................................,,,--... ........... 87
New publications of~the burean... ,...................... ........................ 87
Organization of the Burean of Animal Industry............................ -............. 88



CHANGES IN DIRECTORY

MEAT INSPECTION GRANTED

5. Stegner Products Co., 1816 Race Street, Cincinnati, Ohio.
*94. The P. Brenan Co., 3927-3943 Bouth Halatead Street, Chicago, Ill.
502. Pure Mea~t Products Co. (Inc.), 217 Broome Street, Newark, N. J.

MEAT INSPECTION WITHDRAWN

237. Retmo Packing Co., Richmond, Va.
*295. Sidney Packing Co., Sidney, Ohio.
485. Thomas Harris, New Y'ork, N. Y'.
*1012. Brown Bros., Indianapolis, Ind.
*Conducts slaughtering.
71085--27 79









CHANGE IN NAME OF Ol FICIAL ESTABLISHMENT
*R-77. Schlesser Bros. (Inc.), Kenton Station, Portland, Oreg., Instead of
Portland Horse Products (Inc.)..
*886. The Fowler-8tranb Packing Co., First SJtreet and Meyern Avenue,
Kansas City, Kans., instead of The Fowler &t Straub Packing Co.,
First Street and 1Meyrer Ave.
CHANGE IN ADDRESS OF OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENT
19-D. The Cudahly Packing Co., WTaqtuplia, Mass., mail, 17f End Street, Fall
River, MTass.
318. Wm. Underwood Co., 85 Walnut Street, Watertowna Meas., Insptea~d of
52 Fulton Street, Boston, Mass.
CHANGE OP O~FF(CIAL IN CHARGE
Dr. G. W. Knorr succeeds Dr. Joshua Miller (retired) as inspector in charge of;
meat inspection at Frankfort, Ind., effective November 7, 1927.
Dr. T. H. Applowhite succeeds Dr. S. J. Horne (resigned) at Jacksonville, Fla~.
CHANGE OF ADDRESS OF OFFICIAL IN CHARGE
Dr. E. S. Dickey, 308 Federal Building, Milwaukee, Wis., instead of 423
Federal Building.
R. E. Simme, 65 Oak Street, Naugatuck, Conn., instead of Storre, Conn.
STATION DISCONTINUED
Sidney, Ohio, meat inspection. (Remove Doctor Snyder.)

NOTICES REGARDING MZVEAT INSPECTION
ANIMAL CASINGS OF FOREIGN ORIGIN

Certificates required by B. A. I. Order 305 and instructions issued thereunder,
which bear the official titles of the high officials of the respective foreign coun-
tries as specified below, will be acceptable with animal casings offered for impor-
tation into the United States on and after December 1, 1927.
The certificates must also bear the signature of the high official of the national
government having jurisdiction over the health of animals in the foreign country
in which the casings originated, but owing to the fact that the high officials are
changed from time to time, it is impracticable to publish their names.
Official title Foreign country
Director of Agriculture,,,,........................... Algeria.
Director of State Veterinary Services.. *_____,I The Netherlands.
Minister of Agriculture,-............. -----,- New Zealand.
Chairman, Committee on Veterinary Affairs of the Soviet
of Labor and Defense...... -------,,,-, Russia.
Director of the National Depa -tient of Hes Ith,,,, Veneruela.
Additional official titles will be published when received from other foreign
countries.
IMPORT MEAT CERTIFICATES

Inspectors in charge are directed to see that the correct foreign meat-inspection
certificate is attached to each M. I. Form 109-J report forwarded to Washington.
ANIMAL CASINGS EXPORTED TO POLAND

In order to facilitate the exportation of animal casings to Poland, animal casings
exported to that country via, Hamburg, Germany, should be handled and certified
as indicated in Service and Regulatory Announc~ements of November, 1926, for
animal casings to Austria.

*Conducts slaughtering,


.. ih~j












ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL MEAT INSPECTION,
SEPTEMBER, 1927


Station Cattle Calves Bheep Goats wine


Baltimore.................................- 6, 248 865 2,66...... 5, 230
But~alo................................... 10 987 2, 522 9, 221 ............, 61, 650
Chicago...................................- 163, 608 40, 975 269, 147 79 326, 712
Cicinai...................... 12, 027 5, 697 6, 3971 38 61, 743
Cleveland.....__ __ __.......... 8, 810 8, 459 14, 657 ............_ 62, 957
Denver... ......................_ _........ 8, 271 1, 863 16, 100 ........ 1, 553
Detroit... _........................ 8, 154 4, 262 23, 75 ... .. .. 67, 145
Fort Worth.....~_ _. ..................... 34, 676 40, 033 12, 633 1, 000 28, 000
Indianspolia._ __ _.....__ __ _........ 19, 661 3, 699 5, 912 ............_ 48, 696
Kansas City.... _-................... 108, 843 25, 194 127, 445 1, 116 115, 4 28
Milwaukee.._ _........... _............ 15, 740 25, 539 8, 325 ............, 07, 960
National Stock Yards......______________- 41,892 6, 571 27,269 128 92, 619
New York, ...,............................ 33, 570 51, 900 192, 355 ............_ 103, 908
Omaha....................................- 68, 726 7, 649 132, 625 17 100,815
Philadelphia..._ _.......... ..........-,,-,- 7, 935 8, 075 20, 713 ............- 80,805
St, Louis.............. .,-,,,,- __ __ 16, 544 4, 360 7, 020 ....... 110, 804
Slonx City.................. ... ........- 26, 189 3, 670 23, 678 1............ 72, 632
South St. Joseph~........ __........... 35, 224 5, 905 76, 620 0 56, OSI
Both St. Paul............._.............- 46, 181 38, 993 63, 509 2 113, 761
W iebits........................_ _._ _1 7, 701 2, 64 I 2, 675 10 32, 873
All other establishments._ _.._ __ _146, 636 68, 127 143, 247 520 827, 501

Total: September, 1927.............. 827, 725 357, 008 1, 185, 160 3, 018 2, 533, 819
September, 1926.............. 971, 400 408, 114 1, 224, 325 3, 084 2, 616, 452
0 months ended September,

0 months ended September,
1926............ 7, 351, 016 3, 861, 033 9, 582, 730 20, 160 29, 656, 475

rE~orses slaughtered at all establishments, September, 1927, 7,137. Inspections of lard at all establishments,
105,952,786 inspection pounds; compound and other substitutes, 55,291,039 inspection pounds; sausage
chopped, 70,833,891 inspection pounds. Corresponding inspections for September, 1926: Lard, 116,119,947
inspection pounds; compound and other substitutes, 54,122,392 inspection pounds; sausage chopped,
70 387,718 inspection pounds.
~These totals of inspection pounds do not represent actual production, as the same product may have
beeq inspected and recorded more than once in the process of manufacture.)

EXTENT OF TUBERCULOSIS IN ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED AT THREE
IMPORTANT MARKETS, SEPTEMBER, 1927


I IReained for tuberenuosis


Cattle-Chicago.------ .................................
Kansas City- ................................ ~-
Omaba.................................... ~---~
Sw ine-Chicago..................................
Kansas City~..-................................
Omaha_. ............~...........................


CAUSES OF CONDEMNATION OF CARCASSES, AUGUST, 1927


Cause Cattle Calves Sheep Swine


Em aciation_....., .._ ........................... 515 81 436 67
Ilog cholera.. -- ~_.... .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. ... .. .... .. ... .... .. .. ..._. .. .. .. 1, 769
Inflammatory disenases......---....................... 760 1l3 643 1, 816
Im ma turity..... ..... ...... ..... ...... ..... ..... ._ 1 _.- ....... 97 . .
Tuberculosis~--.................... ....... ...... ...... ::~3, 27 5 523 .. ., 0304
All other causes~.~-~-................... .......... ..... 1, 01 21 7 3

Total_..................__ ____ 5, 503 55B 1, 552 11, 976


1981]


STotal
slaughter




163, 608
108,843
68, 726
326, 712
115, 423
100, 815


Station


Passed for
steriliza-
tion


137
21
30
1, 004
121
223


de~mued



70
84
800
104
186


Total



6, 025

51, 157
6, 588
15, 083


SERVICE AND blEG3ULALTORY~ ANNOUNCEMENTS





IMPORMS 'OF POOD ANfIMALSt AND) OR Id~XTitATS AN ~blHAY Vi~b
PRODUCTSi 88P'FYLEMBl 1927

The statements following show t~he imports of food animals and of meats and
meat-food products inspected by the Bureau of Animal Industry during Septem-
ber, 1927, with figures for other periods for comparison.

Im~po;ts of ood animaterl


Country of export Gattle Swine Bheep oanta

M~exico.,, _..........--.... -.... ......... ............ 77......... ........ 107
Canadar~-.............................. L................. .... 37, 005 6,450 3, 7995 9
V~rgi Islands (to Porto Rico) ........................ 151 3 ......... .........
Total, September, 1927......,-......................... 88, 473 6 4435 3705 131
Total, september, 1926...................--............. SS, 375 7, 103 7, 078 4
9 months ended Beptember, 1927.................._ 244,178 145, 1811 10,491 177
9 months ended September, 1926-.--.............. 18,4~991 ,17, 818 Sa 775 lid


laported meals and meal-food produccts


Presh and refrigerated
Canned Other Total
Country f exortand cured prodnets weight
Beef Other

Pounda Pounds Poseds Poends Pounds
Argentina....... -............................. ....... 514, 748 200, 83 714 080
Australia............ .................. 2,462 4,334 70 5, 710 la SB2
B razil.....................-... .. .. .. .. .. ... .S 000 .. 84 00
Canada.,_,,,,,........................ 45, 87,OD 1, 534, 003 2, 117, 095 357, 465 ,SW 2
Urrugnay_.,,........................... ..............1 394, 085 872, 274 I, 764 S
Other country es....................... ......... ......... 290, 971 47, 414 344, 85
Total: September, 1927............. 4,390, 066 1, 539, 297 4, 350, 576 083, 204 11, 27, l143
September, 1926.............1 1,814 545 1, 26, s552 2, 504 078 278 OBB 45,861,
0 months ended September,
1927_-....................... 15 664, 457 18, 800,zs 28141 280, 881 3,776,863 79, 612, 482
9 months ended September,
1926....................(... 8 9283,044 9,496,555 ~22,170,806 3, 103, 771 45, 000 176

Condemned in September, 1927: Beef, 19,10B pounds; veal, 22 pounds; pork, 4456 pounds; total, 25,617
pounds.
Refused entry: Park, 1,180 pounds.


BUREA~tP OF A'IMs~ls nJIJbv8 't


S[oetamer.
























C. A. Cary, Auburn.
S. E. Douglas, Phoenix.
J. H. But, Little Rock.
J. P. Iverson, Sacra-
mento.
C. G. Lamb, Denver.
J. hI. W'hittlesey, Bart-
ford.
O. A. Newton, Bridge-
ville.

J. V. K napp, T alla-
hassee.
J. MI. Sutton, Atlanta.
A. J. Dickman, Boise.
F. A. Laird, Springfield.
Frank H. Browfn, In-
d lanapolis.
Mr. G. Thornburg, Des
Moines.
J. H. Mercer, Topek~a.
D. E. Westmorland,
Frankfort.
E. P. Flower, Baton
Rouge.
H. M. Tucker, Augusta.
James B. George, Balti-
more.
F. B. Cummings, Bos-
ton.
H. W. Norton, Jr.,
Lansing.
C. E. Cotton, St. Paul.
R. V'. Rafnel, Jackson.
H. A. Wilson, Jellerson
City.
W. J. Butler, Helena.
C. H. Hays, Lincolo.
EdwardjRecoirds, Reno.
A. L. Felker, Concord.
J. B. McNeil, Trenton.
Mlat. Keenan, Albu-
querque.
E. T. Faulder, Albany.
Wm. Moore, Raleigh.
W. F. Crewe, Bismarck.
F. A. Zimmer, Colum-
bus.
C. C. Hisel, Oklaboma
Cityr.
W. H. Lytle, Salem.
T. E. blunce, Harris-
burg.
T. E. Robinson, Provi-
dence.
W. K. Lewfis, Columbia.
M. W. Ray, Pierre.
W. B. Lincoln, Nalsh-
v ille.
N. F. Williams, Fort
Worth.
W. H. Hendricks, Salt
Lake City.
Edward HI. Jones, M~ont-
pelier.
B. C. Oivens, R ichmond.
Robert Prior, Olympia.
John W. Smith, Cbarles-
ton.
Wvalter A. Duty, M~adi-
son.
H. D. Port, Obeyenne.
L. E. Case.
Karl Theile.


10BT]


SERVICE AND) REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS


Tube
dur


Herds
or lots










25


167



13 1






512

51



3, 90

395

23





217






548

2, 867



7, 05



31

1;,75


erculin tests
ing month

Cat l
testedter-
ated


2, 697
3,961

3, 23


6, 167





2, 171
4,52
86, 82
35, 343



4,60
8, 024

6, 497

10, 16
8, 80

3,027


152,391
3, 92
4, 514

6, 96
35, 10

2, 06
4,72
749

77, 373
8,111
4, 79
33, 606

1,091

12,03
67,40
47 r

4, 49
4,80
2,88

4,12

5, 971

10,30

7, 619
16,217
6, 23

132, 457


Total to date


State


Once
tested
free
herds

4,671
7,715
2, 884
4, 415

2, 344
2, 859

2, 701
253
6, 94 I

5, 218
27, 999
115, 100
83,155

85, 144

48, 728
64, 946

5, 882

28, 435
8, 206

1,471

128,989

43, 101
5, 289
50, 125

26, 752
50, 361
1, 011
2, 525
2, 535
167

41, 046
236, 943
36j, 098
123, 456
118

26, 284
70,314

101

30, 654
8, 001
20,481
349

10, 578

2, 821

10, 467
34, 150
20,674

99, 821


Berds
under
super-
vision

6, 682
7, 763
4, 571

2,745
5, 602

4, 930



5, 22
31,815
120, 06


141, 52


65, 68

6, 29

31, 87
19, 68

2,915

135,311

56, 68
5, 377
62,20

27, 379
50, 85
1, 211
5, 144
4,46



45. 357
127,15

383

26,729
97,94



80, 869
9,352
20,953
715

11, 527

10, 773

12, 924
36,03
27, 42

113, 61


Inspector in charge State or Territorial official


cred-
ited
herds



18
121


1, 281



414



1, 23
31,68j1

77 ,




3, 02



84

8, 48


91 1


2, 671


40, 50

4, 576





216






49 1

1,06


71 I


R. E. Jackson....
F. L. Schneider..

R. Snyder.......

WY. E. Howe.~....
R. L. Smith-.~..

Wr.G. Mriddleton.

J. A. Kiernan.-..
J. G. Fish.,.--...

A. L. Hirleman..
W. A. Sullivan...
J. J. Lintner.....
J. E.Oibson~.....

J. A. Barger...~...

N. L. Townsend.
W. F. Biles.-.....

O, T. Cole..-.....

G. R. Caldwell...
E. B. Simonds-...

E. A. Crossman..

T. S. Rich..~.....

W'. J. Fretz....
B. Robbins.~.~..
Ralph Graham--
J. W. MIurdoch ..
A. HI. Francis....
L. C.Butterfield.
E. A. Crossman~..
W. G. Middleton.
F. L. Schneider..

H. B. Leonard~...
W.C.Dendinger.
B. H. Cohenour..
A. J. DeFosset ...


S. B. Foster_..~..
J. B, Reidy~......

E. A. Crossman~..

W. K. Lewis....
J. O. Wilson...
H.M~. O'Rear.

H. L.Darby...

F. E. M urray...

L. H. Adamrs...

R. E. Brook bn.
J. C. Edline....
H. M. Newfton..

J. S. B~ealy._..~...

J. T. Dallas......
L. E. Case.......


Ariz.,.-.....

Calif.......


Conn......






Idaho.~.....

Ind.-.......



Kans.~-.....




Md~..-.....

Mass..,.....


Minn......

Mo ........

Mlont.-.....


N. H.......
N. J.......

N. Mex....




N. Y.......
N. Dak~....


Otho.......





Okla..... (
Oreg.....
Pa.... ... .


4
24

63

7
1, 459



40




11







20

182




8,0



26




190

206




640


300


.............

;s98 19

916, 87 27, 402


138, 287 1, 919, 018


1, 625, 180


SUMMARY OF TUBERCULOSIS-ERADICATION. WORK IN COOPERATION
WITH STATES, SEPTEMBER, 1927










'ANTI-REC~OG-H OLRA.~ ISERUlto~AND !WOGW~e~foEBBR VIRUB PROIBtItR
:.t :: UND~ERT;LICENagg ;; ..


ToalseanClear sernm Blood Bimultame- Im uisin
completed cleared ous virus

~C. c. C. c. C. c. C. c. C. c.
September, 1027............... 120, 007, 765 60, 352,04 7 1124 5 1 068 S 81 7
September, 1926............... 70, 191, 876 36 2, 71 851. 0,U 36 0015 08 19, 1
a mon~theended Bept., 1927 1, 102, 22, 560 8507 75 0 58, 117, 81 344 Sta,
9 months ended sept., 1926. 6802525, 14 183, 846, 048 102,60 141 8$ 201, $20 100,

UICENSES IS8tJED FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS IN SEPTEMBER, 1927
License }To. 162 was issued September 8, 1927, to the Monarch Biological
Laboratories, southeast corner Missouri Avenue and Main Street, 623--625 New
Nelson Building, Kansas City, Mo., for mastitie mixed bacterin (bovine).
License No. 186 was issued September 26, 1927, to the Gochenour-Collins
Laboratories (Inc.), near Glenmont, Md. (mailing address, 2130 P Street NWV.,
Washington, D. C.), for abortion mixed bacterin (equine ; antimastitis serum
(bovine); antiwhite-scour serum (bovine); mixed bacterin (avian); white-scour
mixed bacterin (bovine).
License No. 100 was issued September 13, 1927, to the National Drug Co.,
5100 and 5111 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. and Swiftwater, Pa.
(mailing address, 4679 Stenton Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa.), for abortion bacterin
(bovine); abortion bacterin (equine); distemper mixed bacterin (canine); hemor-
rhagic-septicemia bacterin (bovine); hemorrhagic-slepticemia bacterin ovinee);
influenza mixed bacterin (equine); streptostaphylo bacterin (canine); strepto-
staphylo bacterin (equine); tetanus antitoxin.
License No. 190 was issued September 26., 1927, to the National Drug Co. (as
above) for abortion mixed bacteria (bovine); hemorrhagic-septicemia mixed
bacterin (bovine).


PERMITTED DIP FOR *SCABIES OF CATTLE AND SHEEP

The Lucas Kil-Tone Co., VinelandS, N. J., has been granted permission by the
department to distribute "Kilseab," a dry lime-sulphur dip, under the name of
" Green Cross Scab Dip for use in the official dipping of cattle and sheep for
scabies. Dilutions permitted: For cattle, not less than 32 pounds of the product
to 100 gallons of water; for sheep, not less than 24 pounds of the product to 100
gallons of water.

PERMITTED DISINFECTANTS

In accordance with the provisions of B. A. I. Order 292, the bureau has granted
permission for the use of the following saponified cresol solutions, in the general
disinfection of cars, yards, and other premises:
.To United Drug Co., 43 Leon Street, Boston, Mass., for the distribution and
use of Crestall Dip under the name of Elkay's Agricultural Disinfectant."
This dip is identical with "Crestall Dip" manufactured by Baird & Mc~uire (Inc.),
H~olbrook, Mass.
To American Disinfecting Co. (Inc.), Sedalia, Mo9., for the use of ADCO
Cresolis," manufactured by that company.


DISCONTINUANCE OF MANUFACTURE OF DISINFECTANT

The manufacture of U. D. Solution Cresol Compound," a saponified cresol
solution, has been discontinued and is therefore removed from the list of per-
mitted disinfectants. This disinfectant was formerly manufactured by Umited
Drug Co., 43 Leon Street, Boston, Mass.







1987); r SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUJNCEMENTS 85

CHANGE OF PRODUCT
At the request of Parkre, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich., permission is withdrawn
for the use of "'Parke, Davis & Co. Compound Solution of Cresol, Ul. 8. P., in
official disinfection, and Fecticide," a saponified eresol solution, manufactured
by that company, is permitted instead in official disinfection.


CHANGE OF FIRM NAME AND ADDRESS
The firm' name of United Sanitary Products Co. (Inc.) is changed to Creco
Co. (Inc.), and the address is changed from 65 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y.,
to Creco jBuilding, Long Island City, N. Y. Permission was granted to this
company to distribute Crestall Dip," a saponified cresol solution manufactured
by Baird & McGuire (Inc.) under the trade name of Creco Special."


PERMIITTED DIP FOR CATTLE FOR TICKS
The bureau has granted permission for the use of "LRex Arsenical Dip," manu-
factured by ReX Beach Corporation, Toledo, Ohio, in the official dipping of
cattle for ticks. The dilution permitted in interstate movement is 1 gallon of
dip to not more than 127 gallons of water. This will yield a solution containing
not less than 0.22 per cent actual arsenious oxide.


PROCEEDINGS UNDER PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS ACT
Docket No. 219. In re August Smith, dealer, New York Central Stockyards,
West Albany, N. Y. Notice of inquiry issued October 1, 1927, alleging failure
to comply with bond regulation. On October 28, 1927, a cease and desist order
was issued and respondent suspended until such time as he procures at good and
sufficient bond to cover his obligations on that market.
Docket No. 221. In re Frank E. Dennis (Inc.), dealer, National Stockyards,
Jacksonville, Fla. Notice of inquiry issued October 3, 1927, alleging failure to
comply with bond regulation. On October 20, 1927, a cease and desist order
was issued and respondent suspended for 90 days because he had neglected to
procure a good and sufficient bond to cover his obligations on that market.
-1Docket No. 228. In re A. B. Smith, market agency and dealer, Bourbon
Stockyards,- Louisville, Ky3. Notice of inquiry issued October 8, 1927, alleging
failure to comply with bond regulation. On October 29, 1927, a cease and desist
order was issued and respondent suspended until he executes and maintains a
reasonable bond to cover his obligations on the market.
Docket No. 231. In re George B. W~ebb, dealer, Bourbon Stockyrards, Louis-
ville, Ky. Notice of inquiry issued October 8, 1927, alleging failure to comply
with bond regulations. On October 29, 1927, a cease and desist order wlas issued
and respondent suspended until he executes and maintains a reasonable bond to
cover his obligations on the market.
Docket No. 232. In re John A. Rebhan, dealer, Bourbon Stockyards, Louis-
vile, Ky. Notice of inquirry issued October 8, 1927, alleging failure to comply
with bond regulation. On October 31, 1927, a cease and desist order was issued
and respondent suspended from registration as a dealer until he executes and
maintains a reasonable and sufficient bond to cover his obligations on that market.
Docket No. 241. In re W. R. Finger, dealer, Buffalo Stockyards, Buffalo,
N. Y. Notice of inquiry issued October 10, 1927, alleging failure to comply
with bond regulation. On October 28, 1927, a cease and desist order was issued
against respondent because he had neglected to procure a good and sufficient
bond to cover his obligations on that market.







)


SBUREAU- OF AqTTIMAL( INDUST~RY *


[Otober,


D)EMODECTIC MANGE
With reference to bureau circular letter entitled Directions for Detecting
Demodectic MIange in Livestock," dated December, 1926, the bureau desires to
continue the inspections of live animals, especially cattle and hogs, for lesions
of demodectic mange and to receive reports from all field and stockyard stations
as outlined in the above-mentioned circular.
Diligent efforts should be made to cooperate in this undertaking, but the
work should be conducted in such way as not to interfere seriously with the
performance of the regular assignments on which employees are engaged.
Up to this time cases in live cattle have been reported from 14 States.
The fact that the lesions usually are small and the infected animals show no
pronounced symptoms may be responsible for the failure of inspectors in some
instances to have detected this affection in cattle, thus accounting for negative
reports from a number of Stattes in whiob there is good reason to believe that the
disease exists. Except in advanced cases, when the disease has progressed to a
stage where several nodules have coalesced and are discharging their contents, the
lesions of demodectic mange are not similar to those of other kinds of mange or
scabies. Ordinarily the lesions consist of small nodules in the skin, and they
may or may not be superficiaqlly visible. The position of the hair over the lesion
often indicates t~o the trained eye the' presence of nodules. The only known
dependable method of detection, however, is careful manual examination.
Practically all the cases found so far were in aged dairy cows, mostly Jerseys.
A few cases have been found in yearling heifers of the dairy breeds. The inci-
dence of the disease may be greater in the dairy breeds than in the beef breeds,
but a possible explanation is that since milk cows are accustomed to being
handled they can usually be examined in pens without additional restraint.
In almost all cases the lesions have been found on the sides of the neck, shoul-
ders, and dewlap. The flanks, sides, abdomen, and udder are sometimes in-
volved. The size of the nodules vlaries from t~hat of a pinhead to that of a hazel-
nut. As a rule they are not visible until the hair is parted over lesions located
by manual examination.
In hogs the lesions are similar to those in cattle. The lesions usually occur
on the underpart of the neck, breast, and abdomen, and between the thighs.
Gentle animals and those restrained for testing, etc., should be given a manual
examination as conditions will permit. When inspectors become experienced,
the examinations can be made very rapidly and the sense of touch readily
becomes developed so that few nodules escape detection. By passing the hand
over the hair with the fingers pressed firmly against the skin, nodules, if present,
can be detected by t~he sense of feeling. The neck, shoulders, breast, and dew-
lap should be palpated, and also any other suspected areas. The dewlap and
the groove at the union of the neck and shoulder deserve special attention. The
lesions in hogs are visible when the infected areas are exposed to view.
Positive diagnosis canl be made only by demonstrating the mite. By pressing
or scraping out the contents of one or more nodules, pressing a small quantity
between two slides and examining under a low-power microscope, the mites, if
present, can easily be recognized. (See Hutyra and Mrarek, vol. 2, p. 1049.)
If microscope and facilities are not available, material should be sent to the
Zoological Division for examination.
W'hen infected cattle are found in a herd, ascertain if possible and report the
length of time the animal has been in the herd.
It is suggested that whenever it is convenient to demonstrate cases of demol
dectic mange in cattle to interested veterinarians, especially men with a cattle
practice or members of a State force or State college, it should be done as an
educational measure.








SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS


1927]


USE OF THIE FRANKC
The attention of bureau employees is called to the law of Mlarch 3, 1877,
section 5 of which reads in part as follows:
It shall be lawful to transmit through the mail, free of postage, any letters, packages, or other matter
relating exclusively to the business of the Government of the United States **
This law was amended on March 3, 1879, so as to extend to officers of the Gov-
ernment.
By the terms of these laws, therefore, the use of the penalty privilege is abso-
lutely restricted to officers of the United States Government solely for the purpose
of transmitting in the mails free of postage matters relating exclusively to the
business of the Government. Bureau employees who are engaged in work in
cooperation with State authorities or other agencies are entitled to exercise the
penalty privilege onlyr in connection with that part of their work which is per-
formed in their capacity as officers of the Government. Such employees may
not use penalty envelopes, cards, or labels to send in the mail free of postage
matter sent in pursuance of their duties as employees of the States, colleges, or
other agencies wit~h which the bureau is cooperating. The fact that the bureau is
cooperating in a project with outside agencies does not give bureau employees
or such cooperating agencies the right to use the department penalty envelope
for the mailing of matter issued by such outside agencies.
In case there is doubt as to the franking of any matter, the question should be
submitted to the Washington office for determiDRtoOD.


RESULTS OF PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF LAWS
Penalties and fines have been imposed in prosecutions for violations of regu-
latory laws, as reported to the bureau, as follows:
Twenty-eight-Hoar Law
American Railway Express Co. (2 cases), $500 penalties.
Atchison, Topeka & Sant~a Fe Railway Co., $100 penalty.
Chicago Great Western Railroad Co., $100 penalty.
Seaboard Air Line Railway Co., 8100 penalty.
Livestork Quarantine Law
Atchison, Topeka & Santas Fe Railway Co., interstate transportation of 2
dead hogs in the same car with live animals, $100 fine.
Louisville & Nashville Railroad Co., Interstate transportation of 32 cows and
16 calves without tuberculin test, 8100 fine.


NEW PUBLICATIONS OF THIE BUREAU
rhe bureau keeps no mailing list for sending publications to individual employees, but sends copies to
oficers in charge of stations and o8ices. These publications should be regarded as notification copies.
So far as possible additional copies will be furnished on request.
Technical Bulletin 35. Studies of the Occurence and Elimination of Kemp
Fibers in Mohair Fleeces. By J. I. Hardy, Animal Husbandry Division.
Pp. 16, figs. 12.
Farmers' Bulletin 697 (revised). Duck Raising. By Alfred R. Lee and
Sheppard Haynes, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 22, 6gs. 15.
Circular 11. Comparative Values of Types of Anti-hog-cholera Serum. By
D. I. Skidmore. Chief, Division of V'irus-Serum Control. Pp. 8, figs. 2.
Amendment 20 to B. A. I. Order 294, placing the following-named counties
in the modified accredited areas for a period of three years from September 1,
1927: Franklin and Washington, Me.;; Big Stone, M~inn.; Sheridan, Mlont.
Dare, Hyde, and Jackson, N. C.; and Burke, Cavalier, and Pembina, N. Dak.
The following-named counties have been reaccredit~ed for a period of three years
from the same date: Jefferson and Mercer, Pa. P. 1 (mimeographed).
Amendment 30 to B. A I. Order 294, placing the following-named counties
in the modi~ed accredited areas for a period of three years from October 1, 1927:
Rabun, Ga.; Steuben, Ind.; Dallas and Greene, Iowa; Brown, Kans.; Alger
andBargaMic.;Schuyler, WVarren, and Yates, N. Y.; Sampson, N. C.;
a Bottinea, N. Dak.; and Greenville, S. C. The following-named counties have
been reaccredited for a, period of three years from the same date: Harvey, Kans.,
and Antrim and Grand Traverse, Mlich. P. 1 (mimeographed).





BTJBEA.U OF. ANIMAL INDrUSTRY &


[October, 19270;


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU' OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY


Chief:' JoHN R. MOHLER.
Administrative Assistant: CaiRLES C. CARROLL.
Chief Clerk: J. R. COHRAN.
Editor: D. S. BURCH.
Animal Husbandryl Division: E. W. SR~EET8, Chief.
Biochemzic Division: M. DORSET, chief.
Division of Hog-Cholera Control: U. G. Houcx, chief.
Division of Virua-Serum Control: .D. I. SKIDOREoa, chief.
Field Inspection Division: A. W. MILLER, chief.
Meat Inspection Division: R. P. STE1IDDOM, Chief.
Packers and 8tocky/ards Administration: Joax T. CAINE,
Path~ologiecal Division: JoHN 8. BUCKLEY, Chief.
Tick Er~adicat~ion Division: R. A. R4Nman chief.
Tuberedlonia Eradication Division: J. A. KsanxaN, chief.
Zoological Division: MAURIcE C. HALL, Chief.
Esperiment station: E. C. SCHROEDEa, superintendent.
Oface of Accounts: GEORGE F. TUCKER, in Charge.
Ofiee of Personnel: GEORGE 8. RUSSELL, iB charge.


r?~


chief.


ADDITIONAL COPIES
OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY~ BE PROCURED FROM
TRE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS
U.S.GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON, D. C.
5 CENTS PER COPY
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, 25 CEDNTs PER YEAR
V









































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PAGE 1

----S. R. A.-B. A. I. 246 United States Department of Agriculture BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS OCTOBER, 1927 This publication Is issued monthly for the dissemination of information, instructions, ruling1 etc., concerning the work of the Bureau of Animal Industry. Free distribution is limited to persons m the service of the bureau, establishments at which the Federal meat inspection is conducted, public officers whose duties make it desirable for them to have such information, and journals especially concerned. Others desiring copies may obtain them from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., at 5 cents each, or 25 cents a year. A supply will be sent to each official in charge of a station or branch of the bureau service, who should promptly distribute copies to members of bis force. A file should be kept at each station for reference. • CONTENTS Changes in directory •.•.•••••••••••••••.•.•••••.•••••..•...•..••••••.••••••...••••••••••.•••••••••• N oti~ regardi?g meat ~pecti?~ ••.••••.•••.......•••••••.••••••••••.••..••.•••••••••••• Ammal casings of foreign or1gm •...•..••••.•••..•.••••••••.••..•••.•••••••••••.....•••••••.•••• Import meat certificates ..••••••.•.••••••.•...•..••.•...•••.•••.•••.••••••••••••••••••••••.••••• Animal casings exported to Poland ...••••.•...••....••...•.•..••••••.•••••••••••••.•••••.•••••• Animals slaughtered under Federal meat inspection, September, 1927 ....••••••••.•..•••.•.•••••.•• Extent of tuberculosis In animals slaughtered at important markets, September, 1927 .•..••••••.••.• Causes of conde~tion of carcasses, August, 1927 ...••••••••••.•••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••• Imports of food ammals and of meats and meat.food products, September, 1927 •••••••••••••••••••• Summar:, of tuberculosis-eradication work in cooperation with States, September, 1927 ••••.•••••••• Antibog•cbolera serum and hog.cholera virus produced under licenses ••••••••.•.•••••••••••••••••• Permitted dip for scabies of cattle and sheep .•.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••.•••••••••••• Permitted disinfectants •...••....••.••••••••...•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••••••••• Discontinuance of manufacture of disinfectant ...••..•••.•••.•••••••••••••••.•••.•.•••••••••••••.•• Change of product ••••••.•..•..•• • ••••••••••.•.••••••.••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••• Change of firm name and address •••.••••••••.••••••.•.•.••..•.•••.••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••••• Permitted dip for cattle for ticks •••••.•...•••..•••.•••.••..•.•.•••••..••••••••.•••••••...•.•••••••• Proceedings under packers and stockyards act. ••.•.••.••..•••••••••.•.•••••.•••••••.•••••••••••••• Demodecticmange ..•••••••.•••••••.••••••••..•••••••••••••••••••••••••..•.•••••••••••••••••••••••• Use of the frank ..•••••.••••••.•••••••••.•..•••••••.•.•••••••••••••••••.•••••••.•••••••••••.•••••••• Results of prosecutions for violations oflaws .•••••••••••••.•••••••••••.•.•••••••••••••••...•••••••• New publications oftbe bureau •.••••.•.•..•.•..• ._ ••••.••••.••.•••••....••..•••••••••.....•.•••••• Organization of the Bureau of Animal Industry •••••••.•••••.•.•••.•.••......•..••••..•.......••••.• CHANGES IN DIRECTORY MEAT INSPECTION GRANTED 5. Stegner Products Co., 1816 Race Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. *94. The P. Brenan Co., 3927-3943 South Halstead Street, Chicago, Ill. 502. Pure Meat Products Co. (Inc.), 217 Broome Street, Newark, N. J MEAT INSPECTION WITHDRAWN 237. Renno Packing Co., Richmond; Va. *295. Sidney Packing Co., Sidney, Ohio. 485. Thomas Harris, New York, N. Y. *1012. Brown Bros., Indianapolis, Ind. • Conducts slaughtering. 71085 27 79 Pag6 79 80 80 80 80 81 81 8l 82 83 84 84 84 84 85 85 85 85 86 87 87 87 88

PAGE 2

80 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY [October, CHANGE IN NAME OF OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENT *R-77. Schlesser Bros. (Inc.), Kenton Station, Portland, Oreg., instead of Portland Horse Products (Inc.). *836. The Fowler-Straub Packing Co ., First Street and Meyer Avenue, Kansas City, Kans., instead of The Fowler & Straub Packing Co., First Street and Meyer Ave. CHANGE IN ADDRESS OF OFFICIAL ESTABLISHMENT 19-D. The Cudahy Packing Co., Wautuppa, Mass., mail, 17 End Street, Fall River, Mass. 318. Wm. Underwood Co., 85 Walnut Street, Watertown, Mass., instead of 52 Fulton Street, Boston, Mass. CHANGE OF OFFICIAL IN CHARGE Dr. G. W. Kn.orr succeeds Dr. Joshua Miller (retired) as inspector in charge of meat inspection at Frankfort, Ind., effective November 7, 1927. Dr. T. H. Applewhite succeeds Dr. S. J. Horne (resigned) at Jacksonville, Fla. CHANGE OF ADDRESS OF OFFICIAL IN CHARGE Dr. E. S. Dickey, 308 Federal Building, Milwaukee, Wis., instead of 423 Federal Building. R. E. Simms, 65 Oak Street, Naugatuck, Conn., instead of Storrs, Conn. STATION DISCONTINUED Sidney, Ohio, meat inspection. (Remove Doctor Snyder.) • NOTICES REGARDING MEAT INSPECTION ANIMAL CASINGS OF FOREIGN ORIGIN Certificates required by B. A. I. Order 305 and instructions issued thereunder, which bear the official titles of the high officials of the respective foreign countries as specified below, will be acceptable with animal casings offered for importation into the United States on and after December 1, 1927. The certificates must also bear the signature of the high official of the national government having jurisdiction over the health of animals in the foreign country in which the casings originated, but owing to the fact that the high officials are changed from time to time, it is impracticable to publish their names. Official title Director of Agriculture _____________________________ _ Director of State Veterinary Services ________________ : _ Minister of Agriculture _____________________________ _ Chairman, Committee on Veterinary Affairs of the Soviet Foreign country Algeria. The Netherlands. New Zealand. of Labor and Defense ______________________________ Russia. Director of the National Department of Health_________ Venezuela. Additional official titles will be published when received from other foreign countries. IMPORT MEAT CERTIFICATES Inspectors in charge are directed to see that the correct foreign meat-inspection certificate is attached to each M. I. Form 109-J report forwarded to Washington. ANIMAL CASINGS EXPORTED TO POLAND In order to facilitate the exportation of animal casings to Poland, animal casings exported to that country via Hamburg, Germany, should be handled and certified as indicated in Service and Regulatory Announcements of November, 1926, for animal casings to Austria. • Conducts slaughtering.

PAGE 3

1927) SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81 ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL MEAT INSPECTION, SEPTEMBER, 1927 Station Cattle Calves Sheep Goats Swine Baltimore _________________________________ 6,248 865 2,666 ------------65,239 Buffalo ____________________________________ 10,987 2,522 9,221 ------------61,659 C~i~go ... --------------------------------163,698 40,975 269,147 79 326,712 C1nc1nnat1 _________________________________ 12,027 5,697 6,397 38 61,743 Cleveland •• -------------------------------8,810 8,459 14,657 ------------62,957 Denver ____________________________________ 8,271 1,863 16,190 ------------16,553 Detroit ____________________________________ 8,154 4,262 23,775 ------------67,145 Fort Worth •.•• ---------------------------34,676 40,033 12,633 1,099 28,090 Indianapolis _______________________________ 19,661 3,699 5,912 ------------48,696 Kansas City _______________________________ 108,843 25,194 127,445 1,116 115,423 Milwaukee ________________________________ 15,740 25,539 8,325 ------------97,960 National Stock Yards _____________________ 41,892 6,571 27,269 128 92,619 New York. ________________________________ 33,579 51,900 192,355 ------------103,908 Omaha ____________________________________ 68,726 7,649 132,625 17 100,815 Philadelphia. __ . ___________________________ 7,935 8,075 20,713 ------------80,805 St, Louis_--------------------------------16,544 4,369 7,020 ------------110,804 Sioux City ___________________ : _____________ 26,189 3,670 23,678 ------------72,632 South St. Joseph_ __________________________ 35,224 5 ,905 75,620 ; I 56,024 South St. Paul. •• ------------------------46,181 38,993 63,599 113, 761 Wichita _________________________________ , _ 7,704 2 ,641 2,675 10 32,873 All other establishments ___________________ 146,636 68,127 143,247 520 827,501 Total: September, 1927 ______________ 827,725 357,008 1,185 ,169 3,018 2,533,819 September, 1926 ______________ 971,460 408,114 1,224,325 3,084 2,616,452 9 months ended September, 1927 ________________________ 6,982,209 3,676,556 9,524,043 15,341 32,107, 730 9 months ended September, 1926-----------------------7,351,016 3 ,86 1,033 9 ,582, 739 20,169 29,656,475 r Horses slaughtered at all establishments, September, 1927, 7,137. Inspections ofla rd at all establishments, 105,952,786 inspection pounds; compound and other substitutes, 55,291,939 inspection pounds; sausage chopped, 70,833,891 inspection pounds. Corresponding inspe ct ions for September, 1926: L a rd, 116,119,947 inspection pounds; compound and other substitutes, 54,122,392 inspection pounds; sausa g e chopped, 70,387,718 inspection pounds. (These totals of inspection pounds do not represent actual production, as the same product may have beeQ inspected and recorded more than once in the process of manufac ture.) EXTENT OF TUBERCULOSIS IN ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED AT THREE IMPORTANT MARKETS, SEPTEMBER, 1927 Retained for tuberculosis Station Total slaughter Passed for Total sterilize-Contion demned Cattle-Chicago _______________________________________ 163,698 6,025 137 989 Kansas City ___________________________________ 108,843 273 21 70 Omaha _________________________________________ 68,726 486 30 84 Swine-Chicago_. _________________________________ . ___ . 326,712 51,157 ], 004 996 Kansas City ___________________________________ 115,423 6,588 121 104 Omaha _________________________________________ JOO, 815 15,083 223 186 CAUSES OF CONDEMNATION OF CARCASSES, AUGUST, 1927 Cause Cattle Calves Sheep Swine Emaciation ___ ----------------------------------------515 81 436 67 Hog cholera.-------------------------------------------____________________________________ 1,759 Inflammatory diseases ... -----------------------------760 113 643 1,816 Immaturity_------------------------------------------____________ 97 _______________________ _ Tuberculosis___________________________________________ 3,275 5 2 ____________ 5,304 All other causes._____________________________________ __ l, 013 215 473 3,030 Tota l ___________________________________________ _ 5,563 558 1,552 11,976

PAGE 4

82 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY [October, IMPORTS OF FOOD ANIMALS AND OF MEATS AND MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS, SEPTEMBER, 1927 The statements following show the imports of food animals and of meats and meat-food products inspected by the Bureau of Animal Industry during Septem ber, 1927, with figures for other periods for comparison. Imports of Jood animals Country of export Cattle Swine Sheep Goats Mexico _________________________________________________________ 717 --------------------107 Canada ________________________________________________________ 37,605 6,430 3,795 28 Virgin Islands (to Porto Rico) __________________________________ 151 3 --------------------Total, September, 1927 ----------------------------______ 38,473 6,433 3,795 135 Total, September, 1926 ___________________________________ 25,375 7,103 7,075 4 9 months ended September, 1927 __________________ 244, 178 145, 161 19,484 177 9 months ended September, 1926. _________________ 183,499 17, 313 24, 775 54 Imported meats and meat-! ood products Fresh and refrigerated Country of export Canned Other Total and cured products weight Beef Other . Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds Argentina _________________________________ ------------------514,743 200,343 715,086 Australia __________________________________ 2,462 4,334 76 5,710 12, 582 Brazil _____________________________________ ---------------------36,006 ------------36,006 Canada ____________________________________ 4,387,604 1,534,963 2,117,695 357,463 8,397, 725 Uruguay ___________________________________ -----------------------1,394,085 372,274 1,766,359 Other countries ____________________________ ----------------------296,971 47,414 344,385 Total: September, 1927 ______________ 4,390,066 1 , 539,297 4,359,576 983,204 11,272,143 September, 1926 ______________ 1,810,545 1,264,552 2,503,078 273,686 5,851,861 9 months ended September, 1927 ________________________ 15,664,457 18,890,281 41,280,881 3,776,863 79,612,482 9 months ended September, 1926 ____________________ ---8,283,044 9 , 496,555 22,176,806 3,103 , 771 43,060,176 Condemned in September, 1927: Beef, 19,169 pounds; veal, 22 pounds; pork, 6,456 pounds; total, 25,647 pounds. Refused entry: Pork, 1,180 pounds.

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1927] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83 SUMMARY OF TUBERCULOSIS-ERADICATION WORK IN COOPERATION WITH STATES, SEPTEMBER, 1927 Tuberculin tests Total to date during month State CatOnce Ac -Herds Inspector in charge State or Territorial official Herds Cattle tie retested cred-under or lots tested acted free ited superherds herds vision . -----Ala.209 2,697 4 4,671 236 6,682 R. E. Jackson .... C. A. Cary, Auburn. Ariz ________ 245 3,961 24 7,715 39 7,763 F. L. Schneider .. S. E. Douglas, Phoenix. Ark ________ 190 1,769 7 2,886 18 4,678 H. L. Fry ________ J. H. Bux, Little Rock. Calif__ _____ 157 3,213 63 4, 4.15 121 4,571 R. Snyder _______ J. P. Iverson, Sacra mento. Colo. ______ 13 272 7 2,346 140 2,745 W. E. Howe ..... C. G. Lamb, Denver. Conn ______ 722 6, 167 1,459 2,859 1,281 5,602 R. L. Smith _____ J. M. Whittlesey, Hart-ford. Del. _______ 204 1,909 146 2,701 1,547 4,939 W.G. Middleton_ o. A . Newton, Bridgeville. D . C ..•.... --------------------253 26 286 J. A. Kiernan .... Fla._----128 4,366 40 6,941 414 7,798 J. G. Fish ________ J . V. Knapp, Tallahassee. Ga _________ 228 2,171 11 5,218 40 5,262 A. L. Hirleman .. J.M. Sutton, Atlanta. Idaho ....•. 591 4,542 20 27,999 60 31,315 W. A. Sullivan ... A. J. Dickman, Boise. Ill __________ 8,846 86,082 1,467 115,109 1,263 129,036 J. J. Lintner_.-F. A. Laird, Springfield. Ind __ ----5,800 35,343 182 83,155 31,681 120,907 J.E. Gibson.-Frank H. Brown, In-dianapolis. Drs Iowa _______ 3,920 59,985 1,725 85, 144 7,562 1 44,502 J. A. Barger ...... M. G. Thornburg, Moines. Kans ____ ._ 395 4,646 10 48,728 773 49,992 N. L. Townsend_ J. H. Mercer, Topeka. Ky _________ 1,399 8,024 34 64,945 59 65,678 W. F. Biles. _____ D. E. Westmorland, Frankfort. La _________ 423 6,487 80 5,882 29 6,249 G. 'l'. Cole _______ E. P. Flower, Baton Rouge. Me ________ 2,329 10,176 26 28,435 3,042 31,887 G. R. Caldwell___ H. M. Tucker, Augusta. Md ________ 1,20 8 8,840 190 8,206 4,678 19,698 E. B. Simonds. __ James B. George, Baltimore. Mass _______ 174 3,027 296 1,471 526 2,915 E. A. Crossman __ F. B. Cummings, Boston. Mich ______ 5,724 49,241 773 128,989 84 135,311 T. S. Rich _______ H. W. Norton, jr ., Lansing. Minn ______ 8,476 152,391 2,547 43, 101 8,458 56,698 W. J. Fretz ______ C. E. Cotton, St. Paul. Miss _______ 397 3,982 2 5,289 88 5,377 H. Robbins ______ R. V. Rafnel, Jackson. Mo--------509 4,514 7 59,125 956 62,529 .Ralph Graham __ H . A. Wilson, Jefferson City. Mont_ _____ 548 6,946 40 26,752 91 27,379 J. W. Murdoch __ W. J. Butler, Helena. Nebr _______ 2,867 35,129 201 50,361 104 50,855 A. H. Francis ____ C. H. Hays, Lincoln. Nev ________ 51 679 9 1,011 10 1,211 L. C. Butterfield. Edward Records, Reno. N. H _______ 173 2,066 179 2,525 2,571 5, 144 E. A. Crossman __ A. L. Felker, Concord. N. J. ______ 752 4,702 309 2,535 1,503 4,496 W. G. Middleton_ J. H. McNeil, Trenton. N. Mex ____ 55 749 4 167 17 185 F. L. Schneider .. Mat. Keenan, Albuquerque. N. y _______ 7,065 77,373 8,017 41,946 40,520 97,849 H.B. Leonard ... E.T. Faulder, Albany. N. C _______ 3,292 8,111 20 236,943 338 237,595 W. C.Dendinger_ Wm. Moore, Raleigh. N. Dak ____ 300 4,709 19 36,098 4,576 45,357 H. H. Cohenour_. W. F. Crewe, Bismarck. Ohio _______ 4,475 33,606 1,468 123,456 647 127,615 A. J . DeFosset. __ F. A. Zimmer, Colum• bus. Okla _______ 31 1,091 2 118 246 383 L. J. Allen _______ C. C. Hisel, Oklahoma Oreg. ______ 1 ,725 City. 12,923 64 26,284 409 26,729 S. B. Foster. _____ W. H. Lytle, Sal e m. Pa _________ 7,003 67,490 2,668 79,314 4,520 97,894 J.B. Reidy ______ T. E. Munce, Harris-R. I._ ______ burg. Robinson, Provi-40 477 67 101 49 285 E. A. Crossman .. T. E. dence. S. C. ______ 1,629 4,549 2 30,654 142 30,869 W. K. Lewis _____ W. K. Lewis, Columbia. S. Dak _____ 212 4,890 98 8,091 1,036 9,352 J. 0. Wilson. ____ M. W. Ray, Pierre. Tenn •. ____ 522 2,868 5 20,481 333 20.953 H. M. O'Rear _ W. B. Lincoln, Nashville. Tex _____ . __ 208 4,122 122 349 195 715 H. L. Darby _____ N. F. Williams, Fort Worth. Utah _______ 1,202 5,971 41 10, 578 97 11,527 F. E. Murray ____ w. H. Hendricks, Salt Lake City. Vt._--571 10,030 501 2,821 4,777 10, 773 L. H. Adams ____ Edward H. Jones, Mont• Va .....•... 1,9 8 1 pelier . 7,619 22 10,467 2,175 12,924 R. E. Brookbank. H. C. Givens, Richmond. Wash ...... 1,672 1 6,217 648 34,150 69 36,063 J. C. Exline ...••• Robert Prior, Olympia. W. Va ..... 1,899 6,203 49 26,-374 1,080 27,472 H. M. Newton ... John W. Smith, Charleston. Wis .......• 7,004 1 32,457 3,655 99,821 9,657 113, 621 J . S. Healy _______ Walter A. Duffy, Madi-son. Wyo _______ ------------------------------------------J. T. Dallas .. ____ H. D. Port, Cheyenne. Hawaii. .... 42 1,295 53 -------------------------L. E. Case ....... L. E. Case. Alaska (3 81 798 19 ---------------------------------------Karl Theile. months). TotaL 87,687 916,876 27,402 1,625 , 180 138,287 1,919,018

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84 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY [October, ANTI-HOG-CHOLERA SE RUM AND H OG-C HO LERA VIRUS PRODUCED UN D ER L I CENSES Clear serum Blood SimultaneHyper• Total serum completed cleared ous virus immunizing virus . C. c. C. c. C. c. C. c . C. c. September, 1927 •••.•••.••••••. 129,007,765 69,352,054 78,151,244 5,615,068 26,181,773 September, 1926 •••...•.•••..•• 79,191,676 3 6,272,716 31,902,362 8,843,001 19,898,874 9 months ended Sept . , 1927. 1, 102, 225, 569 507,675,902 578, 117, 281 50,389,344 243,641,615 9 months ended Sept., 1926. 502, 525, 214 183, 346, 948 192,602,141 34,201,820 1 09,700,598 LICENSES ISSUED FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS IN SEPTEMBER, 1 927 License ~o. 162 was issued September 8, 1927, to the Monarch Biological Laboratories, southeast corner Missouri Avenue and Main Street, 623-625 New Nelson Building, Kansas City, Mo., for mastitis mixed bacterin (bovine). License No. 186 was issued September 26, 1927, to the Gochenour-Collins Laboratories (Inc.), near Glenmont, Md. (mailing address, 2130 P Street NW., Washington, D. C.), tor abortion mixed bacterin (equine); antimastitis serum (bovine); antiwhite-scour serum (bovine); mixed bacterin (avian); white-scour mixed bacterin (bovine). License No. 190 was issued September 13, 1927, to the National Drug Co., 5109 and 5111 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. and Swiftwater, Pa. (mailing address, 4679 Stenton Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa.), for abortion bacterin (bovine); abortion bacterin (equine); distemper mixed bacterin (canine); hemorrhagic-septicemia bacterin (bovine); hemorrb.agic-septicemia bacterin (ovine); influenza mixed bacterin (equine); streptostaphylo bacterin (canine); streptostaphylo bacterin (equine); tetanus antitoxin. License No. 190 was issued September 26, 1927, to the National Drug Co. (as above) for abortion mixed bacterin (bovine); hemorrhagic-septicemia mixed bacterin (bovine). PERMITTED DIP FOR • SCABIES OF CATTLE AND SHEEP The Lucas Kil-Tone Co., Vineland, N. J., has been granted permission by the department to distribute "Kilscab," a dry lime-sulphur dip, under the name of "Green Cross Scab Dip" for use in the official dipping of cattle and sheep for scabies. Dilutions permitted: For catt le, not less than 32 pounds of the product to 100 gallons of water; for sheep, not less than 24 pounds of the product to 100 gallons of water. PERMITTED DISINFECT ANTS In accordance with the provisions of B. A. I. Order 292, the bureau has granted permission for the use of the following saponified cresol solutions, in the general disinfection of cars, yards, and other premis es: To United Drug Co., 43 Leon Street, Bo ston, Mass ., for the distribution and use of "Crestall Dip" under the name of "Elkay's Agricultural Disinfectant. " This dip is identical with "Crestall Dip" manufactured by Baird & McG. uire (Inc.), Holbrook, Mass. To American Disinfecting Co. (Inc.), Sedalia, Mo., for the use of "ADCO Cresolis," manufactured by that company. DISCONTINUANCE OF MANUFACTURE OF DISINFECTANT The manufacture of "U. D. Solution Cresol Compound," a saponified cresol solution, has been di scontinued and i s the refore removed from the list of permitted disinfectants. This disinfectan t was formerly manufactured by United Drug Co ., 43 Leon Street, Boston, Mass .

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rn211 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85 CHANGE OF PRODUCT At the request of Parke, Davis & Co., Detroit, Mich., permission is withdrawn for the use of "Parke, Davis & Co. Compound Solution of Cresol, U. S. P., in official disinfection, and "Fecticide," a saponified cresol solution, manufactured by that company, is permitted instead in official disinfection. CHANGE OF FIRM NAME AND ADDRESS The firm name of United Sanitary Products Co. (Inc.) is changed to "Creco Co. (Inc.), and the address is changed from 65 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y., to Creco Building, Long Island City, N. Y. Permission was granted to this company to distribute "Crestall Dip," a saponified cresol solution manufactured by Baird & McGuire (Inc.) under the trade name of "Creco Special." PERMITTED DIP FOR CATTLE FOR TICKS The bureau has granted permission for the use of "Rex Arsenical Dip," manufactured by Rex Beach Corporation, Toledo, Ohio, in the official dipping of cattle for ticks. The dilution permitted in interstate movement is 1 gallon of dip to not more than 127 gallons of water. This will yield a solution containing not less than 0.22 per cent actual arsenious oxide. PROCEEDINGS UNDER PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS ACT Docket No. 219. In re August Smith, dealer, New York Central Stockyards, West Albany, N. Y. Notice of inquiry issued October 1, 1927, alleging failure to comply with bond regulation. On October 28, 1927, a cease and desist order was issued and respondent suspended until such time as he procures a good and sufficient bond to cover his obligations on that market. Docket No. 221. In re Frank E. Dennis (Inc.), dealer, National Stockyards, Jacksonville, Fla. Notice of inquiry issued October 3, 1927, alleging failure to comply with bond regulation. On October 20, 1927, a cease and desist order was issued and respondent suspended for 90 days because he had neglected to procure a good and sufficient bond to cover his obligations on that market. 1Docket No. 228. In re A. B. Smith, market agency and dealer, Bourbon Stockyards, Louisville , Ky. Notice of inquiry issued October 8, 1927, alleging failure to comply with bond regulation. On October 29, 1927, a cease and desist order was issued and respondent suspended until he executes and maintains a reasonable bond to cover his obligations on the market. Docket No. 231. In re George B. Webb, dealer, Bourbon Stockyards, Louis ville, Ky. Notice of inquiry issued October 8, 1927, alleging failure to comply with bond regulations. On October 29, 1927, a cease and desist order was issued and respondent suspended until he executes and maintains a reasonable bond to cover his obligations on the market. Docket No. 232. In re John A. Rebhan, dealer, Bourbon Stockyards, Louis ville, Ky. Notice of inquiry issued October 8, 1927, alleging failure to comply with bond regulation. On October 31, 1927, a cease and desist order was issued and respondent suspended from registration as a dealer until he executes and maintains a reasonable and sufficient bond to cover his obligations on that market. Docket No. 241. In re W. R. Finger, dealer, Buffalo Stockyards, Buffalo, N. Y. Notice of inquiry issued October 10, 1927, alleging failure to comply with bond regulation. On October 28, 1927, a cease and desist order was issued against respondent because he had neglected to procure a good and sufficient bond to cover his obligations on that market.

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86 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY DEMODECTIC MANGE [October, With reference to bureau circular letter entitled "Directions for Detecting Demodectic Mange in Livestock," dated December, 1926, the bureau desires to continue the inspections of live animals, especially cattle and hogs, for lesions of demodectic mange and to receive reports from all field and stockyard stations as outlined in the above-mentioned circular. Diligent efforts should be made to cooperate in this undertaking, but the work should be conducted in such way as not to interfere seriously with the performance of the regular assignments on which employees are engaged. Up to this time cases in live cattle have been reported from 14 States. The fact that the lesions usually are small and the infected animals show no pronounced symptoms may be responsible for the failure of inspectors in some instances to have detected this affection in cattle, thus accounting for negative reports from a number of States in which there is good reason to believe that the disease exists. Except in advanced cases, when the disease has progressed to a stage where several nodules have coalesced and are discharging their contents, the lesions of demodectic mange are not similar to those of other kinds of mange or scabies. Ordinarily the lesions consist of small nodules in the skin, and they may or may not be superficially visible. The position of the hair over the lesion often indicates to the trained eye the presence of nodules. The only known dependable method of detection, however, is careful manual examination. Practically all the cases found so far were in aged dairy cows, mostly Jerseys. A few cases have been found in yearling heifers of the dairy breeds. The incidence of the disease may be greater in the dairy breeds than in the beef breeds, but a possible explanation is that since milk cows are accustomed to being handled they can usually be examined in pens without additional restraint. In almost all cases the lesions have been found on the -sides of the neck, shoul ders, and dewlap. The flanks, sides, abdomen, and udder are sometimes involved. The size of the nodules varies from that of a pinhead to that of a hazelnut. As a rule they are not visible until the hair is parted over lesions located by manual examination. In hogs the lesions are similar to those in cattle. The lesions usually occur on the underpart of the neck, breast, and abdomen, and between the thighs. Gentle animals and those restrained for testing, etc., should be given a manual examination as conditions will permit. When inspectors become experienced, the examinations can be made very rapidly and the sense of touch readily becomes developed so that few nodules escape detection. By passing the hand over the hair with the fingers pressed firmly against the skin, nodules, if present, can be detected by the sense of feeling. The neck, shoulders, breast, and dewlap should be palpated, and also any other suspected areas. The dewlap and the groove at the union of the neck and shoulder deserve special attention. The lesions in hogs are visible when the infected areas are exposed to view. Positive diagnosis can be made only by demonstrating the mite. By pressing or scraping out the contents of one or more nodules, pressing a small quantity between two slides and examin.ing under a low-power microscope, the mites, if present, can easily be recognized. (See Hutyra and Marek, vol. 2, p. 1049.) If microscope and facilities are not available, material should be sent to the Zoological Division for examination. When infected cattle are found in a herd, ascertain if possible and report the length of time the animal has been in the herd. It is suggested that whenever it is convenient to demonstrate cases of demodectic mange in cattle to interested veterinarians, especially men with a cattle practice or members of a State force or State college, it should be done as an educational measure.

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H>27] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS USE OF THE FRANK 87 The attention of bureau employees is called to the law of March 3, 1877, section 5 of which reads in part as follows: • It shall be lawful to transmit through the mail, free of postage, any letters, packages, or other matter relating exclusively to the business of the Government of the United States * * •. This law was amended on March 3, 1879, so as to extend to officers of the Government. By the terms of these laws, therefore, the use of the penalty privilege is absolutely restricted to officers of the United States Government solely for the purpose of transmitting in the mails free of postage matters relating exclusively to the business of the Government. Bureau employees who are engaged in work in cooperation with State authorities or other agencies are entitled to exercise the penalty privilege only in connection with that part of their work whic~ is performed in their capacity as officers of the Government. Such employees may not use penalty envelopes, cards, or labels to send in the mail free of postage matter sent in pursuance of their duties as employees of the States, colleges, or other agencies with which the bureau is cooperating. The fact that the bureau is cooperating in a project with outside agencies does not give bureau employees or such cooperating agencies the right to use the department penalty envelope for the mailing of matter issued by such outside agencies. In case there is doubt as to the franking of any matter, the question should be submitted to the Washington office for determination. -RESULTS OF PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF LAWS Penalties and fines have been imposed in prosecutions for violations of regulatory laws, as reported to the bureau, as follows: Twenty-eight-Hour Law American Railway Express Co. (2 cases), $500 penalties. Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Co., $100 penalty. Chicago Great Western Railroad Co., $100 penalty. Seaboard Air Line Railway Co., $100 penalty. Livestock Quarantine Law Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Co., interstate transportation of 2 dead hogs in the same car with live animals, $100 fine. Louisville & Nashville Railroad Co., Interstate transportation of 32 cows and 16 calves without tuberculin test, $100 fine. NEW PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU rhe bureau keeps no mailing list for sending publications to individual employees, but sends copies to officers in charge of stations and offices. These publications should be regarded as notification copies. So far as possible additional copies will be furnished on request. Technical Bulletin 35. Studies of the Occurence and Elimination of Kemp Fibers in Mohair Fleeces. By J. I. Hardy, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 16, figs. 12. Farmers' Bulletin 697 (revised). Duck Raising. By Alfred R. Lee and Sheppard Haynes, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 22, figs. 15. Circular 11. Comparative Values of Types of Anti-hog-cholera Serum. By D. I. Skidmore. Chief, Division of Virus-Serum Control. Pp. 8, figs. 2. Amendment 29 to B. A. I. Order 294, placing the following-named counties in the modified accredited areas for a period of three years from September 1, 1927: Franklin and Washington, Me.; Big Stone, Minn.; Sheridan, Mont. Dare, Hyde, and Jackson, N. C.; and Burke, Cavalier, and Pembina, N. Dak. The following-named counties have been reaccredited for a period of three years from the same date: Jefferson and Mercer, Pa. P. 1 (mimeographed). Amendment 30 to B. A I. Order 294, placing the following-named counties in the modified accredited areas for a period of three years from October 1, 1927: Rabun, Ga.; Steuben, Ind.; Dallas and Greene, Iowa; Brown, Kans.; Alger and Baraga, Mich.; Schuyler, Warren, and Yates, N. Y.; Sampson, N. C.; Bottineau, N. Dak.; and Greenville, S. C. The following-named counties have been reaccredited for a period of three years from the same date: Harvey, Kans., and Antrim and Grand Traverse, Mich. P. 1 (mimeographed) .

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88 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY [October. 19271 ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY Chief: JOHN R. MOHLER. Administrative Assistant: CHARLES C. CARROLL. Chief Clerk: J. R. COHRAN. Editor: D. S. BURCH. Animal Husbandry Division: E. W. SHEETS, chief. Biochemic Division: M. DORSET, chief. Division of Hog-Cholera Control: U. G. HoucK, chief. Divi.sion of Virus-Serum Control: D. I. SKIDMORE, chief. Field Inspection Division: A. W. MILLER, chief. Meat Inspection Division: R. P. STEDDOM, chief. Packers and Stockyards Administration: JoiHN T. CAINE, chief. Pathological Division: JOHN S. BUCKLEY, chief. Tick Eradication Division: R. A. RAMSAY, chief. Tuberculosis Eradication Division: J. A. KIERNAN, chief. Zoological Division: MAURICE C. HALL, chief. Experiment Station: E. C. SCHROEDER, superintendent. Office of Accounts: GEORGE F. TucKER, in charge. Office of Personnel: GEORGE H. RussELL, in charge. ADDITIONAL COPIES or THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS U.S.GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON, D. C. AT 5 CENTS PER COPY SUBSCRll'TION PRICE, 25 CENTS PER YEAR "

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