Citation
Service and regulatory announcements

Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Animal Industry
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat inspection ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Summary:
Contains Insecticide decisions and Notices of judgment under the Insecticide Act formerly issued only as a separate publication, now published in both forms.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available in electronic format
Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
No. 81 (1914)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
004884120 ( ALEPH )
17762165 ( OCLC )
AA00005308_00017 ( sobekcm )
Classification:
HD9000.9.U5 A14 ( lcc )
630.61 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service announcements

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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[This publication is issued monthly for the diissemination of information, instructions, rulings. etc.,
concerning the work of the Bureau of Animal Indujtry. Fr~ep distribution is limited to persons in the
service of the bureau, establishments at which the F~ederal muent inspection is conducted. public others
whose duties make it desirable for them to have such information, and journals esp~cially concerned.
Others desiring copies may obtain thom from the Superintendent of Documents, Go\ernment Printing
Offce, Washington, D. C., at 5 cents each, or 50 cents a year. A9 supply~ will be sent to each official Ia
charge of a station or branch of the b~ureau scenic. ho should promptly distribute copiles to members
ohi~sforce. A file should be kepat at each station for reference.]


CONTENTS.


Chan ges in d irect ory. ................... .....
Notices regarding meat inspection ...........
Improper marking of containers of in-
edible grease... ................... .....
Supreme Court decisions construing meat-
inspect ion act ................... ......
Labellag hydrogenated lard.............
Reporting eareasse~s and parts passed for
sterilization and afterwfards tanked for
offal...................................
Importation of beef cheek meat.........
Revocation of instructions to cooperate
with the United States Food Adminis-
tration in enforcing certain orders.....
Amendment to net weight and volume
regulation ................... ..........
Animals slaughtered under Federal meat in-
spection, M~arch,1919......................
Imports of food animals and of meats and
meat food products. ................... ....
Foreign officials authorized to sign inspection
certificates for meat and products for im-
portation into the United States...........
Inspection and testing of animals for Canada.
Licenses for veterinary biological products..
Requirements for labeling veterinary
biologies...............................


Page.
31
33

33

33
34


34




31

34

35


35

36
36
36


Page.
Texas-fever quarantine--pllres to which
southern cattle may be shipped for imme-
diate slaug~hter. ................... ........ 37
Chauge. in designlllon of Olicer of H~o,-Cholera
Cont-ol........................ .........,, 37
Notice to t hose in c~hlrge of field stat ions.... 3;
Permitted dips for cattle and sheep......... 33
Results of proseicution; for violation oflawms. 38
New sobledulo of rtions for lie stork in inter-
state transportation ................... .... 39
Status of tick eradication in various States,
February, 1919O............................ -10
Sunmmary of t ubrrcu loji;-eradlicat ion w.ork in
cooperatio n with ,he various States, Ma~rch,
1919...................................... 41
C linic~l t hermomet er cases..............,, 41
Payment of bills re~ndiredt on Form 5
vouc~hers ................... .............. 4L
Street-car fares for employees receiving per
dicm allowance in lieu of sulbsistource......2
Transportation requests to be used only on
strictly' o::eial business. ................... 42
Mutilation of bureau padlocks.............., 43
Publi.ations in A9pril........................ 43
Orqanizat ion or the bureau..............,. 44


t




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*920. T. Pareeky, B~rigrhton Abattoir, Boston, M~ass.
*808. Purdue University Agricultural Experiment Station, La Fayette, Ind.
49. B. Mleier & Son, 516 Westchester Avlenue, New Y'ork, N. Y'.
245. The Brewer-Snyder Co. (Inc.), 119 Third Street SE., Washington, D. C.
*919. J. C. Bull, jr., Co., Arcatat, Calif.


* Conducts slaughtering,


116792"--19


L~Ste Department o~f A u




GORty Io U OE1LER, CaEHF OF BUREAU.


AND~. REGULATORY ANNOUNG:

APRIL, 1919.


CHANGES IN DIRECTORY.

Meat Inspection Inaugarated.




" ;- ------: -- ;:~~--o~ v cr ~;''::'I: ''


B3UREAU~ OF ANKIlllL INDUSTRY.


[A pril,


M~eat Insportion Withdrawn.
032. Donnelly &- Co. (Inc. 1, 75-81 Blackstone Street, Boston, Mlass.
161. Sami r:. Smnithi Co., Waltham, Mlass.
1G8. T'he Pur;e Foo~d 'rov\isio~n Plroducts7 C'o. (Inc.), 121-123 Fulton Street: Boston,

"3b. Warrl~len B3eef ('o~., 1.ir, Backs~tone Street, Boston, Masjs.
20-DD. Wilson &i Clo., Thre~e Oak:L, M~ich.
Mlcal Insipe.-Iion Tou~porarily Suspended.
42 '. Ri, ha~rd sonl & Robbl~ins, Dovecr. Del.
073. Holllndlt Pule Foodl c:o., 000 V~inewood Aienue, De~tloit, Mlich.
113. P. Di. H~ughej, Camden. NT. J.
2,18. Kiook~er Siausage C'o., Lamrbertville, Nu. J.
188. ('lement E~. A1llen, Medi~a, Pa.
"121. Olanigeburgr Packing Co., Orangeburg, S. C.
248. The Southern Cotton~ Oil Co., Bayonne, N\. J.
983-A. J. T. Polk Co., M~ound City, Ill.
42~1-.. W!. S. Forb1:es~i & Co., Richmond, Va.
76.5. John G~rnce &~ Son,l Circleville, Ohio.
SSBI. Intelertate Cotton Oil Retining Co., Shennan, Tex.
201. Henl3 ry Strcker, Ph~ilad-elp~hin, Pa.
MYeat Inspection Reinaugurated Following Suspension.
):1003. Interstate Vac~cine Co., 58 G~reystone Heights, K~ansas C~itr, Ka~ne. (Mail:
Sublstationn 2, Kians~as City. Mo.) *


Change inl Adldress of Officisl Estabishment.
54~. Royal Specialty C'o., 8-10 Wes~t N~incteenth Street, NVew York, N.
81! Reade Street.
Station Added.
Arralal, Calif., meatf inspection isubsatation of San Francisco, Cialif.).


Y., instead of


Stations Discontinued.
Wasltham, Mas~s., mleat inspection (substa~tion of Boaoon, Manss.).
DI:vecr, D~el., meat inspection (subatationi of Philadelphia, Pa.).
Lambetrtvllle, N. J., meat inspection (sub.station of Newark, N. J.).
Media, Pa., me~at inspection (substation of Philadelphia, Pa.').
Three Oaks, Mlich.. meat inspection substationn of Chicago, Ill.).
Mound C'ity, Ill., meat inspection (substation of National Stock Y'ards, 1I.).
Circilev~ille, Ohio, meat inspection (substation of Columbus, Ohio).
Sherman, Tex., meat inspection (substation of Frt. Worth, Tex.).
Orangreburg,, S. C:., mient inspection (substation of Augusta, Ga.).
Gl!en Olden. Pa.. inspection of plants manufacturing viruses, sernims, toxins, etc.
Changes of OllciasL in Charge.
Portlandl, M~e., Dr. A. N. Smith, instead of Dr. F~. W. Huntington.
Memnphi, Tenn.. Mr. Alpheus D. Payne, instead of Mr. T. H. Berry.
Changes in Addresses of Inspertors in Charge.
D~r. Jolhn P. O?'Leary, P. O. box 586, Pearl River, N. Y., instead of P. O. b~ox 91, Glen
O~lden. P3 .
Dr1. Jens M~adsenI, 55; ('entral Building, Seattle, Wansh., instead of 750 Central Building.
Dr. F'. L,. Schneiderl, P. O. hox 46f4 officee, rooms 1-3 City Hall), Albuquerque, N.
Mex.. instead of P. Oj. b~ox 464 ('office. Occidental Building), Albuquerque, N., Mex.
Dr. W.11. Wray, M~arlanld, Lecdboroughl Lane, Beaconsfield, Bucks, England, instead
of Beechwood, D~aring Roadl, Beaconsfeld, Bucks, England.
Note.
Meatfl inspectionll extenddcr at <-stabllishmcnt ,319, The W~..I. W~ilcox L~ard and Refining










1910.] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 33

NOTICES REGARDING MEAT INSPECTION.
IMPROPER MARKING OF CONTAINERS OF INEDIILLE GREASE.
It has come to the attention of the bureau that at some establishments cold-water
paint has been employed in markiing the ends o~f t ierces servings as coat Li ners of inedible
grease or other inedible rendered fat. Since the requirements outlined in Sectiojn 9,
Regulation 16, B. A. I. Order 211, contemplate durable markinug, the- use olf cold-wa~ter
paint does not meet the reluiremnents. Insp~ectors will give this matter careful atten-
tion and see that the requirements are properly colmplied with.
SU~~PREM COURT DECISIONS CONSTRUl~C~ING MT-LNSi'ECTION ACT.

At the present term of the Supreme Court of the United States three decisions of
great importance hav\e been rendleered construing the prvisions of the Meatt-Inspetction
Act. The firs t was given in th e case of the Pi tt sburgh Mielt ingr Co. versus G E Tol'rttern,
nspector.,,, of the bureau,, whichwas rougt in the western district of Pennsylvania to
restrain the inspector from interf~ering wCith the interstate and foreign shipment of
ojlea oil, the company contendlingr that the oil is not a meat foodll product and therefore
not subject to the provisions of the meat-inspection alaw. On November~i 4, 1918, the
Supreme Court heldl, in effect, that 01eo oil is a meat food product within the meaning
of the law, is subject to, the regnultionls of the Secretary of Agriculture under the act,
and that thle interjtate an~d foreign shipment of the same for industrial purposes was
unlawful unless thle product wTas denatured as required by the! regulation.
Thec econdl decision wpas rendered on April 14, 1919, in the case of David F. H~ouston,
A. Mlvin, andl Jmes J. Brougiham versus St. Louis Independ~ent Paclking Co.
This case, known as the "'Sausage case~, in volved the validity of the regrulatiojn pro-
hibiting the use in sausage of cereasl in excess of 2 per cent, and water or ice in excess
of 3 per ce~nt. The pack~ing: company LlUSlugt to compel the department's officials to
ma rk as Inspected and passed the product manufactured by it anld called" Sa1usage "
containing cereal and water in excess of the amounts specified in the regulation. The
department claimedl that the use of the word '"Sausage'" on such a product was false-
and deceptive, and declined to mzark it as "Inspected and passed." The District
Court f.,r thie Easternl District of Mlissouri upheld the contention of the department,
b t cr i nr f pel er t dcso t ti cutCourt, however. susrtainedl the position taken by the department by deciding that the
Secretalry of Agricultur~e in promulgating the regulation referred to acted on sub-
stantial evidence and with sufficient reason in curnrlud~ing that persons p'urchansing or
using as "Sarusage"' the pack~ingr conimpany' compounl o;f var;iousl me~lts, cereal, and
water would be lec~eived as to~ its comnpasition and as to its va;lue as a fliodi product, and
that it was not an abuse of discretion to, prohibit the use of the word- ''Sausagre" as
applied to it, rather than to prescribe qualifying terms excplanatolry of it.
The third decision was rendleredl on April 21, 1919, in thle case of James J. D~rougham
and Arthur N. Stank~ey vencus B~lanton Mannufacturing Co. This case involved the
company's use of the word "Creiamo" in co~nnertiojn with i:s labje! on relemnargairin.
The company had secured a trade-mark on t~he wrordl. The dlepartment originally
approved the use of the word on the product of the company, which at that timie,
however, continued 30 per cent of creim. Subsequently~ no cream wais used in the
manufacture of the produce t and the department thereup~on withdrew~ it.; approval of
the label beiringr the wordi "Crelmo"' without qualification, on the ground that its use
would be deceptive. The company then appliedl for an injunction to prevent thle
insnpetors of the dlepartment fnrom interfer~ing with the company in the use of the
word upon packragres of its product Ihipped in interstate commerce, colntendling that
the product was not subject to the provisions of the melt-inspection law, but rather
was wFithin the terms of the oleomargarin act. Both the District Court for the Eastern
District of Missouri and the Circuit Court of Appeals sustained the views of the com-









BUREAU OF ANIMVAL INDUSTRY,


[April,


pa~ny. The Sup~reme Courtt however, in reversing the lower courts held, in effect,
that the action of the department in withdrawing its.approval of the label o~f the com-
p~any on the product, was proper and within its power under the law, and that. the use
of the word "Crea~mo" without quallication on the product was false and deceptive.
The Supremn Oturt also Fustained~ the right of the Secretary of Agriculture to withdraw
hlis app~lroval olfl a~P ~labelwh it may~S ber false or deceptive. The court Efurther held, in
effect, that a 'rade-mar~k do~es not protect the manufact~urer whlen it, is used on a product
mlanufattur~ed and- shipped in inte~rstate commerce contrary to the provisions ofI the
meat-in p-ction~ lacw.
LABELING HYDROGENATED LARD.
Attention is invited: to the~ ruling in Sprvice Annoulncements of Augrust 15, 1913,
ulnder the captioln "Lab.~els for Compounds Containing Stearin from (ottonseePd Oil."
It now appears that a hydrogelnated lard is to be pre~pared fromt lard by treating it
wFithl hydrogen and consi~stent woith the ruling abov-e referred to, the normal et~earin
ob~taine~d from natural lord by~ pre~ring: should be designated ''Lard Stearin,' while
hydrogenated lard which is a stesrin obtained from lard by treating the lanl~ with
hy!droge~n should be designated "S~tearin made from Liard." Under the pro~visions of
laragraph 5, section 93, regulation 17. set forth in Amendment 7i to B. A. I. Order 211,
lar may havec Pdded thereto Ilord stearin without the presence of added stearin being
shown on thE Ilabl. Since lanrd Ftearin differs malteriallyv from hyrdrogeunated lard it
is requ~ired that w\hetn hydarognated1 lard is added to lard there shall appear on the
label co~ntigneur "to and in thel same size and sty~le of lettering as the nam~e of the
promduct, the starment "Stcar~in made From L~ardl dded."
Since lardi itse~lf is a meat food pmrodct thle operation of hy!drogenation must be
c~rried out under Federal mea t i inspection. Hy~drogecnated lard leaving official estab-
lishments so~e su~ch Fshould b>e labe1~, led"tearin mrade From Lard," and inspetors
are cautioned to obsecrv~e carrefully thle labeling of lardT stearin and stear~in ma~de from
lard, in order to avoid c~onfursion and preclurde mislabeling of prodnelts containing
eithler of these fals avi: nrred ientIs.
REiPORTING CARC.4SSES AN PART'S PA~SSED FOR. STERILIZATION AND AFFERWAIRDS
TANKiED P`OR OFFAL.
Wh'len the mar~na~emen t of an official esta blishm~ent tan ks ior ojilI care~a~ss and p~arts
whireb hav\e beecn pasEd for st~eri~lizatlion, such2 Carrcas~sesand parts s)hould bi condemned
and so repolrted on the Mi. I. Formsu 112 and 114. Thle carcaw-s and parts should be
reported also on the forms 112-D and 112-F as passed~ for steriiizationl, anld the 112-D
lepo'rt should bear the notation "Tanked for offal."
mIPORTATION OF BEEF CHEEK ME4T.
R~ferrning to ite in S'rv.i;e! and Regulator: Annnouncemnts~t~ of Octobs., 1915,
pag 113, eFnti~tled "Implorted Meat Trimmingsa" beef chieek meat maya be imported
into the Unite States ulnder the same restrictions that govecrn the imlport~ation of
pork trimmiings.
REVOCATIOi OF INSTRUCTIONS TO COOPERATE W;ITH TFHE U. 8. FOOD ADMINISTRA-
TION IN ENFORCI~NG CERTAIN ORDERS.
Refe~rring tor the~ iteml in\ Se.vice and Reguilatory Announcements of O~ctoiber, 1918,
page 82, entitled "Cooperation with thr? United Staltes Food Administ.ration," which
spec~ifis certain orders of that administration, it is u~nderjstood that said orders have
been annulled. Accordingly the provisionls as ,set forth in the item are hereby revoked.
AMENDMENT TO NET WEIGHT AND VOLUME REGULATION.
Food-inspection decision No. 1755, issued A~pril "fi, 1919, assends the regu~ilationa
wh~ich relates to mark~ing the qu~antity' of food in parckag~e formn, as follows:














Paragraph (j) of regulation 29 of the Rules and Regulations for th Enforcement
of the Food and Drugs Act is hereby amended by striking out thre words "twfo av~oir-
dupois ounces" and inserting in lieu thereof "'one-half avoirdupois ounce," so that
paragraph (j) as amended shall read as follows:
(j) A package containing one-half avoirdupois ounco of food or less is "amnall" and
shall be exempt from marking in terms of Fwight..



ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL M1EATI INSPECPTION, MARCH,
1919.


Stat ion. Cottle. le. Sheep. CoaltS. Swrine.


Chicagno................................. 170.1 6,7. 194, 759 i.........., 593, 690
Fort Wrorth................................ 1;,995 11,12 6,03 13 63, 154
Kiansat;City ................... ............ 69;,554 4*4 t,2 40 20t, 347
National Stookk Ya~s....................... 3.1, 154 II,9t.u li 2,'3 114)
Omaia ................... ................. (8, .,3 1,(11.4 2,.. 4 24,9
St. Louis............ ................... .... 1,1 2..02 2,075 50 10,0
Sioiux City...................... ........., 21,1.153,1 15, 93; 5 122,341)
Eouth St. Joseph................... ....... 2',', 81 f,.,4..5 (1,5 134 3,4
All other establishm nts. .................. 25,U 7400 29,2 5 1,;19, 156
Total: Mlarch, 1919...................... 140, 2,S 29.".,. .9. T.T, Marich, 11-. ........... ....... "al 5.14 3., 20 ,9, s
9 monrhj endedi March, 1919. 9,234,721 2F2,4 ,.'1.l t,1. 217,,9
9 monthse; ndeid Ma~rch,1915.. 6,4111,t:52 2,0,t. ,5I,0 1, 2 2.,23,4


IMPORTS OF FOOD ANIIMALS AND OF MICAITS AND MIEAT FOOD
PRODUCTS.

The statemnts folllowingS show the implorts of fo~od animals andl of meats and meat~
food products intp~c~tcd by! the B~ureau of A~nimail Industry during Manrch, 1Tr10, with
figures for other periods~ fo~r cormparison..




Coun: ry o: export. Cattle. Swine. Sheep. Goats.



'Trilot:Mrhl)............................... F18 .......... 20,10 ,5 2 12,2 0(
M:.chI'sS.................................. ,2 ...... 1,<.18 731,99
9mont l~rhsede March,1919.......................... 344d. 22,771 105, 218 23,8
9montsende March,1918..... .... ................... .. 29,3 13,57 11-150. 21,8



Imnports of ments andl meatl food produrcts.


Frceh and refrigerated.
Country of export. Beef Othr. dd pro lcs. ae h.


Pounds. PoundjS. Pou nds. Pounds. Pounds1.
Canada. ................................. 2, 220, 327 1 S,8- ,13,<5 ,34 5, 881;, 2938
Uru;-usy........................ .......... .).... ....... ........... .) 2:,380 ............2t,0
Other countries.. ................... ...... 419,743 1,218 24,;50 51;4 445, 263
Total: Majrch, 19193..................... 2, 6.39, 0;2 1, 189, 072 1, 154, 819 1, ;34, 973 t,3.,9>
Marchl, 1918..................... 14,68 .,4s3 4, 301,593 305,.8r -,Swtl
9mron ths ended Manrch,13819....1 25, 085,019 3, 937,574 11 -1,3441,473 5,0t,.5 1835, 9 17
9 months euded Ma~rch, 1918....l 15,518, tl3 4I,405,394I 12,415,939 10,39..,221 43, 0;9,417

Condemned in Ma~rch, 1913; D~eef, 168 pounds; pork, 3,081 pounds; Lotal, 3,252 pounds. Refused entry:
Beef, 1,;98 pounds.


35,


1919.]


SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS.





I _


BUREAU OF ANSIIMAL INDUSTRY.


[April,


FOREIGN OFFICIALS AUTHORIZED TO SIGN INSPECTION CERTIFICATES
FOR MEAT AND PRODUCTS FOR IMPORTATION INTO THE UNITED
STATES.

The following are addcitiolnal names, addre~sses, and facsimile signatures of foreign
national Government officials authorized to sign and issue certificates of inspection
for meat and! meat foold iroduc~ts offered for importation into the United States:


Country, name, End address. Signature.




W'. G;. G~illam, carei of Swif t C'ana-
dian C'o. (Ltd.), Edmnonton,
Alberta. srhSiw


INSPECTION AND TESTING OF ANIMALS FOR CANADA.

The following chanugs have been made in the list of pradct~icing veterinarians re~gis-
Iored b.y the bureau and aulthorized to inspect and test with mallein hlorsse, mules,
and assres intendedl for export to Catnada:

Names Added to List.

Dr~. Roblert Disoix, Supecrior, Wis.
Dr. IL. J. Ri!-hards, Delaware, Ohiio.

Names Remo.ved from Listl.

Dr. F'. E. Unruhaml, Superior, W'is.
Dr. B. H. Olds. ('olumbhuA, Ohio.



LICENSES FOR VETERINARY BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS.

The fullowingr chanrges have beecn mnade in thle Ilstf of licen1FSe fojr the manufacture
of \-eterinar! b~iologica~l products for the ye-ar 1919 under the act of Coangress of M~arch
4, 19)13 IS7 Stat., 8321I, and the regulations made thereunder (D. A. I. Order 196):

Lirearse~s isweld.


DatP.


1D 9.


.1pr. 9


.Li euse




]?
52
Jul
1"22


]?2


Name and address of firm.


P~rodnects.


Bic~ho Laloratoriies Iln.), 101-10.3 We'st
Thiirdl Stlret, St. Paul, Mlinn.
Thec Cutte~r Lborarorry, Sixth and t;Ira;,-
soni Streets. nerkeley alf
Swa n-MByer s'o. ?lD Nrort h Senlte A venne,
Th*~ lioSal Biologicanl Lab1oratori~s, 217
Arlgy'le Buildingp, TwelCth1 and McGee
Str;ets, Kaoses City, M~o.


Disrkieg: aggressin; blackleg filtrate:
blackleg vacc'ineP; antiequ~ine influenza
vanccine (n.uxd I.
.intimixed-infection seruml(sw~inc).
EqulintinOflunza bacteria.
Mlixed-infection vaccine\ (av~ian); mixed-
inf~ctrion vaccine! (orine); navel-ill
mixed v~accine (equine); swine-plague
vacc~ine.
Autogenowl vaccine; mi xed-infection
vateine bo .nle); mixed-infection vac-
Cine (bu no


. pr.

Apr.


2 ......do. .. .. .. .. .










1919.] SERVIICE AND REGULATORY' ANNOUNCEMENTS. ST

REQUIREMENTS FOR LABELING VETERINARY BIOLOGICS.
Establishments manufacturing' tuberculin under a United States veterinary Ticense
should cause trade labels used on packages or containers of this product to show the
amount of Koch's old tuberculin (0. T.) contained in each cubic centimeter of the
product as marketed. This shall appear in substantially the following~ form: "'1 c. c.
equals 0.2 gram Koch's old tuberculin."! Further, such labels shall bear recom-
mendations regarding the minimum dose to be adlministered, which dose shall be not
less than the equivalent of 0.5 gram of Koch's old tub~erculin. Thus if the product
as marketed contains 0.1 gram Koch's old tuberc~ulin per cubic centimleter, not less
than 5 cubic centimeters should be recommended as a dose for testing cattle. Until
labels can b~e procured in conformityr with this requirement thle amount of K~och's
old tuberculin contained in each cubic centimeter should be stamped upon approved
labels, in the form set fourth ab~ove.
Trade labels alltixed to, or used in connection with, containers of vete~rinary bio-
logical products when feasible should b~ear the formula u~sed in manufacturing: the
product involved; i. e., the organismsi or antigens used should be indicated. Whaen
such products are composed of organisms in suspension the approximate number of
each organ ism con tained in am cubic centimeterr of the product as marketed should also
be indicated. All trade labela.of .sufficient size shall bear appropriate instructions,
stating for wFhat disease or condition and in what manner the product should be used.
If these inst ructions mlust be too brief. for clearness, a reference should be made on. the
label as to wrheite full instructions inay' be found, e, g., "Directions inclosed"' will be
satisfactory. The provisions of thEis pslaragrap will not apply to present stocks of
approved labels.

TEXAS-FEVER QUARANTINE--PLIACES TO WHICH SOUTHERN CATTLE
MIAY BE% SHtIPPED FOR IMMnEDIAT;E SLAUGHITER.

The following changes have been made in the list published in Service and Regou-
latory Announcements for June, 1918, of places to which southern cattle may be
shipped for immediate slaughter under State and Fedra~l permission.
Permission Withdrawn.
KANsAS: Pillsbuirg, Hull d Dill00 packing CO.
ILIuNors: Cairo, E. Bucher Pack~ing Co.


CHANGE IN DESIGNATION OF OFFICE OF HOG-CHOLERA CONTROL.

Effective A~pril 16, 1919, the designation of the Office of Hogn-Cholera Control was
changed to Division of Hog-Cholera Control, with Dr. U. G. Houck as chief, vice
Dr. O. B. Hess, who has resigned to take service with a serum company.


NOTICE TO THOSE IN CHARGE OF FIELD STATIONS.

Persons in charge of field stations are directed to indicate the character of their
work in communications addressed to the bureau, as, Inspector in Charge, MI. I.;
Inspector in Charge, H. C.; Inspector in Charge, V. 8. and T., etc.











38 B~UREAUr OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY, [April,

PERMIITTED DIPS FOR CATTLE AND SHEEP.

The following is a revised list of thle propriettary dips writh thle dilutions permitted
for use in thle offc~ial dipping of cattle and shePep for scab~ies, in accordance with pro-
visions of B. A. I. Order 24-5.


Qua- uantity of water.
Name of dip?. tity of
dp" Casttle. Sheep.


Lirnc-a ulphutr dips for catikr and shu~p for scabies.
Gallon. Gallons. G~allons.
The Adalms Lime and Sulphur Dip...................................... 1 15 0
The .?nchor B~rand Lime atnd Sulphur Dip............................... I 13 171
Armstrong's Lime andl Sulphur Dip...................................... I 126 17
Devoe Lime and Sulphur Solution. ...................................... 1 1 20
Dow Lime-Sulpbur Solution...............~................... ............ 1 14 2
Eckman's Lime-Sulphur Solution .......... ,.................. ...... I 1520
ICrasselli Limie-Sulphur solution ................................... ...... 1 IB20
L~atimer's Lime-Sulphur Bolution.................................... I 14f 20
Lilly's Lime and Sulpbur Solution ........., ......................... 1 131 186
National Lime and Sulphur Dip. ................... ..........,............ 1 5 7
Niagara L~ime and Bulphur Solution.................. ..,. ..........,. I 14 19
Orchard Brand L~ime and Bulphur Solution ...........,,............... 1 15 20)
Rox Lime and Sulpbur Solution..................... I 15 20t
Richard's Limo andl Sulpbjr Dip....... .................................. I 93 131
Sherrwin-Willams Lime-Sulphur Solution .............................. I 131
Sherwrin-W'illiarms No. 15, Cat tle Dip. ............................~...... I 15 2
Union Lime and SulphurSlto..................... 4 9
Ulpon Honor Lime-Sulphurr Wash.................... I 125 17
O3rt ho Sprays Lime-Sulphur Polution. ................... ................. I 1 20
Cooper's Lime-and-Sulph-ur Dip ........., ............... ............ I 1520
SprinS~dalo Brand Lime-Snifur Solution.................. ...............I I 1520
Laritu Cattln Dip. ................... ................... .................. I 1520
Kicolt n delp. /r cotn ic and shee'tp or i cabk~j.l
Black Leaf Toba3cco Extract. .................. ................... ........ I ;0 70
B3lac~k Leaf 410. ................... ................... ................... ... I 900 980
Skabenrra................................................ 1 S32 832

I The presc~ribed quantities of DlI.olin dips should give a dilution of fil-e one-hundredths of 1 per cent, of
nii otin.
Permitted Dip for Catule for Ticks.

'"Hemningway's', Alliance Brand ARlsnical Cattle Dip"' is p maittcd bya the depart-
ment in the official dippFing of cantltl forr ticks. D~ilution for- thle official dipping of
canttle for interstate movement, 1 gallon of the concentrated dip to not more than
117 gallons of water. Th~is dilu~tion will yield a solution containing not less than
0.22: per cent actual a~rsenious oxid.

.RESI.LTS OF PRO)SEC'UTIONS FOR VIOLATION OF LAWS.S

Penalties hea.ve bee~n imnposed in prosecutions for violations of regulatory laws, as
reported to the b~ureau, as follows:

Live-Stock Quarantine Lawv.

Central of Georgia Railway) Co. (2 cases), $9200 fines and $7.830 costs.
H~ouston 6 Tr'Xas iCentral R~ailroadl C'o., f100 fine.
Southern Railw-ay' re., .100 fine and $17.95 costs.
Chicago, Rock Islandl & Fniific Railwny Co., $100 fine and t19.25 costs.
Atlantic C'oastI line Ra;ilrolad i'o. (2 capceft. .12300 fines and $914 costs.
Cleveland, f inr inna~ti, i hiicago &~ St. Louis Railway C'o. (4. cases), 4200 fines and
950.70 costF.
Pan Antonio 6 Arianrsas Pas Railwray Co.. 5100 fine.
Hearsc!y Hollingsw orthI, .5100 i no and P28.28 costs.
Chlicago, Rock Isla~d c& Pacil cRsilwray Co. (3 casesl, .?300 fines and' $18.8 co sts.










1019.] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANZNOUNCEMIENTS. 3Q

Twenty-Eight-Hour Law.

Philadelphia &3 Reading Railwfay C'o. (20 c13ases, $1,800 fines andl 877.30 costs.
WTabash Railway Co. (4i cases), .9400 fines and $1:3.55 costs.
Southern RailwFay Co., $100 fine and 518. 15 costs.
Batimore~ &~ Ohiio: railr~oad~ (Co. ~I'- caseP'. .9t300 finei.: and1 $11.30? costs.r
Chicago, B~urlington & Quincy Railroad Clo. 4- casr-sl, .5500 fines andi $10.;.; co~sts.
Colorado & Southern Railway c'o. (3 clses 1, 430)0 flues anld $17.70) costs.
New York; Central Railroad Co., $100 fine andl 513.30 costs.-
Yanzoo & lifississippi Valley3 Railr~oad C'o., Delt2 Dii ision i.: case~sr, 5.:00 Unes~ and
$53.710 costs.
Kfansas C'ity Southerln Railwray C'o., $100O fine alnd. .18.')3 costs.
American E xpress Co., $100 fine and $1S$3.S0 costs.


NEW~ SCHEDULE OF RATIONS FOR LIVE STOCK' IN INTERSTATE TRANS-
PORTATION.
At the time of the recent annual conference of the American National Live Stock
Association at Denv~er, Colo., department officials conferredl withl re-resent~atives of
the American National Live Stock Associastion, National Live Stock Shippers Pro-
tective League, National Live Stock Exchlange, Packers Traftie Com~mittee, and the
Railroad Administration, concerning the prlopcr muiinimum rations to, be fedl live stock
unloaded for feed, water, and rest under the pro~visions of the Twenty-eciglt-Hroulr
Law.
The recommendations of the conference committee hiave b~en approved by~ thle
Secretary and~lhave bleen incorporated in thle followr.ing letter, issue~ld from his office
under date of A pril1 23, set ting fort h the dlepa rt men t's v~iews as to t he m ini m um requ aire-
ments of thle law:
THE FEEDING, WYATERING, AND RESTING OF LIVE STOCK~ IN COURSE OF NINTERSTATE
TRANSPORTATION.
Inl order to avoid the difficulie--s exup~enriene by3 tranllportationu compnianis shippIers,
and others, in computing the amouints of feed which should be given to animals whlile
in the course of interstate transportation, the 11ureau of Animal Industry, in con-
nection with the enforcement of the Twecnty-eight-Hour Lawr (3-1 Stalt., G007) hias
given further consideration to the feeding, watering, and wresting of cat tle, sheep,
swine, and other animals, and hias delorrmined that the use- of a carload as a unit b.asis,
raLther than the hundredweighit of animal, is a more satisfactory meth~od for' arrivinga
at the amount of feed which should b~e givenI to ther animals.
As a result, the conclusion has b~een reached that. the hlandling of animals in ne-
cordance withi the suggestion outlined below will meet the aiew of the Departmient
of Agriculture as to the minimum reqluirements of the law.
FEED REQUIREMENTS.
HoesM and mnules: Not less than 200 pounods of hay, or its equivanlent, per~ car.
Cattle: Not lcess than 200 pounds olf hay, or its eqluivalent, pesr car.
Sheep or goante: Not less Ihan1 100 pounds of hay, or its eqivii\alent, per deck.
Swine: Not less than 2 bulshels of she~llccd corn, or its equlivalentt in ear coml or
other grain, per single-deck car of no~t more thian 1 ,00)0 poiiund weight; noit less
than 24 bJushels of shielled corn, or its eqluivalesnt in ear corn or otheri grain, pier
doublel-deck car of not more than 21,000 pounds we-ighlt.
Carload lots of hogs in excess of these w~eight should b~e fed an addiiional
amount in the same proportion.
Animals shipped in lots less than at ca~rblarl shouj~ld be ifed a p~ro raita amou~nt
based on the above~ figures.










40 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY, [April,

Calves too young to eat hay or grain and shipped alone should be given a
sua~cient amount of some suitable feed, such as milk -or raw eggs.
The rations above indicated are to be given each time the animals are fed to
comply with the provisions of the law.
UNLOADING.

The only practicable methods for railroads to transport animals, other than hogas,
without unloading during each period prescribed by the statute for rest, water, and
feeding, are in "~palace" or similar stock cars and with emigrant outfits. There are
cases in which exceptional facilities complying with the law make unloading unneces-
sary; for instance, specially equipped cars conveying show animals and blooded
stock. In such cases care should be taken to observe the law. In all cases, if animals
are not unloaded, sufficient space to permit all the animals to lie down in the cars at
the same time must be provided.
Bogs may be fed, watered, and rested without unloading, provided (a) the cars are
loaded so as to allow all the animals to~ have sufficient space to lie down at the same
time, (b) the trains are stopped for sufficient thne to allow the watering troughs to be
prepared and to allow every hog time to drink his fill, and (c) care is exercised to dis-
tribute properly through each car deck sufficient shelled corn, or its equivalent in
ear corn or other grain, for each hog.
UNLOADING PENS.

All pens into which animals are unloaded must contain adequate facilities for
feeding and watering and suitable space on whiich the animals can lie down com-
fortab~ly for resting. Covered pens should be provided for unloading animal in severe
weather.
This letter to supersede the letter of the department dated Maly 31, 1913, on this
subject.


STATUS OF TICK ERADICATION IN VARIOUS STATES, FEBRUARY, 1919.

Dipped during Amount of
month. infection. Slir .AI State County Vats
State. bein inspec-l inspee~- inspec- avail-
.kd tors. tors. Lors. able
Herds. Ca tle erds. Cattle.wo .

Alabama.......,.......1,9 111,775 19 500 35, 439 17 22 08 5, 651
Arkansas ............. 7 478i 1 100) 16, 245 20 ......... 1,658
Florida................ 218 27,7:2J 15S 27, 4:9 50, 032 18 41 23103
Georgia.. ............ 1, 864 17, 629 11 456 27, 6683 27 19 42 2, 444
L.ouisiana ..........,.. ........ .......... .1......... .......... 45, 104 40 2 59 4, 479
ALississippi..........., 5,513 57, 002 24 122 34,0OSS 20 7 39 5, 531
Nort h Carolina........l ........ .......... 2 20 8, 802 12.... .... 383
Oklaboma............. 2421112 2 50 27, 113 14 9 6 1,003
Boouth Carohina....... 10 3;3 4 6Y 15, 611 23 ......... 791
Texas (Fort WVorth)... 1,016 57,48~6 74 14,719 61,681 35 23 43 2,967
Texas (Houston)...... 890 50, 83'! 350 13, 868 37, 459 16 1 5 078
Total............l 21, 6471 337, 441 645 57, 382 359, 504 242 126 315 26, 910





SERVICES AND REGULATORY" ANTNOUNCFMnENTS.


011)8.1


Tubrc ulllm tests. l es











19 3 1 20 ~ 4 7 3.


35 1.1-1 1 1 I'll 71 4 2
3; 5 ~ 1 38 I3 ... .. 1 I
]J1; ,1 21 1 ...
511 1,00 13 12J 10 '
2,J 39 29 "1 10-1 3 I


116 2,I 9 4 .. ....
25 ~ ~ ~ ~ i .5.10 ...
21 ~ ~ ~ 55 31 3 5


49 1, SO. 12 71 4 1

6 7:1258 1? ..... ....1..
. 51 ,2 li 7 .... 4


S 13 5 l?... 1

?.3 I
1Hi 2,n 45 47 T ...
;,iI ,,... ..

1 4801 7 13 309 I 1
15 1331 i 3 ..... .. ..


11151

Si~~ Areal-I work


Ilu:pector in rlharge.






Dr. HI. B. Leonnar.
SDr.W\.MI.M~aaokllar.
Dr. 9. E. Jack;Son.
DrI. H. l. Cohienour.

Dr. E..\. Crosmanr.


;/Dr. J. J. Li ntnelr.
SI Dr. W5.R.Va3n Nos .
DrU. W.Kt. Lewiis.
Dr.WTi. E. lowe.
Dr I. .II. Tho~m psn.
Dr. P. E. Quinn.


;, Dr. J. E. G:ibson1.

Dr. T.S. Rich.
D~r. Ml. Oregory.
Dr. J. 8. H~ealy.
Dr. A. J. DeIPosst.
Dr.M, B.`Lincolu.
Dr. R. WT. Tuck;.

Dr. IT O.Bamabn.
Dr. 8, B. FsTer.nl



Dr3. W~. J. Frotr.
Dr. F. E. Zuirray.

iiDr.WV.c.M~iddletonr.

Dr. J. A. K'lrnazu.


Staten.State.







Albany, N'. Y........... New Y~ork....... .
Atlanta,Ga~.............GCeorgia...........
Birmingham, Ala........ Aliibama..........
Bbimarok, N. Dak.... North Dakota.....
(Massajchusetts..... .
Mlaine.............
Bosi ,n,Manjs........... Rhode Ijslnd.....
Con nec~t iut .......
New Hamps~hire..
Chicago, Ill...........,.. lilinoii............
Clarksbhurg, WV. Va~......) WVet V'ireinia.....
Coluolbia, S. C.......... South Cairolina,...
Denier. C'olo............ Colorado..........
Des Mrotnes, Iow3........ Iown..............
Barrisbulr>, Pa........,.. Pennsylv-ania.....
He~lena, Nori............ Monanal..........
Indi lljo~s Ind..... JInodiorns...........
Indanaoli, nd......Ohio..............
Khentuctky.........
Jackson, ~i~ss........... Mlissiasippi........
LaningMicrh...........Mbichtiganl..........
Ciirtie Rock, Ark........I Arkaonas..........
HIadijon, Wis............ Yijconsi n .........
hlontpeller Vt..... \'ermon~t..........
Naishville, fenn.........; Te~nnes.=ec.........
New Orleanns L3........ Loulislans.........
Oklahoma, Okla.........( Oklahoma........
Omaha, Nebjr............ Nebrask)i~l .........
Pierre,S. Dak...........SBoutb Dakota.....
Portand Org........ n.. 1 ...

RichmondJ, \'a.......... r\ a I~ i......

St. Paul, Mi nn .......... 2i nsta o...
Salt Lake City, U13h.... Utoh..............
Tallahaslsee. I:1.......... Florir~da.............
Topeks, Kans........... Ka3nsas;............
Trentou, N. J...........( Newf Jersey.......
Diit rict of Col umn-
Washington, D. C.... M a-l.....

Toi al..... ........ ..................



a Accredited herds.


CLINICALE THERMIOMETERI CASES.


At times~ cases for clinical thleonrmomters are dific~ult to ob~tain anld inl th~e ggregateO
represet a consid~erable outlay. All empty cases should be mailed promptly to
the pr'operty;S clerlk. It is not necePssary to send a letter of transmiitnal or furnishl Form
P-2a in making this re~tulrn. B~roke~n the~~lrmomtersY shouldl be rep~lol'rte on Form P1 -3
quarterly, as hleretofore.



PAYMENT OF BILLS RENDERED ON FORMI 5 VOUCHERS.

In order to facilitate thle payment of bills; for purch~aset and se-rviess other than
pemYonal render~ed on depalrtmental Polm 5 vou~chelr~s? inspectors in charge and others


SUMWMARY OF TUBERC ULOSIS. ERADIC ACTION WOR K IN COOPE RATION
WITH THE VARIOUS STATES, MI~ARCH. 1919.




B"


42 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. IApril,

rendering and approving such vouchers in favor of firms and corporations are directed
to see that the vouchers are stated in the name of the firm or corporation instead of
the agent or manager thereof.
Wihen anyJ firm or corporation has once rendered a bill against the department,
payment of which bas been made on Form 5 voucher, all future bills in favor of that
par~ticular firm or cojrporation should be stated in exactly the same name.


STREET-CAR FARES FOR EMPLOYEES RECEIVING PER DIE111 ALLOW-
ANCE IN LIEU OF SUBSISTENCE.

Under date of M~arch 29, 1919, the Comptroller of the Treasury rendered a decision
concerning street-car fares incurred by employees who receive a per diem allowance
in lieu of reimbursement for subsistence. The effect of this decision is to modify
materiallyr the instructions from1 the Auditor for' the State and Other Departments
whiich were printed on pago 8 of Service and Regulatory Announcements for January,
19)19.
Under the abov~e-mentionedl decision the comptroller makes a clear. distinction
between street-car fares expended by employees in goings from hotels to various places
of offcial business and return, while making their hotels or other temp~orary places of
abjode their heatdquarters, and street-car fares expelnded in going fIrorn such temporary
headquarters to a certain place regularly every day and return therefrom to their
hotels or other temporary places of abode. In the former cases the car fares may be
allowred, but in the latter cases such fares are not reimursable.
InI order that t he b ureau, as well as t he A udi tor for the Stat e and Other Departments,
may determine to which of these two c~lasses charges for street-car fares pertain, it
w~ill be necessary for employees to indicate in timir accounts in connection with
each and every charge therefor the points between which the street cars were used,
the name of the individual or fu-m, the building or business house, and the street
address v-isitedc; also that the trip w~as on investiga~tionll1, statistically, regulatory, or
inspection work, etc., as thle case may be, for example as followsu:
'Januiary 8, street-car fares, hotel to Bond Buildingn anld return, invecstigational
work,, 10 cenit= Janluary 9, street-car fares, hotel to John Smith andl Company, 1222
Gira~rd Avenue, and return, regulatory work, 10 cents."
EmployIees who re~ceive a per diom allowa~nce in -lieu of reimbursement for sub-
sistence should study these instructions carefully in order that they mayr have a clear
understandingr of them. It is e~s ential that there be a strict compliance therewithl
so as to obviate suspensions, further correspondnce, and delay in the settlement of
their travel accounts.

TRANSPORTATION REQUESTS TO BE USED ONLY ON STRICTLY OFFI-
CIAL BUSINESS.

Recently the bureau's attention has been called to instances in which employees
have used Government transportation requests for travel, the cost of which was to be
borne by private concerns and individuals, or for combined official and personal
travel in connection writh trips where emp!oyees deviated from the direct route or
stopped over en route for personal reasons and thereby incurred transportation and
Pullman expense ini excess of what would have been :neurred had there been no
dev~iation or stop>-ovcr. Such use of t~ransportation requests is prohibited.
Employees of the bureau therefore will be guided in the future by the following
instruct ions:
1. Under no circumstances may a transportation request be used for travel on
personal or private business. (See paragraph 89, Fiscal Regulations, Dec. 1, 1917.) :










SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS..


3919.]


2. When an employee begins a trip whlichl he knows will involved persotnal t~ravel,
he mlay use a transportation request for Po much thle-rof as relates to G~overnment
business, but he must pay cash fare, p~lus l!ear taJ, for anly p.ult of the trip which relaztej
to ~persoal or private bus.inecss.
3. W~hen an employee perflormls travel of a ~emioffic~ial naturec, such as coopetativez
work wrhere the expenses w-ill be paid by a priva.te imllividuall or firml, he shIould pa&y
cash fare, plus the w1ar tax requgi:~re.
4. Under the internatl-re~venue lawr a w'ar taxs of 3 per cents ii requ~~ilc red for transporta-
tion and 10 per cent for Pullmann or other thain atrictly ollicial business~~ of the Govecrn--
ment. This taxt must be paidl at the timec the tic-ket ise purchased andii whnci the
traveler failj to pay hec is liable to a penalty imrposed undcir the law. The practice
of the bureau heretofore hlaa beenl to adlviae employee.< of the amount of war tax thatt
has boon evaded and request a remlittance covering same to Ibe cint to the Inlternal
Revenue Collector. Thiis practice will be discontinued~ with the i33uance of these
instructions, leaving onl employees liability to penalizationl~ for thle evasionl of pay-
mentC of the wair tax.
5. Rureau employees who muay have occasion to- travel shlO~~d fam~iliaiize themu-
selve~s w:ith these i nst ructions andiL see t o it that there is a St ici.t I omplPianICC t herewithl .
Failulre to observe these instructions may! r;!sult in the enltiret ictem !'-;bein disallsowed
from the reimbursement alccounit of thle employe~e r~-~r~lcncerne.



RIUTILATION OF BUREAlr PADLOCI~:KSi.


fore houldJ1. re--i returnied for repairsJ ind-icates th-'t mairlInyc ha-e1c1 len oened by forces applied to the
shackle andi~ that the c!yilnder pilu; of rlheni hav1 been pulled ouit or otherwise~l
d~namaed. Thesc condiitio ns3 hav~.e exieted~ for l Ilongi tiime withoutt anyi actioni looking~
to a reduerr~ion inl thre Iinuber of locks so- (Iamazedr. As the Iinumber of locks usedl is
increassing, the above cowllitions~ are'( c.llledi to theI atntr,~iiio of all having custody
of these~ parllocks.
Herea~fter, w\heni lok tiat hlaie beenCI forced or~ that cJbow\ t'v.i..lIonc? of what mlay

of damage9 mulst ber statdc onl 1-'orml P-2a1 recovering uc~h !uclkq. A/ ll emlOy'ees areC
instruicted to handle b~ureaur pa3dllcks with care, as~ their puIIrcha e and m rainltelnance
Irepresent. a c~onsiderablle exp.-n-c? to the. hrulau;.



PUBLICATIONS IN APRIL.

[The burreau ke-sps no maliling Lj lst folr ieding pubilcatil~us to mndivliduO employees, b~ut putblicatio*M~
nre sent in bulk to oncers in charge for distrllhution to Icm mbers of t heir fo1 rce. The number of copi?.*s
sent varies writ h t he sub jecrt or natulre ofI ther publlirstionl Jud t he num ber Ind ..*lass oi employeee. I.fficers
in charge wvill use their jnidgment and diistrib~ute pullhl lion n to l.,:-t ~\:012~:ip. So far as possible
additional c~opiej wrill be furn~ished on request 1
Department IHullcetin ;(j1. A~ Comp-ar~isl-n! I0: ('onc!entrt', frl~ Fttening~ Stecrs in
the South. By WI. F:. W'rdl and S. S. Jerdsl.ln, Anlimal( Hu~sbandryr! Division, and
E. R. Lloyd, Director olf bli;issipp~i Experimentl Station.P.1.
Department Bulletin il ;i. Oak-Leaff Poijoniing of Domesctic Alnimals.. Byv C.
Dwight MarsYh, A. B3. C'la~sonl, ani H~arl~eigh 1\l:rshl, Pa~thlog~ical Division. Pp. 38,

Farmlers' B~ullotin 1031;l..Fe in ir-. y .eladJ. .Wlims
Aniinal Husbandiry D~ivision. i'p. 21.










4L4 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [April,

Farmers' Bulletin 10410. Illustrated Poultry Primer. By Harry M. Lamon and
Jos. Wrm. K~inghorne, Animal Hulsbandry Division. Pp. 284, figa. 53.
Yearbook Separate 765. How Dairying Built up a Community. By J. C. MlcDowell,
Dairy D~ivisrion. Pp. 18, pl. 4.
YSearbook Separate 773. Live Stock and Reconstruction. By George M. Rommel,
.Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 16i.
Yearbook Sepanrate 77. Less C'holer.1-Mhore Hogs. By O. B. I-ess, Office of Hog-
C'holera Control. Pp. 6, pl. 2.
Yearbook Separate 778. Better Poultry Through Community Breeding Associa-
tions. By J. W. K~inghnrne, Animal HZusbandry Division. Pp. 8, pl. 4.
Y'earboojk Separate ?St. The Accredited-Herd Plan in Tuber~culosis Eradication.
By J. A. Eiernan, Tuberculosis Eradication Division. Fp. 8, pl. 2.
Yearbook Separ~ate 783. Some Results of Federal Quazrantine Against Foreign
Live-Stock Diseases. By G. W!. Pope, Quarantine Division. Fp. 10, pl. 2.
Yearbook Separate 757. The Redi covery of an Old Dish. By Hlerbert P. Davis,
Dairy Division. Fp. 10, pl. 1.
Delicious Prodlucts of the D~airy. (Revised.) By J. C. M~cnowell, Dairy Division.
Pp. 12, figs. 7.
Mieat Extracts, Their Composition and Idlentification. By Robert R. Benley and
James A. Emepry, Biochemic Division. In Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol.
XVll, No. 1, April 15, 1919.A-7,P117



ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ANIMlAL INDUSTRY.

Chief: JonN R. MIOHLER.
Assistantl~ ChIe/: B. H-. RhwL.
ChiefCl''ErkX: CHA.RLES C. CIARROLL.
Editor: D. S. BuncH.
Animarll Hustandrily Divlision.: (GEORGE Mi. ROMMnEL, chief.
Bioceminic Dcaiorsio: Mi. DOseT, chief.

Field Ins~pection Dnivision1: A. W. MIlL.LER, chief.
Neat Inspct'io~n Divisioll: R. P. STEDOMu, chief.
M~iscellanetous8 Divilusio: A. MI. FAnnsworow, chief.
Pathlologicaul D~iision~: Jous S. BUCK;LEY, chief.
Quarantlii neivision: RIcHrARD n. HICK~MAN, chief.
T~ick Erardication Div~is;,io n:. A. R~aus~v, chief.
Tubrculosis Eradlication Divisionw: J. At. IrE RN ANr, chief.
Zoological Didlsion: B. H. RNnsonr, chief.
Experimntcn Station: E. C. ScHR-oEDER, Euperintendent.
Divlision of Ilog-Cholera Contlrol: U. G. HOUCK, chief .
Oqilice of' V'irs-Sc~ru~n Control: D. I. SKrDMrORE, Rcting in charge.
Oiet of Accountsl : E. J. NEWMYIIER in charge.
Appointmentii Sictioni: GEORaE H. RUS.SELL in charge.


































































!



























































ADDITIONAL COPIES.
OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROM
THE SUPERINUTENDENT OP DOCUMENTS
GOVER.NMENT PR'IlNTI OFFICE
WASHINGTON, D. C.
AT
5 CENTS PER COPY
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It, A. -A., p144 Issued May 31, 1919.United Sttes Department of Agriculture,BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY.JOHN I. MOULER, CHIEF OF BUREAU.SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS.APRIL, 1919.[This publication is issued monthly for the dissemination of information, instructions, rulings. etc.;concerning the work of the Bureau of Animal Industry. Free distribution is limited to persons in theservice of the bureau, establishments at which the Federal meat inspection is conducted, public officerswhose duties make it doirable for them to have such information, and journals especially concerned.Others desiring copies may obtain them from the Superintendent of Documents, Government PrintingOffice. Washington, D. C., at 5 cents each, or 50 cents a year. A supply will be sent to each official incharge of a station or branch of the buroan s'ervicA, who should promptly distribute copies to membersof hisforce. A file should be kept at each station for reference.]CONTENTS.Page. Page.Changes in directory. 31 Texas-fever quarantinc-places to whichNotices regarding meat inspection. 33 southern cattle may be shipped for imme-Improper marking of containers of indiate slaughter. 37edible grease. 33 Change in designation of Oflice of hog-CholeraSupreme Court decisions construing meatControl. 37inspection act. 33 Notice to those in charge of field stations. 37Labeling hydrogenated lard. 34 Permitted dips for cattle and sheep. 38Reporting carcasses and parts passed for Results of prosecutions for violation of laws. 38sterilization and afterwards tanked for New schedule of rations for live stock in inter-offal. 34 state transportation. 39Importation of beef cheek meat. 34 Status of tick eradication in various States,Revocation of instructions to cooperate February, 1919. 40with the United States Food AdminisSummary of tuberculosis-eradication work intration in enforcing certain orders. 34 cooperation with uhe various States, March,Amendment to net weight and volume 1919. 41regulation. 34 Clinical thermometer cases. 41Animals slaughtered under Federal meat inPayment of bills rendered on Form 5spection, March, .1919. 35 vouchers. 41Imports of food animals and of meats and Street-car fares for employees receiving permeat food products. 35 diem allowance in lieu of subsistence. 42Foreign officials authorized to sign inspection Transportation requests to be used only oncertificates for meat and products for imstrictly official business. 42portation into the United States. 36 Mutilation of bureau padlocks. 43Inspection and testing of animals for Canada. 36 Publications in April. 43Licenses for veterinary biological products. 36 Organization of the bureau. 44Requirements for labeling veterinarybiologics. 37CHANGES IN DIRECTORY.Meat Inspection Inaugurated.*920. 1. Paresky, Brighton Abattoir, Boston, Mass.*808. Purdue University Agricultural Experiment Station, La Fayette, Ind.49. B. Meier & Son, 516 Westchester Avenue, New York, N. Y.245. The Brewer-Snyder Co. (Inc.), 119 Third Street SE., Washington, D. C.*919. J. C. Bull, jr., Co., Arcata, Calif.116792*-19* Conducts slaughtering. 31

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BUREAU, OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [Apri,Meat inspection Withdrawn.9,2. Dunnellv & Co. (Tne.), 75-81 1lackstonc Street, Boston, Mass.161. Sam C. Smith 'o, Waltham, Mass.168. The Pure 'ood Provision Products Co. (Inc.), 121-123 Fulton Street, Boston,46. Warren Beef Co., 1w lsacisone Street, Boston, Mass.20-DD. Wilson & Co., Three Oaks, Mich.Meat Inspe-tion Temporarily Suspended.427. Richabrdson & Robbins, Dover, Del.975. Il aond Pure Food Co., 660 Vinewood Avenue, Detroit, Mich.113. P. 1). ilughe, Camden. N. J.218. Kooker Sausage Co., Larnbertville, N. J.189. Clement E. Allen, Media, Pa.:,' Oaongebnrg Paching Co. Orangeburg, S. C.248. The Southern Cotton Oil Co., Bayonne, N. J.985-A. J. T. Polk Co., Mound City, 111.421--A. W. S. Fories & Co., Richmond, Va.765. John Groce & Son, Circleville, Ohio.S85. Interstate Cotton Oil Refining Co., Sherman, Tex.201. Henry Strecker, Philadelphia, Pa.Meat Inspe-tion Reinaugurated Following Suspension.*100. Interstate Vaccine Co., 58 Greystone Heights, Kansas City, Kans. (Mail:Substation 2, Kansas City. Mo.)Change in Aidress of Official Establishment.54. 2 yal 'Specialtv Co., 8-10 West Nineteenth Street, New York, N. Y., instead of,)2 Reade Street.Station Added.Arcata, Calif., meat inspcciion (substation of San Francisco, Calif.).Stations Discontinued.Valtham, Mass., meat inspection (su Istation of Boston, Mass.).Dover, Del., meat inspection (substation of Philadelphia, Pa.).Lambertville, N. J., meat inspection (substation of Newark, N. J.).Media, Pa., meat inspection (substation of Philadelphia, Pa.).Three Oaks, Mich., meat inspection (sulbstation of Chicago, Ill.).Mound City, Ill., meat inspection (substation of National Stock Yards, Ill.).Circleville, Ohio, meat inspection (substation of Columbus, Ohio).Sherman, Tex., meat inspection (substation of Ft. Worth, Tex.).Orangeburg, S. C., meat inspection (substation of Augusta, Ga.).Glen Olden, Pa., inspection of plants manufacturing viruses, serums, toxins, etc.Changes of Officials in Charge.Portland, Me., Dr. A. N. Smith, instead of Dr. F. W. Huntington.Memphis, Tenn., Mr. Alpheus D. Payne, instead of Mr. T. IT. Berry.Changes in Addresses of Inspectors in Charge.Dr. John P. O'Leary, P. 0. box 586, Pearl River, N. Y., instead of P. 0. box 91, GlenSlden, Pa.Dr. Jens Madsen, 557 Central building, Seattle, Wash., instead of 750 Central Building.Dr. F. L. Schneider, P. 0. box 464 (office, rooms 1-3 City Hall), Albuquerque, N.Mex., instead of P. 0. box 404 (office, Occidental Building), Albuquerque, N. Mex.Dr. XX. H1. Wray, Maryland, Ledborough Lane, Ueaconsfield, Bucks, England, insteadof Beechwood, Baring Road, Beaconsfield, Bucks, England.Note.Meat inspection extenI ded at establishment 819, The V. J. Wilcox Lard and RefiningCo., GIllitenbeir. N. J. to i'il (1de 1h iie W. J. WVilc'x 1L. &k, R. Co.

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1910.J SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 33NOTICES REGARDING MEAT INSPECTION.IMPROPER MARKING OF CONTAINERS OF INEDIBLE GREASE.It has come to the attention of the bureau that at some establishments cold-waterpainthas been employed in marking the ends of tierces serving as containers of inediblegrease or other inedible rendered fat. Since the requirements outlined in Section 9,Regulation 16, B. A. I. Order 211, contemplate durable marking, the use of cold-waterpaint does not meet the requirements. Inspectors will give this matter careful atten-tion and see that the requirements are properly complied with.SUPREME COURT DECISIONS CONSTRUING MEAT-INSI'ECTION ACT.At the present term of the Supreme Court of the United SU&tes three decisions ofgreat importance have been rendered construing the provisions of the Meat-ispectionAct. The first was given in the case of the Pittsburgh Melting Co. versus C. E. Gotten,nspector of the bureau, which was brought in the western district of Pennsylvania torestrain the inspector from interfering with the interstate and foreign shipment ofoleo oil, the company contending that the oil is not a meat food product and thereforenot subject to the provisions of the meat-inspection law. On November 4, 1918, theSupreme Court held, in effect, that oleo oil is a meat food product witbini the meaningof the law, is subject to the regulations of the Secretary of Agricultule under the act,and that the interstate and foreign shipment of the same for industrial purposes wasunlawful unless the product was denatured as required by the regulation. The second decision was rendered on April 14, 1919, in the case of David F. Houston,A. D. Melvin, and James J. Brougham versus St. Louis Independent Packing Co.This case, known as the "Sausage" case, involved the validity of the regulation pro-hibiting the use in sausage of cereal in excess of 2 per cent, and water or ice in excessof 3 per cent. The packing company sought to compel the department's officials tomark as "Inspected and passed " the product manufactured by it and call " Snusagecontaining cereal and water in excess of the amounts specified in the regual ion. Thedepartment claimed that the use of the word "Sausage" on such a product was falseand deceptive, and declined to mark it as "Inspected and passed." The DistrictCourt for the E sstern District of Missouri upheld the contention of the department,but the circuit court of appeals reversed the decision of the trial court. The SupremeCourt, however, sustained the position taken by the department by deciding that theSecretary of Agriculture in promulgating the regulation referred to acted on sub-stantial evidence and with sufficient reason in concluding that persons purciasing orusing as "Saussage" the packing company's compound of various meats, cereal, andwater would be deceived as to its composition and as to its value as a food product, andthat it was not an abuse of discretion to prohibit the use of the word "Sausage" asapplied to it, rather than to prescribe qualifying terms explanatory of it.The third decision was rendered on April 21, 1919, in the case of James J. Iroughamand Arthur N. Stankey versus Blanton Manufacturing Co. This ca-e involved thecompany's use of the word "Creamo" in connection with its label on oleomargarin.The company had secured a trade-mark on the word. The department originallyapproved the use of the word on the product of the company, which at that time,however, contained 30 per cent of cream. Subsequently no cream was used in themanufacture of the product and the department thereupon withdrew its approval ofthe label bearing the word "Creamo " without qualification, on the ground that its use would be deceptive. The company then applied for an injunction to prevent theinspectors of the department from interfering with the company in the use of theword upon packages of its product shipped in interstate commerce, contending thattile product was not subject to the provisions of the meit-inspection law, but ratherwas within the terms of the oleomargarin act. Both the District Court for the EasternDistrict of Missouri and the Circuit Court of Appeals sustained the views of the coin-

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34 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [April,pany. The Supreme Court, however, in reversing the lower courts held, in effect,that the action of the department in withdrawing its approval of the label of the com-pany on the product was pr per and within its power under the law, and that the useof the word "Creamo" without qualification on the product was false and deceptive.The SupvemCourt alo suaained the right of the Secrethry of Agriculture to withdrawhis approval of 8 lalbel when it may be faise or deceptive. The court further held, inetufot, that .1 tradQ-mark does not prtceet the manufacturer when it is used Ol a pjrnductmianul < tured I an1.shipped in inte-Stae conmemCee contrary to the provisions (f theLABELING HYDROGENATED LAIRD.A teltion it il l iu-d to the ruling in Servkee Announcemoenits of AuguK 1-. 1913,under the (-aption ah for Compounds Containing Stearin from Cotto-'--ed Oil."It now appc-lro that a hydrogenated lard is to be prepared from lard by treating itwith hydirogen and consistent with the ruling above referred to, the normal stearinobtained from natural lard by presing should be designated "Lard Stearin," whilehydroenate.i lard which is a stearin obtained from lard by treating the lard withi-drogen should he di-ignotrd "Stearin made from Lard." Under the provisions ofparagraph 5, section 9, regulation 17, set foth in Amendment 7 to B. A. L Order 211,lard may have addedl thereto lard stearin without the presence of added stearin beingshown on the lab-l-. Since lard st-arin differs materially from hydrogenated lard itis required Ihat when hydro-enoAed lard is added to lard there shall appear on thelabel contiguous to and in the same size and style of lettering as the name of theproduct, the statement "Stearin made From Lard Added."Since lard iisel: is a meat food product the operation of hydrogenation must iecarried out under Federal meat inspection. Ifydrogenated lard leaving ofial estab-lishments as uch should be label'-!, "Stearin made From Lard," and inspectorsare cautioned to observe carefully the labeling of lard stearin and stearin made fromlard, in order to avoid confusion and preclude mislabeling of pr itots containingeither of thes' fIs a< ingredients.REPORTING CARCASSES AND PARTS PASSED FOR STERILIZATION AND AFTERWARDS TANKED FOR OFFAL.Whein the ma nagvument of an official establishment tanks for oil car asses and partshi-ch have been pass-d for sterilization, such carcasse :nd p ar sb'd -hcndemnedand so reported on the M. I. Forms 112 and Mi4. Tn car -nd parts should bereported also on the forms 112-1) and 1 12-F as passed for sterilizalon, and the [12-Dreport should ear the notation -Tanked for offal."IMPORTATION OF BEEF CHEEK MEAT.Referring" to ite-m in Service and Regulatory Annonenicts of October, 1915,page 115, enti led Imported Meat Trimmings,'" beef cheek mea nay be importedinto the United Stanes under the same restrictions' that govern the importation ofpork trimninigs.REVOCATION OF INSTRUCTIONS TO COOPERATE WITH THE U. S. FOOD ADMINISTRA-TION IN ENFORCING CERTAIN ORDERS.Referring to tile item in Service and Re-kmlatory Annonenats of October, 1918,pace S2, entitled ' -ation with the United States Fool Administration,'' whichspeci!fis certain orders of that administration, it is uiderstood that said orders havebeen annulled. Accordingly the provisions as set forth in the ilen are hereby revoked.AMENDMENT TO NET WEIGHT AND VOLUME REGULATION.Food-inspection decision No. 179, issued April 26, 1919, amtnds the regulationwhich relates to markinth quantity of food in package forn, as follows:

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1910.] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 35Paragraph (j) of regulation 29 of the Rules and Regulations for the Enforcementof the Food and Drugs Act is hereby amended by striking out the words "two avoir-dupois ounces" and inserting in lieu thereof "one-half avoirdupois ounce," so thatparagraph (j) as amended shall read as follows:(j) A package containing one-half avoirdupois ounce of food or less is "small" andshall be exempt from marking in terms of weight.ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED UNDER FEDERAL MEAT INSPECTION, MARCH,1919.Station. Cattle. Calves. Sheep. Goats. Swine.Chicago. 137,061 65,276 194,759 .593,690Fort Worth. 17,995 11, 128 6,036 13 63,154Kansas Cit v. 69,554 14, 0o: 96, 123 40 2o6,8 7National Stock Yards. .33, 154 11, 919 17,-12: 283 151,435Omaha. (8,453 6,9c4 122, O3 4 28x,798St. Loui. 11,214 2,552 2,07S 50 103,30,;Sioux City. 21,6t 8 3,112 1S, S37 5 122,346South St. Joseph. 22, 51 5,9 6 (0,4. 134 134, 441All other establishments. 25s, 20 174, 686 219, 829 988 1, 719, 186Total: March, l99. 40,288 295.38 737,S36 1,517 3,443,203Mareb, 1'Ls.823,21 259,354 735,595 2,764 3,925,99 mointhsended March, 1919. 9,254,721 2,572, 149 8, 634, 14 96,716 33, 71s, 199 months ended March, 1918. 8,411,382 2,302, 1tS 6,759, 23 112,:29 26,283,242IMPORTS OF FOOD ANIMALS AND OF MEATS AND MEAT FOOD PRODUCTS.The statements following show the imports of food animals and of meats and meatfood prodwts inspected by the Bureau of Animal Industry during March, 1919, withfigures for other periods for comparison.Im ports offood ncils.Country o &export. Cattle. Swine. Sheep. Goats.M exie .6,797 .4,302 105Candda. 19,913 1,512 8,523 .Total: March, 191. 26,710 1,512 12, 25 106M arch,191s. 14, 568 68 17, 3,5 10,9919 months endedi March, 1919. 34,, -44 22, 776 165, 918 23,S919 mniuths eaded March, 1918. 219,556 13,577 144,805 21,384Imports of meals and reat food products.Fresh and refrigerated.Country ofexport. Canned Other TotalCoutr other. tand cured. products. weight.Bccf. Other.Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds.Canada. 2,220,327 1,187,854 1, 103,683 1,374,429 5,886,293Uruguay. .2G, 380 .26, 380Other countries. 418,745 1,218 24,756 564 445,283Total: March, 1919. 2,639,072 1,189,072 1,154,819 1,374,993 6,357,956March, 1918. 148, 678 61, 453 4,301,893 305,586 4,817,6109 months ended March, 1419. 25, 085,019 3,937,574 114, 344, 473 5,018,851 148, 385,9179 months ended March, 1918. 15, 818, 863 4, 40, 394 12,415,939 10, 395, 221 43, 039, 417Condlemned in March, 1913. Beef, 16S pounds; pork, 3,081 pounds; total, 3,232 pounds. Refused entry:Beef, 1,798 pounds.

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36 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [April,FOREIGN OFFICIALS AUTHORIZED TO SIGN INSPECTION CERTIFICATES FOR MEAT AND PRODUCTS FOR IMPORTATION INTO THE UNITEDSTATES.The following nre additional names, addresses, and facsimile signatures of foreignnational Governmnent officials authorized to sign and issue certificates of inspectionfor meat and meat food products offered for importation into the United States:Country, name, and address. Signature.W. G. G ilhnm, care of Swift Cana-dian Co. (Ltd.), Edmonton,Alberta.INSPECTION AND TESTING OF ANIMALS FOR CANADA.The following changes have been made in the list of practicing veterinarians regis-tered by the bureau and authorized to inspect and test with nmallein horses, mules,and asses intended for export to Canada:Names Added to List.1)r. Robert Dixun, Superior, Wis.Dr. L. J. Richards, Delaware, Ohio.Names Removed from List.Dr. F. E. Ilurnham, Superior, WiS.1)r. B. II. Olds, Columbus, Ohio.LICENSES FOR VETERINARY BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS.The following changes have been made in the list of licenses for the manufactureof veterinary biological products for the year 1919 under the act of Congress of March4, 1918 (37 Sat., 832), and the regulations made thereunder (3. A. I. Order 196):Li'cnses issued.license Date. Name and address of firm. Products.No.1919.17 Arr. 9 IBeebe Laoratorics (TIne.), 161-163 West Blackkeg aggressin; blackleg filtrate;Thurd Stroet, St. Paul, Minn. blaekleg vaccine; antiequine influenzavaccine (mixed).52 Apr. 22 The Cutter Laboratory, Sixth and Grny-! Antinixed-infection serum (swine).on Sireefs. Berkiley, Calif.]wA pr. 23 Swanir-Myers Co., 219 North Senate Avenue, Equine-influcnza bacteria.Indi , ial!polis, In d.122 Apr. 14j The loyal Pioiogieal Laboratories, 317 Mixed-infection vaccine (avian); mixed-Argyle Building, Twelfth and McGee infection vaccine (ovine); navel-illSrvets, Kansas City, Mo. mixed vaccine equineo); swine-plaguevaccine.122 Apr. 2 .do. Antogcnou vaccine; mixed-infectionvaccin( bo ine); mixed-infection vac-ciln (su 1.

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1919.] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 37REQUIREMENTS FOR LABELING VETERINARY BIOLOGICS.Establishments manufacturing tuberculin under a United States veterinary licenseshould cause trade labels used on packages or containers of this product to show theamount of Koch's old tuberculin (0. T.) contained in each cubic centimeter of theproduct as marketed. This shall appear in substantially the following form: "1 c. c.equals 0.2 gram Koch's old tuberculin.' Further, such labels shall bear recom-mendations regarding the minimum dose to be administered, which dose shall be notless than the equivalent of 0.5 gram of Koch's old tuberculin. Thus if the productas marketed contains 0.1 gram Koch's old tuberculin per cubic centimeter, not lessthan 5 cubic centimeters should be recommended as a dose for testing cattle. Untillabels can be procured in conformity with this requirement the amount of Koch'sold tuberculin contained in each cubic centimeter should be stamped upon approvedlabels, in the form set forth above.Trade labels affixed to, or used in connection with, containers of veterinary biological products when feasible should bear the formula used in manufacturing theproduct involved; i. e., the organisms or antigens used should be indicated. Whensuch products are composed of organisms in suspension the approximate number ofeach organism contained in a cubic centimeter of the product as marketed should als'be indicated. All trade label, of sufficient size shall bear appropriate instructions, stating for what disease or condition and in what manner the product should be used.If these instructions must he too brief for clearness, a reference should be made on thelabel as to whei-e full instructions may be found, e. g., "Directions inclosed " will besatisfactory. The provisions of this paragraph will not apply to present stocks ofapproved labels.TEXAS-FEVER QUARANTINE-PLACES TO WHICH SOUTHERN CATTLEMAY BE SHIPPED FOR IMMEDIATE SLAUGHTER.The following changes have been made in the list published in Service and Regu-latory Announcements for June, 1918, of places to which southern cattle may beshipped for immediate slaughter under State and Federal permission.Permission Withdrawn.KANSAS: Pillsburg, Hull & Dillon Packing Co.ILLINOIS: Cairo, E. Bucher Packing Co.CHANGE IN DESIGNATION OF OFFICE OF HOG-CHOLERA CONTROL.Effective April 16, 1919, the designation of the Office of Hog-Cholera Control waschanged to Division of Hog-Cholera Control, with Dr. U. G. Houck as chief, viceDr. 0. B. Hess, who has resigned to take service with a serum company.NOTICE TO THOSE IN CHARGE OF FIELD STATIONS.Persons in charge of field stations are directed to indicate the character of theirwork in communications addressed to the bureau, as, Inspector in Charge, M. I.;Inspector in Charge, H. C.; Inspector in Charge, V. S. and T., etc.

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38 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [April,PERMITTED DIPS FOR CATTLE AND SHEEP.The following is a revised list of the proprietary dips with the dilutions permittedfor use in the official dipping of cattle and sheep for scahies, in accordance with pro-visions of B. A. I. Order 245.QuanQuantity of water.Name of dip. tity ofdip. Cattle. Sheep.Limc-uulphur dips for cattle and shcep for scabies.Gallons. Gallons. Gallons.The Adams Lime and Sulphur Dip. 1 15 20kThe Anchor Brand Lime and Sulphur Dip. 1 13 171Armstrong's Lime and Sulphur Pip ..1 121 17Devoe Lime and Sulphur Solution. 1 142 20Dow Lime-Sulphur Solution. 1 14 20Eckman's Lime-Sulphur Solution. 1 15 201Crasselli Lime-Sulphur Soluion. 1 15 20tLatimer's Lime-Sulphur Solution. 1 141 20Lilly's Lime and Sulphur Solution. 1 133 18)National Lime and Sulphur Pip. 1 5 7Niagara Lime and Sulphur Solution. 1 14 19Orchard Brand Limne and Sulphur Solution. 1 15 20tRox Lime and Sulphur Solution. . .1 15 201Richard's Lime and Sulphur Dip. I o1 131Sherwin-Williams Lime-Sulphur Solution. 1 13 171Sherwin-Williams No. 15 Cattle Dip. 1 15 201Union Lime and Sulphur Solution. .t .141 19AUpon Honor Lime-Sulphur Wash. 1 12:I 17Ortho Sprays Lime-Sulphur Solution. 1 14 20Cooper's Lime-and-Sulph-ur Dip. 1 15 20MSpringdalo Brand Lime-Sulfur Solution. 1 15 20jLariat Cattle Dip. 1 15 204Nicotin dipjs fvr (
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1919.1 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 39Twenty-Eight-Hour Law.Philadelphia & Reading Railway Co. (20 cases, $1800 fines and '77.90 cots.Wabash Railway Co. (4 cases), $100 fines and $:13.55 costs.Southern Railway Co., $100 fine and p18. 15 costs.Baltimore &: Ohio Railroad Co. (4 cases), $300 fines and $11.56 costs.Chicago, Burlington & Q)uincy Railroad Co. '(4asI s $c00 fines and $19.7,_ cods.Colorado & Southern Railway Co. (3 casos), $300 ines and $17.70 costs. New York Central Railroad Co., $OO fine and $13.20 costs.Yazoo & Mississippi Valley Railroad Co., Delta Division (3 cases), S200 lines and$53.70 costs. Kansas City Southern Railway Co., $100 fine and $IS.5 costs.American Express Co. $100 fine and $1S5.80 casts.NEW SCHEDULE OF RATIONS FOR LIVE STOCK IN INTERSTATE TRANS-PORTATION.At the time of the recent annual conference of the American National Live StockAssociation at Denver, Colo., department officials conferred with representatives ofthe American National Live Stock Association, National Live Stock Shippers Pro-tective Lea gue, National Live Stock Exchange, Packers Traffic Committee, and theRailroad Administration, concerning the proper minimum rations to be fed live stockunloaded for feed, water, and rest under the provisions of the Twenty-eight-hourLaw.The recommendations of the conference committee have been approved by theSecretary and have been incorporated in the following letter, issued from his officeunder date of April 23, setting forth the department's views as to the minimum require-ments of the law:THE FEEDING, WATERING, AND RESTING OF LIVE STOCK IN COURSE OF INTERSTATETRANSPORTATION.In order to avoid the difficulties experienced by transportation companies, shippers,and others, in computing the amounts of feed which should be given to animals whilein the course of interstate transportation, the Bureau of Animal Industry, in con-nection with the enforcement of the Twenty-eight-Hour Law (34 Stat., 607), hasgiven further consideration to the feeding, watering, and resting of cattle. sheep,swine, and other animals, and has determined that the use of a carload as a unit basis,rather than the hundredweight of animal, is a more satisfactory method for arrivingat the amount of feed which should be given to the animals.As a result, the conclusion has been reached that the handling of animals in ac-cordance with the suggestion outlined below will meet the riew of the Departmentof Agriculure as to the minimum requ irements of the law:FEED REQUIREMENTS.Horses and mules: Not less than 200 pounds of hay, or its equivalent, per car.Cattle: Not less than 200 poUnds of hay, or its equivalent, per car.Sheep or goats: Not less than 100 poiuds of hay, or its equivalent, per deck.Swine: Not less than 2 bushels of shelled corn, or its equivalent in ear corn orother grain, per single-deck car of not more than 17,000 pounds weight: not lessthan 21 bushels of shelled corn, or its equivalent in ear corn or other grain, perdouble-deck car of not more than 21,000 pounds weight.Carload lots of hogs in excess of these weights should be fed an additionalamount in the same proportion. Animals shipped in lots less than a carload should be fed a pro rata amountbased on the above figures.

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40 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [April,Calves too young to eat hay or grain and shipped alone should be given asufficient amount of some suitable feed, such as milk or raw eggs.The rations above indicated are to be given each time the animals are fed tocomply with the provisions of the law.UNLOADING.The only practicable methods for railroads to transport animals, other than hogs,without unloading during each period prescribed by the statute for rest, water, andfeeding, are in "palace" or similar stock cars and with emigrant outfits. There arecases in which exceptional facilities complying with the law make unloading unnecessary; for instance, specially equipped cars conveying show animals and blooded stock. In such cases care should be taken to observe the law. In all cases, if animalsare not unloaded, sufficient space to permit all the animals to lie down in the cars atthe same time must be provided.Hogs may be fed, watered, and rested without unloading, provided (a) the cars areloaded so as to allow all the animals to have sufficient space to lie down at the sametime, (b) the trains are stopped for sufficient time to allow the watering troughs to beprepared and to allow every hog time to drink his fill, and (c) care is exercised to dis-tribute properly through each car deck sufficient shelled corn, or its equivalent inear corn or other grain, for each hog.UNLOADING PENS.All pens into which animals are unloaded must contain adequate facilities forfeeding and watering and suitable space on which the animals can lie down com-fortably for resting. Covered pens should be provided for unloading animals in severeweather.This letter to supersede the letter of the department dated May 31, 1913, on thissubject.STATUS OF TICK ERADICATION IN VARIOUS STATES, FEBRUARY, 1919.Dipped during Amount ofmonth. infection. Square B.A.I. State County VatsState. mile nspecinspecinspecavail-en tors. tors. tors. able.Herds. Cattle. Herds. Cattle. boing -Alabama. 11,887 114,775 19 500 35,439 17 22 98 5,651Arkansas.7 478 1 100 16,245 20 . .1,658Florida. 218 27,724 158 27,479 50,032 18 41 23 1,023Georgia. 1,864 17, 629 11 456 27,668 27 19 42 2, 444Louisiana. . . .45,164 40 2 59 4,479Mississippi. 5,513 57,002 24 122 34, 08 20 7 39 5,531North Carolina. . .2 20 8,802 12 . .383Oklahoma. 242 11,142 2 50 27,115 14 9 6 1,005South Carolina. 10 373 4 68 15,811 23 . .791Texas (Fort Worth). 1,016 57,486 74 14,719 61,681 35 25 43 2,967Texas (Houston). 890 50,832 350 13,868 37,459 16 1 5 978Total. 21,647 337,441 645 57,382 359,504 242 126 315 26,910

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919.] SERVICES AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 41SUMMARY OF TUBERCULOSIS-ERADICATION WORK IN COOPERATIONWITH THE VARIOUS STATES, MA.RCT, 1919.St
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42 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [April,rendering and approving such vouchers in favor of firms and corporations are directedto see that the vouchers are stated in the name of the firm or corporation instead ofthe agent or manager thereof.When any firm or corporation has once rendered a bill against the department, payment of which has been made on Form 5 voucher, all future bills in favor of thatparticular firm or corporation should be stated in exactly the same name.STREET-CAR FARES FOR EMPLOYEES RECEIVING PER DIEM ALLOW-ANCE IN LIEU OF SUBSISTENCE.Under date of March 29, 1919, the Comptroller of the Treasury rendered a decisionconcerning street-car fares incurred by employees who receive a per diem allowancein lieu of reimbursement for subsistence. The effect of this decision is to modifymaterially the instructions from the Auditor for the State and Other Departmentswhich were printed on page 8 of Service and Regulatory Announcements for January,1919.Under the above-mentioned decision the comptroller makes a clcar distinctionbetween street-car fares expended by employees in going from hotels to various placesof official business and return, while making their hotels or other temporary places ofabode their headquarters, and street-car fares expended in going from such temporaryheadquarters to a certain place regularly every day and return therefrom to theirhotels or other temporary places of abode. In the former cases the car fares may beallowed, but in the latter cases such fares are not reimbursable.In order that the bureau, as well as the Auditor for the State and Other Departments,may determine to which of these two classes charges for street-car fares pertain, itwill be necessary for employees to indicate in their accounts in connection witheach and every charge therefor the points between which the street cars were used,the name of the individual or firm, the building or business house, and the streetaddress visited; also that the trip was on investigational, statistics, regulatory, orinspection work, etc., as the case may be, for example as follows:"January 8, street-car fares, hotel to Bond Building and return, investigationalwork, 10 cents. January 9, street-car fares, hotel to John Smith and Company, 1222Girard Avenue, and return, regulatory work, 10 cents."Employees who receive a per diem allowance in lieu of reimbursement for sub-sistence should study these instructions carefully in order that they may have a clearunderstanding of them. It is es-ential that there be a strict compliance therewithso as to obviate suspensions, further correspondence, and delay in the settlement oftheir travel accounts.TRANSPORTATION REQUESTS TO BE USED ONLY ON STRICTLY OFFI-CIAL BUSINESS.Recently the bureau's attention has been called to instances in which employeeshave used Government transportation requests for travel, the cost of which was to beborne by private concerns and individuals, or for combined official and personaltravel in connection with trips where employees deviated from the direct route orstopped over en route for personal reasons and thereby incurred transportation and Pullman expense in excess of what would have been :ncurred had there been nodeviation or stop-over. Such use of transportation requests is prohibited.Employees of the bureau therefore will be guided in the future by the followinginstructions:1. Under no circumstances may a transportation request be used for travel onpersonal or private business. (See paragraph 89, Fiscal Regulations, Dec. 1, 1917.)

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191.J SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 432. When an employee begins a trip whi(h he knows will involve personal Iravel,li myv use a transportation request for so much thereof as relates to Governmentbusiness, but he must pay cash fare, pls rar tax, for any part of the trip which relat'ito pt'tieriJal or private businels.3. Vhen an employee performs Iravel of a semioflicial at ure, such as coopeatlivework where the expense's will ibe paid by a pri ate individual or irm, he should paycash fare, plus the war ian req ired.4. Under the interna-revenue iaw a 'ar tax of4 par cont is re quired for transporta-tion and 10 per cent for Pullman or other than si t'ic ly' ofilcial business of the Cover-ment. This tax must be paid at the time the lickeI i, purcha ed :til when thetraveler fails to pay h e is liable to a penahlyv mpod iundr the law. The practiceof the bureau heretofore has been to advise Qmploy(is of thP a ;ount of war tax thathas been evaded and request a remittance cuverinsame to 1-e c tit the InernalRevenue Collector. This practice will be discontinuet I with the issue ance of theseinstrucrionvS, leaving on employees liability to penalizifat isn for the evasion of pay-ment of the war tax.5. liureau employees who may have occaion to travel should familiarize them-selvc3 vnith these instructions and see to it t hat thire 1sa t1its omplin, Iaherewith.Failure to observe these instructions may result in the entire iwer bing disallowedfrom the reimbursement account of t h*e employee e 1 n0)nedMUTILATION OF BUREAU PAD Lfi'KS.The Yale padlocks uod 1hiouott bur'1) u tro f rvi' are 4 nigh grade and there-fore should re-ist for a ria inabk' time all irdinay w-ar. An examitntation of lockreturned for pairs indicate' th! man'y have b'.n p'w.ned by force applied to theshackle and that the cyl inder pln_ of 'th rs have e'n pulled out O' ithirwisdamaged. The7'e (n'ditiots have oxist'd (JfOr a iun t' without aiy action lookingto a rodnciion in the nunrber of loks -so iaaged. A.,i tniumber of locks used isincreasIng, tth above (fnditia .ald ti the an'tion of all having custoiyof thes' padlocks;Ilerafter. when stocks that have b)(elt forced ort that rhow evideno of what maybe considered mi-usi are ri uriid to the bureau, oxplanal ion as to manner or canseof damage must Ib' slat ali Oni Form P-a covering, sutwh liks. All oem uployees aninst rutted to handle bureau padl'ocks with care, as their pur hase and mtaintenaiw'repreent a considerable cXpiense to iltl' bureau.PUBLICATIONS IN APRIL.[Thei bire tm keepis no mniltn; list f-Sr Seniilg iiibii(cati1ns ts individiual emnplvees but publjeat iOni-i: 1 sent ta bulk to oflilers in ch rge for di-Aribalion to nemibers of either for>'o. Toe number of copiesseilt varieswillithe subject or n attire of the pub it tea and t" nrunmher and c-lass of omptoyet'. Officersin charge will use tShoi jidgmeit and diiribto lIt-tion tie;! &d'anta e. Su fur as possibleadditional copies will b furnished on roptegt-Department Bulletin 701. A wopa ri-i o i itO atrat vS for Fattoocing Stee-'r inlthe South. By W. F". Ward and S. .Jirdati, Aaiimal iluoandrv !)ivisiou, andE. R. Lloyd, Director of Mississippi Experiment Statiou. Pp. Ni.Department Bulletin 767. Oak-l .oaf Poi inin of D one-tic Aninals. By C.Dwight Marsh, A. B. _T'aw'seoi, an iHad leigh Mar-h, Vat h :iolical Divi-ion. Pp. 36,fig's. 19.Farmers' lullcdn Ib3 F edin; lio . By U. A. 1ll and J. (. \Vill"Ams,Animal lusbandry !%ivP-ion. i'p. 21.

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44 BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY. [April,Farmers' Bulletin 1040. Illustrated Poultry Primer. By Harry M. Lamon andJos. Wim. Kinghorne, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 28, figs. 53.Yearbook Separate 765. How Dairying Built up a Community. By J. C. McDowell,Dairy Division. Pp. 18, pl. 4.Yearbook Separate 773. Live Stock and Reconstruction. By George M. Rommel,Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 16.Yearbook Separate 777. Less Cholera-More Hogs. By 0. B. Hess, Office of Hog-Cholera Control. Pp. 6, pl. 2.Yearbook Separate 778. Better Poultry Through Community Breeding Associa-tions. By J. W. Kinghorne, Animal Husbandry Division. Pp. 8, pl. 4.Yearbook Separate 782. The Accredited-Herd Plan in Tuberculosis Eradication.By J. A. Kiernan, Tuberculosis Eradication Division. Pp. 8, pl. 2.Yearbook Separate 783. Some Results of Federal Quarantine Against ForeignLive-Stock Diseases. By G. W. Pope, Quarantine Division. Pp. 10, pl. 2.Yearbook Separate 787. The Rediscovery of an Old Dish. By Herbert P. Davis,Dairy Division. Pp. 10, pl. 1.Delicious Products of the Dairy. (Revised.) By J. C. McDowell, Dairy Division.Pp. 12, figs. 7.Meat Extracts, Their Composition and Identification. By Robert R. henley andJames A. Emery, Biochemic Division. In Journal of Agricultural Research, Vol.XVII, No. 1, April 15, 1919. A-47, P. 1-17.ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY.Chicf: JoHN R. MoHLER.Assistant Chief: B. 11. RAWL.Chief Clerk: CHARLES C. CARROLL.Editor: D. S. BuRca.Animal lusbandry Die ision: G EoiwE M. RoMM EL, chief.Biochemtic DiVision: NI. DoRsET, chief.Dairyq Dit ision: B. H. RAwL, (cief.Field inspection Dirision: A. W. MILLER, chief.Meat Inspection Driision: R. P. STEDDOM, chief. Miscellaneous Division: A. M. FARINGTON, Chief.Pathological Division: JOHN S. BUCKLEY, chief.Quarant in Dicision: RICHARD W. hICKMAN, chief.Tick Eradication Division: R. A. RANSAY, Chif.Tuberculosis Eradication Dii.sion: J. A. KIERNAN, chief.Zoological Division: B. H-. RANSOM, chief.E:pcrimeant Station: E. C. SCHROEDER, superintendent.Division of H[og-Cholera Control: U. G. hloucK, chief.Office of Virus-Scrum Control: D. I. SKIDMORE, acting in charge.Office of Accounts: E. J. NEWMYER in charge.Appointment Section: GEORGE II. RUSSELL in charge.

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DIVERSITY OF FLORIDA3 1262 08850 3833To Meet a Rainy Day and Enjoy a Sunny OpportunitySAVEADDITIONAL COPIES.OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE PROCURED FROMTHE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTSGOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICEWASIIINGTON, D. C.AT5 CENTS PER COPYSUBSCRIPTION PRICE, 50 CENTS PER YEARWASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1911


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