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Multiple representations of concept formation

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Multiple representations of concept formation
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Turner, Carl W
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vi, 115 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.

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Cognitive psychology ( jstor )
Conceptualization ( jstor )
Experimental psychology ( jstor )
Experimentation ( jstor )
Grammar ( jstor )
Learning ( jstor )
Memory ( jstor )
Psychology ( jstor )
Regression analysis ( jstor )
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Concepts ( lcsh )
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Thesis:
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Florida, 1993.
Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 108-114).
General Note:
Typescript.
General Note:
Vita.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Carl W. Turner.

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Copyright [name of dissertation author]. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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MULTIPLE REPRESENTATIONS OF CONCEPT FORMATION


By

CARL W. TURNER III



















A DISSERTATION PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


1993


L
















ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I wish to express my gratitude to the members of my

dissertation committee: Howard Beck, Jeff Farrar, Richard

Griggs, C. Michael Levy, and particularly to my advisor Ira

Fischler.

I am also deeply grateful to Don Dulany and Russ

Poldrack at the University of Illinois for sharing with me

computer programs used to validate the statistical analysis

of Experiment la, and for their patient explanations about

the fine points of this analysis.

Thanks go to Heather Howes and Hollie Altman for data

collection in Experiments 2 and 3.

My deepest appreciation goes to my wife Krista Thoren,

for her emotional and material support during my time as a

graduate student.

















TABLE OF CONTENTS

page
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS............................... .......... ii

ABSTRACT............................................... v

CHAPTERS

1 INTRODUCTION................................. 1

Prototype versus Exemplar Theories........... 2
Implicit versus Explicit Learning............ 2

2 EXPERIMENT 1A.......................... ....... 7

Method....................................... 14
Results ..................................... 17
Discussion .................................. 22
Notes........................................ 27

3 EXPERIMENT 1B................................. 28

Method....................................... 31
Results ..................................... 33
Discussion ................................... 35
Note......................................... 41

4 EXPERIMENT 2................................. 42

Method....................................... 48
Results ..................................... 52
Discussion................................... 56
Note .......................................... 60

5 EXPERIMENT 3................................... 61

Method....................................... 71
Results ..................................... 75
Discussion................................... 81
Notes ....................................... 85


iii










6 GENERAL DISCUSSION ........... ............... 86

What is Abstraction?......................... 87
Abstract Structure or Abstract Analogy?...... 91
Two Approaches to Process Dissociation........ 94
Conclusion................................... 97

APPENDICES

A CALCULATIONS OF MEAN RULE VALIDITY........... 99

B LETTER STRINGS USED IN EXP. 1................. 101

C LETTER STRINGS USED IN EXP. 2................. 102

D QUESTIONNAIRE: EXPERIMENT 2.................. 103

E LETTER STRINGS USED IN EXP. 3................. 105

F LETTER PAIRS USED IN EXP. 3.................. 107

REFERENCES............................................. 108

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH....................... ............. 115
















Abstract of Dissertation Presented to the Graduate School
of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the
Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

MULTIPLE REPRESENTATIONS OF CONCEPT FORMATION

By

Carl W. Turner III

August 1993

Chairperson: Dr. Ira Fischler
Major Department: Psychology


This study addressed the current debate over the

relative contributions of recognition memory for category

members and abstract knowledge of category structure in

classification behavior. Three experiments were conducted

using the familiar artificial grammar paradigm in which

subjects study rule-ordered letter strings, then make

classification judgments of novel letter strings. The

experiments, and supporting computer simulations, supported

the existence of abstract knowledge in human concept

learning. In Experiment 1, subjects classified test items

and reported the item fragments that led to their judgments;

the experiment replicated an earlier study in which the

computed rule validities of reported item fragments closely

followed the subjects' percentage of correct judgments. A

computer program that simulated simple recognition and

report of item fragments in the same task showed that the










correspondence between the two measures could be accounted

for by separate computations for feature recognition and

item classification. In Experiment 2, modification of the

report procedure failed to alter the close correspondence

between the computed rules validities and percentage correct

judgments, demonstrating the difficulty of dissociating

recognition and classification measures in this task. In

Experiment 3, subjects participated in one of four groups

based on letter set (same or different) and display type

(strings or pairs). The experiment included two "no-

transfer" trial blocks and a third, "transfer" trial block,

in which the test items were constructed of an unfamiliar,

unstudied letter set. Subjects in the different-letter-set

condition studied novel letter sets in each trial block;

those in the same-letter-set condition saw a novel letter

set only in the transfer test phase. In the pairs

condition, letters were paired for display during study,

rather than in a typical whole-item strings display. The

different-strings group outperformed the other three groups

in both the no-transfer and transfer tests, demonstrating

the importance of variable stimuli and whole items during

study for developing an abstract representation of the test

domain. The research argues for the importance of knowledge

of structure both across and within items in the formation

of concepts.


L
















CHAPTER 1

INTRODUCTION

The ability of humans to acquire concepts forms the

basis of intelligent action. The world's objects and

activities could be assigned to categories in an infinite

number of ways, presenting humans with a bewildering amount

of information. Only a subset is learned; the knowledge of

those categories we find useful and necessary is mentally

represented as concepts. Concepts allow us to go beyond the

information given, to make generalizations, and to apply old

knowledge to new situations. "Without concepts, mental life

would be chaotic" (Smith & Medin, 1981, p.l).

As in other healthy domains of psychological inquiry,

there are many issues in concept formation and

categorization still unresolved. Discussions of concept

formation are often framed in terms of competing theories;

frequently, the question asked is "Given some behavioral

data, which of two (or more) theories best accounts of the

data?" One such pair of competing theories is the prototype

and exemplar theories. These theories are better described

as classes of theories, or perspectives. Another

controversy in the literature of concept formation pits

theories of implicit learning and tacit knowledge against

conventional theories of concept formation, referred to here









as explicit theories. The present research considers the

problem of explaining concept formation from each of these

competing views, and attempts to reconcile different

approaches rather than confirm or disconfirm any single

theory.

Prototype Versus Exemplar Theories

A popular and well-researched issue in the literature

of concept formation deals with the distinction between

prototype theories and exemplar-based theories. According

to prototype theories, concepts are formed through

observation and induction of category members, and exist as

abstract knowledge, distinct from explicit memory for

individual members (Hayes-Roth & Hayes-Roth, 1977; Posner &

Keele, 1970; Rosch & Mervis, 1975). Exemplar theories hold

that concepts depend only on explicitly remembered category

members (Medin & Schaffer, 1978; Nosofsky, 1986; Smith &

Medin, 1981). Any fair account of the issue acknowledges

the difficulty of distinguishing between prototype and

exemplar-based theories, and some suggest that both

processes may be at work (Allen & Brooks, 1991; Malt, 1989;

McAndrews & Moscovitch, 1985).

Implicit Versus Explicit Learning

Implicit learning has been described as an automatic,

effortless process that results in knowledge that is

abstract, powerful, and unavailable to conscious awareness

(Reber, 1989). According to this hypothesis, implicit

knowledge is characterized by the following features: (a)









automatic, or passive acquisition of the structure of

complex stimuli; (b) independence from explicit knowledge,

available for use in making judgments but not available to

conscious awareness; and (c) abstract knowledge, independent

from memory for specific episodes or stimuli. This theory

in support of a fully cognitive unconscious is contrasted

with theories that explain all categorization behavior,

judgment, and decision making as purely conscious, fully

rational processes (Dulany, 1991).

The issue of the form of knowledge created during

concept formation has emerged again in the debate on

implicit knowledge (Dulany, Carlson, & Dewey, 1984; Reber,

Allen, & Regan, 1985). Broadly stated, we see in this

debate many of the concerns raised in the discussions over

prototype versus exemplar theories. What is the form of

knowledge? Is it possible to dissociate procedural

knowledge and verbal awareness in the performance of some

task? What constitutes explicit knowledge of contingencies

in some stimulus domain? The present research attempted to

reconcile some of the findings in implicit learning and

tacit knowledge with some of the larger issues in concept

formation.

Studies of concept formation frequently rely on

artificial stimuli. The instrument used in all of the

experiments presented here is the artificial grammar task.

In a typical artificial grammar experiment, subjects study

lines of letters that are ordered by a set of predetermined










rules. In a subsequent test phase, subjects must classify

novel lines of letters as well-formed (those believed to

follow the rules) or ill-formed (those believed to violate

the rules). The process by which humans categorize

unfamiliar objects--whether artificial stimuli or natural

objects--forms the basis of continued research in learning,

memory, and concept formation.

If viewed as a special case in the larger issues over

concept formation, the artificial grammar tasks can provide

an important contribution to theories of knowledge

representation. Likewise, some of the viewpoints generated

in the concept formation and categorization literature may

shed light on the controversy over implicit learning. This

research attempts to place the artificial grammar studies

within the context of some unresolved arguments over

prototype/exemplar theories of concept formation, and argues

for the existence of separate facilities for computing

classification decisions and recognition memory.

The results of four experiments are presented. Three

experiments involved human subjects making classification

judgments in artificial grammar tasks; one involved a

computer simulation of an information processing model of

the task. Experiment la replicated an earlier artificial

grammar study which purported to show that subjects' verbal

reports could fully account for their classification

judgments of letter strings (Dulany et al., 1984).

Experiment la also provided a set of data upon which a


I






5


computational model was developed of recognition and

reporting in the task. Experiment lb reports the details of

the model and describes the outcome of a computer

simulation.

Experiment 2 modified the design of Experiment la in an

effort to uncover dissociations between verbal report and

classification performance. The experiment also compared

the differences between two groups of observation learners

and one group which learned the task as an explicit test for

memory of logical rules. The lack of success in finding a

dissociation between classification performance and two

verbal report measures is discussed both in terms of

experimental methodology and directions for future research.

Experiment 3 included a novel transfer task in which

subjects made classification judgments of letter strings

created from sets of letters that did not appear during

study. The experiment demonstrated that classification

judgments could be made in the absence of explicit

recognition memory of studied items; the test items in this

case shared no surface features with the studied items.

The results were offered in support of the hypothesis that

subjects were abstracting the underlying structure of the

stimuli both within and across studied items and using

knowledge of that structure to correctly classify the novel

test items. The results also showed, contrary to some

previous research, the advantage of variable, whole-item

stimuli during study on the ability to classify novel test






6



items. The discussion of this experiment centers on the

importance of abstract knowledge of structure in concept

formation and is tied to the issue of separate processes for

classification and recognition of exemplars.
















CHAPTER 2

EXPERIMENT 1A

The arguments over the existence of implicit knowledge

in artificial grammar tasks are well known. Typically,

subjects studied strings of letters ordered by an artificial

grammar (see Figure 1).1 In a subsequent test phase, they

were asked to discriminate between well-formed (grammatical)

letter strings and ill-formed (nongrammatical) letter

strings based on their experience with the items seen during

the initial study phase (Reber, 1967, 1976; Reber & Allen,

1978; Reber, Kassin, Lewis, & Cantor, 1980). Implicit

learning, it is claimed, occurs automatically and results in

abstract knowledge (Reber, 1989). In artificial grammar

tasks, this abstract knowledge takes the form of unconscious

grammatical "rules" that can be accessed to classify novel

stimuli. The most contentious of the claims for implicit

knowledge is the assertion that subjects are able to make

better-than-chance classifications of these complex stimuli

without being able to verbally justify the reasons for their

judgments.

Dulany, Carlson, and Dewey (1984) addressed this issue

of classification and verbal awareness in the artificial

grammar tasks. In a study based on Reber (1976) and Reber

and Allen (1978), subjects justified their classification


j





8










T

S S3
M

SO X R S5


S2 S4






Figure 1. A representation of the finite-state grammar used
to generate the grammatical letter strings.










judgments by marking on their scoresheets a fragment of the

test item that made the item correct or incorrect. Each

item fragment, they argued, constituted a conscious "rule"

used by the subject to make a judgment. Each of these

reported "rules" was associated with a computable "cue

validity" based on their occurrence in the set of test

items.2 A regression analysis of the mean rule validities

and proportion correct judgments for 50 subjects yielded an

intercept of .01 and a slope of .99. Thus, mean rule

validity "predicted" the percent correct judgments for a

large sample of subjects. In their view, classification

judgments were not the result of nonconscious knowledge of

grammatical rules, as Reber had insisted; they resulted from

imperfectly learned rules, fully available to conscious

awareness (Dulany et al., 1984).

These reported "rules" are somewhat different in

character than the logical rules that order the letters, as

represented by Figure 1: they represent combinations of

letters that occur together within letter strings. Previous

research had shown that the knowledge acquired from the

observation of rule-ordered strings is qualitatively

different from that gained by explicit knowledge of the

logical rules used to order the letter strings (Turner &

Fischler, 1993). Experiment 2 in the present study

introduced a training manipulation which contrasted learning

by observation with explicit memory for logical rules.

Therefore, in order to prevent misunderstanding, reported










item fragments will henceforth be referred to as featural

rules, in contrast with the knowledge of logical rules.

Might the same data have come from subjects correctly

classifying strings, then randomly marking combinations of

letters within the test items (Reber et al., 1985)? It was

hypothesized that subjects simply making random reports

after classification judgments would produce the same

outcome described in Dulany et al. (1984). To test this

hypothesis Reber et al. (1985) generated judgments and

featural rule reports for 15 simulated "subjects" and found

that the results followed closely those of Dulany et al.

Regression analysis yielded a line with a unit slope (slope

= .96, intercept = .06, r = .82). Reber et al. suggested

that subjects were merely guessing when asked to justify

their judgments, and concluded that the close association of

computed rule validity and percent correct was an artifact,

produced by the constraints of the experimental design.3

Dulany, Carlson, and Dewey (1985), in reply, rejected

this methodological criticism, insisting that the act of

identifying and providing featural rules relied on recall

and verbal knowledge. They offered their own computer

simulation of guessed rule reports. Using the data from 50

simulated subjects, rule reports were randomly generated for

each of 100 trials. The total set of 50 subjects was

simulated 100 times in this fashion. Based on this

extensive simulation, "overall mean validity of guessed

rules did progressively underpredict our subjects'










proportions correct judgments (slope = 1.65, intercept = -

.38), and all 100 simulations yielded slopes greater than

one and intercepts less than zero" (p. 27). These data

showed that producing rule reports in this task was not a

purely random process.

Clearly, the conclusion that classification judgments

cannot be made without verbal awareness depends on two

assumptions: (a) the instrument measures what it claims to

measure, and (b) the close relationship between

classifications and rule validities is not preordained by

the design of the experiment. If either of these two

assumptions is not satisfied then the interpretation is

invalid. This raises the issue of the appropriateness of

the analysis used in these studies: the regression analysis

on classifications and computed rule validities.

The interpretation of this study has implications that

go beyond a simple critique of the growing list of

artificial grammar experiments. Its conclusions touch

issues not only of classification and verbal awareness, but

of recognition memory, representation of knowledge, and the

status of consciousness in human psychology. Dulany et al.

(1984) have been widely cited as evidence that all

classification behavior is verbalizable (Ericsson & Simon,

1984; Perruchet & Pacteau, 1990). To date, this argument

has served as powerful evidence against the implicit

knowledge hypothesis. Before rejecting the notion of

implicit knowledge in artificial grammar tasks, therefore,










it may be worthwhile to examine this study again and ask if

its conclusions are fully warranted.

The present study reexamined the relationship between

classification and reports in one version of the artificial

grammar task. Experiment la attempted to replicate the

findings of Dulany et al. (1984). Experiments la and lb

describe the outcome of several computer simulations and

consider them in terms of the discrepancy found between the

simulations reported by Reber et al. (1985) and Dulany et

al. (1985). A model was developed for generating reports in

this task and is discussed in the context of reinterpreting

the results reported by Dulany et al. (1984, 1985).

The purpose of this experiment was twofold: first, to

attempt to replicate, as nearly possible, the important

experimental results and simulation results of Dulany et al.

(1984, 1985) and second, to provide a set of data upon which

a model of featural rule reporting in this task could later

be developed. It was hypothesized that the methods of

Dulany et al. were sound and that the results were

replicable. It was expected that subjects would be able to

correctly classify test items at a rate equal to or

approaching those reported by Dulany et al. (1984).

Likewise, the instruction manipulation (memory versus rule-

discovery instructions) should follow Dulany et al. (1984)

and have no effect on classification judgments and no effect

in the relationship between classification performance and

the mean validities of featural rules. It was also expected









that the lengths of featural rule reports by subjects would

follow the same as those in Dulany et al., in which the

reports of items judged grammatical were longer than items

judged nongrammatical, and increased with item length.

Two simulations of guessed rule reporting were

conducted to check the accuracy of the algorithm and the

methods used in Dulany et al. (1985). The first simulation

used a set of 50 simulated subjects in which classification

judgments were generated by the experimenter.

In pilot testing this experiment it was found that

human subjects regarded some of the items in the test sets

as compellingly grammatical or nongrammatical; that is, they

classified some items the same way at a rate of 80% or

higher. The use of "simulated" subjects, in which correct

judgments for each string are generated by a simple

probability function, fails to account for this phenomenon.

To provide a contrast with the simulated subject group, the

second simulation used the actual judgment data generated by

the human subjects who participated in the artificial

grammar experiment.

Both simulations of guessed reporting were compared to

the results published by Dulany et al. (1985) with respect

to the slope and intercept of the regression analysis and to

the correlation between judgments and rule validities. It

was hypothesized, following Dulany et al., that mean rule

validities would progressively underpredict percent correct

classification judgments.










Method

Subjects

The subjects were 43 undergraduates at the University

of Florida who participated as part of a requirement for an

introductory psychology class. The data from 10 other

subjects were discarded: seven for marking single items as

both grammatical and nongrammatical, one for making no

judgment on over 10 items, and two for inattention during

the study phase. Subjects were tested in groups of 8 to 13;

22 participated in the "memory" condition, and 21 in the

"rule discovery" condition.

Procedure

The procedure for the experiment follows closely that

conducted by Dulany et al. (1984). The finite-state grammar

used to generate the grammatical letter strings is seen in

Figure 1. The letter strings used during the study and test

phases are shown in Appendix B. Nongrammatical strings were

created by including invalid letters or reordering letters

within grammatical strings; nongrammatical strings are

underlined at the point of violation. During the study

phase, subjects viewed for 10 minutes 20 grammatical letter

strings projected on a screen using an overhead projector.

The entire set of 20 grammatical items was viewed

simultaneously. This corresponded to the "all" condition in

Dulany et al. (1984) in which subjects saw the entire set of

grammatical study items on one screen.4










Subjects in the memory condition were instructed as

follows:

This is a simple memory experiment. You will see items
made of the letters M, R, T, V, and X. The items will
run from three to six letters in length. You will see
a set of 20 items. Your task is to learn and remember
as much as possible about all 20 items. (Dulany et
al., 1984, p. 544)

To subjects in the rule discovery condition, it was stressed

that:

The order of letters in each item of the set you are
about to see is determined by a rather complex set of
rules. The rules allow only certain letters to follow
other letters. Since the task involves memorization of
a large number of complex strings of letters, it will
be to your advantage if you can figure out what the
rules are, which letters may follow other letters, and
which ones may not. Such knowledge will certainly help
you in learning and remembering the items. (Dulany et
al., p. 544)

The test phase consisted of 100 letter strings printed on

four pages. The 25 grammatical and 25 nongrammatical letter

strings were randomly ordered and printed on the first two

pages; the same letter strings were reordered and printed on

the next two pages. All subjects were instructed in the

test phase as follows:

The order of letters in each item of the set you saw
was determined by a rather complex set of rules. The
rules allow only certain letters to follow other
letters. About half of the lines of letters on your
answer sheets follow the rules used to generate the
lines of letters you saw earlier, and about half of
them violate the rules in some way. For every item,
you have to do two things. One, you have to decide
whether or not the line of letters follows the rules,
and then you have to justify your decision.

The procedure for making a judgment was demonstrated by the

experimenter. The letters KZK were written on a chalkboard.










The experimenter underlined or crossed out a portion of the

sample item to illustrate the procedure for making a

response. It was stressed that each item should contain

only one type of mark, and that a mark should be made for

each item.

Simulation of Featural Rule Reporting

There were two simulation runs performed. For the

first run, 50 simulated subjects were created by generating

100 classification judgments for each subject (recall that

there were 50 letter strings in the test set, and each was

judged twice). The distribution of percent correct

judgments for the group was created by estimating the

percent correct for each of the 50 experimental subjects

reported in Dulany et al. (1984, p. 547). The percent

correct judgments (M = 64.4%, SD = 7.0%) of these 50

simulated subjects followed closely the classification

performance of the subjects in Dulany et al.

For the second run, the classification data from the 43

human subjects were used. For both simulation runs, the

procedure was the same. For each of 100 trials, for each

subject, the program randomly generated a report length

ranging from 2 to the number of letters in the letter

string, then randomly generated the starting position of the

report in the string, constrained only by the length of the

report. Thus, there were 100 rule reports associated with

100 letter strings for each subject in both the "simulated"

subjects group and the "real" subjects group. The program










was coded from the random-guessing algorithm published by

Dulany and Carlson (1985).5

Results

Judgments and Conditions

The mean percentage of correct classification judgments

for the 43 subjects in the present study was 63.4%, compared

to 64.9% for the experimental group in Dulany et al. (1984).

The rule discovery group (M = 66.8%, SD = 8.1%) scored

higher than the memory group (M = 60.3%, SD = 8.7%), F(l,

41) = 6.67, p < .05. Most of the subjects had better-than-

chance performance as indicated by a score of 60% or higher:

18 out of 21 subjects in the rule-discovery group and 11 out

of 22 in the memory group.

Table 1 shows the mean lengths of featural rule reports

calculated for subjects' grammatical and nongrammatical

responses. The data were analyzed in a 2 x 2 x 2

(Instruction x Response x String length) ANOVA. As

expected, subjects marked more letters per report for their

grammatical responses than nongrammatical responses, F(1,

41) = 47.0. The length of reports also increased with

String length, F(1, 41) = 84.4. Response interacted with

String length, F(1, 41) = 14.4. All effects were p < .0001.












Table 1

Mean number of letters reported per featural rule as a
function of response and string length.

---------------------------------------------.


String length

-------------------------------------

Response 3 4 5 6

-------------------------------------------


Memory group

Grammatical 2.7 3.0 3.4 4.0

Nongrammatical 2.2 2.3 2.7 2.9

-------------------------------------------

Rule discovery group

Grammatical 2.7 3.2 3.6 4.3

Nongrammatical 1.9 1.9 2.1 2.3

-------------------------------------------


Combined

Grammatical 2.7 3.1 3.5 4.1

Nongrammatical 2.0 2.1 2.4 2.6

---------------------------------------------




There was no effect of Instruction on report lengths,

F(1, 41) < 1.0, but the analysis revealed an Instruction x

Response interaction, F(1, 41) = 4.47, p < .05. Except for

this interaction, and the unexpected effect of Instruction

on judgments, the results appeared to be comparable to

Dulany et al. (1984).










Rules and Judgments

Figure 2 displays the scatter plot of calculated mean

rule validities and percent correct judgments. Using the G3

computation, mean rule validity was .647 (the details for

computing mean rule validities are in Appendix A). The

regression equation yielded a slope of 1.09 and an intercept

of -0.07, r = .95. The regression line was not significantly

different from the unit slope, t(41) = 1.62, R > .10.

Simulation of featural rule reporting

For the "simulated" subject group, the overall mean

rule validity was .60, as compared to 64.4% correct

judgments. Mean validity underpredicted mean percent

correct judgments (slope = 1.24, intercept = -0.1). The

regression line was significantly greater than the unit

slope, t(48) = 2.29, p < .05. Thus, the nature of the test

set of items was such that randomly generated item fragments

had a high (approximately .60) level of predictive validity.

However, randomly generated items still underpredicted

percent correct judgments. Notably, the correlation was r =

.86, which was as high as the correlation reported for the

experimental groups in Dulany et al. (1984).

















100


90 Rule

- 80 Memory
o 80-









40
S70









0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1
Mean Rule Validity

Figure 2. Scatter plot of percent correct judgments and
mean rule validities of "real" rule reports for each of 43
subjects in Experiment la.
40 -------------





subjects in Experiment la.

















100


90


0 80



L..
o0 o





40 _
70 (ge



50 -

40
40 ------------
0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1
Mean Rule Validity

Figure 3. Scatter plot of percent correct judgments and
mean rule validities of randomly generated rule reports for
each of 43 subjects in Experiment la.









For the "real" subject group, in which random featural

reports were generated for each of 43 real subjects'

judgments, mean rule validity was .586, compared to 63.4%

judgments. Mean validity underpredicted mean percent

correct judgments (slope = 1.3, intercept = -0.12). The

intercept of the regression line was significantly less than

zero, t(41) = -2.54, p < .05; the slope was greater than the

unit slope, t(41) = 3.55, p < .001. The correlation (r =

.92) was higher than that reported by Dulany et al. (1984).

See Figure 3.

Discussion

The experiment replicated in large measure the

experiment carried out by Dulany et al. (1984). The results

closely followed, in terms of length of reported featural

rules and the relation of mean rule validities and percent

correct. The only unexpected finding was that the rule-

discovery group outperformed the memory group in the

classification task. Previous research had shown that

subjects instructed simply to memorize letter strings during

the learning phase sometimes scored higher on the

classification task than those informed of the rules

underlying the letter strings (Reber, 1976; Reber & Allen,

1978). It has been pointed out that this particular version

of the artificial grammar task is somewhat different than

previous versions of the task (Reber et al., 1985).

However, a number of studies have failed to replicate the

original "instructional set" effect for classification









judgments; the instruction manipulation seems rather weak

(Dienes, Broadbent, & Berry, 1991; Millward, 1980; Reber et

al., 1980, Experiment 2).

Both of the simulations conducted also supported the

results of the simulation reported by Dulany et al. (1985).

Purely random guessing of rules did not account for the

relationship between judgments and reported rules, at least

for subjects who learned from having viewed the letter

strings during the study phase. The methods of Dulany et

al. (1984, 1985) appear to be sound, and the basic findings

replicable.

As previously stated, however, the aim of this study

was not to question the data presented by Dulany et al., but

to question their interpretation of performance of the task.

Therefore, it is worthwhile to review some of the

alternative interpretations offered to explain the process

by which subjects' decisions are made in making their

classification judgments.

It has been argued that rule reports are measuring

verbal awareness in the task, and that this verbal awareness

leads causally to classification judgments: judgments arise

from consciously identified rules that are represented by

the featural rules reported for each judgment (Dulany et

al., 1984). In support of this position, Dulany et al.

considered but rejected three alternative explanations:

1. The featural rules were guessed after the

classification judgments were made. As independent computer









simulations have shown, pure guessing cannot account for the

relationship between mean rule validity and percent correct.

It seems unlikely, in any case, that subjects would be

unable to recognize frequently occurring letter bigrams and

trigrams. Indeed, subjects frequently are able to recall

salient bigrams and trigrams in post-experimental interviews

(Reber & Allen, 1978).

2. The featural rules emerged from an unconscious

representation of the stimuli, a "conscious reconstruction

of some aspect of a nonconscious grammar" (Dulany et al.,

1984, p. 553). This was suggested as a possible

interpretation, but its likelihood not explored, nor was any

support for the position cited.

3. Classification judgments and reported featural rules

exist as independent knowledge. This is essentially the

position of Reber and others who support an abstractive view

of the knowledge acquired in this task (Reber, 1976; Reber

et al., 1985). "The reported rules are learned in parallel

with the unconscious grammar and then are recalled as cued

by the string at hand" (p. 553). The first problem with

this account, according to Dulany et al., is the absence of

"linking assumptions, which is to say a description of a

process that would strongly relate assumed amounts of

unconscious grammatical learning to the observed mean

validities of reports" (p. 553). A second problem invokes

an appeal to parsimony: it is easier to explain the effect

of validities and correct judgments as one of conscious










control, rather than as separate systems apparently doing

the same thing.

The relationship of classification and recognition

measures figures prominently in larger issues of concept

formation, as in the debate over prototype versus exemplar

theories. Dissociations between classification and

recognition are cited as support for prototype theories, a

variety of a separate-systems theory (e.g., Hayes-Roth &

Hayes-Roth, 1977). However, the same data cited in support

of prototype theories were found to be consistent with

single-system exemplar models, supposing that classification

and recognition were computed separately (Nosofsky, 1988).

It was suggested that the differences in classification and

recognition measure found in some tasks were the result of

different "decision rules" used in each process. In this

view, classification involved a comparison between a target

category and a contrast category, whereas recognition may be

determined by overall summed similarity of a probe to all

exemplars stored in memory. "Thus, classification and

recognition may often be based on common representational

substrates, but different decision rules may underlie

performance in each task." (Nosofsky, 1988, p. 707). This

analysis supports a single-system exemplar view of

classification behavior as opposed to a separate-systems

view (e.g., Reber, 1989), but preserves the notion that

classification and recognition are computed separately.










The reporting technique used in this experiment may

more properly be thought of as one of recognition, rather

than of verbal awareness (Broadbent, 1991; Reber et al.,

1985). In the analysis of the task by Dulany et al., the

featural rules supplied by subjects during the task tell us

nothing about how the particular item fragment was selected

by the subject, whether other fragments were considered, or

if other item fragments had an effect on the subject's

judgment. However, if we work from the assumption that item

fragments are based on recognition memory, it is possible to

begin to explore schemes for computing the familiarity of

item fragments. Under this assumption, the reporting

technique touted by Dulany et al. as providing a reason for

a classification judgment is seen simply as a cue for the

subject to supply a featural rule based on an item

fragment's perceived familiarity.

The issue of classification versus recognition in this

task must take into account the instrument used in this

version of the artificial grammar task: the relationship

between classification and mean rule validities as revealed

by the regression analysis. The next experiment turns to

the problem of postulated processes, and the "linking

assumptions" that cause classification judgments and rule

validities to follow each other over a large group of

subjects. Put more succinctly, "Is there some more

systematic way that rules might come to track judgments

without controlling them?" (Dulany et al., 1984, p. 553).










Notes

iIn this grammar, each circle (S, Sl, ., S5)
denotes a node and each arrowed line denotes a directed
transition between nodes. Grammatical letter strings are
generated by following a path through the grammar from node
to node from beginning to end. At each transition between
nodes a symbol (M, T, V, X, or R) is generated. For
example, the path represented by So, Sl, S3, S5 produces the
grammatical letter string MVT. The letter string VXX is
nongrammatical: There is no valid path through the grammar
that can generate that sequence of letters.

2Simply put, the validity of a featural rule is a
proportion based on the number of times the featural rule
appears in items of a selected category and the number of
times it appears in all items in all categories. For
example, if MT appears in x grammatical items and y
nongrammatical items then the computed rule validity for
this featural rule is x / (x + y). See Appendix A for
further information.

3Unfortunately, the details of this simulation are no
longer available (Arthur Reber, personal communication).

4The "all" display during study was contrasted with a
display in which study items were viewed individually; there
were no differences found between the "all" and "individual"
groups (Dulany et al., 1984). Thus, there was no particular
benefit to seeing all the study items at the same time in
this particular version of the artificial grammar task.

5The algorithms were in fact slightly different.
Dulany and Carlson's algorithm estimated the lengths of the
featural reports published in Dulany et al. (1984). In the
present study, the report lengths were generated completely
at random.
















CHAPTER 3

EXPERIMENT 1B

For this experiment a model was developed of item

fragment recognition and featural rule report in the

artificial grammar task. The model was instantiated in a

computer program that was written to simulate the process of

producing reports in this task. The outcome of the

simulation was evaluated in terms of the model's

psychological validity.

The model of producing rule reports in the artificial

grammar task began with the assumption that classifications

and reported featural rules are computed independently. It

also was assumed that rule reports involve recognition

processes rather than verbal awareness for the contingencies

behind classification judgments. Following Nosofsky (1988),

the classification of objects involves the comparison of

objects judged to be within the target category (items

judged grammatical) and outside the target category (items

judged nongrammatical). The model developed in this

experiment did not deal explicitly with the processes

involved in making judgments; there already exist a number

of plausible computational accounts of how classifications

are made in artificial grammar tasks, both symbolic (Servan-









Schreiber & Anderson, 1990) and connectionist (Dienes,

1992).

How are the reports produced? After making judgments,

subjects in Experiment la were required to justify their

decisions by marking some portion of a test item. The data

from Experiment la and from Dulany et al. (1984) followed

some reliable trends. Reports of items judged grammatical

were longer than items judged nongrammatical and increased

with the length of the test item. Reports of items judged

nongrammatical averaged about two in length. In this model

of rule reporting, subjects searched items they judged

grammatical for item fragments that appeared familiar; items

that were judged nongrammatical were searched for a pair of

unfamiliar letters. The model also followed the

instructions given to the subjects in the test phase of the

experiment: First, to make a judgment about an item, then

provide a rationale for having made that judgment.

An important feature of the model is the assumption

that subjects did not search items exhaustively and often

failed to find an optimal report. That is, a few item

fragments were randomly considered, and the best (the most

familiar or least familiar) item fragment reported.

Previous research had shown that subjects were fairly

accurate at discriminating between letter bigrams that

appeared in a study phase and new, or unfamiliar, bigrams

(Perruchet & Pacteau, 1990). The same item fragment might

be considered several times; most fragments in an item were










not considered. Furthermore, it was assumed only that

subjects who scored better than chance in classification

judgments had any memory of the study items; subjects who

scored less than chance were assumed to be responding

randomly in producing featural rule reports.

In this model of rule reporting, subjects first

classified an item, then briefly searched the item for

evidence of its grammaticality or nongrammaticality. Items

judged grammatical were searched for item fragments that

appeared familiar; nongrammatical items were searched for

pairs of letters that appear unfamiliar. The familiarity of

an item fragment was based on its summed frequency of

appearance in the set of study items (Nosofsky, 1988). It

is reasonable that subjects should be most familiar with the

items, and therefore the item fragments, that they were

instructed to remember: The items that were viewed for 10

minutes during the study phase of the experiment. The model

incorporated this assumption by computing the familiarity of

an item fragment viewed during the test phase against its

number of occurrences in the study phase. The best item

fragment was reported as a featural rule.

A computer program was written to simulate this model

of featural rule reporting, and was run against the judgment

data from Experiment la. It was hypothesized that the mean

rule validities of featural rules produced by this model

would predict percent correct classification judgments as










accurately as the reports produced by the subjects in

Experiment la.

A fully explicit, exemplar account of classification

and rule reporting in this task starts with the selection of

an item fragment followed by the judgment of the item

(Dulany et al., 1984). In this view, the close association

between the percentage correct judgments and mean rule

validities supports that model. If, however, the same

association could be demonstrated based on separate

computations and separate sources for classification and

rule reports, this would suggest the possibility that

separate processes were used in performance of the task.

Method

The simulation uses the judgment data collected from

the 43 experimental subjects in Experiment la. For each

grammatical or nongrammatical judgment, item fragments are

generated and considered, and a featural report is produced.

Each featural rule can be characterized by a rule length

(from 2 to the maximum number of letters in the item) and

rule position (which specifies the position of the first

letter in the rule).

The familiarity of a item fragment was calculated based

on its frequency in the set of study letter strings. The

item fragment is counted from the rule length and rule

position of all strings in the study set, regardless of the

length of the string. This corresponds to the G2 method of

deciding whether a given featural rule occurs in an item,










and is less constrained than the G3 calculation (Dulany et

al., 1984).1

The individual percent correct for each subject were

calculated. Twenty-nine subjects demonstrated their having

learned to discriminate between grammatical and

nongrammatical test items by scoring 60% correct or higher

during the test phase, a rate better than chance. Fourteen

subjects scored less than 60%, and were assumed not to have

learned to discriminate test items. These 14 subjects were

assumed to simply be responding randomly, both on their

classification judgments and their rule reports.

For the 14 subjects who scored less than 60% correct

judgments, the simulation did not consider the familiarity

of item fragments, but simply reported the first item

fragment generated. This corresponds to random responding

of rule reporting. For the 29 subjects who scored 60% or

more, the following algorithm was used:

1 IF item is Judged Grammatical THEN

2 DO 7 TIMES

3 Randomly generate an item fragment

4 Compute the familiarity of the item fragment

5 IF familiarity > top familiarity score

6 Save item fragment

7 Save top familiarity score

8 LOOP

9 IF item is Judged Nongrammatical THEN

10 DO 7 TIMES









11 Randomly generate an item fragment

12 Compute the familiarity of the item fragment

13 IF familiarity < least familiarity score

14 Save item fragment

15 Save least familiarity score

16 IF familiarity = 0 then EXIT LOOP

17 LOOP

18 Report the saved item fragment as featural rule

Following the model of rule reporting in this task, reports

generated on grammatical trials were between two letters

long and the maximum length of the item. Reports generated

on nongrammatical trials were two letters long.

The number of item fragments available in each item is

given by the formula (n (n + 1)) / 2, where n is the

number of letters in the item. Thus, an item 5 letters long

has (5 (5 + 1)) / 2, or 15 item fragments. Pilot testing

of the simulation showed that 7 iterations of the loop,

although it does not generate and consider all item

fragments in every item, provided a close approximation

between computed mean rule validity and percent correct

judgments.

Results

Figure 4 displays the scatter plot of mean rule

validities and percent correct judgments. Using the G3

computation, mean rule validity was .62. The regression

analysis yielded a slope of 1.04 and an intercept of -.01, r

= .94. The intercept was not significantly different from

















100


90


80


70






40
40
0.4 0.5 0.6
Mean


0 Qo


0.7
Rule


0.8
Validity


0.9


Figure 4. Scatter plot of percent correct judgments and
mean rule validities of simulated "familiar" rule reports
for each of 43 subjects.


I











zero, t(41) = -0.25; the regression line was not

significantly different from the unit slope, t(41) = 0.65.

The mean lengths of featural rule reports were

calculated (see Table 2). As specified in the algorithm,

all nongrammatical reports were two letters long.

Grammatical reports increased with item length, as found in

Experiment la.



Table 2

Mean number of letters reported per featural rule as a
function of response and string length.

------------------------------------------------------

String length

-------------------------------------

Response 3 4 5 6

--------------------------------------------

Grammatical 2.3 2.5 2.9 3.1

Nongrammatical 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

-------------------------------------------------------




Discussion

In assessing the psychological validity of the

algorithm for recognizing item fragments and producing

reports, it is useful to remember what the algorithm did not

do. It did not search exhaustively for familiar or

unfamiliar item fragments. The search was undirected; no

attempt was made to keep track of item fragments which were










generated and considered. The algorithm did not account for

item length in assessing the frequency of fragments;

fragments were counted only from the beginning of all items.

The algorithm was not dynamic in that items viewed during

the test phase were not remembered, and had no effect on the

reported featural rules.

Most importantly, there was no attempt to "scale" the

efficiency of the algorithm within the two sets of subjects.

Subjects who were able to discriminate grammatical from

nongrammatical items at a rate higher than chance ranged

from 60% correct to 85% correct. It might plausibly be

suggested that the subjects at the top end of the scale

learned more of the "correlated grammars" needed to classify

items than those scoring only 60% and might also be more

efficient at recognizing and reporting rules, but the

algorithm made no allowance for this. From an examination

of the scatter plot of Figure 4, there appears to be a

slight tendency for mean rules validities to underpredict

percent correct judgments for a few of the highest scoring

subjects. However, the regression analysis was not

sensitive enough to detect any "progressive"

underprediction. Despite these many limitations, the

simulation was still able to produce featural rules which

closely tracked the judgments made by the experimental

subjects.

Asking subjects to report familiar and unfamiliar

portions of items provides clues to the information that









subjects are using as they are making judgments, but

selection and report of the featural rules themselves, the

basis upon which the present analysis rests, incompletely

specify what the subject knows about an item. As found in

Experiment la, Dulany et al. (1984) found that many

subjects--despite the experimenter's careful instructions--

insisted on reporting more than one item fragment. Subjects

also tended to mark part of an item "grammatical" and

another part "nongrammatical." This could be interpreted as

the subject's way of telling the experimenter "I believe

this item to be both well-formed and not well-formed." A

more likely explanation would be that the subject first

classified the item, but found a portion of the item

familiar and a portion unfamiliar, and reported each.

As an instrument for detecting dissociations between

classifications and recognition, the regression analysis

reveals little more than the fact that reports are not made

at random. The correlation coefficient is equally

uninformative. It was noted that correlations between

randomly generated rules and percent correct were as high or

higher than those reported for real subjects; why would the

correlation between rule validity and judgments decrease as

subjects learn the task and produce "nonrandom" reports?

Dulany explains this as nothing more than sampling error.

If this were the case then real data would reliably show

correlations higher than those for randomly generated data.










If it is assumed that computations were made

independently for classification and recognition of item

fragments (upon which the featural rule reports were based),

then it suggests one possible interpretation for the

relatively low correlation coefficient found among subjects

who participated in the study phase of the experiments.

Data points above the unit slope, in which mean rule

validity underpredicts percent correct judgments, represent

good classification performance and poorer explicit

recognition of item fragments. Points below the unit slope,

where mean rule validity overpredicts percent correct,

represent good recognition, and poorer classification

performance based perhaps on poor integration. To the

extent that there are differences between classification and

explicit recognition of the test items, some subjects may

tend to demonstrate superior classification performance of

test items, some will show superior recognition of study

items, and the correlation between the two measures will go

down.

The main issue deals with the question of the

instrument's sensitivity to the hypothesized difference

between classification and reported rules. The magnitude of

the difference between randomly generated rule reports and

those provided by experimental subjects is quite small.

That is why a crude recognition algorithm, such as that used

in this model, can "cover the distance" between randomly

generated reports and subjects' report data: there's very










little distance to cover. Although the instrument may, with

modification, be useful in detecting dissociations between

classification and explicit recognition, the presence or

absence of the effect is nondiagnostic for the issue over

classifications and verbal awareness in the artificial

grammar task. Given this particular task, where the stimuli

are arranged such that explicit recognition and

classification follow each other closely, it is difficult to

find a set of conditions where the outcome is not

preordained.

Is there some way that featural rules might come to

track judgments without controlling them? It has been shown

that, in this particular task, it is hard to come up with a

way of producing reports (short of random guessing) that

will not track judgments. The fact that featural rules

track judgments says as much about the stimuli as the

phenomenon under investigation.

Classification and Recognition

The instrument used in this study does not allow one to

definitively distinguish between two competing hypotheses:

one in which a rule is consciously considered and leads to

classification, or one in which classifications and reported

rules are computed separately (Dulany et al., 1984). The

aim of this study was relate the artificial grammar

experiments to larger issues of concept formation and

recognition, and to demonstrate that the hypothesis of










separate computations is (at least) as likely as one of

fully conscious control.

In subjects with unimpaired memories, measures for

classification and explicit recognition are inevitably

confounded (Turner & Fischler, 1993). Evidence for separate

computation of classification and recognition has come from

work with amnesic patients. In one study involving

artificial grammars, amnesic subjects performed as well as

normals in a classification task, but were impaired on a

test of letter string recognition (Knowlton, Ramus, &

Squire, 1992). Simply put, classification and recognition

involved separate, but co-occurring, computations.

The Role of Simulation

The simulation reported in Experiment lb did not

"prove" the hypothesis of separate computations in the

artificial grammar task. Rather, it demonstrated the

feasibility of separate computations. Rule reports

generated by a simple algorithm on one set of items (the

study items) were matched to judgments made by subjects on a

separate set of items (the test items). The reporting

measure, computed independently of the judgments, followed

the judgments as closely as any produced by real subjects.

As a tool for research, the simulation will allow one

to generate testable hypotheses and predictions for

performance in experimental follow-ups. The model predicts,

for example, that subjects would be able to take test

scoresheets on which are printed randomly generated










classifications and mark familiar and unfamiliar item

fragments for each, with the same results as described in

Experiment lb.

Importantly, the simulations in both experiments gave

insight into the structure of the instrument that is not

readily apparent. The random reports generated in

Experiment la and in Dulany et al. (1985), when compared

with real subjects' data, showed clearly how close the

"ceiling" and the "floor" are in this task. Simulating the

experiment also suggests ways in which this instrument can

be modified to detect dissociations between classification

and explicit recognition.

Note
1For a discussion of the relative merits of the G2 versus
the G3 calculations for rule validity, see Appendix A.















CHAPTER 4

EXPERIMENT 2

In building a case for the independence of implicit and

explicit knowledge, Reber (1976) cited the fact that

subjects in his experiments were unable to explain the basis

for their classification judgments. It was claimed that

memory-instructed subjects made judgments in an intuitive,

"wholistic" fashion, implying that the rule-discovery

subjects made their judgments consciously and deliberately.

However, no data on verbal reports were presented to

indicate that these rule-discovery subjects, presumably

possessed of a base of knowledge that was verbally

accessible, were making verbalizable judgments. In fact,

little data have been presented in the artificial grammar

tasks that demonstrates different modes of processing based

on intention to learn (Brody, 1989).

More importantly, there has been little evidence from

the artificial grammar experiments for difference levels of

verbal behavior based on some variable, such as intention to

learn. To the extent that verbal knowledge does not

accurately predict one's performance on a given task, there

is said to be independence, or "dissociation" between

explicit knowledge and implicit, tacit knowledge. Such

dissociations have been found in experiments involving the










control of so-called complex systems (Berry & Broadbent,

1984, 1986; Hayes & Broadbent, 1988). However, the effect

is subtle, and demonstrating dissociations based on verbal

report in these complex system tasks is the subject of much

dispute (Dulany, 1991; Sanderson, 1989).

The case for independent processes depends on two

points: differences between groups in verbal report and

differences in task performance. Berry and Broadbent (1984)

examined the relationship between performance on a cognitive

task and the explicit, or reportable, knowledge associated

with that performance. Subjects controlled a complex

computer-simulated system by supplying input in the form of

integers and observing the resulting output. The output was

based on the following formula:

0 = ((I x 2) 01 + R)

where o = current output, I = input, 01 = the previous

output, and R = either -1, 0, or 1, randomly selected.1

Thus, there was no one-to-one mapping from input to output.

The subjects' task was to achieve and maintain a given

output goal. Questionnaires were administered after the

task was completed in order to assess subjects' verbal

knowledge of the behavior of the system, and the rules they

had developed in order to control the system.

In one experiment, practice with the system improved

subjects' ability to control the system, but had no effect

on the ability to answer related questions. In a second

experiment, one group of subjects was given verbal training










prior to the start of the task; a second group simply

performed the task. This verbal training improved subjects'

ability to answer questions but had no effect on control

performance. In a third experiment, verbal instruction

combined with concurrent verbalization led to an improvement

in control scores. Verbalization alone, however, had no

effect on task performance or question answering. Results

such as these show the independent, but related, nature of

implicitly acquired knowledge and verbal (or declarative)

knowledge. "These data allow for stronger conclusions than

are possible on the basis of a simple demonstration that

subjects cannot give an adequate verbal account of their

overt behaviour" (Hayes & Broadbent, 1988, p. 250).

However, much of the work done with artificial grammars

does rely on "simple demonstrations" of subjects' inability

to verbally justify the reasons for their decisions or

solutions to tasks. One of the reasons that Dulany's

criticism is so important is the fact that no one on the

implicit learning "side" has been able to show dissociations

between performance and verbal abilities in groups of

subjects based on a variable, such as type of study or

intention to learn, differences that should exist according

to the implicit learning hypothesis.

Mathews, Buss, Stanley, Blanchard-Fields, Cho, and

Druhan (1989) attempted to dissociate performance and verbal

report in an artificial grammar task. During an initial

learning phase, subjects received memory or rule-discovery










instructions. During the test phase, in what the

researchers called a "teach-aloud" procedure, subjects

provided concurrent verbal descriptions of the rules on

which they based their grammaticality judgments. During

breaks between blocks of trials in the test phase, memory

subjects also were asked to recall grammatical strings, or

string fragments, from the study and test phases.

A third and fourth group of subjects, the "yoked"

groups, did not participate in an experimental study phase,

but made their judgments during a test phase using

transcripts of the memory and rule-discovery subjects'

concurrent verbal protocols. The yoked subjects'

performance on the classification task was better than that

of a control group, but was worse than that of the two

experimental groups. The results showed that the

experimental subjects had some verbal knowledge of the rules

used to order the letter strings, as evidenced by their

ability to relay rules to the yoked groups, but that their

verbal knowledge was incomplete.

Notably, they did not find reporting differences

between the memory and rule-discovery groups, nor

performance differences between the two yoked groups. If

the rule-discovery subjects had better verbal awareness of

the rules by which they made their judgments, this should

have permitted better verbal report on the "teach aloud"

task, and better performance by the subjects yoked to the

rule-discovery group. Thus, Mathews et al. were able to










show that verbal ability lags behind classification

performance in the artificial grammar tasks, but were not

able to fully dissociate performance and verbal awareness

based on intention to learn, as the Broadbent studies had

been able to do. This failure to dissociate judgments and

verbal measures of awareness are a weak point of the

implicit learning research.

The present experiment attempted to find dissociations

between judgments and two measures of memory for study

items: one of recall and one of recognition. In addition to

a recall test of item fragments after the study phase, the

experiment introduced a modified version of the test phase

reporting task from Dulany et al. (1984). The experiment

also included a group of subjects who learned the task as a

set of logical rules. This "rule-training" for logical

rules results in substantially higher performance in

unspeeded test trials, and allows a direct comparison of

rule-discovery and fully explicit learning (Turner &

Fischler, 1993).

The first measure, the recall test, was administered in

the form of a questionnaire at the end of the study phase.

It was hypothesized that rule-discovery subjects, informed

of the nature of the task and fact that the study items were

rule-ordered, would be better able to answer general

questions about the study items than the memory group.

The second measure, the recognition test, was a

modified version of the reporting technique used by Dulany










et al. (1984). In the present Experiment la, it was argued

that the stimuli and design of the experiment were such that

there could be little alternative to the close association

between percent correct judgments and computed mean rule

validities. Because of this, the design of the reporting

measure is inadequate for showing differences between groups

in the ability to recognize and report featural rules. It

is possible, however, that the reporting technique could be

altered in such a way as to permit different levels of

performance of the task.

In particular, there are two features of the technique

that insured a high correlation between percent correct and

mean rule validity and the resulting regression line.

First, nearly every portion of every letter string has

predictive validity in the sense that it occurs more

frequently in one grammatical category than the other.

Second, there are no constraints on the length of allowable

reported item fragments; the longer the reported item

fragment the better the item's predictive validity. Forcing

subjects to be more specific about their reports by

constraining their reports to one or two letters would

introduce more variability into the rule reports and allow

differences in the level of predictive validity of rule

validities. It was hypothesized that rule-discovery

subjects would be better able to recognize item features

that determine the items nongrammaticality.










It was hypothesized that the rule-training group,

having had specific training, would show near-perfect

knowledge of the rules underlying the production of the

letter strings; the regression analysis, however, would not

predict performance as accurately as for the two observation

groups. The comparison of the rule-training group and the

rule-discovery group might also shed light on theories of

explicit processes.

Method

Subjects

Sixty-nine undergraduate college students served as

subjects. The data from three subjects was dropped for

failure to follow instructions. All were voluntary

participants satisfying a requirement for an Introductory

psychology course.

Materials

The materials followed those used by Reber et al.

(1980) and Turner and Fischler (1993). A finite-state

grammar represents the rules employed in the study to

generate the grammatical letter strings; see Figure 5.

Twenty-one letter strings were selected for use in the study

phase. Twenty nongrammatical strings were constructed such

that they each resembled a grammatical string, but contained

one violation of the five logical rules needed to correctly

discriminate grammatical from nongrammatical strings.




49










S

S1 X S3






S2 S4 K
K
T




Figure 5. A representation of the finite-state grammar used
to generate the grammatical letter strings in Experiment 2.










Generating nongrammatical items in this way permitted the

creation of a small set of logical rules that could be

easily memorized by subjects and used to fully discriminate

grammatical from nongrammatical items. The logical rules,

and their associated Rule Numbers, were:

(1) The first letter in a string must be T or P
(2) The last letter must be S or K
(3) The letter pair "P P" cannot appear in a string
(4) If the first letter is T then the next letter must
be X or S.
(5) If the first letter is P then the next letter must
be T or K.

These rules were printed on sheets of paper, in the order

described above, for use by the rule-training groups. All

letter strings are shown in Appendix C; nongrammatical

strings are underlined at the point of violation. The

stimuli were presented and all responses taken on IBM-

compatible PC microcomputers.

Design and Procedure

In the study phase, subjects were assigned to one of

three groups based on type of Training (memory, rule-

discovery, or rule-training). There were 22 subjects in

each group. In the memory condition, subjects were given

the same instructions as the memory group in Experiment la.

For the rule-discovery group, the subjects were read the

following:

The order of letters in each item of the set you are
about to see is determined by a rather complex set of
rules. The rules refer to which letter or letters is
allowed to appear at the beginning or end of a line,
and which letters can appear next to one another. Your
task is to figure out the rules by looking at the lines









of letters. After you have looked at the lines of
letters, I'm going to ask you to name the rules.

In the rule-training condition, subjects learned the set of

logical rules necessary to make correct grammaticality

judgments.

For the two observation groups (memory and rule-

discovery), three grammatical strings were displayed in each

of seven frames. Each frame was displayed on the screen for

30 seconds after which the screen went blank. The set of

seven frames was presented again, for a total viewing time

of 7 minutes. Letter strings of similar appearance were

distributed across frames, to avoid introducing structure

that would make the grammar "salient." For the rule-

training group, the learning phase was presented as a test

of memory for logical rules. Subjects were given a sheet of

paper with the rules printed on it and asked to study the

rules. After studying the rules, they were verbally quizzed

on the rules until they could repeat them perfectly.

After the study phase all subjects received a written

questionnaire to assess their explicit knowledge of the

rules. For the rule-training subjects the multiple-choice

test was based on the rules they had studied during the

study phase. For the subjects in the observation groups,

the questions asked for memory of letters in the initial

position, last position, letters that appeared as doubles,

and initial letter pairs. The questionnaires appear in

Appendix D.










In the test phase, the memory group learned that the

letter strings were ordered by a set of rules. All subjects

made classification judgments of novel letter strings

presented one at a time on the computer screen. In the

first half of the test phase subjects were shown 40 letter

strings in random order for classification judgments. The

same 40 strings were reordered and presented again.

After each classification judgment, digits appeared

beneath each letter in the string corresponding to the

position of the letter in the string (e.g., beneath the item

"P T K P S" would appear the digits "1 2 3 4 5"). Subjects

were required to enter a pair of contiguous digits to

indicate the reason for their judgment. If in judging a

string "grammatical," a subject could indicate that the

first two letters appeared familiar or appropriate by

entering the digits "1" and "2." Subjects might also enter

the same digit twice, to indicate an interest in a single

letter in a particular position. This is the equivalent of

Dulany's paper-and-pencil procedure of underlining portions

of letter strings. The computer accepted no input other

than digits that appeared on the screen and were equal or

contiguous to each other, thus eliminating missing or

ambiguous data.

Results

Memory Group vs. Rule-Discovery Group

The first analysis compared the classification

performance and reporting measures of the two observation










groups. There was no difference in mean percent correct

judgments between the memory group (M = 59.7%, SD = 4.2%)

and rule-discovery group (M = 60.5%, SD = 6.6%), F(1, 42)

0.26, p > .6. The fact that the two groups scored somewhat

lower than the groups in Experiment la could be due to the

change in the stimuli used in this experiment; the strings

were longer on average, and the nongrammatical strings were

created by substituting a single impermissible letter in

place of a letter in a grammatical letter string.

Mean Rule Validity Analysis. For subjects in the two

observation groups, Figure 6 displays the scatter plot of

mean rule validities and percent correct judgments. Using

the "G3" computation, mean rule validity for the memory

group was .577. A regression analysis yielded a line with a

slope of .97 and intercept of .04, r = .67. The computed

slope was no different than the unit slope, t(1) = -0.14, p

> .8; the intercept was not significantly different from

zero, t(l) = .28, p > .7.

The mean rule validity for the rule-discovery group was

.585. The regression analysis produced a line with a slope

of 1.09 and intercept of -0.04, r = .74. The slope was not

significantly different from the unit slope, t(1) = .43, E >

.6; the intercept was not significantly different from zero,

t(1) = -.28, p > .7.


















100


90 Memory

Rule Discovery
80


70

60



50


40
0.4 0.5 0.6
Mean


0.7 0.8 0.9
Rule Validity


Figure 6. Scatter plot of percent correct judgments and
mean rule validities for observation groups in Experiment 2.


C










Questionnaire Analysis. Subjects' explicit knowledge

of the rules used to order the letter strings could best be

described as "fair." None of the subjects in the

observation groups correctly identified all 5 rules without

error. Two subjects in each of the memory and rule-

discovery groups correctly included all 12 letters related

to the rules but incorrectly included others. In the memory

group, subjects correctly identified, on average, 8.8 of the

letters related to the rules and incorrectly included 5.7

letters. The rule-discovery group subjects correctly

included 8.7 letters related to the rules and incorrectly

included 7.2.

Observation Groups vs. Rule-Training Group

The next analysis compared the classification

performance and reporting measures of the two observation

groups with those of the rule-training subjects. As

expected, the rule-training subjects were significantly

better at the classification task (M = 85.6%, SD = 15.8%)

than the observation groups (M = 60.1%, SD = 5.5%), F(1, 64)

= 93.4, p < .0001.

Mean rule validity analysis. For subjects in the two

observation groups the combined mean rule validity was .581.

A regression analysis yielded a line with a slope of 1.06

and intercept of -0.01, r = .72. The computed slope was no

different than the unit slope, t(l) = -0.36, p > .7; the

intercept was not significantly different from zero, t(1) =

-0.14, P > .8.










The mean rule validity for the rule-training group was

.76. The regression analysis produced a line with a slope

of 1.38 and intercept of -0.19, r = .72. The slope was

significantly different from the unit slope, t(1) = 3.15, p

< .01; the intercept was marginally different from zero,

t(l) = -2.06, p < .06.

Questionnaire analysis. Fifteen of the 22 subjects in

the rule-training group correctly identified all 5 rules.

Four subjects included all 12 letters related to the rules

but incorrectly included others. On average, rule-training

subjects correctly identified 11.7 of the letters and

incorrectly included only 0.3 letters.

Discussion

As expected, there were no differences in percent

correct classification judgments between the two observation

groups. The critical findings in this experiment were the

lack of effects between observation groups in both the

recognition reporting task and the recall test. In

contrast with the predicted outcome, the rule-discovery

group was no more successful at inducing and reporting

important rules in the post-study phase questionnaire than

the memory subjects. Recall that the rule-discovery

subjects were specifically informed that the rules used to

order the letter strings dealt with positions of letters

within strings and the appearance of certain letters next to

other letters. Perhaps their failure to correctly induce

many of the possible rules was due to the large number of










hypotheses that could have been generated and tested.

Follow-up studies to detect dissociations between verbal

reports and classifications would include taking verbal

protocols during the study phase for these subjects to

discover what kinds of hypotheses they entertain (e.g.,

Mathews et al., 1989).

There was also no difference between observation groups

in computed mean rule validities and the slopes generated by

the regression analyses. While the mean rule validities in

each case slightly underpredicted the percent correct

classification judgments, there was no difference between

the groups and no effect on the slope of the regression

line. This failure to produce any progressive

underprediction by mean rule validities of percent correct

provides more evidence of the "robustness" of the effect

discussed in Experiments la and Ib: more research needs to

be done before the task can be used to dissociate

recognition and classification.

The so-called "instructional set" effect has been

difficult to replicate (Dienes, Broadbent, & Berry, 1991;

Mathews et al., 1989; Millward, 1980; Reber et al., 1980,

Experiment 2). The lack of a consistent, predictable

outcome speaks directly to the issue of using instructions

to evoke a particular learning set. It is difficult to know

what subjects are doing as they observe the stimuli.

Subjects under rule-discovery instructions may be working

under erroneous, biased, inefficient strategies, or abandon










the search for rules entirely (Lewicki, Hill, & Sasaki,

1989). Those under memory-based instructions may realize,

however imperfectly, the rule-ordered nature of the letter

strings. This may explain the many "no effect" studies in

the implicit learning literature. In light of this and

other failures to replicate Reber (1976), discussed earlier,

it should be concluded that the "instructional set" effect

is not very useful for exploring dissociations between

classifications and verbal awareness, at least in unspeeded

test trials (cf. Turner & Fischler, 1993).

The difference in percent correct judgments between the

observation groups and the rule-training subjects was

expected, and essentially replicates Turner and Fischler

(1993). Of interest in this study are the differences in

the two reporting tasks.

It is no surprise that the subjects in the rule-

training group, who studied the logical rules prior to

taking the questionnaire, were able to complete the

questionnaire so easily. In contrast with the observation

groups, the regression analysis of the rule-training group

revealed a substantial difference between the regression

line and the unit slope. However, little can be made of

this outcome. The rule reporting technique permitted

subjects, many of whom scored 100% correct on the judgment

task, to report featural rules (such as the first letter of

a line) that had only moderate predictive validity. This

simple characteristic of the reporting technique reduced the









close association between percentage correct and mean rule

validities. As an instrument for predicting the

classification performance of subjects who learn the set of

logical rules, the regression analysis turned out not to be

appropriate.

It is claimed that "implicitly" instructed subjects in

the artificial grammar tasks make judgments in an

"intuitive" fashion, whereas "explicitly" instructed

subjects make judgments consciously and deliberately. Yet,

for all the research done on implicit learning in these

tasks, there has been no demonstration that explicitly

instructed subjects can verbally articulate anything more

than implicitly instructed subjects. A compelling

demonstration of independence between classification and the

ability to verbally justify classification judgments in

artificial grammar tasks has yet to appear (Dulany, 1991).

If the issue of interest is one of verbal awareness, then it

is contingent upon the implicit knowledge "side" to develop

adequate measures of verbal ability.

The failure in this experiment to dissociate report and

classification performance based on the instructions

variable motivates the search for a design in which

classification performance cannot be explained so easily by

the recognition of member features. It has been suggested

that the artificial grammar task may simply be unsuitable

for demonstrating dissociations between verbal performance

and classification judgments (Broadbent, FitzGerald, &









Broadbent, 1986). "If one is trying to show the less common

kind of discrepancy, improving verbal knowledge without a

change in the quality of decision, then from the armchair

the more academic tasks of concept and language learning do

not seem very suitable. One can hardly imaging that a

person who can define a concept would nevertheless be unable

to pick out instances of it ." (p. 35). The challenge

is to find a set of conditions that do demonstrate the

phenomena of interest, and to introduce these methods into

the artificial grammar tasks. The next experiment includes

a classification test of "transfer" that is not easily

explained by recourse to simple recognition of item

features.

Note

1Although little was made of the fact by the authors,
the equation is a nonlinear, dynamical equation, in which
the output of one trial, or iteration, depends on the output
of the previous trial. Interest in humans' ability to learn
nonlinear sequences is a fairly recent phenomenon (cf.
Neuringer & Voss, 1993).
















CHAPTER 5

EXPERIMENT 3

Categories and category memberships are based on

similarity between and within category members. A single

word, "similarity," disguises the very difficult question of

what it means for an object to be "like" another object, in

the sense that the two may be treated as members of a single

category; many theories of similarity assume that members

can be treated as points in coordinate space (Tversky,

1977). Many theories of categorization begin with some

discussion of features and the relations between features of

category members, and the rules for weighing the relative

contributions of each. A large number of detailed,

computational accounts have been proposed to explain human

categorization behavior; all can account for behavior in

some particular domain, but all suffer in comparison to

their competitors when shifted from their domain of interest

(see Estes, 1986, for a review). There is still much work

to be done on the acquisition of knowledge in simple domains

as used here, for despite the effort that has gone into this

work, scientists have reached no consensus with regard to

categories and concepts (Medin, 1989).

The issue over the representation of knowledge in the

artificial grammar task shares with other concept formation










tasks a substantial lack of agreement. Dulany et al. (1984,

1985) and Reber et al. (1985) described subjects' knowledge

of the relations between features as one of "correlated

grammars": Incomplete, often inaccurate knowledge of bigrams

and trigrams within letter strings. Still unresolved is

whether this knowledge is conscious and explicit or whether

it is abstract, and unavailable to conscious awareness. The

precise form of the knowledge acquired in the artificial

grammar tasks has become one of renewed interest, due

primarily to a series of experiments by Perruchet and

Pacteau (1990) and Mathews et al. (1989).

Perruchet and Pacteau (1990), in a series of artificial

grammar experiments, set out to demonstrate that performance

in these tasks can be explained as nothing more than

explicitly remembered letter pairs, or bigrams. They

extended the Dulany et al. (1984) study by modifying the

learning phase of the artificial grammar task. They also

addressed the issue of the underlying form of the knowledge

acquired in the task.

In their Experiment 1, subjects who studied a set of

permissible bigrams performed as well in a classification

test phase as subjects who studied complete letter strings.

In Experiment 2, subjects made judgments of letter strings

whose ill-formed strings contained violations consisting of

invalid bigrams or of valid bigrams in nonpermissible

locations. Judgments of strings composed of invalid bigrams

was accurate; valid bigrams in nonpermissible locations was










extremely poor. The results indicated that memory for

pairwise features was the critical factor in the task.

In Experiment 3, subjects took a recognition test of

bigrams presented during a study phase; there was no

difference between rule-discovery and memory groups. The

bigrams and their collected recognition scores formed the

basis of a simple simulated model of grammaticality

judgments. Test items presented in Experiments 1 and 2 were

judged ungrammatical if they contained an unfamiliar (low

recognition score) bigram; otherwise they were judged

grammatical. The judgment data from this simulation seemed

to follow the data collected from human subjects in

Experiments 1 and 2. Perruchet and Pacteau concluded that

there was no need to posit knowledge of the structure

underlying the formation of valid letter strings; explicit,

fragmentary knowledge of valid letter strings accounted

fully for classification performance.

The experiments by Perruchet and Pacteau suffered from

some methodological problems that limit their usefulness

(Reber, 1990). Some of the data collected in the first two

experiments were eliminated based on some questionable

posthoc analyses: They deleted test items that were

nongrammatical based on impermissible first letters in order

to make the results conform to the outcome of their

simulation in Experiment 3. Also, the decision rule used in

the simulation to decide if a bigram was unfamiliar appeared

arbitrary and of questionable validity (Reber, 1990).










In these experiments, Perruchet and Pacteau were able

to show that abstract knowledge of the set of items was not

necessary for above-chance classification performance in a

typical artificial grammar task. However, the

classification task does not measure all of the information

a subject might have acquired during the study of

grammatical letter strings. Humans are opportunistic

problem solvers in the sense that they take advantage of the

information at hand to solve a given problem. For the tasks

designed by Perruchet and Pacteau, it is entirely reasonable

to view classification judgments as the result of remembered

bigrams. Turner (1992) simulated classification judgments

of the artificial grammar task using as a knowledge base

only a small set of letters in valid positions and letter

bigrams; the simulation performed as well as the best human

subjects (80% correct). This would seem to support the

simulation carried out by Perruchet and Pacteau.

However, to say that subjects can perform a task or

solve a problem in a particular way does not preclude the

existence of other approaches. Given the proper testing

procedure, the study of grammatical, whole-item letter

strings should produce an advantage in classification (or

decision time, or some other dependent measure) when

compared to study of rule-ordered letter pairs. Such an

outcome would demonstrate that there is more learned in the

artificial grammar task than simple memory of letter pairs.










In the artificial grammar tasks dependent measures such

as anagram solving (Reber & Allen, 1978), concurrent verbal

protocols (Mathews et al., 1989), and reaction times (Turner

& Fischler, 1993) have all been used with success in an

effort to uncover and describe the knowledge acquired by

subjects in these tasks. Perruchet and Pacteau's designs

tested for the explicit recognition of item features, not

for the knowledge of underlying structure across a set of

related items, and they found what they were looking for

(Mathews, 1990). As shown in Experiment Ib, the recognition

of a feature relies on its frequency of occurence in a set

of studied items. The structure of a set of items, as

implied by the grammar used to order the items, describes

the relations between symbols within each item and within

the set of items. A subtle, but more direct, test of the

acquisition and knowledge of structure is the ability to

transfer knowledge from one task to another that is

structurally similar, but superficially different. Such

studies of "transfer" in artificial grammar tasks have been

used to test subjects' knowledge of the structure of the

stimulus domain, rather than for their explicit recognition

of features.

Reber (1969) tested subjects' ability to memorize and

reproduce letter strings ordered by a finite-state grammar.

In a subsequent transfer phase, subjects in the "symbols"

group reproduced letter strings with the same grammar but

different letters. Subjects in the "syntax" group










reproduced letter strings with the same letters ordered by a

different grammar. The "syntax" group showed more

impairment in the memory task than the "symbols" group.

Reber claimed that subjects were learning the structure of

the stimuli rather than groups of explicit symbols.

A similar effect was demonstrated in a classification

task. Mathews et al. (1989) showed that subjects can

transfer knowledge of an artificial grammar from one set of

letters to another set of letters in a classification task,

though imperfectly. Subjects were assigned to one of four

groups based on instructions (memory or rule-discovery) and

letter-set (same or different). In what the researchers

called a "teach-aloud" procedure, subjects in the rule-

discovery groups provided concurrent verbal descriptions of

the rules by which they selected strings in a multiple

choice design. Feedback was given as to the correctness of

the judgments. During breaks between blocks of trials in

the test phase, the memory groups also were asked to recall

grammatical strings, or portions of strings from the study

and test phases.

The experiment was conducted in 4 sessions over a

period of 4 weeks. The same-letter-set groups studied and

tested on the same set of letters throughout the first three

sessions; in Week 4 (the transfer condition) subjects made

discrimination judgments of items composed of a new,

unfamiliar letter set. The different-letter-set groups

studied and tested on different sets of letters over the










first three sessions, then transferred to a new test letter

set in Week 4. The main finding was that performance as

measured by selection of grammatical strings was

significantly higher for all subjects in Week 4 than a group

of no-study control subjects, who scored no better than

chance. The Week 4 transfer manipulation demonstrated that

subjects were not simply recognizing previously studied

bigrams; they were making classification judgments of items

constructed of letter sets they had never seen.

These results showed more than explicit recognition of

letter pairs; they demonstrated the ability of subjects to

apply knowledge of structure to new stimuli and new

situations. The data also suggested that subjects

integrated knowledge of structure across strings.

Commenting on the design of the study phases in Perruchet

and Pacteau (1990), "If their subjects' knowledge consisted

almost entirely of pairwise associations, it would be

utterly useless in a transfer task using the same grammar

instantiated with an entirely different letter set"

(Mathews, 1990, p. 415).

If subjects can acquire and apply structure from one

domain to another in transfer tasks, under which conditions

will transfer be facilitated? The Mathews et al. (1989)

study raised some interesting questions. Significantly,

there were no differences between groups in the final week

of testing; neither the instructions nor the letter set

manipulations seemed to affect transfer. Perruchet,










Gallego, and Pacteau (1992) pointed to the lack of effect

based on instructions in criticizing the experiment as

evidence for abstractive processing. If the "strong view"

of implicit learning is true, shouldn't memory instructions

produce better performance on the transfer task than rule-

discovery instructions? This is a reasonable critique of

the Mathews et al. study. However, the failure of one

variable, such as instructions to subjects, does not

effectively rebut the notion of abstraction in these

artificial grammar tasks. The weakness of the instructions

manipulation in producing differential effects in these

tasks has already been discussed. Suffice it to say, the

trick in these experiments is to find a set of conditions

which demonstrate an effect, rather than a set of conditions

in which no effect is produced.

The lack of an effect based on the letter set variable

during training is more interesting. This result was

interpreted by Mathews et al. as evidence for "automatic

abstraction;" the acquisition of structure occurs at the

same rate no matter what the surface features of the

stimuli. Thus, the different letter sets were no more

effective in training subjects for the transfer task than

repeated exposure to the same letter set. This

interpretation ignored the fact that subjects in the task

had to study far longer than subjects in previous artificial

grammar tasks in order to achieve above-chance levels of

performance in classification tasks: about 30 minutes over 4










sessions compared with about 7 minutes in the typical

artificial grammar experiment. If abstraction were indeed

automatic then Mathews subjects should have reached

asymptotic performance in 7 minutes (or less).

This interpretation also does not touch on an

interesting feature of the reported data. In fact, the

same-letter-set groups improved substantially in the

discrimination task from Weeks 1 to 3, but fell

substantially during the transfer manipulation (Week 4).

The different-letter-set groups, in contrast, performed more

poorly than the same-letter-set groups: They improved only

slightly from Weeks 1 to 3, but continued to improve on the

transfer task, performing up to the level of the same-

letter-set groups. This apparent interaction between letter

set and Week number was not tested, however, and Mathews et

al. maintained that there were no differences between the

letter-set groups.

The issue of letter sets and the abstraction of

knowledge in artificial grammar tasks follows a similar

issue in earlier studies in pattern recognition, namely, the

importance of the variability of study items in classifying

novel items. Posner and Keele (1968) tested two groups of

subjects classifying novel dot patterns; subjects who

studied items that were closely similar to a computed

prototypical pattern were less accurate in classifying novel

patterns than subjects who studied more variable items.

Dukes and Bevan (1967) asked subjects to study faces;










subjects who studied faces of high-similarity were more

accurate in recognizing previously studied faces than a low-

similarity group. The low-similarity group, however, was

more accurate in classifying new faces. The results of

these studies and others on pattern recognition (c.f. Fried

& Holyoak, 1984; Reed, 1972) argue against the automatic

abstraction of structure independent of the features

comprising the study items. In light of past research,

variability in the sets of study items should enhance

classification judgments in artificial grammar transfer

tasks (Brooks & Vokey, 1991).1

There were two objectives to this experiment. The

first objective was to explore the differences in

classification performance between subjects trained on

letters paired for presentation with subjects trained on the

more typical display of grammatical letter strings. The

first part of the experiment replicated Perruchet and

Pacteau's (1990) Experiment 1, which compared subjects in a

pairs-display group with a strings-display group.

Additionally, the present study also extends the work of

Perruchet and Pacteau by including a transfer test phase, in

which subjects made classification judgments of letter

strings generated by the same grammar but with different

letter sets. It was hypothesized that the strings-display

condition would produce better performance than the pairs-

display condition in the initial, no-transfer classification

trials. It was hypothesized further that subjects in the










strings-display condition, having abstracted knowledge of

the structure of the strings, would be able to accurately

classify novel items in the transfer task. Subjects in the

pairs-display condition, having developed no knowledge of

the structure of the grammar across strings, would be unable

to perform the transfer task at a rate better than chance.

The second objective of this experiment was to study

the effects of different letter sets in both the no-transfer

and transfer test trials. Although Mathews et al. (1989)

found no effect of changing letter sets on subjects'

performance on a 5AFC version of the transfer task, earlier

work on pattern recognition suggested that increasing the

variability of the stimuli during study should improve

performance during transfer. It was hypothesized that

subjects in the different-letter-set condition would be more

accurate in the transfer test than subjects in the same-

letter-set condition. The 2 x 2 factorial design of the

experiment also allowed analysis of the combined effects of

letter sets and display presentation.

Method

Subjects and Design

The subjects were undergraduates at the University of

Florida who participated as part of a requirement for an

introductory psychology class. Eighty-two served in the

experimental conditions, 15 in a no-study control group.

The data from nine other subjects were discarded for making

the same response on every trial in one or more trial









blocks. Subjects in the experimental conditions were

assigned to one of four groups based on Display Type

(strings or pairs) and Letter Set (same or different). The

experiment was conducted in three trial blocks, which was a

within-subjects variable.

Materials

This experiment employed the same finite-state grammar

used in Experiment 2 (refer to Figure 5). The same items

were used during the test phase; in addition, three new sets

of test items were created by substituting a unique letter

for each letter in the original letter set comprised of the

letters PTKXS (henceforth referred to as Letter set 1). The

following letters comprised the new letter sets: Letter set

2, BLYFC; Letter set 3, NHMZJ; Letter set 4, DGQRW. Thus,

the rules used to order the letter strings remained the

same, but there were four unique letter sets employed as

stimuli. The stimuli were presented and all responses taken

on IBM-compatible microcomputers.

Strings Display Type. The Display Type variable refers

to the presentation of study items during the study phases

of the experiment. The strings-display used the same 21

study items that were used in Experiment 2. As with the

test items, three new sets of study items were created by

substituting three new letter sets for the letters in Letter

set 1. The entire set of strings-display study items and

the test strings are seen in Appendix E. None of the study

items appeared in the set of test items.









Pairs Display Type. The pairs-display was created by

showing the letters used in the study phase in pairs, rather

than as entire strings as in the previous experiments. The

set of letter strings in the study set comprised 145

letters, or 72.5 pairs of letters. To facilitate display,

70 pairs of letters were chosen for the study set. The

pairs were chosen so that the frequency of occurrence of

each pair best matched its frequency of occurrence in the

letter strings from which it was extracted. For example,

pair KP appears 14 times in the study set in the total of

124 pairs (124 is the reference here because each letter of

a string except the first and the last ones, enters into two

different pairs). Therefore, KP was presented (14/124) x 70

= 7.9 times, rounded off to 8 times, to the pairs groups.

This procedure follows closely the procedure from Experiment

1 in Perruchet and Pacteau (1990). The pairs of letters

from Letter set 1, and their frequency of occurrence in the

study set, are seen in Appendix F. Like the strings-

display, the study pairs were constructed with four letter

sets.

Procedure

In the study phase of each trial block, subjects in the

strings groups viewed three grammatical letter strings in

each of seven screens. Each screen was displayed for 30

seconds after which the screen went blank. Letter strings

of similar appearance were distributed across frames to

avoid introducing structure that would make the grammar










"salient." Subjects in the pairs groups viewed 10 pairs of

letters in two columns in one of seven screens. Each screen

was displayed for 30 seconds. Total viewing time of the

study items was 3.5 minutes for both the strings and pairs

groups. All subjects were asked to study the items

carefully, and told that they would be asked some questions

about the items.

In the test phase of Trial Block 1, subjects in all

four experimental groups learned that the items were ordered

by a set of rules. All subjects made classification

judgments of 40 novel, randomly ordered letter strings

presented one at a time on the computer screen. Subjects

made judgments by pressing "1" on the keyboard to indicate a

grammatical judgment and "0" for a nongrammatical judgment.

Between each trial block a message indicated that subjects

could take a break before continuing the experiment.

In Trial Block 1, all test phase items used the same

letter set as the items in the study phase. In Trial Block

2, subjects in the different-letter-set groups studied and

tested on a different letter set from the letter set in

Trial Block 1; subjects in the same-letter-set groups

studied and tested on the same items from Trial Block 1.

Trial Block 3, the "transfer" block, was based on the

transfer manipulation in Mathews et al. (1989). The same-

letter-set groups studied items of the same letter set as in

Trial Blocks 1 and 2, but tested on a new letter set (their

second). The different-letter-set groups saw a new letter










set during study and another new letter set during the test

(their fourth). The presentation of letter sets was

counterbalanced across subjects.

Control Condition

Subjects in the control condition took part only in the

test phases of the experiment. They were informed that some

of the test items were based on a set of rules, and to make

their judgments based on whether they thought the items

appeared to follow rules. To justify this difficult task,

it was emphasized to these subjects that the experiment was

a test of "intuition" rather than problem solving ability.

Each subject saw a different letter set in each trial block.

The presentation of letter sets was counterbalanced across

subjects.

Results

The mean judgment accuracy and standard deviations for

each cell in the 3 x 2 x 2 design (Trial Block x Letter Set

x Display Type) are presented in Table 3. The mean score

for Trial Blocks 1 and 2 are shown under the heading

"Combined 1&2." The first analysis compared the percent

correct judgments for the four experimental groups across

all three trial blocks.

The different-letter-set groups were significantly more

accurate in classifying the test items than the same-letter-

set groups, 58% and 55% respectively, F(l, 78) = 9.94, p <

.005. The strings-display group scored higher than the

pairs-display group, 57.8% and 55.2%, respectively, F(l, 78)











= 7.48, p < .01. The Letter Set x Display Type interaction

was not significant, F(1, 78) < 1.0.




Table 3

Mean Percent Correct Judgments by Letter Set and Display
Type for the Experimental Groups in Experiment 3.

-----------------------------------------------------.


Trial Block



Letter Set n 1 2 Combined 1&2 3

--- --------------------------------------------------

Strings

Same 22

M 56.0 58.5 57.3 54.3

SD 6.9 7.6 4.4 7.4

Different 20

M 59.8 62.4 61.1 56.0

SD 6.9 8.3 6.0 6.9

--- --------------------------------------------------


Pairs

Same 19

M 51.7 58.0 54.9 50.7

SD 5.9 8.1 4.0 6.6

Different 21

M 56.1 60.5 58.3 53.6

SD 7.8 10.3 6.3 6.9

--- --------------------------------------------------










The analysis also revealed a main effect of Trial

Block, F(2, 256) = 14.7, p < .0001. Trial Block did not

interact with Letter Set or with Display Type, all Fs < 1.0.

Analysis of No-Transfer Trial Blocks

The next analysis was concerned with the effects of the

variables across Trial Blocks 1 and 2 only. The percent

correct judgments were analyzed by a 2 x 2 x 2 ANOVA.

The different-letter-set groups were significantly more

accurate in classifying the test items than the same-letter-

set groups, 59.6% and 56.2% respectively, F(1, 78) = 9.43, p

< .005. The strings-display groups were significantly more

accurate than the pairs-display groups, 59.1% and 56.7%

respectively, F(1, 78) = 4.91, E < .05. The Letter Set x

Display Type interaction was not significant, F < 1.0.

The general trend was for subjects to improve on the

task between the no-transfer trial blocks; there was a main

effect of Trial Block, as subjects scored higher on Trial

Block 2 than on Trial Block 1, 59.8% and 55.9% respectively,

F(1, 78) = 9.61, p < .005. Trial Block did not interact

with Letter Set or with Display Type, all Fs < 1.3.

Analysis of Transfer Manipulation

The next analysis of the experimental groups compared

the percent correct judgments for each of the four groups on

Trial Block 3, the transfer trial block. The strings-

display group scored marginally higher than the pairs-

display group, 55.1% and 52.2% respectively, F(1, 78) =

3.88, p < .06. There was no effect of Letter Set and no










Letter Set x Display Type interaction. Duncan's Multiple

Range test shows the relative ordering of the four groups;

the clusters are shown next to the means in Table 4.



Table 4

Duncan's Multiple Range Test on percent correct judgments in
Trial Block 3.

Experimental groups Mean Grouping



Different strings 56.0 A

Same strings 54.3 A B

Different pairs 53.6 A B

Same pairs 50.7 B



Note: Groups that share a common letter are not

significantly different.



Table 5

T-tests run for Groups in Trial Block 3, Better Than Chance
Performance.

Experimental groups df t P



Different strings 19 3.91 0.001

Same strings 21 2.72 0.013

Different pairs 20 2.37 0.028

Same pairs 18 0.43 0.67










Finally, individual t-tests were conducted to test for

above-chance performance for the four groups. The results

are shown in Table 5. Of the four groups, only the same-

pairs group failed to achieve above-chance performance on

the transfer test.

In response to the failure of the pairs groups on the

transfer task, it might reasonably be argued that the no-

transfer phases might have been more difficult for the pairs

groups than the strings groups, resulting in a lower level

of learning in the pairs groups prior to the beginning of

the transfer phase. This is plausible, in light of the

lower levels of performance by the pairs groups across Trial

Blocks 1 and 2. In anticipation of this criticism, a final

analysis concentrated on those subjects who demonstrated

their having learned the "grammar" by individually scoring

better than chance during Trial Blocks 1 and 2. Eight

subjects in the pairs groups (seven in the different-letter-

set condition and one in the same-letter-set condition)

scored higher than chance (at least 49 out of 80, or 61.25%

correct). Fifteen subjects in the strings groups (11 in the

different-letter-set condition and 4 in the same-letter-set

condition) scored higher than chance.

The data from these 23 subjects were analyzed by a 2 x

2 x 2 (Trial Block x Letter Set x Display Type) ANOVA. The

15 selected subjects in the strings groups scored no higher

than the 8 subjects in the pairs groups, 64.8% and 64.4%,

respectively. There were no main effects of Letter Set,











F(1, 19) = 1.2, or Display Type, F(1, 19) = .75, and no

interactions. There was an effect of Trial Block, F(1, 19)

= 8.75, p < .01.

Mean percent correct on the transfer task for the 8

selected subjects in the pairs condition was 54.1% (SD =

7.1). A t-test revealed that the score was no greater than

chance, t(7) = 1.63, E > .1. The 15 subjects in the strings

condition scored 57.2% correct (SD = 7.6), which was

significantly higher than chance, t(14) = 3.68, P < .01.

Control Condition Analysis

The mean judgment accuracy and standard deviations for

the no-study control group are presented in Table 6. The

data were analyzed by an ANOVA.



Table 6

Mean Percent Correct Judgments for the Control Group in
Experiment 3.

------ ---------------------------------------------

Trial Block



1 2 3 Total

-------- ----------------- -------

M 46.3 51.7 51.3 49.8

SD 6.6 4.8 4.2 2.7

----- ---------------------------


Note: n = 15.










There was a main effect of Trial Block on judgment

accuracy, F(2, 28) = 4.33, p < .05. Planned t-tests showed

that the control subjects scored higher on Trial Block 2

than on Trial Block 1, t(15) = 2.4, p < .05; there was no

difference in accuracy between Trial Blocks 2 and 3, t(15) =

-0.18, E > .8.

Subjects' scores ranged from 45% correct to 54.2%

correct. Mean accuracy over all three trial blocks was only

49.8%. This confirmed that the relatively higher levels of

performance by the experimental groups was due to learning

during the study phases of the experiment rather than to any

inherently detectable differences between the grammatical

and nongrammatical letter strings.

Discussion

Within the no-transfer trial blocks, the hypothesized

superiority of the strings training over the pairs training

condition was confirmed. The outcome failed to support

Perruchet and Pacteau's (1990) claim that the knowledge

acquired in the task consists strictly of pairwise

comparisons. It should be emphasized again that this design

was not one of simple recognition of exemplars; none of the

study items appeared in the test set in the strings

condition. The inclusion of study items in the test set

might have conferred an obvious advantage on the strings

group, as subjects could have memorized and recognized the

study items, making classification relatively easy.

Instead, the advantage seemed to derive from the display of










entire strings, and the subjects' ability to integrate

information about pairs of letters across entire strings.

It had been suggested that the pairs display would be

"utterly useless" in a transfer test of classification

judgments (Mathews, 1990). This hypothesis was also largely

confirmed. The same-pairs group, the group most like

Perruchet and Pacteau's (1990) pairs group, scored no higher

than chance in the transfer test. Likewise, the pairs

groups when analyzed together scored no higher than chance.

This was in contrast to the strings groups, each of which

scored higher than chance in the transfer test.

It could be argued that the no-transfer trial blocks

were more difficult for the pairs groups than the strings

groups, which may have resulted in there being nothing to

transfer during the transfer test. That is, were the two

no-transfer trial blocks less effective in training the

subjects prior to the start of the transfer trial block,

making the transfer block harder for the pairs groups than

the strings groups? This is a reasonable observation, given

that only seven subjects in the pairs groups individually

scored higher than chance during the no-transfer trial

blocks. Yet even these seven subjects, who performed as

well or better than the average subject in the strings

groups, were unable as a group to score higher than chance

in the transfer test. This result, as well as any, showed

the pairs training as "utterly useless" in a test of

transfer in this task.










There was a small tendency for above-chance performance

in the transfer test for the different-pairs group. But, as

with the same-pairs group, there was a possible confound.

All subjects saw grammatical and nongrammatical strings

during the test phases of the no-transfer trial blocks,

which may have contributed to their ability to perform the

transfer test. Recall that the control subjects, who viewed

and classified only test strings, increased from 46.3% to

51.7% between Trial Blocks 1 and 2, a small but

statistically significant amount. Thus, the act of judging

the test strings during the no-transfer trial blocks may

have improved performance slightly during the transfer test

phase.

Within the no-transfer trial blocks, the superiority of

different-letter-sets versus the same-letter-sets was

somewhat unexpected. Mathews et al. (1989) found that the

same-letter-set groups gradually improved on the

classification task during the no-transfer trial blocks,

relative to the different-letter-set groups, but fell

substantially during the transfer test. The different-

letter-set groups, on the other hand, showed only a small

improvement between no-transfer trial blocks, but continued

to improve during transfer. The differences between the

tasks could account for the different results; Mathews

subjects chose from four visible alternative items on each

trial, a design which emphasizes comparison of a few items

within each trial. The yes-no decision made for each item










in the present experiment may emphasize memory for structure

over the entire set of items. That is speculation, but it

is clear that the task relies on a combination of knowledge

of structure and explicit recognition of letter bigrams and

trigrams. So, it might have been found that performance for

the same-letter-set groups would increase at a faster rate

during no-transfer trial blocks, as seen in Mathews et al

(1989). This was not the case, as the different-letter-set

groups outperformed the same letter set groups in both the

no-transfer and transfer tests. Such a finding indicates

the greater relative importance of structure compared to

recognition of features, at least when subjects are faced

only with decisions about individual items.

The results of the transfer test clearly indicate the

importance of different training sets over the same letter

sets. The hypothesis that training with different letter

sets would result in better classification performance in

the transfer task was confirmed. This finding, when taken

together with the transfer data in Mathews et al. (1989),

showed that the acquisition of structure is not fully

"automatic," as suggested by Mathews et al. (1989), but is

tied to conditions during study. More important than the

main effect of letter set, however, was the results of the

four conditions: the different-strings group scored the

highest on the transfer task, demonstrating the combined

advantage of both the different letter sets during study and

the strings presentation. As pointed out earlier, the same-










pairs group scored the lowest of the four groups, and were

unable to score higher than chance. The relative ordering

of the four groups demonstrated the contributions of letter

set and display type presentation on performance of the

transfer test. Further testing to detect possible

interactions between the display type and letter set

variables would make the test items easier to discriminate;

the scores on the transfer test ranged from just 50% to 56%.

Note

1The idea that variability is an important determinant
in concept formation apparently goes back to the notion of
"learning sets" in the animal learning literature (Harlow,
1949).
















CHAPTER 6

GENERAL DISCUSSION

Experiment la replicated two well-known studies by

Dulany et al. (1984, 1985) that purported to show that

reported featural rules correlated with, and hence were

directly responsible for, classification judgments in

artificial grammar tasks. These studies have been cited

frequently in support of a fully "explicit" model of

categorization, and against the notion of implicit, abstract

knowledge. Experiment Ib simulated the generation of rule

reports in the task, and demonstrated the possibility that

reports and classification judgments could be generated

independently of one another to produce the close

association between reports and judgments found in

Experiment la. The results showed the inadequacy of the

regression analysis on reports and judgments for

distinguishing between the two models of performance, and

for detecting dissociations between recognition and

classification in the task.

The design of Experiment 2 followed that of Experiment

la, but modified the report procedure in such a way as to

force subjects to be more specific about their rule reports.

This modified report procedure failed to alter the close

correspondence between the computed rules validities and










percentage correct judgments and demonstrated the difficulty

of dissociating recognition and classification measures in

this task.

In Experiment 3, the classification test included a

transfer test in which subjects made judgments of items

constructed of a novel, previously unstudied letter set.

The experiment clearly demonstrated that classification

judgments could be made in the absence of explicit

recognition memory of studied items; the test items in this

case shared no surface features with the studied items.

The results were offered in support of the hypothesis that

subjects were abstracting the underlying structure of the

stimuli both within and across studied items and using

knowledge of that structure to correctly classify the novel

test items. The experiment also demonstrated the importance

of variable stimuli and whole items during study for

developing an abstract representation of the stimulus

domain.

What is Abstraction?

Thus far, the term abstraction has been used without

giving a precise definition. In what sense might knowledge

be considered abstract? One line of evidence for abstract

knowledge comes from tasks that show subjects will readily

accept as familiar novel patterns or items that fall close

to a computed prototype or central tendency of a group of

items. This "family resemblance" notion of abstraction is

common in the literature of categorization and concept










formation (Smith & Medin, 1981). Another line of evidence

for abstract knowledge comes from work in problem solving in

which subjects are able to see beyond dissimilarities in the

details of problem domains and solve problems in

superficially different but structurally similar domains.

These two apparently dissimilar meanings for the same term

demonstrate the range of the phenomenon, but also give an

indication of the imprecision of its definition. The

approach, popular among connectionists, that problem solving

is just a special form of pattern recognition (see Holyoak &

Thagard, 1989) does little to help clarify issue of

abstraction.

Perruchet and Pacteau (1990) point out, in criticizing

theories that rely on abstraction, that our concept of

abstraction is loosely defined. Nevertheless, it does not

mean that the idea is without merit or has not been used

with success in describing knowledge which goes beyond

explicit recognition. There is little to be gained by

simply describing an idea as "loosely defined," and

dismissing any discussion of it. Prior to the pioneering

work of Treisman and Broadbent in the 1950's and early

1960's, ideas about attention were also loosely defined.

Likewise, intelligence, awareness, and consciousness are not

fully defined, yet these concepts are freely used in the

literature. The point of research on transfer is to shed

light on the (presently) loosely defined concept of

abstraction.










Mathews (1990), in an effort to better define the

characteristics of abstraction, suggested two operational

definitions of abstraction in these artificial grammar

tasks. Abstraction could refer to (a) the level of

generality of the rules that correctly describe letter

strings, or exemplars and (b) the ability to make correct

classification judgments of novel letter sets. The first

definition (a) concerns the generality of a featural rule

that could include an exemplar. To the extent that the

featural rule was inclusive of a greater numbers of

exemplars the rule could be said to be more abstract. Thus,

the rule "select strings that begin with VXT" is more

abstract than the rule "select strings that begin with V."

This definition of abstraction recalls the use of the term

by Rosch (1978), in reference to category levels.

Superordinate categories, like "furniture," are considered

more abstract than basic or subordinate categories in the

sense that there are few invariant features that include all

members of the category. It is easy to see a superficial

resemblance between this idea about abstraction and the rule

"strings that begin with V" as a sort of an abstract,

superordinate category.

This tacit equivalence between the abstraction found in

the superordinate categories of natural phenomena and the

featural rules of artificial stimuli seems rather tenuous.

Superordinate categories, and membership within those

categories, often depend on context rather than perceptual










characteristics. For example, many items commonly

considered basic members of the furniture category can

function as members of the superordinate category "weapons"

under the right conditions. Context, of course, is absent

in the artificial grammar tasks; the abstraction implied by

general rules, such as "strings that begin with a V" are

strictly perceptual.

The second definition (b) of abstraction suggested by

Mathews refers to the transfer task. This sense of transfer

is more generally associated with research in problem

solving, in which subjects must solve difficult reasoning

problems after having been exposed to superficially

different but structurally similar problems and their

solutions (Gick & Holyoak, 1980, 1983). In the artificial

grammar task, as with the problem solving studies, "we say

abstract knowledge was acquired when transfer to a

relatively novel task is successful" (Mathews, 1990, p.

415).

The definition of abstraction as transfer to novel

stimuli seems by contrast the more compelling example of

abstract knowledge. What is being learned in the artificial

grammar task are relationships between sets of symbols

across a set of stimuli, rather than specific letter pairs.

It is this knowledge that is acquired and displayed during

the transfer task. These results are also the ones that

exemplar based accounts of categorization have the most

trouble with. Obviously, there are no exemplars to










recognize; all classification is of items that do not

resemble study items.

Abstract Structure or Abstract Analogy?

Exemplar theories of classification have difficulty

dealing with the results of transfer studies of artificial

grammars. Obviously, categorization in the transfer tasks

cannot be computed from explicitly recognized letter bigrams

and trigrams. One effort to address this phenomenon of

transfer in artificial grammars tasks from an exemplar

viewpoint describes the process as one of abstract analogy,

or relational analogy (Brooks & Vokey, 1991). As a means of

classifying novel items, analogy relies on within-item

relations of the features, rather than on the abstraction of

the overall structure of the study items. For example, a

subject might observe an items such as MXVVVM and BDCCCB and

notice a common pattern: the same symbol at the beginning

and end, and a symbol repeated 3 times in between. In this

way, two general rules are abstracted from the first item,

and applied to the second item in order to classify it.

This approach to explaining transfer as one of analogical

reasoning recalls an approach common to case-based theories

of problem solving (Gentner, 1983; Gick & Holyoak, 1980;

Kolodner, 1988)

In a study designed to measure the relative importance

of knowledge of structure (the grammar) and specific

similarity to study items, subjects studied grammatical

letter strings, then took a transfer test of "near" and










"far" changed letter set items (Brooks & Vokey, 1991). Near

items defined as those with just one letter difference from

a studied item; far items were those that had more than one

letter different from studied items. Subjects were better

at classifying the near items than the far items. These

data were presented in support of the importance of

analogical reasoning; the process of drawing analogies

between study and test items was easier with the items that

closely resembled the study items than with the "far" test

items.

Some questions about this account of transfer suggest

themselves. First, if subjects are abstracting rules such

as those described above, then verbal protocols taken during

study or test should reveal those rules. None of the

studies cited in support of the analogy perspective attempt

to assess subjects' verbal knowledge of abstract rules.

Perhaps the abstract rules are entirely unconscious and

cannot be tested verbally; if this is the position the

authors take they do not say.

The second question relating to the analogical position

deals with the effect of the study of grammatical items in

preparation for the test phase of the experiment. Brooks

and Vokey clearly believe that much the knowledge acquired

during study of grammatical items is not abstracted across

the entire set of items, but consists mainly of relations

between features within individual items.










In a direct test of this hypothesis, Wittlesea and

Dorken (1993) trained subjects on items with salient

patterns of repetition within each item (e.g., HDFX-HFDX),

but no obvious between-item pattern. "Legal" test items

were created from the study items using a novel letter set

(e.g., GZTP-GTZP). "Illegal" test items were created by

reordering legal test items (e.g., GZTP-GPTZ). Subjects

were able to discriminate legal from illegal items, showing

that abstraction of structure and transfer to novel stimuli

can occur within items as well as between items. A second

experiment looked at the effect of training on the ability

to discriminate novel legal from illegal items. Subjects

viewed 25 letter strings generated by a relatively

unstructured artificial grammar; the items were made

distinctive by letters that appeared two or three times

within the item. Subjects who were directed to process the

study items for the presence of letter pairs scored as well

on a test of novel letter set items as on original letter

set items. Two groups of subjects who processed the strings

in an incidental manner were impaired on the transfer test.

These data give support for the idea that relations within

items can be abstracted and applied to novel stimuli.

This account of transfer as one strictly of analogy

based on within-item structure would seem to reduce the

relative importance of studying grammatical items prior to

test. In fact, it would suggest that the "study" phase

could consist of a typical test phase, in which subjects










make classification judgments, then transferred to a second

test phase using items constructed of a new letter set.

This was the design for the control subjects in the present

Experiment 3, who scored less than 51% correct. The data

from these control subjects indicate the importance of

knowledge acquired by experimental subjects across a set of

grammatical items during the study phase.

Although they downplay the relative importance of an

abstracted grammar in these artificial grammar tasks, Vokey

and Brooks (1992) found enough evidence for abstraction of

structure to suggest that two processes may be at work in

the transfer task. The model incorporates both abstraction

of structure and abstract analogy as necessary for

performance. In this way, they attempt to reconcile an

exemplar position of performance in artificial grammar tasks

with the strong abstractive views proposed by Mathews (1990)

and Reber (1989). Their model also modified an earlier

strong exemplar theory of performance (Brooks, 1978).

Two Approaches to Process Dissociation

In light of failure of Experiment 2 to dissociate

classification from reporting measures, and some of the

earlier difficulties with invoking a particular learning

set, what is the best approach to take in uncovering

separate processes? There are two lines of research worth

mentioning in this regard: decision times analysis and work

with amnesics.




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