Citation
Banque nationale de la République d'Haïti. Département fiscal; Annual report of the Fiscal Department (continues the Americn fiscal report series, see U.S. relations section below, (4-trUS-1933-40)

Material Information

Title:
Banque nationale de la République d'Haïti. Département fiscal; Annual report of the Fiscal Department (continues the Americn fiscal report series, see U.S. relations section below, (4-trUS-1933-40)
Publisher:
Port-au-Prince, Imprimerie de l’Etat, 1941-.

Notes

General Note:
2b-L/E- 1941-50
General Note:
Hollis 005396553

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Harvard Law Library
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BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
FISCAL DEPARTMENT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
OCTOBER 1946 SIQPTEMEBER 1947
SUBMITTED TO
THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR FINANCE,
AND NATIONAL ECONOMY BY THE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Imorimerie de l'Etat
PORT.AU-PRINCE, HAITI







CONTENTS
NARRATIVE SECTION:
Pages
Introduction ....................................................................................... 1
Government Receipts ........................................................................... 2
Customs Collections ....................................................................... 3
Import Revenues ... ................................................................ 3
Export Revenues ................................................................... 4
Miscellaneous Customs Receipts ............................................. 4
Internal Revenues ......................................................................... 5
Telephone, Telegraph and Hydraulic Services ..................................... 6
Miscellaneous Government, Receipts ........... ; .................................... 6
Government Expenditures ................................ 4 .................................... 7
Disbursements of Departments and Services ..................................... 8
Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Halti, Fiscal Department ............ 10
Treasury Position ............................................................................... 11
The Public Debt ............................................................................... 12
The Budget .................................................. I ...................................... 15
I Budgetary Operations, 1946-1947 .................................................... 16
Banking and Currency ...................................................... .................. 16
C(?mmunal Accounts ............................................................................ 18
Foreign Trade Values ......................................... ................................... 18
Percentage of Import byCountries of Origin ........................................... 19
Imports from the United States of America .............................................. '19
Imports by Principal Groups ................................................................. 20
Chart No. 1: Quantities and values of leading commodities imported, fiscal
years 1927-28 to 1946-47 ........ 21
Prices of Principal Commodities ...................... ...................... ............ 22
Percentage of Imports by Ports ......................................................... 22
Percentage of Exports by Countries of Destination ................................. 23
Exports to the United States of America ................................................ 23
Relative Importance of Exports ........... ; ............................................. 24
Volume and Value of Exports ............................................................... 24
Chart No. 2: Quantities and values of leading commodities exported, fiscal
years 1927-28 to 1946-47 ................................................................ 25
Percentage of Exports by Ports ......................................................... 26
Principal Export Products .................................................................... 26
Coffee Exports ..... .......... 26
Banana Exports ........................................................................... 28
Sisal Exports .......................................... ............... .................... 29
Cotton Exports ............. .............................................................. 29
Cotton Prices .............................................................................. 30
Raw Sugar Exports ....................................................................... 30
Handicraft Exports ............ 31
Essential Oil Exports ......... 31
Tariff Modifications ................. ............. 32
Air Traffic ............. ............. 33
Planes and Passengers ....................... .......... o ............................ 33
Air Express ................................................................................... 33
c;' I tk




?V APPENDICES
P.Y'S
M aritim e Traffic ................................................................................ 33
B uilding Activity ................................................................................ 34
Buildings Constructed .................................................................... 34
Atlantic R efining ................................................................................ 34
American Sanitary Mission ................................................................... 34
Cooperative Food Production Program ................................................... 37
Conclusion ....................................................................................... 38
APPENDICES:
Law of July 12 1947, authorizing the Government of the Republic of Haiti to
float an Internal Loan of ten million dollars, United States currency ............ 45
TABLES:
1. Value of Imports and Exports, and Excess of Imports or Exports, fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ............................................................... 55
2. Value of Imports showing countries of origin in percentages, fiscal years
1916-17 to 1946-47 ...................................................................... 55
3. Value of Exports showing countries of destination in percentages, fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ............................................................... 56
4. Value of Total Foreign Commerce by countries in percentages, fiscal
years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ............................................................... 56
5. Value and Percentage of Value of Imports, Exports, and Total Foreign
Commerce by countries, fiscal year 1946-47 .................................... 57
6. Value of Imports by Ports of Entry, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ... 58
7. Value of Exports by Ports of Shipment, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ... 58
8. Value and Percentage of Value of Imports, Exports and Total Foreign
Commerce by ports, fiscal year 1946-47 .......................................... 58
9. Net Tonnage of Steam and Motor Vessels in Foreign Commerce Entered
by Registry and Months, fiscal year 1946-47 .................................... 59
10. Net tonnage of Sailing Vessels in Foreign Commerce Entered by Registry
and Months, fiscal year 1946-47 ................................................... 60
11. Value of Imports by Registry of Carrying Vessels, fiscal year 1946-47 ... 61
12. Value of Exports by Registry of Carrying Vessels, fiscal year 1946-47 ... 62
13. Value of Imports by Months and Ports of Entry, fiscal year 1946-47
compared with 1945-46 ................................................................. 63
14. Value of Exports by Months and Ports of Shipment, fiscal year 1946-1947
compared with 1945-46 .................................................................. 64
15. Value of Imports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ...... 65
16. Quantity of Imports by Commodities, fiscal years 191&17 to 1946-47 ... 66
17. Value of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ...... 67
18. Quantity of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ... 67
19. Quantity and Value of Five Principal Exports by ports, fiscal year 194647 compared with 1945-46 ......................................................... '168
20. Percentage of Value of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-17 to
1946-47 ..................................................................................... 69
21. Quantity and Value of Exports by Commodities and Months, fiscal year
1946-47 .................................................................................... '7
22. Expenses of the B.N.R.H., Fiscal Department (and previous Administrations) by objects of Expenditures, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ...... 71
23. Classification of Administration and Operation Expenditures of the B.N.
R.H., Fiscal Department, fiscal year 1946-47 .................................... 71




APPENDICES V
Pages
24. Classification of Total Expenditures of the B.N.R.H., Fiscal Departmen
fiscal year 1946-47 ......................................................................... 72
25. Cost of Customs Operations by Ports and Cost of Administration, Repairs
and Maintenance, Acquisition of Property and Fixed Charges, fiscal
years 1919-20 to 1946-47 ......................................................... 73
26. Operating Allowance of Internal Revenue Service, fiscal years 1923-1924
to 1946-47 ................................................................................. 74
27. Revenue of Haiti by Source, fiscal years 1889-90 to 1946-47 ............... 75
28. Relation between Import and Export Values and Customs Receipts,
fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ................................................... 76
29. Customs Receipts by Months, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ............... 77
30. Customs Receipts by Ports, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ............... 78
31. Customs Receipts by Sources and Ports, fiscal year 1946,747 .................. 79
32.. Customs Receipts by Sources and by Months, fiscal year 194&47 ...... 79
33. Distribution' of Customs Receipts, fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ......... 80
34. Miscellaneous Receipts by Sources and Months, fiscal year 1946-47 ...... 80
35. Total Receipts of Haitian Government by Sources, Months and Ports,
fiscal year 1946-47 ....................................................................... 81
36. Ordinary, Supplementary and Extraordinary Appropriations from Revenue, fiscal years 1944-45 to 1946-47 ................................................ 82
37. Receipts and Expenditures, fiscal years 1944-45 to 1946-47, ..... ........ 83
38. Functional Classification of Expenditures, fiscal year 1946-47 .... I .......... 84
,39. Classification of Administration and Operation Expenditures by Departments and Services, fiscal year 1946-47 .......................................... 85
40. Classification of Total Expenditures by Departments and Services, fiscal
year 1946-47 ................. ............................................................ 86
41. Receipts and Expenditures, fiscal year 1946-47 ................................. 87
42. Revenues and Expenditures and Excess of Revenues or Expenditures,
fiscal years 1916-17 to 1946-47 ...................................................... 88
43. Treasury Assets and Liabilities ...................................................... 88
44. Public D ebt ............................................................................... 89
45.- Expenditures from Revenue for the Public Debt and Relation of such
expenditures to Revenue Receipts, fiscal years 1945-46 and 1946-47 ...... 90
46. Notes of the Banque Nationale in circulation by Months, fiscal years
1919-20 to 1946-47 ....................................................................... 90
47. Loans and Deposits of Banks in Haiti by Montlis, fiscal year 1946-47 ... 90
48. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources, fiscal years 1944-45 to 1946-47 ... 91
49. Internal Revenue Receipts by Collection Districts, fiscal years 1944-45
to 1946-47 ................................................................................. 91
50. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources and Districts, fiscal year 1946-47 ... 92
51. -Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources and Months, fiscal year 1946-1947 93
52. Communal Receipts and Expenditures, fiscal year 1946-47 ............... 94-95
SCHEDULES:
1. Quantity and Value of Imports into Haiti by Countries of Origin, fiscal year 1946-47 .............................................................................. 99
2. Quantity and Value of Exports from Haiti by Countries of Destination,
fiscal year 1946-47 ........................................................................ 123
3. Customs Receipts by Sources, Ports and Months, fiscal year 1946-47 ...... 136




BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT.
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
OCTOBER 1946- SEPTEMBER 1947




BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
ANNUAL REPORT
of the
FISCAL DEPARTMENT
For the Fiscal Year
OCTOBER 1946 SEPTEMBER 1947
Port-au-Prince, Haiti January 15, 1947
TO-THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI.
Gentlemen:
On October 1, 1947, the Executive Agreement of September 13, 1941 between the Governments of Haiti and the United States of America, concerning the payment of the external debt, came to expiration, by virtue of the Law on the Internal Loan, the complete text of which is appended hereto.
In July 1947 the funds necessary for the complete liquidation of the 1922 and 1923 external loans were made available and the Haitian Government, on October 1, 1947 thus regained its complete financial freedom.
In conformity with Article 11 of the above mentioned law, His Excellency the President of the Republic appointed, for a period of five years, the following gentlemen as members of the Board of Directors of the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti: Emmanuel Th6zan
Gaston Margron
C. E. van Waterschoodt A. M. Herres
Christian Aim6
The Board of Directors proceeded to elect Mr. C. E. van Waterschoodt as Vice President of the Bank, in charge of the Commercial Department, and Mr. Alexandre Dominique as Vice President of the Bank, in charge of the Fiscal Department.




2 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Subsequently, Mr. Gaston Margron was replaced as Secretary of State for Finance by Mr. Emmanuel Th6zan and became Co-President & General Manager of the Bank. Mr. Th6zan, already a member of the Board, was appointed Co-President of this Institution.
Since 1915, a report on the Commerce and the Finances of Haiti has always been prepared at the close of each fiscal year, first by the Office of the Financial Adviser General Receiver, then by the Office of the Fiscal Department, which succeeded the latter. Th law of July 12, 1947, fixing the -attributes of the Commercial and Fiscal Departments of the Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti, does not mention these periodical reports. However, the 'Fiscal Department contemplates continuing their publication as well as that of the monthly bulletins which constitute an authoritative source of current information on the economic life of Haiti and in which there appears to be an ever-increasing interest on the part of the public.
The present report covers the period from October I, 1946 to September 30, 1947, during which the Service was under the direction of Mr. Thomas Pearson. Mr. Pearson, formerly a member of the American Commission in charge of the Reorganization of the Finances of Persia and, more recently, Deputy General Receiver of Dominican Customs, was Vice President of the Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti, in charge of the Fiscal Department, from October 1, 1941, to September 30, 1947.
It is also opportune to recall at this point that during the same period of six years Mr. W. H. Williams was Co-President and General Manager of the National Bank. Mr. Williams had previously held various positions of importance with the Bank over a period of many years.
During a ceremony held on October 1, 1947 at the Banque Nationale de la R6publique dHaiti, the Haitian Government decorated Mr. Williams and Mr. Pearson as Officers in the National Order ,Honneur et M6ritea in token of its appreciation of the services rendered to the Republic of Haiti by these distinguished gentlemen.
Government Receipts
Total revenue receipts during the fiscal year 1946-47 amounted to Gdes. 65,266,415.49 which represented an all-time high record. The nearest approach to these returns was recorded in 1927-28 when total fiscal receipts amounted to Gdes. 50,421,016.49. Government revenues during 1946-47 exceeded. those of 1945-46 by 46.5%. \




REPORT OF FISCAi. DEPARTMENT
The following table shows a comparison between receipts from all
sources during the fiscal year 1946-47 and those collected in the preceding year: RECEIPTS
Gowrdes 1447Per cent Gourdes 954 Per cent
Customs:
Import duties................ 38,5 64,19 4.9 4 59.09 2 25,070,225.8 6 56.3
Export duties...............13,3 10,9 78.54 20.40 7,448,82 0.45 16.7
Miscellaneous................ 549,792.24 0.84 279,956.06 0.6
Total Customs ....52.424,965.72 80.33 3 2,7 99,002.37 73.6
Internal Revenues ......... 11,9 33,06 0.9 0 18.28 10,8 78,482.3 4 24.4
Mi.scell aneous Government
Receipts................... 413,302.10 0.63 443,335.03 1.0
Receipts from Communes 495,086.77 0.76 436,407.01 1.0
Total Revenues...6 5.2 66,415.49 100.00 4-4,557,226.75 100.00
While internal revenues increased considerably over the 1945-46 collections, customs receipts showed a relatively much higher rise and, consequently, accounted for a larger proportion of total revenues.
Customs Collections
Total receipts from customs amounted to Gdes. 52,424,965.72 or 80.33 per cent of all Government collections. Import duties increased. by 53.8 per cent and export duties by 78.7 per cent while miscellaneous customs receipts almost doubled.
The increase in import revenues reflects the receipt of a larger volume of certain kinds of foreign articles such as cotton goods, gasoline and kerosene, cigarettes and, tobacco, wool, linen, silk goods and jute bags, foodstuffs other than flour, chemical and pharmaceutical products, iron and steel products, glassware, soap and motor vehicles. It also reflects to some extent the higher prices paid for certain classes of merchandise purchased abroad. The principal sources of import revenues, in order of yield and compared with those collected in 1945-46, were as follows:
1946-47 1945-48
Gourdes Gourdes
Cotton goods............................................. 19,78 0,4 95.9 5 4,3 41,00 6.75
Flour ...................................................... 5,3 74,325.9 9 6,014,027.01
Gasoline and kerosene............... ...... 3,3 97,93 6.86 2,895,014.53
Cigarettes and tobacco ................................. 2,716,76 5.41 2,4 35,818.65
Wool, linen, silk goods and jute bags............. 2,528,584.89 1,23 6,057.67
Foodstuffs other than flour ........................... 2,264,692.86 1,120,639.40
Chemical and pharmaceutical products............. 2,114,310.35 1,596,269.65
Iron and steel products, machinery and apiiaratus 1,98 0,25 8.96 1,529,183.40 Glassware................................................. 977,928.71 369,878.34
Soap ....................................................... 722,490.32 691,173.91
Autos and trucks ........................................ 597,935.92 306,199.11
Rubber goods ....6......................................... 530,266.99 577,111.80
Paper, etc ................................................. 482,682..61 539,311.95
Cement, lumber, etc.................................... 404,411.62 412,114.22
Leather, shoes and leather goods ..................... 402,392.66 154,985.82
Earthenware, etc ......................................... .85,702.16 47,893.28
All other.................................................. 4,203,012.6 8 803,540.37
3 8,5 64,194.94 25,070,22 5.86




4 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE DOHAITIDuties on cotton goods were, by far, the most important source of import revenues. These duties accounted for 25 per cent of all import taxes and 15 per cent of total government revenues in 1946-47, The duties on flour were some Gdes. 640,000 less than in 1945-46 while those on gasoline and kerosene increased by Gdes. 503,000. Revenues from wool, linen, silk goods and jute bags, as well as those from foodstuffs other than flour were approximately double the amounts collected the prior fiscal year. Aside from flour, declines from 1945-46 duties were recorded under the schedules covering rubber goods, paper, cement and lumber. The very sharp rise of Gdes. 3,400,000 in duties derived from imports other than those specifically named in the above table is worthy of note.
Export Revenues
Export revenues by sources were as follows in 1946-47 and 1945-46:
1946-47 1945-4G
Gourdes Per cent Gout-des Per cent
Coffee.......................... 6,942,031 52.15 5,090,070 68.33
Bananas ....................... 3,243,809 24.37 370,864 4.98
Sugar.......................... 2,369,527 17.80 1,106,665 14.86
Sisal............................ 300,673 2.26 274,393 3.68
Goatskins ...................... 70,964 0.54 56,815 0.76
Cotton ........................... 5,617 0.04 102,035 1.37
All other ....................... 378,357 2.84 447,978 6.02
13,310,978 100.00 7,448,820 100.00 The regular specific duty on coffee was supplemented in the course of 1946-47 by a tax which varies with the market price of coffee. This new tax was primarily responsible for the increase of Gdes. 1,852,000 in the revenues derived from coffee,- exports, the quantity having been only slightly higher than in 1945-46. Bananas had also, in previous years, been subject to a nominal specific duty but, as in the case of coffee, a new tax which varies with the market price came into effect during 1946-47 and accounted largely for the sharp increase in duties noted in the above table. The ad valorem tax on sugar was increased in the course of the year. This explains,,in part, the indicated rise in the export duties derived from sugar. However, a larger volume and higher market prices for sugar were factors of greater importance.
Miscellaneo ;us Customs Receipts
Miscellaneous customs receipts amounted to Gdes. 549,792.24 during the fiscal year 1946-47 as compared with Gdes. 279,956.06 in the pre-. ceding year. Storage charges and certain other minor sources showed increases, but the sharpest rise, amounting to some. Gdes. 233,000.00, was accounted for by increased receipts from the service charge for handling imported merchandise at the Port~au-Prince custom house. This service tentran incrase in thne olume importsd Afreciterexlanaton sofe te chntarg icrbase on tongdthe ofincoreasedA frer reflcton soe te increase lies in the fact that in the course of 1946-47 it became necessary




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 5
to increase the rate ofthe service charge in order to make possible certain pay increases for laborers engaged in the handling of imports.
Internal Revenues
Internal revenue receipts again established an all-time high record in 1946-47, having amounted to Gdes. 31,933,060.90, as compared with Gdes. 10,878,482.34 in the previous year. The latter figure had previously represented the high point of internal revenue yield. In the following table the sources of internal revenue receipts yielding more than Gdes. 100,000 are listed in the order of yield. The extent to which there were increases or decreases, as compared with 1945-46, is also shown:
Increase (*)
Amount Decrease (-)
Collected As compared with
1946-47 previous year
Gourdes Gourdes
Income tax .............................................. 4,844,778.22 480,848.51*
Cigarettes (excise) ................................ 1,432,336.10 155,806.03*
-Documentary stamps ............................... 1,198,539.49 288,609.66*
Recording fees ........................................ 864,267.60 144,981.97*
Postage Stamps ..................................... 540,939.19 413,282.77Alcohol from cane juice (excise) ............ 514,576.81 106,517.88*
Public land rentals .................................... 463,588.64 62,919.15*
Identity card fees...: ................................ 433,809.54 91,216.08*
Occupational licences ................................ 364,886.51 29,859.18*
Mineral exploration fees .......................... 176,183.21 20,073.85*
Vehicle licence fees ................................ 171,180.95 33,185.95*
Consular fees ............................................ 105,631.65 28,752.45*
Vegetable oils (excise) ............................ 104,307.39 94,039.15The income tax was, by far, the principal source of internal revenues, having accounted for 40.6 per cent of the total. This tax also represented 7.4 per cent of total fiscal receipts for 1946-47. The increase of Gdes. 480,848.51 may be ascribed to larger business profits since n6 increase in the rates occurred during the fiscal year 1946-47.
The next most important source of internal revenue was the excise tax on cigarettes which amounted to Gdes. 1,432,336.10 or Gdes. 155,806.03 more than the amount collected in 1945-46. This tax accounted for 12.0 per cent of total internal revenue receipts in 1946-47.
Receipts from documentary stamps and recording fees recorded relatively sharp increases. In fact almost all of the principal sources of internal revenue yielded considerably more than during the previous year, and it can be assumed that this record reflects generally improved business conditions since there was no increase in any of the tax rates during the year, on account of a stamp policy which has been given up but which, it would seem, should be reinstated.
The outstanding exception was the receipts from the sale of postage stamps which declined by Gdes. 413,282.77 from the 1945-46 collections. This decline is accounted for in part by a reduction in the air mail tariff which became effective during the year. Furthermore, the volume of shipments by parcel post of products of small industries sisAl handbags, shoes, etc. decreased, while sales to stamp collectors appear to have declined.




6 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Telephone, Telegraph and Hydraulic Services
At the end of the fiscal year 1943-44, the Telephone and Telegraph Service and the Hydraulic Service (Urban water systems) became autonomous organizations. Prior to that time, the funds for the operation of these Services were appropriated under the general expenditure budget of the Government and the receipts derived from these public utilities were classified as internal revenue receipts of the Treasury. Under the new arrangement, the two Services function as non-fiscal accounts outside the general budget of the Government; that is, receipts are credited to special non-revenue accounts and, from these accounts, expenditures for the operation and improvement of the.Services are effected. As a matter of interest, the receipts and expenditures of the two Services during the last two years of operation as fiscal organizations, as well as during the three years as autonomous organizations, are shown below:
Telegraph and Telephone Hydraulic
Receipts Expenditures Receipts Expenditures Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
1942-43 .................. 476,913.51 495,797.91 422,838.00 183,535.15
1943-44 .................. 511,021.70 568,299.81 442,586.90 171,440.86
1944-45 .................. 842,387.97 792,639.10 522,064.11 453,938.99
1945-46 .................. 1,053,065.47 1,028,775.58 568,813.25 610,529.30
1946-47 .................. 1,045,708.73 1,074,249.08 570,642.14 591,621.95
Other public service operations during 1946-47 included the following: / Receipts Expenditures
Gourdes Gourdes
Post Office ........................................................ 550,951.19 598,028.58
Irrigation .......................................................... 96,024.24 132,431.62
656,975.43 730,460.20
Miscellaneous Government Receipts
Miscellaneous receipts of the Government totalled Gdes. 413,302.10 during the fiscal year 1946-47 as compared with Gdes. 443,335.03 in 'the prior year. Returns on investments accounted for Gdes. 179,143.35. The principal source of returns from investments was the dividend of the Commercial Department of the Banque Nationale de la R6publique dHaiti which amounted to Gdes. 100,000.00. The profits of the Banque Nationale are divided as follows:, one-third to the Public Treasury; one-third for projects designed to increase exports, and one-third to build up the surplus of the Bank. The dividend declared for 1946 amounted to Gdes. 300,000.00, and one-third of this sum was taken up as miscellaneous receipts of the Government in 1946-47.
Other returns on investments included interest on balances on deposit with the Fiscal Agent for the payment of interest and amortization of Series A and S6ries C bonds.
Miscellaneous receipts, other than returns on investments, amounted to Gdes. 234,158.75. The greater portion of this amount represented transfers from non-fiscal accounts for the purpose of covering special appropriations.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 7
Government Expenditures
The following table shows the expenditures from revenue during 1946-47 by Departments and Services. All disbursements from ordinary, supplementary and extraordinary appropriations are included and increases
or decreases from the preceding year are-shown.
Increase ()
Government Decrease (-)
Expenditures As compared with
1945-47 Previous year
Gourdes Gourdes
Public Debt .................................... 13,652,176.80 7,483,804.30*
Army .............................................. 11,464,112.45 1,742,427.33*
Department of Public Works ............ 7,182,749.76 2,927,619.31*
Department of National Education .... 5,423,579.25 1,485,505.10* Department of Public Health........ 4,338,476.29 1,114,503.65* Department of Interior .................... 2,920,903.25 1,142,800.86*
Agricultural Service ........................ 2,582,264.64 581,936.88*
Department of Foreign Affairs ........ 2,351,571.68 961,166.86* Fiscal Department, B.N.R.H ............. 1,981,925.37 467,459.68*
Department of Justice ...................... 1,852,330.14 188,362.14*
Internal Revenue Service .............. 1,728,251.67 298,285.42*
Department of Finance .................... 1,625,990.55 38,442.39International Institutions .................. 1,568,831.50 1,100,274.17*
Department of Commerce ................ '879,270.37 2-25,3A9.73*
Department of Religion .................... 539,346.80 74,684.00*
Department of Labor ........................ 180,165.12 180,165.12*
Department of National Economy .... 125,749.33 125,749.33*
Department of Agriculture ................ 40,721.53 452.9360,438,416.50 20,06,1,198.56:
From the above table it will be seen that expenditures in 1946-47 were
Gdes. 20,061,198.56 (49.6 per cent) above those of 1945-46 and that with, two exceptions, all Departments and Services disbursed considerably larger
sums than during the previous year.
The sharpest increase occurred under the budget of the public debt.
Payments from revenue during the preceding year toward amortization of the Series A and Series C external loans amounted to Gdes. 1,500,000 while the similar payments n 1946-47 reached Gdes. 6,173,195.45. It is pertinent to remark at this point that a law dated July 12, 1947 authorized the flotation of a $10,000,000 Internal Loan for the purpose, primarily, of reimbursing the Series A and Series C external loans and that, with a portion of the proceeds of this internal loan, the funds necessary to call all outstanding Series A and C bonds at par as of October I, 1947, were remitted to the fiscal agent. It is also appropriate to remark that as a result of the retirement of all bonds of the Series A and C loans, there came to an end the series of Treaties and Executive Agreements between the Republic of Haiti and the United States of America, extending over a period of more than thirty years, tinder which nominees of the United States Government participated in the administration of the finances of
Haiti.




8 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Payments on account of the public debt in 1946-47 included Gdes. 1,092,154.90 remitted to the Banque Nationale de la R~publique, fiscal agent of the new Internal Loan, to cover interest and amortization for the period July 15 September 30, 1947. Further remarks about the Internal Loan will be found in a subsequent section of this report relative to the Public Debt.
Disbursements of Departments and Services
As usual the expenditures of the Army were considerably higher than those of any other Department or Service. Such expenditures, in 1946-47, amounted to Gdes. 11,464,112.45 or approximately one-fifth of total Government disbursements. The increase over the previous year was Gdes. 1,742,427.33 or approximately 18 per cent.
The expenditures of the Department of Public Works showed the sharpest increase of any Department or Service, having amounted to Gdes. 7,182,749.76 or Gdes. 2,927,619.31 more than during 1945-46. It is interesting to note that expenditures from extraordinary appropriations for roads and bridges accounted for Gdes. 2,453,141.29, and that budgetary appropriations for the same purposes were debited with Gdes. 995,073.81.
The Department of National Education expended Gdes. 5,423,579.25 or Gdes. 1,485,505.10 more than during the previous year. The budget of this department is largely a salary budget, and the rise was principally accounted for by salary increases and new personnel.
The disbursements of the Department of Public Health amounted to Gdes. 4,338,476.29 or Gdes. 1,114,503.65 above the expenditures of the fiscal year 1945-46. Extraordinary expenses included some Gdes. 115,000 for the operation of the tuberculosis sanatorium at Port-au-Prince, which had previously functioned as a private enterprise, and a similar amount for typhoid and small pox vaccines.
The disbursements of the Department of Interior were some Gdes. 1,143,000 above those of 1945-46. The increase is explained in large part by the fact that over a pericd of several months of the previous year no payments were effected under the accounts covering the presidency and the legislature as the result of the overthrow of the Government in January 1946.
I The Agricultural Service expended Gdes. 2,582,264.64 of which more than half was drawn from extraordinary appropriations. Expenditures from these appropriations included Gdes. 622,173.71 for various agricultural projects, Gdes. 390,238.95 for drainage work and Gdes. 230,350.17 for the raising of livestock.
The Department of Foreign Affairs recorded expenditures of Gdes. 2,351,571.68 during 1946-47 or some 70 per cent higher than those of the previous year. The reestablishment of legations and onsulates in Europe,




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 9
following the close of the war, accounted for a considerable part of the increase. Also, certain new diplomatic and consular posts were created during the year. The traveling and other expenses of members of .the diplomatic and consular corps and of special representatives of the, Government to international conferences, etc. showed a large increase.
The expenditures of the Fscal Department of the Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti were Gdes. 467,459.68 greater than in 1945-46. Further comments on these expenditures will be found in a subsequent paragraph.
Expenditures of the Department of Justice, as is the case for National Education and certain other Departments, are principally for salaries and the rise of some Gdes. 188,000.00 was largely due to increased salary payments. Extraordinary expenditures of the Department of Justice in 1946-47 included Gdes. 75,254.04 paid to the special Commission named to inquire into the administration of ex President Lescot.
Disbursements of the Internal Revenue Service rose by Gdes. 298,285.42 due, in large measure, to increased amounts paid to a certain class of its agents who are paid a percentage of the amounts collected. Salary adjustments, new personnel and construction of new offices also contributed to the increase.
The Departments of Finances and Agriculture were the only organizations to register expenditures below those of 1945-46.
Payments to International Institutions amounted to Gdes. 1,568,831.50 or some 1,100,000 more than during the preceding year. Payments under this account included Gdes. 872,500.00 representing the contribution to the local food production program sponsored jointly by the Haitian and United States Governments. A payment of Gdes. 425,000.00 was also made to the American Sanitary Mission.
The Department of Commerce was reorganized during the year resulting in an increase of some Gdes. 225,000 in its expenditures.
The Department of Religion recorded an increase of Gdes. 74,684.00. A considerable number of the clergy were on leave for duty in Europe during the war. Their resumption of service in Haiti, after the close of the war, accounted in large part for the increase noted in the disbursements of the Department of Religion.
The Department of Labor and the Department of National Economy functioned in 1946-47, for the first time, as separate Department with independent budgets. Formerly Labor was combined with Agriculture while National Economy shared the budget of the Department of Commerce. Both the Department of Labor and the Department of Commerce were' reorganized at the beginning of 1946-47 and their expenditures during the year amounted to Gdes. 180,165.12 and Gdes. 125,749.33 respectively.




10 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Fiscal Department, Banque Nationale de ]a R~publique d'Haiti
The expenditures of the Fiscal Department of the Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti inclusive of those of the Customs Administration, the Central Accounting Service and the Inspection Service, amounted to Gdes. 1,981,925.37, or Gdes. 467,459.68 more than those in 1945-46, as shown in the following table:
1L46-47 1945-46
Goardes Gourdes
Salaries and Wages ........................ 1,603,966.18 1,296,012.59
Supplies and Materials .................... 121,048.73 85,163.85
Transportation ................................ 107,206.27 78,206.97
Communications ............................... 15,570.20 11,096.60
Rents ......... .................................... 50.00
Repairs and Maintenance .................. 26,592.52 15,425.08
Equipment ..........................82,484.46 17,512.06
Special and Miscellaneous ................ 25,057;01 10,998.54
1,981,925.37 1,514,465.69
There were certain minor increases of salaries of regular personnel of the Fiscal Department during 1946-47, but the rise of some Gdes. 308,000 noted above was principally accounted for by payments to laborers engaged in handling imports at the Custom House at Port-au-Prince. Due to the increase in the volume of imports more laborers were required. Furthermore, the hourly rate of pay of laborers was sharply increased in the course of the year.
The upward trend of prices for paper and other office supplies continued in 1946-47. Furthermore a larger quantity of such supplies was required as the result of the sharp increase in the volume of imports and exports as well as of receipts and expenditures. Consequently the cost of supplies necessary for the functioning of the Fiscal Department, including the Customs Administration and the Central Accounting Office of the Government; showed an increase of Gdes. 36,000 over the amount expended during the previous year. Transportation, Communications, repairs and maintenance and miscellaneous expenses also were above the 1945-46 figures.
The relatively important increase of some Gdes. 65,000 in expenditures for equipment is explained largely by the fact that, during the year, three of the automobiles of the Service were replaced. Also freight and duties on a new motor boat for the Port-au-Prince port service were paid. The F.O.B. price of this boat was charged to an extraordinary appropriation of the Department of Finance. Other equipment acquired during the year included typewriters and calculating machines. Furthermore, a sum of Gdes. 20,000.00 was paid toward the reconstruction of the customs house at the border port of Bellad~re.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT
Treasury Position
Government receipts in 1946-47 totalled Gdes. 65,266,415.49 while expenditures amounted to Gdes. 60,438,416.50. The unobligated balance as of September 30, 1947, amounted to Gdes. 11,529,210.52. Details of the Treasury assets and liabilities at the end of the fiscal year 1946-47 were
as follows:
Gourdes Gourdes
I ASSETS
Current Assets
Deposit in Banks:
Government gourde account .......... ................... 8,757,9 76.20
New York current account ................................ 103,001.00
Cash in hands of disbursing officers ..................... 224,060.92
Miscellaneous unpaid checks, reserve .................... 11,762.80 9,096,800.92
Investments
Capital stock of Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'H aiti ...................................................... 5,000,000.00
Bonds of the Republic ..................... 13,722,136.05 18,722,136.05
Other Assets
Fiduciary currency in vault .................................. 422,500.00
Advances by Government reimbursable ...... ......... 51,417.04 473,917.04
Total-Treasury Assets ............................ 28,292,854.01
LIABILITIES
Current Liabilities
Outstanding checks .........................2,603,021.42
Balance of extraordinary appropriations ................ .1,807,644.86
Balance in non-revenue accounts ......................... 3,667,297.37
M iscellaneous checks ............................................ 11,762.80 8,089,726.45
Other Liabilities
Capital stock of Banque Nationale de la R~publique d'H alti ....................................................... 5,000,000.00
Fiduciary currency fund ...................................... 3,622,500.00
Advances by Government, reimbursable ................ 51,417.04 8,673,917.04
Surplus .................................................................... 11,529,210.52
Total Treasury Labilities ........................ 28,292,854.01
In connection with non-revenue accounts referred to in the above statement, it is of interest to note that these accounts are subject to the regulations comprised in the general Law on the Budget and Public Accounting in so far as concerns justifying documents covering expenditures.
Among the most important of the non-fiscal accounts may be mentioned the Communal Accounts, Civil Pensions, Army Pensions, Army Savings Account (enlisted men), Telegraph, Telephone and Radio Service, Water Service, State Lottery, National Coffee Bureau and the Social Assistance S Account.




12 BANQUET NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
The following table shows a comparison of treasury assets and liabilities at the end of the past three fiscal years:
Sept. 30, 1947 Sept. 0, 1946 Sept. 30, 1945 Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
ASSETS
Current assets ................................ 9,096,800.92 15,733,595.72 11,147,333.23
Investments .................................. 18,722,136.05 5,218,736.70 5,196,850.35
Other assets .................................. 473,917.04 1,248,294.30 2,158,867.86
Total .............................. 28,292,854.01 22,200,626.72 18,503,051.44
LIABILITIES
Current liabilities ........................ 8,089,726.45 6,450,123.52 6,544,920.43
Other liabilities ............................ 8,673,917.04 ,8,674,667.04 8,675,417.04
Surplus .......................................... 11,529,210.52 7,075,836.16 3,282,713.97
Total ............................ 28,292,854.01 22,200,626.72 18,503,051.44
The outstanding changes from September 30, 1946 to September 30, 1947, were the decrease in current assets (primarily deposits in banks) and the increase in investments. On July 14, 1947, a law was published authorizing the flotation of a $10,000,000.00 internal loan for the purpose, first, of redeeming all outstarding bonds of the external Series A and C Loans and, second, of executing a program of economic equipment of the country.
In conformity with the authorization accorded by.this law, the public treasury and certain non-fiscal accounts invested Gdes. 13,518,838.90 in bonds of the new internal loan. It is pertinent to remark that promptly after the close of the fiscal year 1946-47 the liquidity of the treasury account and of the non fiscal accounts was largely reestablished with the proceeds of the internal loan which had not been required for the redemption of the outstanding Series A and Series C bonds.
The Public Debt
The gross public debt of the Republic of Haiti on September 30, 1947, aniounted to Gdes. 49,980,616.70 as compared with Gdes. 49,448,437.50 as of September 30, 1946. Table No. 44 (See appendix) presents the statement of the public debt at the end of each fiscal year since 1915. For convenient comparison, the portion of that table which shows the debt as of September 30, since 1924 (the year in which, through refunding operations




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 13
and consolidation, the amount of the debt was fixed in United States
dollars) is reproduced below:
Year Gourdes Year Gourdes
- 1924 ............ 121,048,501.20 -.1936 ............ 49,092,715.80
1925 ............ 115,23 1,2 63.80 1937 ............ 44,3 17,2 95.95
1926 ............ 108,307,079.3 0 1938 ............ 43,9 50,094.29
1927.........99,70 6,8 55.09 1939 ............ 52,137,491.99
1928.............9448150 1940 ............ 60,87 1,5 50.33
1929.............. 88,677,3 96.00 1941 ............ 68,096,049.72
1930 ....... I..... 82,705,6 49.3 5 1942 ............ 70,4 68,212.6 0
1931.............. 78,3 57,5 76.10 1943 ............ 70,419,3 81.30
1932............. 72,6 25,8 70.96 1944 ............ 60,459,610.5 5
If 1933.............. 66,9 01,412.8 4 1945 ............ 52,9 36,3 69.30
1934............. 60,8 30,43 5.79 1946 ............ 49,4 48,437.50
/ 1935.............. 54,93 0,5 99.85 1947 ............ 49,9 80,616.70
As previously stated, a law voted in July 1947 authorized the" flotation
of a $10,000,000 Internal Loan for the purpose of redeeming the External Series A and C Loans and of executing a program of economic equipment [of 'the country. The bonds bear five per cent interest payable semi*annually, and are due July 15, 1957. Amortizat ion payments amount to j$500,000.00 each six months. The Banque Nationale de la R6publique, /d'Haiti is the Fiscal Agent. It seems pertinent to reproduce at this point /Articles 10, 11 and 12 of the law governing the new Internal Loan: Article 10.-The servicing of the interest and amortization payments
of the Internal Loan constitutes irrevocably a first lien on all the internal 4 and customs revenues of the Republic of Haiti with priority over all other
debts of the State, with the exception of the engagements previously made
with regard to the as yet unpaid Foreign Debt.
Article 1 1.-The Government of the Republic undertakes, as of October
I, 1947 and during the entire duration of the present loan, not to modify the organization and the attributes of the Commercial and Fiscal Departments of the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti, except as regards the preparation of the Ways and Means Budget and the expenditures of the Republic of Haiti and of the Communes. The Government may nevertheless by agreement with the Board of Directors of the National Bank tof the, Republic of Haiti, the members of which, five in number, are appointed for a period of five years beginning October 1, 1947 by the President of the Republic, create such other departments besides those already in existence as may be judged necessary for the economic development of the country. The members of. the Board may be removed only for,
misappropriation, recognized incompetence, improper conduct involving
loss of civil and political rights.
As a consequence of the foregoing, the National Bank of the Republic of
Haiti is irrevocably invested with the following functions:
a) Effect the ordinary transactions of a commercial bank; b) -Effect all the customary transactions of,a State bank;
c) Collect the customs revenues;




N
14 BANQUET NATIONALE DE LA.REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
d) Receive all customs, internal, and other revenues of the State;
e) Inspect the collection of the internal revenues;
f)- Account for and disburse the funds of the Haitian Government;
g) Make, in Haiti; the registrations stipulated in Articles 6, 7, 8 and
9 of the present law;
h)- Centralize the registrations made abroad as weli as in Haiti;.
i Make monthly deductions from the revenues of the State, in conformity with Article 12; pay, semi-annually, the sums duei for
interest and amortization payments;
j)- Arrange the drawing by lot provided for in Article 13.
Article 12.-The National Bank of the Republic of Haiti is irrevocab authorized, in conformity with Article 10 and 11, to take each month front the internal revenue and the customs receipts of the State, one-twelfth cf the monies required in order to ensure the interest and amortization. service of the bonds and bond certificates of the present loan.
The Haitian Government undertakes to make the interest and amortization payments provided for in the present law in time of peace as well as of war.
Contractual payments from budgetary and extraordinary appropriations, up to the time the law authorizing the new Internal Loan was promulgated, had reduced to Gdes. 24,305,986.20 the amount necessary to call at par as of October I, 1947 all outstanding Series A and C bonds and to pay all interest due to that date. The said amount, in conformity with the law on the new loan, was provided as follows:
PUBLIC TREASURY
Investment Account Cash ............................................... 8,380,510.85
Fiduciary currency account Cash ................................... 3,200,000.00
Non fiscal accounts Cash ................................................ 1,937,791.30
Non fiscal accounts A and C bonds ................................ .215,671.70
BANQUE NATIONALE:
Reserve against gourde notes in circulation Cash .............6,200,000.00
Investment account Cash ................................................ 349,512.35
Investment account -A and C Bonds ................................ 3,322,500.00
SOCIAL INSURANCE ACCOUNT Cash ........................ 700,000.00
24,305,986.20
The Public Treasury, the. Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti and the other accounts mentioned received bonds of the new internal loan to cover the advances made. The Board of Directors of the Bank approved all operations involving the Bank.
The above mentioned sum of Gdes. 24,305,986.20, derived from the sale of bonds of the internal loan to the accounts listed, was duly remitted to the fiscar agent of the Series A and C loans. Therefore, at the end of the fiscal year 1946-47 the 1922-1923 external loans had been extinguished.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 15
It seems appropriate to remark at this point that as the result of the redemItion of the external Series A and C loans the Haitian Government regained complete liberty of action in.the administration of its finances. The replacement of the external loan by an internal loan will conserve foreign exchange. The external loan bore six per cent interest whereas the interest rate on the internal loan is five per cent. Furthermore, the new eternal loan offers opportunities for sound investment not only to persms residing abroad, but particularly to local institutions (such as the Baniue Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti), firms and individuals.
'The public debt of the Republic consisted of the following at the close of he fiscal years 1946-47 and 1945-46: Sept. 30.1947 Sept. 30, 1946
Gourdes Gourdes
Series A loan ......... ................................ .................... 26,271,658.65
Series C loan ....................... ........... 4,204,278.85
Internal loan ....................... 35,008,116.70
Public Works Contract of 1938........11,350,000.00 15,350,000.00 / Fiduciary Currency ............................ 3,622,500.00 3,622,500.00
, 49,980,616.70 49,448,437.50
The amount shown for the Internal Loan is the net amount after deduction of Gdes. 833,333.30 remaining in the amortization account at September 30, 1947.
Total expenditures from revenue for service of the public debt amounted to Gdes. 13,652,176.80 during the fiscal year 1946-47 as follows: Interes: Amortization Expenses Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Series A loan ................ 1,571,925.00 5,287,969.00 31,997.00 6,891,891.00
Series C loan ................ 248,618.70 885,226.45 9,529.65 1,143,374.80
Internal loan ............... 258,821.60 833,333.30 .............. n 1,092,154.90
Public Works Cont ..... 513,397.30 4,000,000.00 11,358.80 4,524,756.10 2,592,762.60 11,006,528.75 52,885.45 13,652,176.80 All interest and amortization payments for the year on the out standing indebtedness of the Republic of Haiti were met in full and, as previously remarked, the external Series A and C loans were completely redeemed with funds derived from an internal loan.
The Budget
Expenditures during the first several weeks of the fiscal year 1946-47 were based on the budget of the previous year which had been prorogued. However, in December 1946 the regular budget for the fiscal year was Published. This new budget carried the appropriate adjustments from October I, 1946, and it may be stated that, from an administrative point of view, it became effective from the latter date which was the beginning of the fiscal year 1946-47. The said budget estimated receipts at Gdes. 46,509,163.00 and authorized expenditures of a similar amount. However, as the year progressed and receipts considerably exceeded expectations, it




16 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
was found necessary or desirable to appropriate further sums frn the treasury ,surplus. The Departments of Public Works, Agricultue and National Education were the principal beneficiaries of special credit;. The following table shows that total expenditure authorizations in 1546-47 reached Gdes. 62,678,739.99 and that effective expenditures totalledGdes. 60,438,416.50.
Budgetary Operations, 1946-47
Gourdes Gourde
Unexpended baance of extraordinary appropriations
as of September 30, 1946 .................................... 1,425,299.28
Operating budget as of October 1, 1946 ................ 46,509,163.00
Total authorized expenditures at beginning of year 47,934,462.28 Accruals to operating account of Internal Revenue
Service over amount carried in budget ................- 909,390.70
Appropriations opened but not compensated by'cancellation of other credits ........................................ 13,834,887.01
Total authorized expenditures during Year ........ 62,678,739.9
Unexpended balance of budgetary credits at September 30, 1947 Cancelled ................................ 303,733.98
Balance in extraordinary credits which expired in
course of year ..................................................... 128,944.65
Unexpended balance in extraordinary credits at September 30, 1947, carried over into 1947-48 .... 1,807,644.86 2,240,323.49
Expenditures 1946-47 ........................................ 60,438,416.50
With reference to the abc.ve sum of Gdes. 909,390.70 representing accruals to the operating account of the Internal Revenue Service over and above the amount carried in the general budget, it should be remarked that the said Service is entitled to an amount equivalent to ten per cent of effective internal revenue receipts. Therefore, when receipts exceed the 'original estimate (on which the budgetary allocation is based), 10% of the difference automatically becomes available for expenditure by the Internal Revenue Service. Furthermore, existing legislation allows additional amounts from revenues for special services rendered by the organization in question, as follows:
15% of Communal Receipts
5% of Stamps sales
5% of Vital statistics fees
The amounts derived from the above sources and placed at the disposition of the Internal Revenue Service in 1946-47 totalled Gdes. 909,390.70.
By law of September 15, 1947 published in -Le Moniteurn No. 86 of September 30, 1947 the expenditure budget for the fiscal year 1947-48 was fixed at Gdes. 51,749,608.27.
ann-n" and cur- ency
Haiti is served by two banks, the Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti, which is owned by the Government, and the Royal Bank of Canada. The latter has its only Haitian office in Port-au-Prince. The Banque




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 17
Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti, besides its headquarters office at Port-au-Prince, maintains branches and agencies at the other eleven open ports of the Republic. In addition to the ordinary commercial operations, the Banque Nationale is the Government bank of issue and the sole depository of all revenues and public funds of whatsoever nature of the Government of Haiti.
The two banking institutions referred to above recorded average loans and discounts during 1946-47 totalling Gdes. 13,650,407.30 as compared with Gdes. 9,001,473.70 in the preceding fiscal year.
Bank deposits showed a moderate increase in 1946-47. Exclusive of Government accounts, deposits averaged Gdes. 40,319,470.34 as compared with Gdes. 40,140,691.08 in 1945-46 and Gdes. 39,275,993.92 in 1944-45. Currency circulation on September 30 1947 and on the corresponding date of the previous year is shown in the table below:
Sept. 30,1947 Sept. S0, 1940
Gourdes Gourdes
Notes of the Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'H aiti .................................................................. 28,080,931.00 .27,851,451.00
Subsidiary currency ................................................. 6,543,902.33 6,568,205.16
United States Currency (estimated) ........................ 17,500,000.00 17,500,000.00
52,124,833.33 51,919,656.16
Inclusive of United States dollars (estimated), total currency in circulation at the end of the past ten fiscal years has been as follows:
September 30, 1938 ......................................... 13,579,154
1939 .......................................... 15,292,752
1940 .......................................... 16,087,122
1941 .......................................... 17,227,027
. 1942 .......................................... 22,959,417
1943 .......................................... 37,330,112
. 1944 .......................................... 34,623,970
1945 .......................................... 34,884,436
1946 .......................................... 51,919,656
1947 .......................................... 52,124,833
able No. 48 shows the circulation of gourde notes by month over a period of years. The annual averages during the past five fiscal years have been as follows:
Gourdes
1942-43 .................................... 20,931,053
1943-44 .................................... 22,727,266
1944-45 .................................... 23,492,204
1945-46 .................................... 24,778,105
1946-47 .................................... 32,019,578
The upward trend in the circulation,of gourde notes during recent years was quite pronounced in 1946-1947.




18 BANQ UE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
The average monthly deposits in banks in Haiti exclusive of Government deposits, have shown a constant upward trend during the past few years. as shown by the following table:
Gourdes
1940-41 .................................. 13,762,277.36
1941-42 .................................. 15,271,935.52
1942-43 .................................. 24,214,759.22
1943-44 .................................. 31,389,973.98
1944-45 ........... .............. 39,275,993.92
1945-46 ............. ; .................... 40,140,691.08
1946-47 ................... 40,319,470.34
The rising trend in the circulation is due in a larger measure to higher prices received for Haitian products, than to a general improvement in business conditions.
Communal Accounts
During the six fiscal years which ended with 1946-47, communal funds have been collected, classified and accounted for in conformity with the provisions of the Law on the Budget and Public Accounting relative to non fiscal receipts. Special accounts covering receipts and expenditures of each of the 104 Communes of the Republic have been maintained in the Accounting Office'of the Fiscal Department of the Banque Nationale de la ,R6publique d'Haiti since the beginning of the fiscal year 1941-42. Table No. 52 (See Appendix) shows the receipts and expenditures of each of the Communes for the fiscal year 1946-47. There is presented below a general statement of receipts and expenditures and surplus for the six years that the Communal accounts have been subject to the general budgetary and accounting regulations:
Receipts Expenditures Surplus
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
194'1-42 .......................... 2,461,621.64 2,127,914.31 373,038.15* o
1942-43 .......................... 1 1) ,. ; Y I ':;.. 1 ) 72. 201 .9
1943-44 .......................... 2,953,282.57 2,294,356.23 658,926.34
1944-45 .......................... 3,003,814.30 2,429,369.43 574,444.87
1945-46 .......................... 2,909,364.72 2,523,131.83 386,232.89
1946-47 .......................... 3,300,560.31 2,815,501.09 485,059.22
*Including Gdes. 39,330.82 from" previous periods.
Foreign Trade Values
Never before, since the present method of compiling commercial statistics- was instituted, has the value of exports been so important as the amount registered for the fiscal year 1946-47 which totalled Gdes. 157,492,052. The highest level during the prior year was reached in 1918-19 when exports amounted to Gdes. 123,811,096.
Imports were valued at Gdes. 136,152,008, or only slightly less titan the record amount of Gdes. 136.992,055 registered during the fiscal- year 1919-20.
The results of the foreign trade of Haiti, in 1946-47, from the standpoint of value, were most satisfactory, when compared with those of the preceding thirty fiscal years. Imports and exports during this fiscal year were, in




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 19
fact, valued at Gdes. 293,644,060, wliereas the highest value appearing inthe foreign trade table, from 1916-17 to 1945-46, was Gdes. 245,096,366 for the fiscal year 19 19-20.
It is also interesting to note that the value of foreign trade, in 1946-47, exceeded that for the fiscal year 1945-46 by Gdes. 99,919,512.
The following table shows the value of imports and exports and the trade balance for each of the past ten years:I
Imports Exports linport Balance Export Balance
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gossrdes
1937-38 .............. 37,973,889 34,731,952 3,241,937 ........
1938-39 .............. 40,9 03,6830 36,338,175 4,565,508 ........
1939-40............... 39,700,574 26,995,200 12,705,374 ........
1940-41 .............. 37,155,548 33,286,537 3,869,011 ........
1941-42 ............. 42,285,166 42,886,390 .......... 601,224
1942-43 .............. 49,202,511 53,072,781, ........ 3,870,270
1943-44............... 80,155,339 80,541,632 ........ 386,293
1944-45 .............. 65,769,704 85,561,674 ......... 19,791,970
1945-46 .............. 79,607,734 114,116,814 ..... ... 34,509,080
1946-47 .............13 6,152,008 157,492,052 ......... 21,340,044
The foreign trade for the ten-year period ended September 30, 1947 'indicates an export balance of Gdes. 56,117,051. It therefore appears conclusive that from 1937-38 to 1946-47, as indicated by the above table, Haiti has 'derived an important profit from its exportations.
Percentage of Imports by Countries of Origin
Haitian imports were distributed, by countries of origin, as follows:
1946-47 1 945-43 1944-45 1I4-44 Per cent Per cent Percent Per Cent
United States .............. 88.01 86.65 83.77 69.4
British Commonwealth 4.75 4.79 4.12 5.68
Netherlands................. 2.80 2.04 1.25 2.70
Mexico ...................... 1.10 1.26 3.87 15.83
Belgium.................... 0.68 0.07 ..... ....
France .................... 0.66 0.21 0.01 0.05
Cuba ........................ 0.52 0.52 1.43 2.19
Argentine .................. 0.27 2.74 5.10 3.50
-All other.................. 1.21 1.72 0.45 0.61
100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
The above figures indicate in some degree the effects of competition
-between the principal suppliers of Haiti. It is pertinent to note in this
-respect, that the .import trade is subject to no special regulation, such as
-quotas and import licence and that, in consequence, the fluctuations shown in the above table are not the result of restrictive or discriminatory measures. It is, moreover of interest to note that all of the countries designated above, are -entitled to the minimum tariff rates.
Imports from the United States of America
The United States of America was again, in 1946-47, the principal supplier of the Haitian market, as indicated by the above table showing the
jpecenageof imports by countries of origin.' The statistics covering




'20 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUJE D'HAITI
Haitian-American trade are thus of particular interest. Haitian imports,
for the fiscal years 1944-45 to 1946-47 inclusive, are shown below:
1946-47 I94-46 1944-45
Gourds Go,,rdes Gourdes
Cement ...................................... 906,034 1,019,704 903,837
Fish .......................................... 980,814 190,618 116,309
Wheat flour ............................... 10,786,181 8,704,203 11,120,966
Automobiles and trucks.................. 4,756,435 2,523,342 735,017
Perfumery.................................. 1,443,196 929,504 646,416
Beverages................................... 330,039 349,622 234,243
Hides, skins and manufactures of 1,153,816 388,333 309,246
jute bags................................... 300,765 435,367 546,145
Chemical and pharmaceutical products 2,795,767 1,644,897 1,317,580
Soap ........................................ 3,118,109 '993,721 1,528,775
Cotton, Manufactures of ................ 39,384,690 17,040,652 13,391,744
Lard........................................ 1,423,863 788,062 813,315
Glass and glassware ...................... 3,331,371 1,244,149 643,892
Machinery and apparatus ................ 4,952,462 6,895,940 3,498,691
Paper and manufactures of ............. 1,522,608 1,592,915 1,082,218
Tires and tubes for vehicles..............1,978,178 2,094,670 677,353
Silk and Mranufactures of ................ 3,930,130 1,360,086 924,273
Tobacco and Manufactures of ........... 2,547,032 2,031,297 1,125,129
All other ................................... 33,934,126 18,210,614 14,073,243
119,575,616 68,437,696 53,688,392
It appears from the above comparison that Haitian imports from the United States of America, rose in 1946-47, as regards the fiscal years 1944-45 and'1945-46 by 100% and 75%7 respectively.
It is pertinent to note particularly the increase in the importations of automobiles and trucks, cotton goods and silk and the decrease in the importations of. machinery and apparatus, during the fiscal year under review, as comparison with those of the fiscal year 1945-46.
Imports by Principal Groups
The different articles imported may be grouped as follows:
1946-47 1945-46 1944-45
Gowdes /. Gourdes 0/0 Gourdes %
Textiles and Clothing 46,616,356 34.2 20,141,012 25.3 17,591,603 26.8 Foodstuffs ............. 20,56 6,695 15.1 13,579,406 17.1 15,306,017 23.3
Gasoline, Kerosene &
Mineral Oils .... 4,135,397 3.0 2,714,458 3.4 2,651,561 1.0 Machinery and Apparatus ................**' 5,050,893 3.7 6,997,79,2 8.8 3,763,688 5.7
Iron and steel pro-,
ducts................. 4,490,882 3.3 3,982,083 5.0 3,074,612 4.7
Soap .................... 4,734,532 3.5 2,995,448 3.8 4,061,036 6.2
Automobiles and
Trucks .............. 4,768,935 3.5 2,523,342 3.1 735,017 1.1
Rubber products ..... 2,440,969 1.8 2,374,073 3.0 839,386 1.3 Chemical and pharmaceutical products 3,186,633 2.3 2.007,453 2.5 1,530,110 2.3 Household utensils 7,059,632 5.2 1,646,269 2.1 1,195,458 1.8 Agricultural implements, etc ............ 1,312,325 1.0 626,526 0.8 1,146,473 1.7
Jute bags ................. 975,893 0.7 1,814,936 2.3 1,362,696 2.1
Tobacco products .... 2,577,345 1.9 2,056,294 2.6 1,156,232 1.7 Paper and paper products ................. 1,977,537 1.5 2,001,426 2.5 1,184,470 1.8
-All other imports ....26,257,984 19.3 14,1471,216 17.7 10,171,345 15.5
136,152,008 100.0 79,607,734 100.0 65,769,704 100.0




CHART No. 1 QUa-2titieS and values of leading commodities imported Fiscal years 1927-28 to
04
0
AW/Olys a_, A-1.05 z /a //S G 4
.10 /S
130 1
CIO
LJ
Ilk
6- V
A
0 1 1 1 Ij 0 1 f I I I' I I I I I I I
-15
CAU04 llyz40 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 41zas
6
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IV
v
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ebo
tfo 0 4(1AOAfO,&ZZF.5 17 C,4^710,V5
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0) ru ct) 11, -.0 1" coo
'u K)j M) TTS cc) t) t) 11) (r) 4 C4 Ou Q N




22 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
The above figures indicate that there was no striking change in the importations for the year 1946-47 as compared with those of the two preceding fiscal years. It should be noted however that a general increase was registered in the various groups with the exception of jute bags. Importations of machinery and apparatus, as well as those of paper and paper products, although inferior to those of the fiscal year 1945-46 were superior to those of 1944-45.
Prices of Principal Commodities
Imports in 1946-47 amounted to 110,699 tons against 82,114 in 1945-46, but the increase in the value of imports during 1946-47 was not due solely to an increase in the volume of merchandise imported. The rise in the C.I.F. prices of imported articles contributed in large measure to the increase, as shown by the statistical data shown below: 1946-47 194-46 1944-45 1943-44 1942-43 Jnit Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Cement ........................ Kilo 0.16 0.12 0.12 0.13 0.14
Fish .............................. 1.08 0.80 0.89 0.72 0.38
Wheat flour .................." 0.81 0.55 0.51 0.48 0.40
Meats ............................ 3.90 2.96 2.44 0.99 1.40
Beverages .................... Liter 2.48 1.97 1.81 2.09 1.66
Gasoline ........................ 0.11 0.10 0.13 0.13 0.13
Kerosene ...................... 0.15 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09
Soap ............................ Kilo 1.96 1.26 1.27 1.21 1.14
Cotton textiles ................ 12.80 9.07 8.61 8.50 7.33
Silk textiles.................... 25.04 17.75 15.88 15.08 13.63
Lard ............................ 3.71 2.36 1.83 1.95 2.13
Perfumery .................... 5.85 4.06 5.93 5.65 6.00
Cigarettes ........... Hundred 1.58 1.42 1.39 1.38 1.43
As a whole, prices of the principal articles imported into Haiti were appreciably higher, in 1946-47, than during the four previous years. For example, laundry soap and cotton goods which are articles of first necessity, show increases of 55% and 41.12% respectively, over 1945-46 prices.
Percentage of Imports by Ports
From the point of view of values, the following table shows the percentage of Haitian imports, by ports of entry:
1946-47 1945-46 1944-45
Per cent Per cent Per cent
Port-au-Prince ......................... 87.18 89.43 87.54
Cap-Haitien .............................. 4.82 4.20 6.15
Fort-Libert6 .............................. 1.76 0.98 1.94
Saint-M arc ................................ 1.49 1.52 1.57
Jrdmie ..................... 1.38 1.18 0.78
Gonaives .................................. 1.27 0.65 0.36
Cayes ...................... .1.24 1.19 1.28
Port-de-Paix ............................ 0.38 0.43 0.27
Jacm el ...................................... 0.15 0.34 0.04
Other ports ............................... 0.33 0.08 0.07'
100.00 100.00 100.00
From the above table, it will be noted that Cap-Haitien, Fort-LibertY, J6r6mie and Gonaives and certain ports of lesser importance were the




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 23
only ones which, during 1946-47, recorded, an increase in the percentage of merchandise landed at those ports. Port-au-Prince remains, by far, the principal port of entry.
Exports
Percentage of Exports by Countries of Destination
The percentage of Haitian exports taken by the various countries Of destination, including colonies, dependencies and dominions, during the fiscal year 1946-47, as compared with 1945-46, is shown below: IW4-47 1945-46
Per cent, Per cent
United States........................... 59.85 62.13
Belgium.............................................. 11.31 5.12
British Commonwealth............................ 9.85 10.18
Norway .............................................. 8.26 1.63
Italy .................................................. 4.15 1.58
Netherlands ......................................... 2.26 0.17
Switzerland ..............................................2
All other............................................. .2.48 16.34
100.00 100.00
It appears from this table that the greater part of exports were placed' on the market of the United States of America during the fiscal years 1945-46 and 1946-47. It should be noted however, that since the fiscal year 1944-45, the percentage of products shipped to the United States of America is inferior to that shipped during the, war and tends to decline. This is accounted for by the resumption of the commercial relations between Haiti and the European markets, which were inacessible during the war.
Exports to the United States
In view of the still high percentage of products of this country shipped to the 'United States of America during 1946-47, it is interesting to make a comparison between the shipments for this fiscal year afid those of the previous fiscal years. To this end, the statistics showing the Value of exports to the United States of America from 1944-45 to 1946-47 are presented as follows 1946-47 1945-46 1944-45
Gowdes Gourdes Gourdes
Coffee ...................................... 17,413,487 15,647,829 31,772,464
Sisal ........................................ 26,319,833 14,290,843 8,358,240
Bananas.................................... 30,648,647 20,115,535 12,534,642
Cacao............ 3,660,664 1,047,117 505,723
Goatskins ................................. 1,440,483 762,417 663,213
Sugar (raw and refined) .................... 320 26 282
Palm leaf braid ............................. 403,896 975,419 849,723
Molasses .................................... 1,632,275 1,869,748 2,057,924
Essential. Oils ............................ 2,681,099 2,495,027 1,830,929
Srwhand bags ......................... 166,005 542,109 207,727
Sal hand bags ..... ..................... 581,464 1,746,617 1,518,027
Sisal shoes and slippers.................. 1,862,063 3,153,644 670,802
Straw shoes and slippers.................. 95,022 28,253 403,595
Mahogany Ware ...................... 7;,6 14315 19028
All other ...................................76,0 6 ,13, 156 13,28013
93,929,955 70,693,196 6 6,512,708




24 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
This table indicate s that, in spite of the decrease in the percentage of shipments to the United States of America, an increase was recorded in the value of products shipped to that Country during 1946-47, as compared with the two previous fiscal years. Such increase was chiefly due to shipments of sisal and bananas.
Relative Importance of Exports
Haiti's leading export commodities in 1946-47 are listed below in the order of their importance: Gods1946-47 1945-46
Coffee ................................. 60,656,839 38.51 38,148,993 33.43
Bananas ............................... 30,648,647 19.46 20,115,535 17.63
Sisal................................... 28,356,768 18.01 14,740,732 12.92
Sugar (raw and refined)............. 14,174,963 9.00 8,377,479 7.34
Cacao .................................. 3,867,361 2.45 1,240,501 1.09
Castor beans ............ ............... 3,053,691 1.94 1,023,348 0.90
Essential oils......................... 2,694,269, 1.71 2,501,138 2.A9
Sisal shoes and slippers..............2,080,735 1.32 3,323,239 2.91
Molasses............................... 1,632,275 1.04' 1,869,748 1.64
Goatskins ............................. 1,464,623 0.93 777,117 0.68
Mahogany Ware ..................... 1,049,530 0.67 1,665,867 1.46
Cotton.................................. 776,964 0.49 8,733,396 7.65
Coconut grated and dessicated .... 721,604 0.46 1,48 4,079 1.30
Sisal hand bags...................... 660,4 14 0.42 1,905,383 1.67
Cottonseed cake..................... ..592,8410 0.38 845,276 0.74
Palm leaf braid ....................... 405,175 0.26 996,850 0.87
All other ............................. 4,655,354 2.95 6,368,133 5.58
/15 7,492,052 1010.00 114,116,814 100.00
From the table above, it will be seen that coffee, bananas and sisal,. in 1946-4 7 as in 1945-46, were the principal export products. For the fiscal year under review, the value of these three commodities was approximately 77%o of total exports as compared with 63% during the preceding fiscal year. It is also interesting to note, that such shipments were valued at Gdes. 119,662,254 in 1946-47 as compared with only Gdes. 73,005,260 in 1945-46.
Volume and Value of Exports
The following table shows that shipments of coffee, bananas and sisal in 1946-47, increased both in quantity and in value, as compared with 1945-46:
1946-47 1945-46
Mfetric, Tos Go-des Metric Tons Goardes
Coffee........................ 24,659 60,656,839 2423 38,148,993
Cotton ......................... 268 776,964 4,868 8,733,396
Cacao......................... 1,902 3,867,361 1,254 1,240,501
Sisal ......................... 21,157 28,356,768 16,812 14,740,732
Sugar ........................ 26,104 14,174,963 20,667 8,377,479
Bananas .................... 142,819 30,648,647 114,605 20,115,535
All other .................... 30,341 19,010,510 32,385 22,760,178
247,250 15 7,49 2,0 52 214,874 114,116,814
The foregoing remarks also apply to cacao and sugar. The statistics indicate, on the other hand, a decrease in the volume and the value of




CHART No 2
Quantities and values of leading commodities exported
Fiscal years 1927-28 to 1946-47
Z XPOA'M/t211
~~/QV3 ik/1'$ yleW44'S Oa C~e
40,
-0 1w I l 11 I
/0
4C C
16 e6
7
ZIlLO'V5 4O1' Go-e ar A llO5
C- CA0C4
JI /4- NAIS




BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
shipments of cotton and other products of lesser importance. There was recorded, however, an increase of approximately 157 in the quantity and 38% in the value of all products exported. These percentages indicate that the average prices on the foreign markets for articles exported were higher in 1946-47 than in 1945-46.
Percentage of Exports by Ports
The figures below show that the predominence of Port-au-Prince as a port of export is being reduced from year to year:
M1-47 1945-46 1944-45
Per cent Per cent Per cent
Port-au-Prince 38.33 47.60 48.68
Cap-H aitien .............................................. 13.15 9.03 9.37
Fort-Libert6 ............................................ 9.62 7.65 8.19
Saint-M arc ................................................ 7.14 6.35 7.01
Gonaives .................................................... 6.43 4.44 5.81
Jacm el ...................................................... 6.14 6.27 6.04
Port-de-Paix ............................................ 5.52 4.92 5.10
Cayes ........................................................ 5.51 5.92 3.93
J~r trnie ..................................................... 5.45 4.92 2.73
Petit-Goive .............................................. 1.95 1.98 2.69
Mirago~ne ..............................0.69 0.87 0.45
O ther ports ................................................ 0.07 0.05 ........
100,00 100.00 100.00
Principal Export Products
As indicated by the figures shown under the heading aVblume and Value of Exports-, coffee, bananas and sisal, ranked first in the list of export products during 1946-47. These principal commodities, together with other like cotton, sugar, essential oils, handicraft articles and goatsk-ins, representing each, on a different scale, interesting percentages of the general exports, deserve special attention.
Coffee Exports
V Shipments of coffee in 1946-47 were valued at Gdes. 60,656,839 and
represented, in consequence, almost 39% of the total value of exports.
The table below shows a comparison between the quantities and the values of coffee shipments frcm 1943-44 to 1946-47: Kilos Goardes
1943-44 .............................. 23,116,197 25,983,822
1944-45 .............................. 29,968,230 36,450,688
1 1945-46 .............................. 24,282,605 38,148,993
1946-47 ............................. 24,659,421 60,656,839
It will be seen from the abc.ve table that the increase in value was much more important than the increase in volume of exports during 1946-47 as compared with 1945-46. It is interesting to note that the volume of coffee exports in 1944-45 was higher than in 1946-47.
. It is to be noted, on the other hand, that important market diversifications took place in 1945-46 and 1946-47 in the coffee export trade. This was to be expected with the reopening of the European markets, to which Haitian coffee had no access during the war period.




REPORT OP FISCAL DEPARTMENT 27
This diversification is shown by the following table:
Exports' of Coffee by Countries of Destination
Kilos I4-700K ilos 14-G Co Kilos L44 /
Bahama Islands .. 9,280 ........ .......................23,600 0.1-1
Belgium ............. 6,685,597 27.1 3,348,35 13.8 ..............
Canada ............................ ........ 1,661,622 6.9 879,600 2.9
Canal Zone.............. 160 .... ........ .... ....... ....
Cuba ...........3 ..... 4,736,128 19.5 3 ....
Curaqao ................ 4,000 .... 80,080 0.3 112,960 0.4
Denmark .........160 ..
France ................ 81,998 0.
Italy............... 2,467,660 10.0 976,990 4.0 ......... ....
M artinique .......22 .... ........ .... ........ ....
Netherlands......... 1,057,843 4.3 75,920 0.3 ......... ....
Norway ............. 5,370,480 21.8 1,000,929 4.1 ......... ....
Puerto Rico ........................ ......... 57,600 0.2 ..............
Sweden............... 364,000 1.5 186,400 0.8 ......... ....
Switzerland ......... 1,209,376 4.9 2,239,700 9.2 2,647,729 9.2
Syria ................- .156,000 0.6 ......... .... ......... ....
United Kingdom 40,026 0.2 24,080 0.1 ......... ....
United States ...7,212,816 29.3 9,894,806 40.8 26,304,338 87.8
24,659,421 100.0 24,282,605 100.0 29,9 68,23 0 100.0
It will be noted that shipments of coffee to the United States of America, declined from 87.8% in 1944-45 to 40.8%o in 1945-46 and to 29.3%7 in 1946-47. This was accounted for, in a certain measure, by the competition of the European markets, where prices are in general more attractive than those -offered on the American market The figures compiled, in this connection, by the National Coffee Burea1us are given below:
1945-46 1946-47
Pe. 50 kilos Per 10 kilos
United States............................ $17.42 $24.87
Belgium................................... 18.32 25.65
Switzerland .............................. 18.88 27.14
Italy....................................... 22.19 27.14
England................................... 20.27 25.18
Sweden................................... 18.80 26.46
Holland ....................... 24.19 26.26
France .................................... 20.32 25.00
Norway ................................. 21.10 25.00
Denmark.................................. 18.36 24.00
Cuba...................................... 16.33 22.50
Canada .................................. 15.73 ....
Cura~ao................................... 16.00 24.00
Bahamas .................................. ........ 25.00
To conclude these remarks, there are shown hereafter certain important facts concerning the International coffee trade which characterized the period from June I, to September 30, 1947. (1)
(a) The dullness in the sale of the varieties known as X X and eTriages-; (b) As a consequence of the sharp drop in the quotations on the Coffee
E xchange of New York, an especially cautious at-itude on the American market, and the application of a policy limiting purchases
to a strict minimum, interest being principally in quality coffee;
(1) Source' National Coffee Bureau




28 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
(c) The unrestricted purchase of sterling by the Bank of Brazil;
(d) The increa'se of 10% in maritime freight from the Brazilian ports
of Angro des Reis, Paramague and Victoria;
(e) The establishment in London of a selling agency for Colombian
coffee;
(f) The negotiation of a purchase by England of 2 million sacks of
Brazilian coffee;
(g) An embargo until 1950 on Peruvian coffee exports;
(h) The' renewal of the Interamerican Coffee Agreement for a new
period of one year, effective October I, 1948;
(i) The discontinuance on August 21, 1947 of the conversion of sterling
into dollars to limit the drainage of Great Britain's dollar reserves.
Banana Exports
Export statistics show that bananas occupy a place of ever increasing importance in the foreign trade of the Country. During the last four fiscal years, the quantity and value of banana exports have been as follows:
Volume Value
Stems Courdes
1943-44.. ....................... 2,889,677 7,981,771
1944-45 ................................ 4,014,825 12,534,667
1945-46 ................................ 5,859,175 20,115,535
1946-47 ................................ 7,301,565 30,648,647
Banana exports, by ports of shipment, were as follows during the fiscal years 1945-46 and 1946-47:
1946-47 1945-46
Stems Gourdes Stems Gourdes
A quin ........................................ 23,178 110,142 ................ ..............
Cap-Haitien .............................. 1,314,225 6,510,719 833,166 2,863,720
Cayes ......................................... 245,018 1,090,933 444,207 1,369,381
Gonaives .................................... 497,456 1,570,196 51,082 198,679
Jacmel ........................................ 348,278 1,424,680 319,898 976,496
Jeremie .................................... 1,388,783 3,802,472 976,945 3,367,724
M iragoane .................................. 226,319 1,053,452 243,322 978,681
Port-au-Prince .......................... 335,062 1,216,208 284,284 812,484
Port-de-Paix ............................ 1,368,940 6,376,329 1,155,268 4,080,022
Saint-Marc ................................ 1,554,306 7,493,516 1,551,003 5,468,348
7,301,565 30,648,647 5,859,175 20,115,535 The increase recorded in 1946-47, as compared with the preceding year, appears to have been the consequence of increased production in almost all the regions of the country where bananas are grown. In fact, exports increased at all ports except Cayes and Miragofne. It should be pointed out that prior to April 1945, only one grantee, the Standard Fruit & Steamship Company, had the monopoly to buy all bananas of the Gros Michel variety, produced throughout the Republic of Haiti. In April 1945, the monopoly held by this Company was limited to a given zone. Later on this zone was again reduced and to date seven Compagnies, grantees of the monopoly to buy and export bananas conceded to the State by the Law of July 17, 1947, are engaged in the exportation of this fruit.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 29
To conclude this short summary of the facts recorded during the fiscal years 1945-46 and 1946-47, relative to the exportation of bananas, it is pertinent to note that in addition to the tax of Gde. 0.10 instituted- by the law of May 21, 1945, there is assessed on every count bunch exported, since the month of December 1946 (Law of December 13, 1946), an export duty based on the sale price of one hundred pounds. This tax averaged, during the fiscal year under review, Gde. 0.80 per count bunch. In addition to the export taxes mentioned, each stem of bananas is subject to a special charge of Gde. 0.05 to cover, in part, the cost of operation of the service created by law of September 15, 1947 to control the banana industry. Also each standard stem is subject to a special charge of Gde. 0.25 as a contribution to the treatment of banana diseases.
Sisal Exports.
During 1946-47 exports of sisal exceeded both in quantity and in value those of each of the three preceding fiscal year, as shown by the following table: Kilos Gourdes
1943-44 .............................. 8,796,589 7,725,820
1944-45 .............................. 9,167,222 8,381,183
1945-46 ............. ............ 16,821,334 14,740,732
/ 1946-47 .............................. 21,156,636 28,356,768
The most striking fact to be noted in the above table is that the increase in value recorded in 1946-47, as compared with 1945-46, was relatively much greater than the increase in the volume exported. This disproportion is accounted for by a marked rise in the price of sisal on the foreign markets during the fiscal year under review.
The average price of sisal, over the past ten years, is shown below:
Gourde per kilo
1937-38 ........................................... 0,448
1938-39 ........................................... 0,361
1939-40 ......................... 0,428
1940-41 ............................................ 0,400.
1941-42 ............................................ 0,729
1942-43 ............................................ 0,919
1943-44 ............................................ 0,878
1944-45 ............................................ 0,914
1945-46 ............................................ 0,876
1946-47 ........................................... 1,340
It is interesting to note that 4,242,171 kilos of the 21,156,636 kilos shipped during 1946-47, were exported by the Socit6 Haitiano-Americaine de D6veloppement Agricole, whereas the exportations of this corporation during 1945-46 amounted to only 2,591,273 kilos.
Cotton Ex ports
Cotton export statistics for 1946-47, as compared with those of the three preceding years, are shown below:
Kilos Gourdes
1943-44 .................................. 4,679,996 5,478,829
1944-45 ......... ..........1,037,300 1,647,319
1945-46 ................................. 4,867,842 8,733,396
1946-47 .................................. 267,973 776,964




30 IBANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
In the absence of data relative to the production of this commodity and to stocks held as of September 30, 1946, it is not possible to indicate precisely the causes of the decrease recorded in the exportations in 1946-47. Such a sharp fall in the quantity exported appear's even more abnormal when it is considered that from 1940-4 1 to 1946-47, the price per kilo of cotton sold abroad, has never been as high as in 1946-47:
Cotton Prices
Gourde per kilo
1940-41.................................. 0,88
1941-42.................................. 1,03
1942-43.................................. 1.07
1943-44.................................. 1.17
1944-45.................................. 1.59
1945-46.................................. 1.79
1946-47.................................. 2.90
It would seem, however, that the fall indicated above, may be attributed both to purchases by the Soci6t6 Anonyme Filature, Tissage et Confection d'Haiti, for'the local manufacture of textiles and to purchases of this commodity by exporters, who forwarded about 1,235,000 kilos 'in October 1947.
Raw Sugar Exports
The exportations of raw sugar in, 1946-47 exceeded, both in quantity and, in value those of the fiscal year 1945-46, and compare as follows with those of the fiscal years 1943.44 and 1944-45:
Kilos Gou-des
"1943-44....................... 77,384,528 21,560,520
1944-45 ...................... 29,276,010 9,744,086
1945-46 ...................... 20,667,088 8,377,428
19.46-47 ...................... 26,103,214 ,14,174,536
It is to be noted that, due to price variations, there is not a constant relation between quantities exported and their corresponding values.
The average F.O.B. price of sugar manufactured in this country and sold abroad during recent years may be presented as follows:
Gourde per kilo
1937-38 ................................ 0,111
1938-39 ................................ 0,131
1939-40 ................................ 0,158
19,40-41 ................................ 0,103
1941-42 ................................ 0,276
1942-43 ................................ 0,293
1943-44 ................................ 0,279
1944-45 ................................ 0,333
1945-46 ................................ 0,405
1946-47 ................................ 0,543
The price of sugar, in 1946-47, it will be noted, was approximately 1007o above the 1943-44 figure. Accordingly, in May 1947, considering that the export tax in force did not permit the State to participate sufficiently in the profits realized by exporter of sugar, molasses and cane syrup, the Government drafted a law which was voted by the Legislature on June 3,




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 31
1947 and published in the Moniteur of June 9. Under the terms of this law products mentioned are subject to an ad valorem export tax the rate of which varies with the average FOB price of each shipment.
Handicraft Exports
Exports of handicraft articles, for the fiscal year 1946-47, were disappointing when compared with those of fiscal years 1944-45 and 1945-46, as shown by the following table:
1946-47 1945-46 1944-45
Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes
Sisal shoes & slippers .................... 148,014 2,080,735 208,579 3,323,239 42,326 679,866
Mahogany ware ...... 109,376 1,049,530 198,808 1,665,867 298,319 2,263,401 Sisal hand bags ...... 89,022 660,414 239,403 1,905,383 160,431 1,683,959 Cane and coconut
straw braids ........ 53,856 405,175 93,965 996,850 86,065 860,710 Straw hand bags .... 29,426 170,588 57,880 552,120 '20,178 253,442 Straw shoes and
slippers .............. 9,060 96,239 3,643 29,114 29,153 408,706
438,754 4,462,681 802,278 8,472,573 636,472 6,150,084
The decrease in 1946-47 shipments does not mean, however, that handicraft articles are doomed to disappear altogether from the table of exports nor that they will eventually even occupy their minor pre-war place. Improvements in recent years in the manufacture of mahqgany ware, sisal shoes, slippers and handbags especially, have secured a market in the United States for these articles that will be maintained, if the Haitian manufacturers do not lose sight of the effort which is necessary to meet the competition of other countries, and keep on improving their production methods.
The fall in the exports of the year under review seems to have resulted from competition. This was to be expected with the resumption of commercial relations between the United States of America and the countries manufacturing handicraft articles which had been practically excluded from the American market on account of the war.
Essential Oil Exports
Exports of essential oils for the year under review, compared with those of the two preceding fiscal years, show increases both in volume and in value: 1946-T 1245-46 1944-45
Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes
Oil of Vetiver .............. 9,686 1,414,500 7,658 1,614,000 3,518 465,693
Lemol Grass ...... 23,903 673,138 8,071 143,585 4,743 38,528 Amyris .............. 17,613 296,530 8,511 212,792 10,216 284,336
. Lime .................. 5,068 211,460 7,794 387,425 10,078 536,441
" Petit Grain ........ 3,737 85,566 4,640 84,855 3,082 58,020
Neroli ................ 12 8,475 ........ 15 540 412,100
" Citronella .......... 181 2,500 687 34,365 186 10,225
Sweet basil ........ 6 2,100 67 23,500 94 25,590
Shaddock .......... ........ ................ 38 601 ........ ................
60,206 2,694,269 37,466 2,501,138 32,457 1,830,933




32 B3ANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
This continuous growth in exports indicates the soundness of the local essential oil industry which developed only during the recent war but which, it appears, is now sufficiently strong to meet competition from other countries producing these oils. It should be noted that the fall in the average sale price in 1946-47, indicated in the above table, was largely compensated by an increase in the volume shipped.
Tariff Modifications
During the fiscal year 1946-47 the following modifications were made to the import tariff annexed to the Customs Law of July 26, 1926:
Paragraph No. 13267 of the tariff was modified by the law of March 5, 1947. Under the new law Churches established in Haiti, Charity Organizations recognized in Haiti and the Haitian Red Cross are exemptedfrom customs duties on all articles, new or used, sent to them to be gratuitously donated to the poor, regardless of the country of origin of the. articles.
By Law dated March 17, 1947, the duties provided* for by paragraphs 1603 and 1604 of the tariff on copper ingots, bars, sheets and bearings were reduced from Gde. 0.30 and Gde. 0.40 respectively to Gde. 0.15 the gross kilo.
Also to be mentioned is the law of July 31, 1947 by which the import duties on lard substitutes or imitations, paragraph 12012, were temporarily reduced from"Gde. 0.60 to Gde. 0.20 per Net Kilo.
Import duties on gasoline, naphtha, and benzine, taxable under paragraph 211 of the tariff, were increaEsed from Gde. 0.65 to Gde '0.73 per gallon of 3,7853 liters by the law of September 15, 1947.
This tariff, which is more than 20 years old, should be entirely revised. Certain duties applied to articles of first necessity are obviously too high; others do not offer sufficient protection to certain new industries or to industries which might be developed in Haiti.
Such an undertaking, however, as the complete revision of the customs tariff, requires thorough examination. As a matter of fact, import duties represented in 1946-47, 59.09 per cent of the State revenue. it would, therefore, be most advisable to. modify the tariff only after careful study of statistical data covering a long period, with a view to ascertaining the effects of such changes on the receipts of the Public Treasury. The following should, as much as possible, be taken into account: the coefficient of elasticity of the demand for each article; the duties collected under each paragraph during the period considered; the effects of the modifications of duties on the cost price and the sale price of each article; the imperfect competition, and -others factcrs.
A task of this scope can be accomplished only after a careful study extending over several years. Meanwhile, it is imperative that the public be furnished with a codification of all different modifications made to the




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 33
tariff since 1926 and, in appendice, an alphabetical index indicating the paragraph under -which each article is taxable in accordance with the various instructions, circulars and decisions issued from time to time, by the different organizations in charge, since 1926, of the control of customs operations.
The undersigned anticipates that the publication of this work, though L r useful in avoiding erroneous taxations; and supplementary duty bills, will
give rise to criticisms. However, bearing in mind that an examination of the numerous assimilation made in the past, with a view of modifying them either through administrative decisions or by legislative action, will unduly delay the printing of this publication, we, have thought it better to provoke these criticisms, as we feel sure that they will help the new administration eventually to effect the necessary changes.
Air Traffic
Although the number of airplanes which visited Haiti during 1946-47
was considerably less than in the prior year, the number of passengers arriving and departing by air increased by approximately 100 per cent. The transportation of merchandise by plane also increased to a considerable
extent.
Statistical data on air traffic are given below: Planes and Passengers
1946-47 1945-46 1944-45
Number of airplanes landing ir and leaving Haiti 1,799 3,436 4,602 Number of Passengers incoming ..................... 7,286 3,693 4,903
Number of Passengers outgoing ......................7,460 3,832 4,939
- Air Express
~Incomiing:
194G-47 1L945-46 1944-45
~Number of Packages ............. 10,799 7,428 7,779
Weight (ilos).................... 160,573 62,226 85,198
Value (gourdes)................ 4,324,580 1,313,224 1,256,535
Outgoing
Number of Packages ................. 7,996 5,493 1,650
Weight (kilos) .................... 91,162 51,498 11,634
Value (gourdes) .............. 1,817,176 1,424,618 1,020,150
It appears from the above figures that imports and exports by air express
increased notably in 1946-47, as compared with the preceding fiscal year.
From the point of view of volume, increases recorded were 158%o for imports and 77%~ for exports.
Maritime Traffic
The net tonnage of vessels entering Haitian ports during the fiscal year
1946-47 increased substantially compared with the preceding fiscal year:
Number I
Fiscal year Of Vessel, Net Tonnage
1939-40 ...................498 1,412,023
1940-41 ..... ............................ 442 1,253,681
1941-42 ................................. 206 350,967
1942-43 ...........................;........211 159,011
1943-44.................................. 566 206,193
1944-45.................................. 786 191,402
1945-46.................................. 634 511,385
1946-47.................................. 734 774,025




34 BANQUET NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAiTI
It will also be noted that there was a corresponding increase in the number of vessels entering Haitian ports from October 1946 to September 1947.
Building Activity
According to figures compiled by the Department of Public Works, 150 building permits were issued at Port-au-Prince and P6tion-Ville during the Fiscal Year 1946-47.
The amounts invested in these; constructics, as shown by plans and estimates communicated to Public Works, indicate that the building industry, instead of developing, declined somewhat during the fiscal year ended September 30, 1947, as compared with the previous fiscal year: Buildings Constructed
1946-47 1945-46'
Buildings Value Buildings Value Number Gourdes Number Gourdes
Port-au-Prince ...................... 136 2,647,675 127 3,433,832
Pftion--Ville ........................ 14 52,850 17 404,63,7
Considering the housing shortage which has prevailed in recent years, both in Port-au-Prince and Petion-Ville, the decrease may be attributed, in part, to the increase in labor costs which was sharply accentuated during the Fiscal Year 1946-47.
Atlantic Refining
The drilling of a deep well on a property located in the Plaine du Cul de Sac which was started on July 23, 1946 was duly pursued. The Company discontinued work after reaching a depth of 8045 feet, no favorable indication of the presence of petroleum having been found.
The equipment was shipped to Saint-Marc and the drilling of another well started on a lot located in that district. After reaching a depth of 4000 feet the Company decided to abandon this well, in view of the unfavorable geological formations encountered.
American Sanitary Mission
During the fiscal year ending September 30, 1947, the American Sanitary Mission, operating in conjunction with the Department of Health of the Haitian Government, carried forward the cooperative program for the improvement of health and sanitation conditions in Haiti inaugurated October I, 1944.
The Institute of Inter-American Affairs in order to carry out the provisions of the Basic Agreement as amended maintains in Haiti a group of technicians and other specialists consisting of a Chief of Field Party, a Medical Officer and Associate Chief of Field Party, a Business Manager, a Public Health Nursing Officer and a Public Health Nurse to supervise the various types of work carried on by the American Sanitary Mission. The




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 35
salaries and expenses of this group are paid exclusively by the United States Government, no part of the joint funds being used for this purpose.
The principal accomplishments of the Mission during the fiscal year under review were as follows:
Haitian General Hospital Port-au-Prince
Improvement work started in November, 1945 was practically brought to completion and included:
1.-Installation of a water storage reservoir having a 40,000 gallon
capacity which will provide ample water for the present and future
needs of the hospital;
2.-Construction of a sewage disposal. system connected to a city outfall
running into the sea;
3.--Construction of a modern laundry equipped with water softening,
hot water and steam production;
4.-Sanitary facilities comprising the installation of a dispensary toilet
and a new line to replace an old clogged sewer passing by ward No. 3.
Maternity Hospital Chancerelles
The market at Chancerelles built by the American Sanitary Mission in .1943 hadibeen used very little and inasmuch as l4ospital facilities were inadequate the Mission was requested by the Haitian Government to convert the market building into a maternity hospital. A project authorization was signed on February I, 1947 to cover this conversion. Sanitary facilities were installed including toilets, wash basins, outside privies and a pipe connection to the main line. As of September 30, 1947, this project'was 98% completed.
Health Centers La Saline and PortaUl Leogane
In 1943, at the request of the Haitian Government a health center was constructed at La Saline (Cit6 Vincent), a densely populated section of Port-au-Prince, to be used as a training center for public health nurses, sanitary inspectors and public health officers.
In view of the rapid growth of the La Saline center to the point where over-crowding resulted in inefficiency, it was decided to enlarge the present health center at La Saline and also build a new health center at Portail L6ogane in Port-au-Prince. This area is on the other side of the city in the slum area. Construction began at Portail L6oghne in May and was completed in December, 1946. Work started on the enlargement of the La Saline health center in July, 1946 and was completed in June, 1947.
The health center at La Saline is staffed and operated by the National Health Department with technical guidance provided by the American Sanitary Mission.
During Dr. Richard J. Plunkett's visit in Haiti, in February, 1947 it was decided, after conferences with officials of the Haitian Government, that




36 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
the Portail Lfog~ne health center would be staffed and operated by the American Sanitary Mission. It was opened on April I, 1947 and was operated all through this period.
Cap-Haifien
A survey of the rural area near Cap-Haitien revealed the need for a health center and small hospital. A contribution was received from the citizens of the area and the work of designing this structure was begun immediately thereafter. This project was begun in May, 1947 and by September 30, 1947 was,97% completed.
Laboratoy
On December 23, 1946, a North American serologist joined the American Sanitary Mission staff. It was originally intended to set up a separate serological laboratory but certain supplies were impossible to obtain .Consequently, he was assigned to the laboratory of the General Hospital in Port-au-Prince. The improvement of serological techniques and the introduction of multiple testing methods were undertaken. ,Advanced training was being given to five persons: three were already on the laboratory staff in the Port-au-Prince General Hospital, one was from Cap-Haitien, and the other from Gonalves. These people now form a nucleus capable of training others. In addition, instruction was given in improving the techniques used in the hematology, bacteriology, and blood chemistry sections of the laboratory. This course was completed in June, 1947.
Eradication of Yaws
Under this project the following clinics for the treatment of yaws were established and closed todate:
Date Date
Location Established Closed
Gressier ...................................................................... M arch 1943
*Cayes-Jacmel ..................................... ...................... April 1943
C6tes de Fer ................................................................ Dec. 1943 Dec. 1945
Savane Zombi ............................................................. M ay 1944 June 1946
K enscoff .................................................................... June 1944
La Vall~e ....................................... Jan. 1945 June 1946
Grand Go~ve ............................................................ July 1945 July 1946
St. M ichel du Sud ........................................................ Sept. 1945 July 1946
A quin ................................. ..................................... Jan. 1946 June 1947
Petite Rivi~re de Nippes ............................................ Jan. 1946 Nov. 1946
Fonds Verrettes .......................................................... June 1946 Sept. 1946
V ialet ........................................................................ July 1946
M aniche .................................................................... July 1946 N ov. 1946
*M oron ........................................................................ July 1946
M irebalais .. ............................................................... Sept. 1946
Pine Forest .................................................................. Oct. 1946 Feb 1947
5D ucis .......................................................................... N ov. 1940
Petite Rivi&re de l'Artibonite .................................... Dec. 1946 Sept. 1947
Anse d'Hainault (Francklin) trial clinic December, 1946, full time January, 1947 ................................ Dec. 1946
Thom ende .................................................................. Jan. 1947
*Full time clinics, the others being weekly.




REPORT OF FISCAL, DEPARTMENT 37
The present Agreement with Haiti terminates on June 30, 1948. The program planned for the 1948 includes water supply and sewage disposal for Cap-Haitien, water supplies for Verrettes and Hinche, continuation of the yaws eradication program, operation of the health center at Portail L6ogfne, malaria control projects at Gros-Morne, Petit-Trou de Nippes and Verrettes.
Cooperative Food Production Program
During the year ended September 30, 1947, the Cooperative Food Production Program completed work on previously unfinished projects, undertook several new ones, and undertook to-prepare surveys and studies for a long term program of agricultural development in Haiti.
Work on the Torcelles irrigation project was completed with the construction of a 760-meter masonry canal, a new flume over the Manegue River and a masonry retaining wall above the dam, and repairs to the base of the aqueduct and general strengthening of minor weaknesses in the system.
To continue the work which had been started at La Gonave, a new agreement was signed to keep a Food Mission agricultural agent at the headquarters which had been erected there and to continue the nursery work and extension work among the peasants.
To continue the livestock work at Papaye Farm, Hinche, an agreement was signed whereunder the Food Mission allocated $5,000 to this project, agreed to purchase supplies and equipment, and to furnish technical advice. To further improve the livestock in Haiti, a Food Mission technician arranged for the purchase in the United States and shipment to Haiti of 5 Guzerat Brahman bulls, 5 Guzerat Brahman heifers, 4 jacks, 3 jennets and 2 rams to be used for breeding purposes. These animals arrived in Haiti in April, 1947.
A project was set up to import into Haiti machinery and equipment necessary to bring into cultivation large areas which have been lying idle.
During the summer of 1947 the students of the National College of Agriculture were given two months' training at the various projects of the Food Mission. All expenses were paid and a small allowance given them. The students all worked on two of the projects, either at La Gonfive, Bois Dehors, Damien or Hinche.
-The training grants to Haitlan agronomists to study in Puerto-Rico were so successful the previous year that during this year five more grants were given. The men's studies included soil conservation, rural extension world vegetable farming and tobacco culture, and their aptitude and application have been highly commended by their instructors.
A limited program of rural extension work has been started by the Program and it is planned to expand this when an experienced technician joins




38' BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D' HAITI
the staff of the Mission. Most of this work to date has been done at Dub&dou where the Food Supply Program repaired and improved a small irrigation system.
In March 1947, 40 acres of land at Damien were assigned to the Food Mission for the, purpose of setting up a training and demonstration farm. This land has all been cleared and put into cultivation, experiments with new varieties of grain sorghum and vegetables being of particular interest. For example, two new varieties of grain sorghum tried appear capable of producing three crops a year instead of the one crop given by local varieties. Pastures have been. cleared and fenced and temporary pastures which have been laid out have helped improve the dairy herd at Damien considerably. Students of the college are given training on the farm and an opportunity to learn about the machinery and farm groups are invited to see the advantages of modern methods of farming.
At the request of the Government, extensive surveys and studies for drainage and irrigation in and general development of the Artibonite Valley have been carried on and will be continued. In conjunction with these studies a project was set up to operate a farm at Bois Dehors to determine whether or not land below the 5-meter co ntour, previously considered too saline for cultivation, could be reclaimed. Headquarters buildings have been erected, 125 acres of land cleared, a pump set up at Tabourb6 Basin and an irrigation canal cut to the farm. Experiments to date with various crops indicate that with sufficient irrigation and drainage to wash the soil much land formerly thought to be completely useless can be put into cultivation.
Conclusion
Fiscal receipts, in 1946-47, exceeded by far those recorded in any year since the establishment in Haiti of statistical data on Government revenue.
This excellent fiscal situation enabled the Government to realize, largely \.with treasury funds, the financial liberation of Haiti.
The foreign trade values also exceeded considerably those of any previous year for which statistical data are available.
As a result of the repeal of most of the restrictions on foreign trade by the United States of America, and of a marked increase in the tonnage of vessels entering Haitian ports, import values rose, the population having lost no time in laying in supplies of many staples of which it had been deprived during the war years.
It is significant to note that in spite of the increase in import values, a large favorable trade balance was recorded.
The conclusions which one, might be inclined to draw from comparison of Government receipts and foreign trade values of 1946-47 with those of the previous fiscal year would be superficial. A report such as this one, having necessarily a practical purpose, must present information permitting




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 39
the study of what economists call the <(conjuncture>> which corresponds to the notion of an evolution tied-otherwise than by more chance-to a set of phenomena. In other words, this report should indicate the adjusted curve of a sequence of economic phenomena facilitating the search for constant antecedents, and accordingly, for causal relations, with a view to the application of the necessary measures of redress. The study of these phenomena, for such a purpose must cover a long period of time. On the other hand, the increase recorded in government receipts and foreign trade values in 1946-47 were due to factors which during recent years, almost everywhere in the world, caused a sharp inflationary trend, there by distorting, through depreciation of currencies, or rising prices, the comparison
over a long period of statistical data expressed in values.
For these reasons, when making a study of the oconjuncture)> over the
last thirty years, we deem it more advisable to consider the variations of these data, not in currency, but in volume, that is to say, in physical amounts, in order to bring out the general trend of actual income in Haiti
since 1916,
It appears from more complete tables published in the report that the
average volume of coffee, cotton and raw sugar exports were as follows:
Periods
Coffee *.Cotton Raw Sugar
Kilos Kilos Kilos
1916-17 to 1925-26....................... 30,684,024 3,191,787 4,637,247
1926-27 to 1935-36............... 31,311,467 5,276,827 18,250,128
1936-37 to 1940-41....................... 23,5 9,6,493 4,096,127 30,333,891
1941-42 to 1945-46....................... 24,263,796 2,975,315 31,516,824
1946-47........................ 24,659,421 267,973 26,103,214
Exports of cacao also show no improvement, the average amount exported having declined from an average of 1,933,755 kilos for the period
from 19 16-17 to 1925-26, to 1,902,404 kilos in 1946-1947.
Several other export products which thirty years ago represented an
important part of our economy, have considerably decreased. Among these items, may be mentioned honey, which declined from an average of 639,813 kilos from 1916-17 to 1925-26 to 165,194 kilos in 1946-47; Iogwood which, during the period from 1916-17 to 1925-26, showed an average of 41,343,196 kilos, dropped to only 5,056,250 'kilos in 1946-47. The amounts of corn exported during the same periods were 1,163,120 kilos and 293,800 kilos respectively. Exports of lignum vitae. were 3,3 73,7 70 kilos and
1,282,954 kilos during the above m entioned periods.
On the other hand, exports of various other commodities increased considerably. Bananas, for example, of which there were practically no exports thirty years ago, has become one of the main sources of our purchasing fPower, the amount shipped having been 7,301,565 stems in 1946-47. Sisal
also, which was almost nonexistent in 1916, is becoming more and more important in the economy of the country. In 1946-47, there were exported




40 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
21,156,636 kilos of sisal. Exports of castor beans rose from 640,917 kilos, for the period from 19 16-17,to 1925-26, to 3,216,451 kilos. in 1946-47 and goatskins, from 141,206 kilos to 266,296 kilos, while molasses increased from 6,375,098 kilos during the period 1926-27 to 1935-36, to 13,225,808 kilos in 1946-47.
Handicraft articles made from sisal and mahogany, as well as essential oils, are now exported in increasing amounts.
In view of the lack of adequate statistical data, it is not possible to give a definite answer to the questions concerning income and y ield problems which have a bearing on the whole economic life. Some commodities, such as coffee, which constitute the, frame-work of our economic system, decreased noticeably. It is true, with reference to coffee, that since the population has increased, a higher amount of this commodity is consumed locally, but it is obvious that the foreign exchange derived from sales abroad of. our key product, has decreased. Cotton exports also declined very appreciably. It is to be noted, in fact, that even when shipments made in October 1947 are added to those recorded from October 1, 1946 to September 30, 1947, the amount exported do not total 1,500,000 kilos, while for the 29 previous years, the average annual shipments were approximately 3,885,000 kilos. Other commodities, which in 1916 -were not produced in commercial quantities or exported in rather limited quantities, appear now in the table of exports for relatively important amounts; but aside from bananas, a few (castor beans, goatskins, etc.) represent only a small contribution to our ecoromy, and others, such as sisal and molasses, are a source of income for big companies as well as for the population.
Taking into account all these factors, and while it is not possible in this connection to make unqualified statements, it is doubtful that the actual income of the peasants has improved. Otherwise imports of articles of first necessity would have gone up, it being understood that from 1916 to the end of the fiscal year under consideration, there has not been established in Haiti any industry which might satisfy the needs of the population, with the exception of cooking oil, and recently, soap on a very small scale.
The following statistics, taken from more complete tables published elsewhere in this report, appear to prove that the income of the rural population has not actually increased:
Cotton Fabrics soap Fish Flour
Kilos Kilos Kilos Kilos
1916-17 to 1925-26 ........ 3,196,716 3,218,000 3,232,765 20,257,680 1926-27 to 1935-36 ........ 2,809,010 3,423,817 4,447,649 20,554,890 1936-37 to 1940-41 ........ 2,833,803 3,286,193 2,423,651 8,064,074 1941-42 to 1945-46 ........ 2,314,316 2,814,715 463,330 13,782,105
-1946-47.......2,857,537 2,419,0,23 1,813,889 14,820,539
It is true, on the other hand, that some articles, such as gasoline, cement, etc., were imported in much greater quantities; it is also true that in certain instances, the decrease in imports may be due less to a decrease in the




REPORT OP FISCAL DEPARTMENT 41
purchasing power than to a displacement of the demand toward articles '.of local production or toward other imported articles. But taking into account the nature of these articles, it will be noted that they are not, as a rule, articles of first necessity, and it would seem in order to conclude that the increase in the importation of luxury articles or goods assimilable to such, on the one hand, and the reduction in imports of articles of first necessity on the other hand, imply that during the last thirty years, there was a concentration of capital in the hands of a part of the population.
Restrictions on exports from the United States which existed during a great part of the fiscal year 1946-1947 do not alter the above remarks. It
is true that these restrictions affected the foreign trade of Haiti over a as negligible considering the lengthy period embraced in this study.
While complete statistics are lacking, it is very doubtful- to repeat that the national revenue has increased. The population, on the other hand, has certainly considerably increased during the past thirty years and continues to increase progressively.
It would therefore be fallacious to consider as prosperity the fact that the value of foreign trade has increased and that the circulation of gourdes has risen from an average of Gdes. 8 ,247,616 during the period 1919-20 l923-24,.to Gdes. 32,019,578 in 1946-1947. The truth is that the productivity of our soil is on the decrease, and that to improve this situation, the output of the Haitian peasants, laborers and technicians should be made more efficient by appropriate occupational education and the provision of proper tools. Moreover the consumption of energy is dominant in modern economy; but aside from hydraulic power which exists only potentially, Haiti is very poor in sources of energy. Another crucial question is that of erosion which causes much damage which is irreparable. The situation is aggravated by the fact that the land is divided into many small parcels and is thus ill-adapted to intensive exploitation. A great number of the peasants occupy lots of lands which are too small to be profitable. It is also very important to undertake without, delay the drainage of the swamps, the irrigation of the plains, the construction of roads and trails leading to producing centers, the methodical development of our basic crops: coffee, bananas, cotton, cacao, sisal, rice and food staples.
The Government has resolutely undertaken the* more urgent projects; but these require much money, both for construction and maintenance. The re--orec, f he ubicTreasury wudcvronly a portion of these charges, it being understood as previously pointed out that the purchasing Power of the people is very low. The only solution is to make every effort Possible to increase this buying power; the individual income having thus [been raised, the necessary works could then be undertaken by means of a




42 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
fair and moderate system of taxation. Some may say that we are in a vicious circle since, to increase the purchasing power, we would need a capital that we do not possess. But this is erroneous, as it appears from statistical data that savings have slowly but surely increased. The problem, therefore, is to encourage private interests to invest, in agricultural works or in processing agricultural products, the amounts presently hoarded or invested in buildings or usurious loans.
Since the fiscal year 1941-1942 Haiti has enjoyed a favorable trade balance, totalling approximately Gdes. 80,500,000. To this figure must be added the important invisible exports derived chiefly from the capital investments of SHADA. (Soci6t6 Haitiano-Am6ricaine de D6veloppement Agricole). The balance of payments, in spite of remittances abroad occasioned by the reimbursement of the external debt,. is unquestionably favorable to Haiti and, although limited, Haitian savings exist. These savings, in our opinion, must be the starting point of the national renovation. Confidence must be strengthened, and the necessary guarantees afforded to those willing to invest their capital, or their savings. It is also important to create opportunities for productive investments, by systematically discouraging even by way of taxation, un productive enterprises.
The Banque Nationale de la R~publique d'Haiti has, in this eminently national undertaking, an important task to fulfill. This organization should set the example by guiding and backing up investors on the one hand; and by granting, on the other hand, against appropriate guarantees, the commercial, industrial and agricultural credits indispensable to sustain the efforts and stimulate those willing to invest.
However, we must not lose sight of the fact that Haiti is a country with limited resources and that the execution of the plan above outlined will imply the rational,' methodical and economical utilisation of all means of production. The strict application of sound rules of private and public administration must be the basis of any program intended to give a vigorous impulse toward maximum production.
The effort is not above the possibilities of the Haitian people who are so patient and. courageous. The Government is firmly determined to get the country out of the rut into which it has fallen. Its attempts will be successful and the atmosphere of confidence which it will no doubt succeed in creating essential factor of our economic evolution will lead to the happy results which the Nation as a whole expects from the clearsighted patriotism of its government.
ALEXANDRE DOMINIQUE
Vice-Pr6sident, D6partement Fiscal
Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti
GASTON MARGRON
Co-Pr6sident du Conseil d'Administration
et Directeur G6nral de la
Banque Nationale de la R6publique d-a~id




APPENDIX (LAW)







LAW
OF JULY 12, 1947
(Published in the aMoniteur No. 59, July 14, 1947)
authorizing the Government of the Republic of, Haiti to float an Internal Loan of ten million dollars, United States currency.
DUMARSAIS ESTIME
PRESIDENT DE LA REPUBLIQUE
In view of Articles 61 and 84 of the Constitution;
Considering that the national interest demands that Financial Liberation of the Country be promptly realized;
Considering that it is necessary, moreover, that the Government be enabled to undertake the execution of an important program of economic rehabilitation and of productive public works;
On the report of the Secretary of State for Finance;
With the advice of the Council of the Secretaries of State;
HAS PROPOSED
And the Legislature has voted the following Law:
Article 1.-The Government is authorized to float an Internal Loan of TEN MILLION DOLLARS, legal currency of the United States of America, ($ U. S. Cy. 10,000,000) at the rate of issue of 90%, except as is provioed in Article 17 of the present Law, and at the interest rate of 5% per annum, for the purpose, first, of reimbursing in full the outstanding bonds of the 1922 and 1923 External Loan and second, of executing a program for the economic development of the country.
Article 2.-The bonds of the present Loan shall be issued to the bearer, in denominations of One Thousand Dollars and of One Hundred Dollars; and shall have twenty coupons attached. Each of these two denominations shall have a separate Series letter and a separate numbering.
The wording of the bonds and of the interest coupons shall be substantially in conformity with that of annexes A and B of the present Law.
Article 3.-There shall also be issued bearer bond certificates in denominations of Twenty and of Fifty dollars in conformity with Annex C. Each of these two denominations ofbond certificates shall have a separate Series letter and a separate numbering.
The interest payments on the certificates shall be made upon the presentation of the aforesaid certificates to the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti which shall inscribe the amount of each payment on the reverse of that document.




-46, BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Aiticle 4.-The Liberation certificates issued by the Financial Liberation Committee and bought by the public shall, after having been audited by the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti and with the concurrence of the Secretary of State for Finance, be exchanged against bonds or bond certificates of the present loan.
i
The liberation certificates bought directly by religious, educational, private or other organizations, with the help of funds gathered by subscription, offerings, or otherwise, shall also be exchanged against bonds or bond certificates which shall be registered in the name of the Social Assistance Account.
Article 5.-Each bond and each bond certificate are signed on behalf of the Haitian State of which they are the direct obligations, by the Secretary of State for Finance. They are dated as of July 15, 1947, shall fall due July 15, 1957, and shall bear interest at the rate of 5% per annum payable every six months on January 15 and July 15 of each year.
Article 6.-The registration of the bonds apd bond certificates is optional as regards the principal, but the coupons shall not be registred. Registration shall be made in the manner stipulated in Articles 7 and 8 of the present law.
After the registration of a bond or bond certificate, its transfer* must, in order to be valid, be registered in the manner stipulated in Articles 7 and 8, upon the written request of the registred owner or of a person bearing and order duly signed by him to that effect. Upon the written request of the owner, any bond or bond certificate shall be stricken from the registration list and shall resume its status as a bearer bond; and an indication, of this change shall be made on the reverse of the bond or bond certificate.
Article 7.-The National Bank of the Republic of Haiti, which is the Bank of the Haitian State, is charged, under the. control of the Secretary of State for Finance, with the sale of the bonds or bond certificates of the present loan, and with all arrangements to be made with Banks or other organizations abroad for the purpose of selling these bonds on foreing markets; The conditions of these arrangements shall be submitted for the approval of the Council of the Secretaries of State by the Secretary of State for Finance. The registration of the bonds and certificates in Haiti shall be ,made by the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti, and abroad by the banking or other organizations designated for that purpose.,
Article 8.-The National Bank of the Republic of Haiti and, abroad, Mae banking or other organizations stipulated in Article 7 of the present law shall consider the persons in whose names the bonds or bond certificates shall have been registered as the owners of these bonds or bond certificates and payments shall be made to them and them alone..




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 47
Any registration, to be valid, must bear on the reverse of the bond or certificate, a notation of the registration date, the full name of the beneficiary and the authorized signature of the organizations stipulated. in Article 7.
The bearer of any unregistered bond or bond certificate, or of a bond or bond certificate on the reverse of which the notation of the registration has not been made, as well as any bearer of a coupon (whether or not the bond corresponding to it has been registered) shall be considered as the owner of the bond or of the coupon.
Article 9.-The National Bank of the Republic of Haiti or the foreign organizations stipulated in Article 7 shall note on the bond or bond certificate, the date of the sale or of the exchange opposite this notation; they shall affix their signature and shall keep a register indicating the amount and the number of the bonds and certificates exchanged or sold, the date of the sale or of the exchange and an indication of the registration of the" bonds or bond certificates.
For calculating the first payment of interest there shall be taken into account the date nf the month in which the bond, or certificate has been sold or exchanged. For this purpose, the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti or the organizations stipulated in Article 7, before delivering the bonds to the purchaser, shall detach from the aforesaid bond the expired coupons and shall mark on the next coupon to fall due the date of the sale, thus indicating the fractional amount of interest to which the-bearer is entitled in relation to the date of purchase of the said bond.
Article 10.-The servicing of the interest and amortization payments of the Internal Loan constitutes irrevocably a first lien on all the internal and customs revenues of the Republic of Haiti with priority over all other debts of the State, with the exception of the engagements previously made with regard to the as yet unpaid Foreign Debt.
Article 11.-The Government of the Republic undertakes, as of October 1, 1947 and during the entire duration of the present loan, not to modify the organization and the attributes of the Commercial and Fiscal Departments of the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti, except as regards the preparation of the Ways and Means Budget and the expenditures of the Republic of 'Haiti and of the Communes. The Government may nevertheless by agreement with the Board of Directors of the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti, the members of which, five in number, are appointed for a period of five years beginning October 1, 1947 by the President of the Republic, create such other departments besides those already in existence as may be judged necessary for the economic development of the country. The members of the Board may be removed only for misappropriation, recognized incompetence, improper conduct involving loss of civil and political rights.




48 BANQUE NATIONAL DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
As a consequence of the foregoing, the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti is irrevocably invested with the following functions:.
a)-effect the ordinary transactions of a commercial bank;
b)-effect all the customary transactions of a State bank;
c)-collect the customs revenues;
d)-receive all customs, internal, and other revenues of the State;
e)-inspect the collection of the internal revenues;
f)-accoufit for and disburse the funds of the Haitian Government;
g)-make, in Haiti, the registrations stiupulated in Articles 6, 7, 8 and
9 of the present law;
h)-centralize the registrations made abroad as well as in Haiti;
i) -make monthly deductions from the revenues of the State, in conformity with Article 12; pay, semi-annually, the sums due for interest and amortization payments;
j)-arrange the drawings by lot provided for in Article 13.
Article 12.-The National Bank of the Republic of,Haiti is irrevocably authorized, in conformity with Articles 10 and 11, to take each month from the internal revenue and the customs receipts of the State, onetwelfth, of the monies required in order to ensure the interest and amortization service of the bonds and bond certificates of the present loan.
The Haitian Government undertakes to make the interest and amortization payments provided for in the present law in time of peace as well as of war.
Article 13.-Since the bonds and bond certificates must be -completely amortized by July 15, 1957, at the latest, the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti, assisted by a member of the Chamber of Accounts, a delegate of the Department of Finance and two notaries of the Capital, shall proceed publicly, on the 15th of June and the 15th' of December, each year, to draw by lot one-twentieth of the total number of bonds issued with the view to redeeming them at par. Drawings by lot will then be undertaken with the view to redemption at par of one-twentieth of the number of each category of coupons or bond certificates issued. During the last semester, all bonds and bond certificates still outstanding will be redeemed at par without drawings by lot.
On January 15th and July 15th of each year the amortization of the bonds and certificates drawn by lot will be paid by the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti against presentation of the bonds and certificates drawn by lot.
After the date for the semi-annual payment of amortization, the numbers of the bonds and bond certificates drawn by lot shall cease to bear interest even if these documents are not presented for payment.
The bonds and bond certificates drawn will be immediately perforated with a view to cancellation, removed from the register of outstanding bonds and bond certificates, then burned in the Head Office of the Na-




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 49
tional Bank of the Republic of Haiti in tlke presence of a member of the Chamber of Accounts, delegate of the Department of Finance. The same procedure shall take place with regard to paid-up interest coupons. A report regarding the matter shall be drawn up and published in LE MONITEUR.
However, the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti is authorized to make use of funds destined for this amortization in order to purchase on the open market bonds and certificates at a price which does not exceed par. The bonds and certificates thus purchased for the account of the Government may be paid into the sinking fund. If the nominal total of these bonds and certificates does not reach the amortization figure expected, the procedure ofdrawing by lot as indicated above shall be followed for the balance to be amortized.
Article 14.-The -bonds, bond certificates and interest coupons of the loan as well as the interest paid on the bond certificates are exempted from any present and future taxes whatsoever, particularly the income tax.
Article 15.-The income tax may be paid, two-thirds in cash and onethird in bonds or bond certificates of the present loan.
Article 16.-There shall be granted for a period of two fiscal years on the amount of income tax due by any taxpayer the following deductions to any holder of bonds or bond certificates registered and 'Purchased before September 15, 1947, provided these bonds and certificates have not been redeemed by virtue of Article 13 or otherwise disposed of or transferred: Reduction on
the A m o u n t
due as income
Tax payment
A)-When the amount of the bonds or bond certificates acquired by the ,taxpayer is $ 2,000 or more ...................................................... 5%
B)-When the amount of these bonds or certifciates is $ 5,000 or more... 6% C)-When the amount of these bonds or certificates is $ 25,000 or more... 7% D)-When the amount of these bonds or certificates is $ 50,000 or more... 8% E)-When the amount of these bonds or certificates is $ 150,000 or more... 9% F)-When the amount of these bonds or certificates is $ 250,000 or more... 10% G)-When the amount of these bonds or certificates is $ 500,000 or more... 11% H)-When the amount of these bonds or certificates is S 1,000,000 or more 12%
However, in no case shall the reduction exceed 1/5 of the par value of the bonds purchased.
Article 17.-From the date of the publication of the present law in LE MONITEUR and in conformy with the contracts of the 1922-23 Loan, the Secretary of State for Finance shall form all holders of Series A and C bonds outstanding by publication in two New York newspapers




50 BANQUE NATIO0NALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
of wide circulation, once a week for eight consecutive weeks that the Haitian Government has decided to redeem in cash on October 1, 1947, all Series A and C bonds outstanding.
The bond holders of the 1922-23 Loan ma4, however, if they so desire, exchange the said bonds against the bonds or the bond certificates of the present loan. As compensation and as an exception, an additional payment of 2%o of the nominal value of the bonds presented for exchange shall be granted them in bonds or bond certificates of the present loan. After September 15, 1947, the exchange may no longer take place. The amount of the coupons up to October 1, 1947, will be paid to them in cash.
Article 18.-With a view to rendering immediately available the funds necessary for the redemption of outstanding Series A and C bonds and in order to satisfy the provisions of Article 7 of the Executive Agreement between the United States of America and Haiti signed on: September 13, 1941, the Government is authorized to place at the disposal of the fiscal agent of the 1922-23 loan both the cash values and the proceeds of the bonds at the present time figuring in the non-fiscal accounts, and this, up io the amount of the sums sufficient for the realization of the operation.
the Government in agreement with the Board of Directors of the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti may also utilize for the same purpose such portion as may be necessary of securities and cash values belonging to the State as well as the funds which, in carrying out the law of July' 16, 1926, figure in the conditional liabilities of the balance sheet of the Government under the denomination <(Funds of the Fractional Currency.p
The inactive cash values held to the credit of the Social Insurance Office may, in ageement with the Committee of Direction of this Office, be utilized for the same ends.
In agreement with its Board of Directors the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti is authorized to increase to $ 1,240.000. in bonds of the internal loan the amount of the obligations of the Haitian State which, by virtue of the law of May 21, 1935, figure in the legal reserve serving to guarantee the circulation of the notes issued by that institution. The proceeds of this operation will be paid for purpose of redemption to the Fiscal'Agent of t Ife 1922-23 Loan.
From the date of the issulance of the bonds of the internal loan, the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti will register in favor of the various accounts mentioned above bonds of the Internal Loan tip to the amount of their respective contributions. The Government undertakes to reestablish at the earliest possible date the liquidity of these accounts with the help of the proceeds of the loan or of any other monies available in the Public Treasury, and the Secretary of State for Finance is consequently authorized to take whatever steps may necessary for this purpose.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 51
Article 19.---The Haitian Government shall have the right to repay the lull amount of the bonds and certificates outstanding as of July 15, 1953.
Article 20.-In case of the destruction or loss of registered bonds and certificates the Government shall issue a new bond or a new certificate of the same category, amount and date in place of those destroyed or lost against the delivery by the interested party of a guarantee judged sufficient by the Government.
Article 21.-The numbers of the bonds and certificates drawn by lot in case of partial amortization as well as the numbers of the bonds and certificates outstanding, in case of anticipated redemption, in accordance with the provisions of Article 19, shall, in Haiti, be made known to the interested parties, by publication in a daily newspapers of the Capital, and abroad, by publication in two newspapers of general circulation in the cities where there exists a foreign orgenization charged with servicing the loan.
Article 22.-Any disagreement between the bearers or registered owners of bonds and certificates, and the Government, shall be submitted to arbitration. Each party shall name an arbitrator and if these arbitrators do not reach an agreement a request shall be made to the President ,of the International Court of Justice constituted by the United Nations Charter to' name a third abitrator. The decision of the majority of the arbitrators appointed shall be without appeal and must be executed by the parties in disagreement.
Article 23.-The present law abrogates all laws or dispositions of laws contrary to it and shall be executed at the instance of the Secretary of State for Finance.







TABLES







REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 55
TABLE No. 1
VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS. AND EXCESS OF IMPORTS OR EXPORTS FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Excess Excess
Imports Exports Total Imports Exports
Gosurdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
1916-17 ............. 43.030,428 44,664,428 87,694.856 ................ 1,634,000
1917-1. ... 50,903.468 38,717,650 89,621,118 12,185,818
1918-19.. ............ 85,588,041 123,811,096 209,390,137 .8,223.055
1919-20.............. ..... 136,992,055 108,104,639 245,096,694 28,887,416 ............
1920-2a .................... 59,786,029 32,952,045 92,738,074 26,833,984
192-22 ........... ........ 61,751,355 53,561,050 115,312,405 8,190,305
1922-23 ....70,789,815 72,955.060 143,744,875 2,165,245
73,480.610 70,881,610 144,362,250 2,599,030 .
1924-25 .......................................... 101,187.825 97,018,810 198,206,635 4,169,015 ...........
1925-26 .............................................. 94,257,030 101,241,025 195,498,055 ..; ............ 6.983.995
1926-27 .... ............... 78,756,600 76,495,442 155,252,042 2,261,158 .
19K-28... ......... 10124L283 113,36,230 214,577,513 ............. 12,094,947
1928-29 ........... ........... 86,189,612 83,619,167 169808,779 2570,445 ...............
1929-30 ........................................... 64,208.132 70,722.835 134,930,967 ................ 6,514,703
1930-31..... 47,8M..591 44,817,093 92.698,684 3,064,498 ...............
1931-32. .... 37,305,551 36,106,294 73.411,946 1,190,157 .
1932-3& .... ............. 38,3.943 46,650,356 84,984,309 ................ 8,316,423
1933-34. .. 45,685.20S 61,546,191 97251,399 ............... 5.860,983
2934-5... .. 41,161.621 35,629.205 76,790,826 5,532,416
1935-36. 37,920,626 47,238,594 85,159,220 .............. 9.317.968
193687 ............. 46.075.660 44,854,450 90,930,110 1,221,210
1937-38 ....... 37,973,889 34,731.,952 72.705,841 3,241.937 .......
19-3 .......................40,903.683 36.338,175 77,241,858 4,565,508 .............
1939-40 ............................. ......... 39,700,574 26,995,200 66,695,774 12.705,374 ..............
1940-41 ......................... ..... 37,155,548 33.26,5,37 70,442,0M 3,89,011
1941-42 42.2,5,166 42,896.390 85,171,5..6 605.224
1912-413...................... ........ 49,302,511 53,072,781 102.275,292 . .... 3,870,270
1943-44 ... .. 80,155,359 80,541.692 160,696,971 ............... 386.293
1944-45 ...................................... 65,769,704 85,561,674 151,331,378 ............... 19,791,970
1945-46 ......................................... 79.607,734 114.116,814 193.724,548 34,509,080
1946-47 ........................................ 136,152,008 157,492,052 293,644,060 ................ 21,340,044
Total ...,.............. 2011,432,660 2,059,946,587 4,071,379,256 329,096,282 171,610,200 ,
TABLE No. 2
VALUE OF IMPORTS SHOWING COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN IN PERCENTAGES FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Average Average Average Average Average
Country of Origin 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1941-42- 1945-46 1946-47 1916-17.
1925-26 1935-36 1940-41 1945-46 1 1946-47
Per cenr Per cenrt Per cent Per cenrt Per cent Per cent Per cent
United Kingdom .................... 6.81 8.65 11.97 1.58 0.74 0.68 6.43
United States........................ 2.58 64.60 64.66 77.99 85.97 87.82 75.87
Argentinan........... ......... ................ ........ 2.95 2.74 0.27
Bahama Islands.... .. .. 0.05 0.07 0.13 0.10 0.14
Belgium............ ..... ............... 1.22 1.98 0.02 0.07 0.68
British India,........ ....... 0.07 0.50 1.40 1.75 0.65
Canada ................................. 0.74 1.85 2.01. 2.12 &18
Canal Zone .............. 0.14 0.09 0.01 0.03
Cuba, ............................ 0.22 0.41 1.20 0.52 0.52
Curaao- ............ ... ........... I 1.61 1.82 2.58 2.02 2.39
Czechoslovakia .............. ........ I 0.15 0.43 ....... .......
Denmark ........ ... ................ 0.30 0.17 0.01 0.03 0.19
Dominican Republic ... .............. 0.48 0.26 0.28 0.04 0.02
France ......................................... .. .... 10.61 6.25 3.05 0.08 0.18 0.62 17.70
Germany ............................................. 4.80 3.5 ..
Guiana, British ................................. 0.09 0.01 ......
Italy ........................................................ 0.87 0.77 ........ ........ 017
Jamaica .................. .... 0.11 0.08 0.02 0.01 0.02
Japan ..................................................... 4.71 4.07 E
M exico .... .............. ........ ...... .. ....... .... ......... ........ 8.9 1.2 1.10~i
Netherlands ........ ..................... 2.53 1.17 ...... 0.02 0.30
Norway ....... ....... ........ ..... ........... ....... 0.28 0.18 ..... ........1 0.05
Puerto Rico ....... ........... 1.42 0.55 0.61 0.65 0.19
Spain ........................ 0.13 0.03
Sweden ........................... 0.06 0.11 0.12 0.62 0.31
Switzerland ....... 0.14 0.22 0.20" 0.32 0.36
Trinidad ................................ .. 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.06 0.07
Venezuela ........................................... 0.11 ..... 002 0.05 0.01
All other ........... .....................J 0.24 1.69 0.39 0.70 0.47
Total.... .. .................. 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 10.00 100.00 100.00




56 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 3
VALUES OF EXPORTS SHOWING COUNTRIES OF DESTINATION IN PERCENTAGES FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Average Average Average Average Average
- Country of Destination 191G-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1941-42-- 1945-46 1946-47 1916-171925-26, 1935-36 1940-41 1945-46 1946-47
Per cent Per cent Per cent Par cent Per cent Per cent Per cent
United Kingdom ............ .. 2.93 9.95 15.37 9.64 7.34 9.30 7.21
United States ........... .. 27.91 9.05 48.90 72.93 61.95 59.64 33.46
Bahama Islands ...................................... 0.06 0.28 0.78 0.30 0.35
Belgium .................................................. 7.45 8.94 1.02 5.12 1131
Canada .................................................... 0.65 1.63 4.38 2.36 0.11
Canal Zone .... ......... ..... 0.10 0.07 0.03 0.06
Colom bia .................................................. ........ ........ 4.99 7.65 0.27
Cuba ...................................................... 0.67 0.01 2.00 7.46 0.27
Curagao ................................................... 0.20 0.40 0.53 0.36 0.52
D enm ark ................................................. 7.50 3.39 ........ ........ ........
Dominican Republic .......................... 0.01 0.01 0.19 0.10 0.01
Finland ................................................... 0.10 0.16 ........
France ........................................... 49.24 10.57 0.04 0.89
French Africa .................... 69.16 0.13 0.05 59.=
Germ any ................................................. 3.70 1.87 ........ ........
Italy ......................................................... 6.32 1.95 0.32 1.58 4.15
Jamaica .................................................... 0.02 0.05 0.06 0.02
Japan ...................................... 0.40 1.58 ........ ........
Netherlands ............................................ 1.58 1.39 0.04 0.17 1.73
Norway ................................................... 0.32 0.63 0.33 1.63 8.26
Puerto Rico ............................................. 0.17 0.01 0.18 0.15 0.15
Spain ......................................................... 1.70 ........ ........ ........
Sweden .................................................... 0.46 0.8- 0.06 0.30 0.60
Switzerland ........................................... 0.51 2.04 2.85 1.84
Virgin Islands ........................................0.08 0.24 0.01 0.36 0.06
All other .................................................. 0.14 1.14 0.48 0.61 0.52
Total ................................................. 100.0 100.00 100.00 10000 100.00 10.00 100.00
TABLE No. 4
VALUE OF TOTAL FOREIGN COMMERCE BY COUNTRIES IN PERCENTAGES FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Average Average Average Average Average
Country 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1941-42- 1945.46 1946-47 1916-171925-26 1935-26 1940-41 1945-46 1946-47
Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent
United Kingdom .................................. 4.99 9.27 1332.2 5.,9 4.(3 5.30 6.83
United States ..................... 56.89 36.16 57.40 75.00 71.82 72.71 54.41
Argentina ....................1 1.38 1.17 0.141
'ahama Islands ...................................... 0.06 0.17 0.47 0.22 0.25
Belgium .................................................... 4.42 5.21 0.61 3.04 6.38
British India ................... 0.01 0.27 0.65 0.73 0.30I
Canada ...................................................... 0.69 1.72 3.22 2.26 1.53
Canal Zone .............................................. 0.11 0.08 0.02 0.01 0.02
Co ba ......................................................... 2.68 4.54 0.17
Cuba .. ............................................... 0.44 0.22 1.71 4.61 0,1 7
Curaqao ........................................... 0.89 1.16 1.40 1,06 1.38
Czechoslovakia ....................................... 0.07 0.&5 ........
D en sark ..................................................I 3.98 1.69 0.01 0.091
Domin;can Republic ............................ 0.24 0.14 0.23 0.07 0.011
Finland ................................. 0.05 0.13 0.02 0.08 0.02
France ........................................................ .67 0.04 0.10 0.761
French Africa .................................... 0.06 0.03 ....... ......
Germany .................................................. 38.12 4.21 2.90 .. 38.76
Guiana, British ......................................1 0.05 0.01.
Italy .......................... 3.65 1.36 0.19 0.93 2,31
Jamaica ....................... 0.06 0.07 0.04 0.02
Japan .........................................................1 2.52 2.91 .......
M artinique ...............................................1 0.01 0,03 ..09 0,05
M e eico ...................................................... ........ ........ 4.23 0.57 0.51
Netherlands ............................................. 2.05 1.27 0.02 0.11 1.07
Norway .................................................... 0.31 0.29 0.19 0.96 4.45
Puerto Rico ............................................ 0.79 0.30 0.37 0.37 0.171
Spain ........................................................ 0.93 0.02 .
Sweden ...................................................... 0.27 0.47 0.09 0.43 0.7
Switzerland ............................................ 0.07 0.45 1.22 1.81 1.15
T rinidad .................................................. 0.01 ........ ........ 0.03. 0.04
Venezuela .............................................. 0,0 0.06 0.13 0.03
Virgin Islands ......................................... 0.05 0.11 0.01 0.02 0.02
All other .................................................I 0.15 1.15 0.29 0.28 0.371
Total .... ..................100.00.100.00.100.000....0. 100.00 .00 00 100.00




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 57
TABLE No. 5
VALUE AND PERCENTAGE OF VALUE OF IMPORTS, EXPORTS
AND TOTAL FOREIGN COMMERCE BY COUNTRIES-FISCAL YEAR 1946-47
Country Imports Exports Total
Gourdes Per cent Gourdes Per cent Gourdes Per cent
Antigua .....................................................................46 511 557
Argentina .................................................................. .67,226 0.27 52,011 0.03 419,237 0.14
A ustralia ................................................................ 6 ........ ................ ........ 6
A ustria ..................................................................... 29 ........ ................ ........ 29
Bahama Islands ...................................................... 184,522 0.14 551,939 0.35 736,461 0.25
Barbados .................................................................... ................ ........ 91,352 0.06 91,252 .03
Iyelgium ..................................................................... 919,977 0.68 17,819,454 11.31 18,739,431 6.38
Berm uda ................................................................... ................ ........ 697 697
B olivia ....................................................................... ................ ........ 14 14
Brazil ........................................................................ 21,214 0.02 247 21.461 0.01
British Africa .............................. 20,650 0.01 ................ ........ 20,650 0.01,
British India ............................................................ 882,319 0.65 .............. 882.319 0.30
Canada ............ 4,32,912 3.18 178.378 0.11 4,502,290 1.53
Canal Zone ............................................................. 42 53,091 0.03 53,133 0.02
C eylon ......................................................................... 499 ........ ................ ........ 499
Chile ................. 55,516 0.04 93 55,609 .02
China ........................................................................ 45.386 0.03 24,375 0.02 69,761 0.03
Colombia .................................................................. 67,691 0.05 418,718 0.27 486,414 0.17
Cuba ........................................................................... 710,359 0.52 418,945 0.27 1,129,304 0.38
Curaa ..................................................................... 3,244,397 2.38 821,429 0.52 4,065,26 1.38
Czechoslovakia ........................................................ 6.081 ........ ................ ........ 6,081 ......
Denmark ................................................................... 261,215 0.19 727 261,942 0.09
Dominican Republic ...................... ....................... 21.993 0.02 19,128 0.01 37,121 0.01
Dutch East Indies .................................. 164,455 0.12 ........................ 164,455 0.06
Ecuador ...................................................................... 55,610 0.04 2 56,642 0.02
Finland ...................................................................... 55.09 0.04 ............. ........ 55,039 0.0-2
France ....................................................................... 840,908 0.62 1,39,193 0.89 2,240,101 0.76
French Africa ............................................-............. 13 ..
Germ any ................................................................. 5 ............. ........ 5
Guadeloupe ............................................................... 2,035 695 2,730 .......
Guatem ala ................................................................. 9 1,265 1,274 .......
Guiana, British ........................................................ 6 2,433 2,439 ......
Guiana, D utch ........................................................ ................ ........ 10,374 0.01 10.374 ......
H onduras ................................................................... 8,449 0.01 ................ ........ 8,449
Iran .......................................................................... 192 ........ ................ ........ 192
Italy ........................................2054................................. 23 ,10 0.17 6,53 ,6, 56 4.15 6,768,766 2.31
Jamaica .................................................................... 27,169 0.02 38,29 0.02 65,468 0.02
Luxem burg ............................................................ 17 ............... ........ 17 ...
M adagascar ............................................................... 31,771 0.02 ................ ........ 31,77 0,01
Martinique ................................................................ 22,155 0.02 120,025 0.08 142,180 0.06
M elanesia .............................................................. 9 ........ 9
M exico ....................................................................... 1,502,-95 1.10 123 1.502,518 0.51
M orocco, French.................................................. 8 ........ ................S........ 8
Netherlands ............................................................. 405,874 0.30 2,729,677 1.73 3,135,551 1,07
New.-Zealand .................................. ... 1................ ..........
N icaragua ................................................................. 3 ........ ................ 3
N igeria .........................................18............................ 14,324 0.01 ................ 14,= 0.01
Norway ...................................................................... 69,153 0.05 13,005,978 8.26 13,075,331 4.45
Palestina ................................................................... 669 ....... ............... ........669
Paraguay ....................................... 122 12 .....
P ersia ......................................................................... 71 ........ ................3........ 71
Pcru ....................... ... ......................70....................... 7 7,29 .......
Philippines Islands ..................................... ............. 10 10
Portugal ..................................................................... 16.85 0.01 5 16,5 0.01
Puerto Rico ............................................................. 262,310 0.19 235,942 0.15 498,252 0.17
Salvador ....................................................................53 625 ....... 1,15 .
Siam ............... ....................... 58,723 0.04 ............ ........ 58,733 0.02
Spain .............. ........................ 2,009 ........ ................ ........ 2.009 ......
Sweden .................................. 143.197 0.11 942,369 0.60 1,085,547 0.37
Switzerland............................................................... 483,659 0.36 2.897,677 1.84 3,381,336 1.15
Syria ........................................................................... 1,446 423,640 0.27 425,086 0.14
Trinidad.. ....................................................... 100,889 0.07 18,575 0.01 119,464 0.04
United Kingdom ..................................................... 919,320 0.68 14,641,328 9.20 15.560,648 5.30
United States ..... 119,575,616 87.82 93,929,955 59.64 213,505,571 72.71
rugay ..... ........ .. 1,42S . ...... 25 1,453 W-.
Venezuela ................................................................. 9,95 0.01 64,381 0.04 74.339 0.03
Virgin Islands ...........................-.......................................... 47,578 0.03 47,578 0.02
Total ................... .......... ... .. 136,152,008 100.00 157,492,052 100.00 293,644,060 100.00




58 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 6
VALUE OF IMPORTS BY PORTS OF ENTRY
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Average Average Average Average Average
Port of Entry 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1941-42- 1945-46 1946-47 1916-171925-26 1935-36 1940-41 1945-46 1946-47
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Aquin.................................. 138,469 7,801 852 352 1,002 3,50 47.486
Belladre................................. 3.241 101,408 63,159 43,534 7,480 46,302 52.460
Cap-Haitien....... ........9,140,339 5,562.835 2,895.820 2,889,153 3,345,593 6,559.738 5,887,621
Cayes......... ........... 6.941,638 3,611,826 1,570.564 619.660 944,894 1,682.830 3,811,890
Fort-Liberti ......................... 438 185,259 372,167 1,094,633 776.601 2,392,635 373,664
Glore.............. 40.783 27.538 7,726 1,868 .............. 827 23,613
Gonaives........ ......... 3,827,411 2,427,296 1,153,560 525,311 514,781 L725,855 2,344,106
Jacmel....................................... 4,181,124 2,358,491 465.794 109,124 271,528 201,728 2,208,789
Jirimie..................................... 1,761,355 1.493,372 645,467 626,188 944,144 1,873.679 1,315,459
Miragolne................................ 737,298 525,629 123.347 17,152 38,319 375.997 442,186
Ouanaminthe ............. 157,025 88,359 7.686 28,161 1,210 466 84,953
Petit-Golve............................ 2,378,240 1,016.732 201,348 23,758 15,895 46,149 1,132,949
Port-au-Prince........................ 43,800,513 37,570,158 31,087,809 56,165,169 71.190,823 118,696,343 44,150,578
Port-de-Paix ........................... 2.073,102 1,252,21 592,156 222,629 342,510 521,749 1,220,965
Saint-Marc........................ 2,595,702 1.639,392 1,174.416 1,037,392 1,212,954 2,024.360 1,788.205
Total................................ 77.776,669 57,868.417 40,361,871 63.404.084 79,607,734 136.152,008 64.884.924
TABLE No. 7
VALUE OF EXPORTS BY PORTS OF SHIPMENT
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Average Average Average Average Average
Port of Shipment 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1941-42- 1945-46, 1946-47 1916-17/ 1925-26 19Z5-36 1940.41 1945.46 1946-47
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Aquin...................................... 885,740 230,964 72,419 .............. ............... 114,472 375,607
Belladire............................... 28 5,218 687 1,165 ................ ................ 1.990
Cap-Hlatien............................ 11198,117 7.384,037 3,125,869 6,271,695 10.307,489 20,700,643 7,855,161
Cayes.................................. 5,597,901 5,048.557 3,220,716 3,018.423 6,755,657 8,678,071 4,720,591
Fort-Libert ............................ 192,902 956.600 3,174,146 6,562,552 8,733,503 15.147,992 2,591,178
Glore......................................... 5,507 109 295 224 ............. .............. 1,895
Gonayves................................... 5,776,860 5.661.902 2,259,227 3.397,105 5,066,194 10.133,917 4,929,103
Jacmel ....................................... 9.323,878 7,955,531 2,293.026 3.539,562 7,152,184 9,667,756 6.826,606
Jrimie ......................3........... 3,288.170 3,585,632 754.795 1,901,933 6,613,770 8,586.410 2.922,841
Miragone....... ......... 1,440,35 1,797,392 733,111 397,072 988,442 1080,948 1,261,582
Ouanaminthe...... ........... 8,153 2,111 1,317 32,596 60,016 ............... 8.780
Petit-Gove ............................ 7,082.317 5.810.627 1.600,940 1,458,117 2,257,270 3.078,690 4.725,917
Port-au-Prince ....................... 21.165.030 14.301,396 14,047.079 40,435,738 54.324.049 60,363.621 22.175,547
Port-de-Paix ........................... 3.994,587 2,915.228 1.446,895 2.769,592 5,608.893 8,688.672 3,189,331
Saint-Marc............................... 5.511.232 4,960,828 2.510,741 4,450,084 7,249.347 11.251,85( 4.863,761
Total................................ 74,390,742 60,616,152 35,241,263 75,235,858 114,116,814 157,492,052 66,449,890
TABLE No. 8
VALUE AND PERCENTAGE OF VALUE OF IMPORTS, EXPORTS AND TOTAL FOREIGN COMMERCE BY PORTS-FISCAL YEAR 1946-47
Ports Imports Exports Total
Gourdes Per cent Gourdes Per cent Gourdes Per cent
Aqin. ........ ..-......... .350 .. 114,472 0.07 117,822 0.04
Belladire ..................................-.......................... 46,302 0.03 ................ 46,302 0.02
Cap-Haitien ....................................................... 6.559,738 4.82 20,700,643 13.14 27.260,381 9.28
Cayes .................... ................................... 1,682,830 1,24 8,678,071 5,51 10,360.901 3,53
Fort-Liberti .......................................................... 2.392,635 1.76 15,147,992 9,62 17.540,627 5.97
Glore ............................. ........ ................... 827 ........ ................ ........ 827 .......
Gonaives .... ......................................... .... 1,725.855 1.27 10.13,917 6.43 11.858.772 4,04
Jamcrel................................................................... 201,728 0.15 9,667,756 6.14 9,869,484 3.36
Jrimie ........ .......................................... ......... 1,873,679 1,38 8,586.410 5.45 10,460,099 3.56
Miragoine............................................. 375,997 0.27 1,080,948 0.69 1,456,945 0.50
Ouanamintbe .................................................. 466 ........ ................ ........ 466 .......
SPett- ............. 46,149 0.03 3.078,690 1.95 3,124,839 1.06
Port-an-Prince ........................................... 118.696,343 87.18 60,363,631 38.33 179.059.974 60.98
Port-de-Pai.......................................... 521.749 0.38 8,688,672 5.52 9,210,421 3.14
....Saint-Marc............ ........... 2,024,360 1.49 11,251.850 7.15 13,276.210 4.52
Total............... ................... 136,152.008 100.00 157.492.052 100.00 293,644,060 100.00




TABLE No. 9
NET TONNAGE OF STEAM AND MOTOR VESSELS IN FOREIGN COMMERCE 0
ENTERED BY REGISTRY AND MONTHS-FISCAL YEAR 1946-47
Steam and Motor Vessels Entered 0
American British Dutch Norwegian Honduranian French Cuban Haitian All other Total
Months U
No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No.. Tonnage
October 1946 .............. 3 4,924 17 7,310, 4 2.381 2 7,147 14 27.725 2 5,998 .... ......... 4 251 G 2.604 52 58,340
November .. 8 15,017 22 4,020 6 4,905 2 3.475 21 21,289 2 4,390 ...... .......... 3 158 4 5,151 68 68,475
December .................... 6 9,896 9 2221 8 8,653 13 17,408 1 2.195 .... ............ 4 234 7 5,682 48 46.289 .-z
January 1947 .............. 5 8,788 7 1.395 7 5,084 1 1.137 10 19.391 2 8,186 2 657 ............... 4 43185 38 48,823
February ...................... 11 14,879 7 2,632 4 2.285 -. .......... 13 17,288 2 5.390 .... ........... 6 595 5 5,701 48 48.770
March ......................... 8 16.726 17 9.747 6 3.998 1 1,292 11 17,868 1 2,195 1 554 6" 692 6 4.567 57 57,639 1
April ........................... 14 20,750 21 11,586 6 6,167 -. ........... 8 16,169 5 20,426 1 671 3 134 6 7,487 64 83,390
May .......................... 10 19.917 23 11,608 6 3.230 2 3,583 9 17,770 2 4.390 ... ............ 4 430 5 2,953 61 64,181 tz
June .............................. 12 25.368 31 10.625 4 2.000 2 6,032 10 19,893 1 2,195 2 140 .2 150 8 7,941 72 75,344 0
July .............................. 11 19,575 26 10,416 5 8,192 1 3,556 12 17,456 4 10,902- 2 139 4 113 8 9,633 73 79,982
August ......................... 8 18,249 40 12.747 4 3,903 .... ............ 13 22,113 2 6,577 3 302 2 160 6 7,422 78- 71,473 1
September ......... 12 34.210 26 7.,26 4 2.480 .. ............ 15 18,987 3 6.585 2 963 3 252 10 9,916 75 81,319 c.
Total ........ 108 209.359 246 92,543 64 53.278 11 216,222 149 22.357 27 79.429 13 8,42 41 3,169 75 73,242 734 774,025




60 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 10
NET TONNAGE OF SAILING VESSELS IN FOREIGN COMMERCE ENTERED BY REGISTRY AND MONTHS-FISCAL YEAR 1946.47
Sailing Vessels Entered
British Haitian -'Total
Months
No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage
October 1946C............... ............ ........... ...... 21 232 7 210 34 442
November ......................... ............... 19 189 5 121 24 290
December............................................ 22 159 5 154 27 313
January 1947 ................ .................... 14 120 2 65 16 125
February ..................................... ............ 12 107 4 68 18 175
March.................................................... ...... 12 141 4 101 16 242
April ................................2.................. ....... 3 197 2 45 25 242
May ...................................................... s ...... S l 175 23 28
June ................................................ .......... 32 256 4 104 36 360
July ............... ............................ ..... 26 291 2 56 28 347
August ................................ .... 13 88 3 69 16 167
September .................................. ..... ..... 4 31 4 97 812
Total ...- ............. ... ....... ........ 2 1.902 47 1,266 269 2iG7




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TABLE No. 12
VALUE OF EXPORTS BY REGISTRY OF CARRYING VESSELS-FISCAL YEAR 1946-47 MW
Merchan- McechanCountry, dise free dise subject American British Dutch French Haitian Honduranian Norwegian All other Total Per cent
of duty to duty
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Antigua ................................................ ...... 511 511 .................................................................................. 511 ............
Argentina ................................. ... 9 52002 428 ............... 12.500 3,150 ................ ................ 1,003 34,930 52,011 0.03
Bahama Islands ................................ 113,077 438,962 15,078 397,720 100 ................ 139,041 ................ ................ ................ 551,939 0.35
Barbados ............................................... ................ 91,252 36.076 ...... ................ ................ 55,276 ................ ................ ................ 91,352 0.06
Belgium ................................................ 143 17.819,311 606,085 ................ 11,309.083 1,65,944 ............. .......... 1,762,171 2,276,171 17.819,454 11.31 X
B erm uda ............................................... ................ 697 ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ 697 697 ............... .
B olivia .................................................. 14 ................ 14 ................ ........ ....... ................ ... ............. ................. ................ ........ ....... 14 ................ c
B razil .................... ; ............................... ................ 247 247 .................. ................ .............. ................ ................ 247 .............. .
Canada .................................................. 32,004 146.374 102,453 ................ 16.105 43,573 ............... ................ ................ 16,247 178,378 0.11
Canal Zone .......................................... 57 53,034 48,215 ................ ................ ................ ................ ..... .......... ................ 4,876 53,091 0.03 >
Chile ..................................................... 8 85 93 ..................................... ...93 .....
China................................................... ............... 24,375 24,315 ................................................ ................ ............... ................ ........... .. 24,375 0.020
Colombia ............................................. 3 418,715 40 ................ 418,678 ............................................................ 418.718 0.27 Z
Cuba ........................................ 120,004 29,911 270.812 .. 5.295 120.84............................ 2.004 418,943 0.27 >
120,034 298,911............ E2,3 ........-........ 4895 02
Curaga .................................... 481 820.948 121,038 .......0 ................ 250 ............... 5,540 138251 821,429 0.52 o
D enm ark .............................................. ................ 727 5 ................ 150 ................ ................ ................152 420 727 .......
Dominican Republic ......................... 5,317 7,811- 12,848 ................ 30 ........................................... 250 13,128 0.01
E cuador ........................................ ..... ................ 2 2 .............. ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ 2 ........
France ................................................... 45 1,399,148 57,649 ................ 160.000 1,181,333 ................ ................ ................ 2n/ 1.399,193 >.9 r
Guadeloupe ......................................... ................ 692 87 603 ................ .... ........... ................ ................ 95 ..............
Guatemla ............................................. ............... 685 87........ 6 ....... 3....... 625 ..... ...... ................ 1, ...............
Guiana, British .................................................. 2,433 2,433........... ... .. ........... ................ ................ 2,433 ..........
Guiana. Dutch ................................... 10374........... ................ 4,085 ................ ............... ................ 6,289 10,374 0.01
Italy ...................................................... 6,536,656 2,539,664 ............... 2,019,260 L699,140...........- 53.000 214,392 11,200 6.536,656 4.15
Jamaica ............................................ . 25 38.274 9,132 24,740 427 ................ ................ ............... ................ ................ 38,299 0.02 '
Martinis,,. ...................................... 8 120,017 48 ................ 50 119,050 .. ... .... 877 120,025 0.08 0
Mexico .................................................. ................ 123 83 ............................................................. .40 123 ................
Netherlands .............................. 2,729,677 70,400 ................ 2.019.074 ........................................ 384558 255,645 2729,677 1.73 to
Norway ................................. 13,005.978 184,000 ................ 4,076,300 184.825 ................ 7.258,953 ................ 1,301,900 13.006,978 &20 u
Paraguay .............................................. ................ 122 ................ ............... ............... ........ .............. ....... .... ....... ..... 122 1 .22 ...............
P hilippines Islands ........................... 10 ................ 10 ................ ................ ................ ............... .............. ............... ................ 10 ................ >
Portugal ................................ 5 5 ......................................................... ........................................ 5 .
Puerto-Rico ......................................... 25 215,917 119,356 ................ ................ ................ 22,750 ................ ................ 93,836 235,942 0.15
Salvador ............................................... ................ 625 .................. 625 .............. ................................ ................ 625 ...............
Sweden ................................................942,360 1796............... 707,644 ................ ................ ................ 193,320 39,600 942.360 0.60
Switzerland ......................................... ................ 2,897.677 91.289 ................ 2,743,468 ................ ................ 8................ .1.720 21,200 2,67,677 ..4
Syria ..................... ................ 423,640 ......................... 260,640 ................ ................ ............... 163.000 ................ 423,640 0.27
Trinidad ................ .................... 1.575 18.573 2........................................................... 18,575 0.01
United Kingdom ......................... 14,641,328 1 14,529,547 50,729 61.000 ............. ........ ................... 51 14,641,328 9.30
United States ..................................... 3,940,056 89,989.899 29,386.864 10,348,492 14.03L171 16,249,749 560,001 19,940.844 57.671 3,355.163 03,929,955 59.64
U ruguay ............................................... ............. ... 25 25 25
Venezuela................................. 1.L750 62,631 53.821 ........ 8.810 ........................ ................ ................ 1750 64,381 00
V irgin Islands .................................... ................ 47,578 43358 ................ ................ .............. ................ ............... ............. 4,220 47.578 0.03
Total .......................................... 4,21.06a 153,278.986 33,816.929 25,304.499 38,401,201 21,409,372 898,152 27.253.422 2,823,517 7,585,950 157,492,52 100.00
P r ns....................................... 2.67 07.33 21.417 16.07 24.33 13.-9 0.57 17.31 1.79 4.82 .............. ................




/
TABLE No. 13
VALUE OF IMPORTS BY MONTHS AND PORTS OF ENTRY
FISCAL YEAR 1946-47 COMPARED WITH 1945-46
0O
Total Total
Port of Entry October November December January February March April May June July August September 1946-47 1945-46 Increase Decrease O
Gourdes Ges Godes Gourdes Gour des Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Aquin...............9 127 475 195 127 610 177 186 123 554 344 423 3,350 1,002 2,348 .......
Belladire ................... 25 110 210 ................ 775 .. ........... 3,775 .............. 744 40,663 ................ 46,302 7,480 38,822 .........
Cap-Haitien ............. 208,471 138,976 374,662 608,481 732,064 896,918 496,799 495,039 812,107 848,760 521,112 526,349 6,559,738 3,345,593- 3.214,145 ..........
Cayes............... 34.977 83,433 93.978 139.891 195,266 193.434 201,377 208,322 123,258 109,066 79,404 220.424 1,682,830 944,894 737,936 ..........
Fort-Liberti ............ 145.171 11.109 394,256 38 576.395 120.871 320.704 136.807 146,735 224,756 128.664 187,129 2.392,635 776,601 1.616.034 .......
G lore ...................... .. ................ ... ............ .............. ................ -.. ..... ............. 82"7 ................ ................ ............... ..... ................ 827 ................ 827 ;o... .
Gonaives........... 22,93 14.026 45,685 9120W 263.453 211.756 199.323 143,4 227.610 105,895, 61,991 337,465 1,725,855 514,781 L21.074 .
Jacmel...................... 51.059 16.910 1,858 3.493 6,948 2,375 4,829 74,135 4.646 2,939 10,853 21,683 201,728 271,528 ........ 69,800
Jrimie .................. 221.580 74,443 64,918 81.666 98.931 461,898 187,037 88.656 205.145 80.472 74.690 244,243 1.873,679 944,144 29.535 ............
Miragolne............... 7.214 63 106,666 67,889 84,741, 30.634 17.966 11,849 5,825 10.098 9.161 23.891 375.997 38,319 337,678 ..
Ouanaminthe .......... 42 ................ 15 .............. 109 .............. 41 108 ................ ............... 8 143 466 1,210 ................ 744
Petit-Goive............ 286 2,071 9,364 8,735 1.034 258 12,521 4.687 3,215 1.033 1.292 1.653 46,149 15.8S5 30,254 ............
Port-au.Prince........ 3.995,068 4,474.348 8.100.272 11.293,646 13,286,055 13 537.723 10.738.754 10.690,763 12,195,663 9.946.249 7,317.003 13,220,800 118.696.343 71,190,823 47,505,520 ..........
Port-de-Paix ........... 54,292 18,156 11,075 44,554 61,652 25,722 91160 35.794 58.200 44,476 46,920 39.748 521,749 342,610 179,239 ...........
Saint-Marc ............... 120.989 175,887 70,267 127,223 94,937 197.957 142,637 82,980 176,696 340,235 180,233 314.270' 2,024.360 1,212,954 811.406 .......... 2
Total 1946-47......... 4,862,166 5.009,659 9,263.701 12,367.931 15.392,487 15,680,155 12.414.152 11.876.649 13,959,222 11,715.327 8.472,338 15,138,221 136,152,00 ................ 56,614818 70.544
Total 1945.46......... 6,434,961 5343,749 6,659,134 5,726,690 6.23586,719 6,52G6,955 6,209,050 8,064,693 6,084,220 6,836,505 6,844,383 8,640,675 ................ 79,607,734 ................. .
Increase 1946-47................ ..... 2,604,567 6.641,41 9,155,768 9,153,200 6,205,102 3.811,956 7,875,002 4,878,822 1,627,955 6,497,646 ................................. ...,....
D ecrease 1946-47... 1,572,795 334 090 ................ .............. ............ ............. .............. ................ ............... ............ ............... ................ ............... ............... ................ .........
Cr




TABLE No. 14
VALUE OF EXPORTS BY MONTHS AND PORTS OF SHIPMENT z
FISCAL YEAR 1946-47 COMPARED WITH 1945-46 0
Strt
Total Total
Port of Shipment October November December January February March April May June July August September 1946-47 1945-46 Increase Decrease
z
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes >
Aquin............ 9,505 13,673 1,541 59,847 7.114 4,644 3.708 2,418 2.082 3,281 ................ 6,759 114.472 ............... 114,472 ........
Cap-Haitien........ 446,893 768,050 3.177,917 1,584762 2,069,902 1.098,035 1,461,669 1,600.242 2,570,719 1.634.206 2,380,417 1,898.831 20.700.643 10.307,489 10,393.154 ........
Cayes................. 3S6.042 1,197.735 475.408 2.417,552 1.435.656 187,095 164,044 176,738 1.167.415 234,164 319.205 517,017 8.678,071 6,755.657 1,922,414 ............
Fort-Liberti .......... 822777 772,725 1,427.726 ........... 1,587,478 919.998 769,473 2.139,402 1.20,743 1.857,520 167,919 3,452,231 15.147,992 8,733.503 6,414,489 .........
Gonaives........... 296.196 1,348.662 1.144,002 1,537,167 1.498.985 240.948 1,251,324 409,550 1,267,761 291,5,35 269.422 577.365 10.132,917 5.066.194 5.066,723 ..........
Jacmel...................... 395.415 1.407.918 956.209 1,073.908 1.567.647 787,979 695,168 865.423 209.283 733,26 810M635 264.909 9,667,756 7,152,184 2,515,572 ...........
Jirimle......... ........ 294.256 1,693,261 1.032,004 1,267,629 323.399 167.689 230,935 467.890 971,105 881.939 496,590 759,313 8,586,410 5.613,770 2.972,640 .........
Miragolne............... 152.505 193,098 74 460 66,386 49,703 86,258 91.318 65,425 86,726 93.512 54.460 67.097 1.080,948 988,442 92.506 ............
O uanam inthe ........ ............... ................ .............. .............. ............... .............. .............. .............. ...............6................0................ ............... .............. 60 016 ............... 60,016
Petit-Goive ........ 3.788 484,SOO 314.621 270 230 855.500 326.800 186,005 ................ 120,000 449.546 67.400 ............... 3,078,690 2,57,270 420 ............
Port-au-Prince ....... 2,675.988 3,856,746 6,467,016 5,6.875.554 3,677.580 8,290.875 2,572 015 5,636,502 7,331,300 2.510.666 6,013,952 6,555,437 60,363.631 54.324,049 6,039,582 ..........
Port-de-Paix ........... 369,352 681,196 633,842 1.005,.826 283,644 530.665 971.170 730.763 973,136 1,114.091 458,249 936,738 8,688,672 5.608,893 3.079,779 ............
Saint-Marc............... 794.939 873,800 937,467 783,325 1.213,322 1,067.674 1,097,487 967.472 1.038.506 836,940 689,522 951,496 11,251,850 7,249,347 4,002,503 ............ t
Total 1946-47......... 6,647.656 13,291,664 16.642.613 15,942.186 14,469,930 13,708,460 9,394,316 13,070.825 16,968.776 10.640,662 11.727,771 14,987.193 157.492.052 ................ 43,435,254 60,016
Total 1945-46......... 5,487,344 7.475,530 9,652.164 6.115,789 10,987.159 8.542,984 13,023,449 11,860.853 7.688,980 10.739,735 12,253,982 10,288,845 .........1141161............ 1141...........
Increase 1946-47..... 1.160.312 5,816,134 6.990.449 9.826.397 3a482.771' 5.165.476 ............... 1.209,972 9.279,796 ............. ................ 4,698,34 ............... ................ ................ .......... ..
Decrease 19 6-47 ... ............... ............. .. ......... ..... ...... ....... 3.629.133 . ............ ............. 99.073 526,211 ............... ................ ................ ................ ............




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 65
TABLE No 15
VALUE O IMPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Average Average Average Average Average
Commodity 1916-17- 1926-27- 1926-37- 1941-42- 1945-46 1946-47 1916-171925-26 1935-36 19,40-41 1945-46 1946-47
Courdes Gcourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gou des Courdes Gourdes
Agricultural implements.............. 519,459 580.634 1,023,415 626,526 1,312,325 691,769"*
Book and other printed matter t 304,603 154.793 156.194 203,700 284,804 232.655**
Cement............................................ 439,939 607.531 685,323 928,181 1.140,524 1,500,421 614,279
Chemical and pharmaceutical
products ................................. 786,512 898,614 890.065 1,624,139 2,007,453 ,3,186.633 1,05L901
Cotton, and manufactures <
other than textiles....... ......... 2,683,915 1.872,145 2,610,825 2,919,277 3.895,661 2,530.936;
Fibers, vegetable, and manufac-
tures of, other than cotton
and textiles................................... 1,985,76 02,308 603,854 1,617,902 1,904;583 1,137,607 1,326,3W
Foodstuffs:
Fish...............................................2,834,858 2,421,726 992,927 330,667 340.850 1,964,068 1,972511
Wheat flour..............................11.3 ,139 7,355,141 2,598,855 6.621,968 9,029,654 12,006,796 7,91,087
Meats ......................................... 1,20.986 889,513 312,374 166,645 229,374 292,026 790,066
Rice ........................................... 1,514,508 1,070,103 212,272 1,280 29 105 868,192
All other..................................... 6,165,680 4,328,423 2,037,244 2,851,582 3,979,499 6,303,700 4,377,060
Household utensils: crockery,
porcelain, glassware, cutlery
and kitchen utensils, of aluminium, iron and steel .......... 976,737 715,108 974,293 1,644,269 7,059,632 1,203.547*
Iron, steel and manufactures of.
other than specified..................... 3,435,82 3,589,013 2.015,721 2,691,517 3.982.083 4.490,882 2.847,542
Leather .............................. ........ 78.1 2M.078 126.014 111,441 163,134 194,232 551,047**
Liquors and beverages ................ 1,331,34 767,839 404,868 369,379 497,962 764,737 1.220.509**
Lumber ................................................. ,2,9 1,185,705 751,098 76,481 116,572 27,880 904,041
Motor vehicles:
Automobiles, passenger ........... 1,181.318 777.925 333,283 810.953 1.858,351 915,598*"
Trucks...................... ...... 376,626 505,418 758,817 L712,389 2.910,584 618,953*
Oils, mineral:
Gasoline.................................. 605,051 1,691,092 953,679 1,204,115 1,153,195 1,688,745 1,143.198
Kerosene................................ 1,01)2,52 1,087,289 572.053 282,687 342,501 600.104 837,560
All other.............................. 268.425 621,409 708,277 1,017,035 L213,762 1,846,548 624,886
Shoes............. . ...................... 614,355 219,938 213,113 162,291 546,844 436,002**
Silk, and manufactures cf, except textiles............................... 168,961 171,252 212.285 233,244 499,512 195,562**
Soap................................................. 3,155,115 2.163,51 1,799,171 3,294,048 2,995,448 4,734,532 2,786,687
Textiles, cotton .......................... 20,4209,296 11,978,376 10,686.461 18,178,653 15,263.153 36,574,521 16.289,574
All other .......................... 2,053,3290 00,655 683,141 1,312,353 1,525,933 4,302,961 1.318,715
Tobacco:
Leaf......................................... 1,59,739 125.356 116.313 489,457 760,416 621,063 764,544
All other................................. 8P.087 144,9525 129,657 178.809 287,443 157,451:
Cigarettes.............................. 105.390 365,768 582,501 1L049,905 1,634,552 464,9875
Cigars................................. 29,574 67,171 34.287 36.431t
Wool, hair and manufactures o
except textiles.......................... 171,378 117,538 108,675 147,784 216,094 145,759*
All other ........................................ 14.920,767 9,228,856 7,587,122 13,121,929 23,198,293 33,384,358 12.207,351
Total .................... .................. 77,776,6"9 57,868,417 40,361,871 63,404.091 79,607,734 136,152,008 68,036,758
*No separate figures available
- *Average for twenty one years only
tPreviously included in



TABLE No. 16
QUANTITY OF IMPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 146-1947
Average Average Average Average Average
1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1941-42- 1945-46 1946-47 1916-171925-26 1935-36 1940-41 1945-46 194-47
Cement ....................................................................... ....................... ........ .............................................. Kilo 4,597.913 7,815,719 9,082,23 7,441,314 9,M3,790 9, 568,22 9 6,7S4,408
Cotton. and manufactures of, other than textiles ................................................................. .. 341,885 36.293 237,674 2S9,872 226,803 317,404"
Fibers, vegetable, and manufactures of ........................................................................................... 717,23 641,405 969,128 1,25,943 509,041 749,'220Foodstuffs:
Fish .......................................................................................................................................... Kilo 3,23-2,765 4,447,649 2,423,651 463,380 427,534 1,813.889 ,001,708 0
Wheat flour ............................................................................................................................. 20,257,680 20,554.890 8,064,074 13,782,105 16,529,674 14,820,09 17,167,W4 X
Meats ...................................................................................... ....................................... 7 9 814 1 21994 8324 77,42 74,88 545,470
Rice ....................................................................................................................................... 1.767,490 3,085,040 695.307 2,321 6 31 1.677,853
Leather ... .............................................................................................. 15.874 10S61 5,305 7.217 6.881 11,73'
Liquors and beverages .......................................................................................................................... Liter 906193 576,101 325,760 808,713 252,973 508,809 847,815*
Lumber ..................................................................................................................................................... Cubic Meter 10,55.36 11,343.14 7,000.70 449.15 521.00 158.33 8,227.37
Motor vehicles:
Automobiles passenger ................................................................................................. Number 325 179 59 143 252 23*
Trucks ....................................................................................................................................... 103 116 100 227 334 116
Oils Mineral: 10
Gasoline ................................................................................................................................... Liter 1,400,881 7,550,572 9,787,423 9,530,724 11.394,313 14.767,208 6.49,757 C
Kerosene .................................................................................................................................. 3. '.143 4, 341 3,678,383 2,737,135 3.009,1S6 4,034,816 3,620.879
Shoes .............................................................................................................................................. F Pair 128,385 40,700 14.38.3 9,703 36,195 75.984*
Silk, natural and artificial, and manufactures of, except textiles .......................................... Kilo 2,943 6,038 5,50 5,299 11,392 4,697"0
Soap ............................................................................................................ .............................................. 3,218.001 3,423.817 3,286,193 2.814,715 2,372,602 2.419,023 3,204.572
Textiles, cotton ..................................................................................................................................... . 3,196.716 2,809,010 2,833,803 2.314.316 1,683.104 2,857,537 2,859.851
All other .................................................................................................................................................. 180,894 63.257 77,977 84,917 80,879 179,892 110,834
Tobacco:
Leaf .......................................................................................................................................... 758,446 73,003 28,819 82,563 129,451 84,119 288,887 "
All other ................................................................................................................................. ". 16,763 24,090 17,415 22,168 124,093 31,202
Cigarettes ............................................................................................................................. Number 7.347.730 28.272 302 41,420.716 73,646.170 103,385,810 33,145,512t
Cigars ............................................................................................................... ..................... 47,607 49,656 63,913 60,39t
Wool, hair, and manufactures of. except textiles ........... .. Kilo 11,000 7,762 4,425 4,758 8,013 8,521*'
"No separate figures available.
tPreviously included in CAll other articles average for five years.
**Average for twenty-one years only.
tAverage for sixteen years only.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 67
TABLE No. 17
VALUE OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Average Average Average Average Average
Commodity 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1941-42- 1945-4 194-47 1916-171925-26 1935-36 1940-41 1945-46 1946-47
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Bananas.................... 290(3) 195.641(9) 3,521,883 9,319.556 20,115,5 5 30.648,647 4.209,354(23)
Beeswax ................. 32.024 4,428 34,606 384 607 380,9831 279,998 88,406
Cacao, crude ........... 1,983,464 951,342 606,139 1,135,038 1240.501 3,867,361 1.366,961
Cashew nuts...... 9,080(1) 76,927(10) 35,446 164,461 204.735 78,525 84.382(22)
Castor beans............ 401,955 20,397 86,6%94 731131 1.023,348 3,053,691 366,656
Coffee............... 53,718,428 44,392,313 16,522,037 29,310,428 33,148,993 60,656,839 40,997,684
Corn........................ 546,152(8) 19,599(10) 40,739 106,868 204,950 86,666 235593(20)
Cotton....................... 7,391 395 7.0 ,090 4,541.140 4,073,665 8,733,396 776,9 64 6,064,672
Cotton seed............... 594,945 108,562 ...... .... ... .. ...-.... ........... 242.588()
Cottonseed cake...... 55,989(7) 535,593(10) 429,839 467.834 845,276 5923,840 391,751(28) Cowhides............... 215,544(9) 14,457(6) 721 ........... ........... ... ... 127,978(13)
Goatskins............. 743,940 572,097 488,490 647,686 777,117 1,464,623 655,028
Honey............... 569.305 311,756 88,462 266,887 5 3291 337.711 352,424
Lignum vitae.......... 318.458 41,450 32,438 57,668 50.673 5 3.935 13'373
Logwood................... 4,215,686 1,615,158 308,950 227,043 670,400 300,116 1.977,081
Molasses................... 852(1) 294,886(8) 397,170 1,431,987 1,869,748 1,632.275 722,918(19)
Pineapples, canned. ................ 102,09(9) 143 ............... ........... ............. 756,22 (12)
Pineapples, fresh................... 20,978(10) 1,334 36 .... ...-...-.... 11,402(19)
Rum........................... ................ 56,.925(10) 34,536 127,430 78,665 28,943 67 056(21)
Sisal............................ 48,464 1,034,168 3,488.929 9,837,00 14.740.73 28,356,768 3,413,314
Sugar, raw............... 2,140,187(9) 2,496,005(10) 3,852,322 9,644,900 8,377,423 14.174,536 4,267,418(30)
Sugar, refined................... 165,774(8) 258,970 86,223 51 427 178,112(19)
Turtle, shells .......... 78,177 35,730 14,574 51 ............... ............ 41.,00(29)
All other exports... 1,326,397 535,767 365,671 7,202,448 16150,994 11.101,187 2,187,536
Total............... 74,390,742 60,616.152 35,241263 75,223,849 114,116.814 157,492.,2 68,247.656
Figures in parenthesis indicate that the commodity was shipped only for that number of years instead of for the total number indicated by the heading to the column.
TABLE No. 18
QUANTITY OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITItS-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Average Average Average Average Average
Commodity 1916-17-' 1926-27- 1936-37- 1941-42- 1945.46 1946-47 1916-171925-26 1935-36 1940-41 1945-46 146-47
Kilos Kilos Kilos Kilos Kiilos Kilos Kilos
B'ananas (steams).. 144(3) 145,580(9) 2,054,416 3059,735 5,859,175 7,301.565 1.492,475(23)
Beeswax ................. 11.094 2,196 16,608 89.528 81,813 56,364 23.234
Cacao, crude ......... 1.933,755 1,493,82 1,506.489 1,398,172 1,254 746 1,902,404 1635.532
Cashew nuts........... 4635(1) 51,410(10) 24,627 45.772 63.074 24,493 40,691(22)
Castor beans............ 640.917 55,481 384,648 1,933,984 1,986,412 3,216.451 1.670,115
Coffee....................... 30.684,024 31,311.467 23.596.493 24.263,796 24.282,605 24.659,421 28,513,412
Corn........................... 1,163,120(8) 1686 43(10) 411,702 604,819 768279 293.800 644,62(20)
Cotton...................... 3,191.787 5.276,827 4,096.127 2.975,315 4.867,842 267,973 3,881.10
Cotton seed. ......... 4,042,471 1,076,769 1....................................... ...... 1.765.355(29)
Cottonseed cake...... 897,589(7) 6 355,354(10) 4,345,616- 3,198,020 3.144,793 1,823.530 4,002,541(28) Cowhides .... ...... 66,107(9) 8.511(6) 476 ..................... 41,=5 (M8)
Goatskins............ 141,206 192,393 150,963 203,077 213,032 266,296 176532
Honey ...................... 639,893 538.887 246,230 297,440 463.973 165.195 473,270
Lignum vitae ........... 3,373.770 342,491 609.513 1248,540 1.235,133 1.282,954 1,539,865
Logwood................. 41,343,196 20,580,384 7,795,562 2,817,500 2,300,000 5.056,250 21,850 237
Molasses .................. 997(1) 6.375,098(8) 12,215661 13.519,648 15,200,429 13,225,80 10,824.38-(19)
Pineapples, canned .............. 162,3.549(9) 408 ............. ............. ......... 12,628(12)
Pineapples, fresh.... ........ 57,331(10) 5,350 327 ...... ......... ...... 31,68(19)
Rum (liters)......... .......... 13,086(10) 9,073 48965 18,873 8.129 20,437(231)
Sisal.................... 62,259 2,464,029 7,916,107 11.426 453 16 821,334 21,156.636 4,617,172
Sugar, raw-......., 4,637,247(9) 18.250,128(10) 30,333,891 31,516,824 20.667,088 26.103,214 18,807,685(30)
Sugar. refined.... .......... 676,320(8) 1194,857 204,180 77 658 724,002(19)
Turtle, shells......... 1,557 1,031 568 2 ............ ............. 991(29)
Figures in parenthesis indicate that the commodity was shipped only for that number of years instead of for the total number indicated by the heading to the column.




00
TABLE No. 19:
QUANTITY AND VALUE OF FIVE PRINCIPAL EXPORTS BY PORTS >
FISCAL YEAR 194G-47 COMPARED WITH 1945-46 10
Port Coffee Cotton Sisal Sugar Bananas
0
Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gour-des Kilos Gourdes Stems Gourdes
Aquin ...... ................................ ... "... . . ............... ................ ............ ................ ............... ................ 23.178 U 0.142
Cap-Haliten ...................... ........ 2,530.5G0 G,279,254 ......... ........... 4972,95 6208,182 46 46 1,314.223 6,510,719 "
Cay7s .........31. ............... ,5 .1.7.......... 225,140 268,198 .................. 245.018 1,090,93 M
Fort-Librti ............................................................... .. .............. .............. .............. ................ 10,308.247 15,033.332 ................ ............... ................ I..............
Gonaives .. .......... ...................... ....... ................................ 2.902,9SO 7.600.867 ................ ...... ........ ................ ................ .............. ................ 497 456 1,570.196
Gonaives . . . .2502.280 .602..67.................. .........44...7019
Jacmel .......... ........ 3,3S3,755 7,713,407 ............. 2,45 22,.................. 348.278 1424.680
Jrir ie .... ....................................................... ............ 1.4 2,0s0 3,348,606 ................ ............. .............. ............... .............. ............. 1.38 ,783 3,80&,472 C
Mirago~ne ..................................................................................... 236,39 1.053.452 t
Petit-Goive ....................................................... .. 1,114,800 2,792,712 ................... 273.828 272,754 ................ ................ ................
Port-au-Prince ........................... 9,557,343 3.772.252 267,973 776,964 3,230,550 3.629,614 26,103.82 14,174,917 5 062 1.216.208
oPort-de-Paix.... ...................... ................... 451 360 1,1 1,374 .............. .............. ........... ................ ................ ................ 1,368,940 6,376.329
Saint-Marc ....................................... 321,280 764.636 .......... ............... 2.122,020 2.22.688 ............. ............... 1,554.306 7,493.516
Total 1946-47 .................. 24.659.421 60,656,939 267,973 76.964 21,156,636 28 356.768 26,103,870 14174,963 7.301,5G5 30.648,647 z
Total 1945-4Z ............... .. 4.282.605 38,148,993 4.867,842 8 733.39 16.821,354 14.740,732 20,667,155 8.577.479 5,859.175 20,115,535 >
Increase 1946-47 ... .. 376,816 22,1507,816 ................ .......... 4,3,3,.02 13,616,036 5,436,705 5,797,484 1 442,390 10,533.112
D decrease 1946-47 ............................................................ ............... ............... 4.5 9 889 7.956,432 ......... ........... ................ ............... .............. ............




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-,-APPENDICES 69
TABLE No. 20
PERCENTAGE OF VALUE OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Average Average Average Average Average
Commodity 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1941-42- 1945-46 1946-47 1916-171225-2G6 1935-26 1940-41 1945-46 1946-47
Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent
Coffee ............. . .. .72. 71.81 46.07 40.54 33.43 3851 6170
............................. 9.94 12M. 12.53 5.18 7.65 0.49 9.13
Logwood ...... .0......0. ....0. ..0. ........................................... 5 67 2. 0.8 0.6 0.59 0.19 2.97
Sugar ................. ..................................................... 2.8s 4.95 12.05 12.95 7.34 9.00 .38
Cacao, crude ........................- 2.67 1.42 1.96 1.69 1.09 2.46 206
Sisal ....................................................................... 0.07 .2.28 10.14 14.13 12.92 18.00 5.14
Cottonseed cake ...................................................... 0.21 0.95 1.20 0.57 0.74 0.38 0.53
Molasses .................................................................. ........ 0.65 1.15 1.79 1.64 1.04 0.67
Goatskins .................................................................. 0.09 0.94 1.17 0.93 0.6S 0.93 0.93
cBananas .................................................................... ........ 0,46 10.54 11.09 17.63 19.46 4.70
All other .......................-....................................... 5.36 1.99 2.17 .10.87 1629 9.54 5.74
Total ...D. 100 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 10.00 10.00




TABLE No. 21
QUANTITY AND VALUE OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES AND MONTHS FISCAL YEAR 1946-47
,z
Month Coffee Cotton Sisal Sugar Bananas All other All exports 0
z
Kilos Gotirdes Kilos Gotrdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes sterns Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes tir
October 1946 .......... .. 705,113 1,681.453 ............. .............. 1.042,307 1,168.120 ....... ........ ... .. 707,202 2,2S5.452 1.512,631 6,647,666
November .................................................................... 2,759,174 6,698,619 ................ ........... 1495,896 1,641.686 ............. ............... 711,276 2,62 ,185 2,328,175 13,291,64 .
December ................................................................... 3,57,552 8,783,207 ........... 2,645,612 2.921.868 ................ ............... 602,270 2,795.721 2,151.797 16,642,613
January 1947 .............................................................. 4,20,308 10.763,914 2193 4.790 717,853 738,791 17 20 476,205 2,108,406 2,526,265 15,942,186 o
February .................................................................... 3783.76 9,307,802 ............... .............. L809.961 2,497,519 ........... . .. 419.543 1,706,126 958,483 14,469,930 t
March ..........................................................................1.5133,171 3.979,60 ........................ 1,504.548 .120,373 6.042.254 3,280.932 497,665 2,161,686 2,166,109 13,708.460
April ............................................................................. 866,382 2.279,803 2.347 3,521 1,365,694 1.914.966 ............. ................ 523,043 2,620,73 2,575,653 9,394,316
May; ............................................................................. 765,062 1.893.26a 5 3 2,417.429 3,578.9W 6.034,190 2,733.560 549,453 2,577,075 2,288.002 13.070.825
June .............................................................................. 2.378,382 5.961,372 155,742 418,650 1,603,279 2.420,139 5.033.963 2,733.963 592,623 2,803,645 2,630.807 16,968.776 C
July ............................................................................... 1.458,160 3,423,354 .... 1.531,661 2.677,891 523 196 825,165 3,251.812 1,287,409 10,640.,662
August ...................... 1,48,149 3,74,699 ........... ............ 1,582,662 2,084.775 5,034.735 2,733890 630.34 2,511,168 1,023,239 11,727,771
September ...................................................................1.084,204 2,509,993 107,686 350,000 3.099.734 4.591.699 4.958.388 2,692,402 766,786 3.213,798 1,629.301 14,987.193
Total ................................................. ... 24.69,421 60,69 ,839 267,973 776,964 21,156.636 28.356.768 26.103.870 14,174.963 7,101,565 30.648,647 22,877,871 157,492,052"




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 71
TABLE No. 22
EXPENSES OF THE B'. N. R. H. FISCAL DEPARTMENT (AND PREVIOUS ADMINISTRATIONS)
BY OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Repairs AcquisiAdminis- Customs and main- tion of Fixed Total
tration operation tenance* property charges
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
September 1916 .................................................................. 9,850.15
1916-17........ .......................................... ............... ................ ................ ............. ... ............ 79 ,6 5.70
1917-18 .................................................. .... ........ ................ ............... .............. ................ 741,055.80
1918-19 ....................... .... ............... ............... 7003560
1919-20 ............................................... 329,634.00 508,570.75 ................ 114,500.00 427,755.85 L580,4,60
1920-21.............................................. 426,498.70 547.194.55 .............. ............... 478,379.85 1,452,973.10
1921-22............................ ....................... 401,251.70 605,773.60 ................ ............... 269,116.95 1,279.142.25
192-23. ................................. ............ 503,997 40 600,627.10 ............ ............. 333,81.65 1.438,506.15
1923-24 .............................................. 455,447.21 648,959.62 ................ b0,000 00 291,925.25 1,896,332.08
1924-25........................................... 461,316.07 673,495.96 ............. 57,745.41 656,980.05 1,849,537.49
1925-26 ............................................. 467,996.6 669,394.41 ................ 155,040.47 405,94832 1,698,379.86
1926-27................. ................................ 523,192.77 712.154.94 ............ 706,274.83 336,618.76 2.278,241.30
1927-28........................................ 514,017.30 684,563.61 ................ 235.593.04 450,820.93 1.884.994 83
1928-29 ................................................. 578.827.16 671,332.60 24,027.32 238,038.92 352,476.50 1,864,702:40
1929-30................................................ 640,263.91 637,588.57 27,567 10 115,479.47 308,330.75 1,729,289.80
1930-31............................................. 583,723.66 582,541.63 9,703.22 11,54462 255,627.84 1,443.140.07
1931-32............................................. 507,252.19 496,013.59 20,544.75 1,284.11 133,33 10 1,158.457.77
1932-33 ................................................ 541,340.28 519,438.83 24,319.02 17,770.70 312,662 24 1,415.531.12
1923-34.................................................. 557,564.73 523,893.01 15.28816 16,450.36 304,331.82 1,417,528.08
1934-35 ................................................ 597,777.34 534,129.65 21,216.57 13,037.48 243,149.59 1.409,310.63
1935-36 .............. ................................... 538,807.95 507,537.91 15,977.73 7,513.69 289.433.66 1,409,270.94
1936-37 ................................................ 556,198.88 508,301.07 45,899.70 15,019.43 287,428.73 1,410,847.81
1937-38 .................................. ........... 551,284.56 483,753.96 8,897,51 4,435.71 203,885.46 1,252,257.20
1938-39....... .................................. 535,819.80 466,283.12 9,509.01 7,755.90 235,341.21 1.254,709.07
1939-40 .............................................. 521,173.21 451.254.44 7,574.66 2,433.13 ............... : 982.4.4 44
1940-41 ............................ ..................... 524,348.50 423,047.06 10,145.88 4,632.25 47,540.46 1,009,714.15
191-4 .................................................. 440,719.20 441,451.70 10,020 10 7,018.69 ............... 8990,209.63
1942-43 ................................... ............ 469,933.17 393,312.74 26,313.85 9,191.84 ............... 898,751.60
1943-44....................................... 496,657.05 466,004.31 11,621.61 3,695.43 .............. 977,978.40
1944-45.......... ............... 704,76156 611,090.32 24,2.31.57 15,566.74 ................ 1,355,650.19
1945-46 ................................... ........... 718,731.46 762,797.09 15,425.08 17,512.06 ................ 1,514,465.69
1946-47 ................................................ 765,400.87 107,447.52 26.592.52 82,484.46 ................ 1,981,925.37
Average 1919-20 to 1946-47.......... 534,533.47 579,855.47 12,674.11 854,2S6.34 2r6,609.24 1,447,958.G3
*Prior to 1928-29 repairs and maintenance expenses were charged to administration or customs operation.
TABLE No. 23
CLASSIFICATION OF ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION EXPENDITURES OF THE B. N. R. H.
'FISCAL DEPARTMENT-FISCAL YEAR 1946-1947
Commu- Special
Month Salaries and Supplies and Transport- nication Rents and Miscel- Total
wages materials ation service laneous
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Oct:ober......................... 103,537.76 4,418.29 7,817.99 .- 49930 ................ 574.87 121,88.21
- November................ 113,321.46 9,077.69 11,615.94 1,229.10 ................ 1.501.07 136,745.26
DOcember........................ 1)20,97'. SS 1,056.43 6,366.19 810.15 ................ 67747 129,883.12
January........................... 135,637.59 1,795.43 8,080.2S 895.00 ................ 1,098.40 147,506.70
February....................... 134,415.S4 7,84.52 7,458.60 1,430 25 ................ 615.40 151,804.61
March.... .................... 144.406.3 9,520.91 6,470.77 820.05 ................ 455.40 161,673.51
April ....... .......... 140,.5.17 7,553.09 6,091.82 534.50 ................ 575.40 154,852.93
May................................ 148.735.79 6,912.10 13,275.31 2,755.00 .............. 949.15 172,657.35
June..... 136,888.36 9,246.34 13.265.74 716 15 ................ 719.40 160,835.99
July.................................. 130,922.44 12,013.46 7,596.39 2,464.40 25.00 2,215.40 155,237.09
August ............................ 137,649.65 14,355.13 8,919.83 1,438 10 25.00* 469.40 162,807.11
September...................... 152,392.86 37,215.34 10,244.41 1,948.20 ............. 15.205.65 217,006.46
Total...................... 1.603,966.18 121,048.73 107,206.27 15.570.20 ............ 25,057.01 1,872,848.39
Percentage ....................... 85.65 6.46 5.72 .83 ............... 1.34 100.00
4Credit




72 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 24 /
CLASSIFICATION OF TOTAL EXPENDITURES OP THE B. N. R. H. FISCAL DEPARTMENT FISCAL YEAR 1946-47
Administration Repairs and Acquisition
Months and operation maintenance of property Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October .................. ..... .......... ....... 121,8=1 626.20 2,885.80 125,350.21
S .................. 136,745 26 L070.70 3,202.51 141,018.47
December ..... ....... ........................ 129,893.12 718.80 ............ 130,601.92
January ..................................... 147,506.70 892.85 753.70 149,15&25
February .................................................................... 151,804.61 2,610.90 1,157.64 155,573.15
March ....... ... ....... .................. ... .... ...... ............ 161,673.51 1.421.75 ... 163,095.2&
April_ _............... ..................... ............... 154,852.93 2,57065 ... 157,423.63
May ............................................................. .... 172,657.35 L346.65 708.75 174.712.75
June..... ........ ..... ........ 160.835.99 989.12 80.52 161,90M63
July ..................................... ........................... ...... 155,237 09 5.594.85 2,408.40 194,240.34
August ......................................................................... 162,807.11 1,024.15 12.25 163,843.51
September ............... .................... ....................... 217,00.46 7.725.90 40,274.89 265,007.25,
T ot.. .................... 1,872,848.39 26.592.52 82,48446 1,981.925.37
Percentage. .................... ...... ........... 94.50 1.34 4.16 100.0.




TABLE No.25
COST OF CUSTOMS OPERATIONS BY PORTS AND COST OP ADMINISTRATION. REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE, ACQUISITION OF PROPERTY AND FIXED CHARGES.
FISCAL YEARS 1919-20 TO 1946-47
rn
'a
0
Average Average Average Average Average Average ;
1919-20- 1924-25- 1929-30- 1934-35- 1939-40- 1944-45 1945-46 1946-47 1919-20-
1923-24 192-29 1933-34 1938-39 1943-44 1946-47
T51
-nl
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes ordes Go urdes Gourdes Ou Gourdes u Gourdes Gude Gourdes
Aquin-...........-....----....----. ..... ..... 4,144.35 3,130.94 2,26.39 3.466.97 2. 68.12 2,517.88 2,664.77 3.633.03 3,058.91 t'
Belladre ....................... ................... ................... 898.96 5,083.92 4,423.56 4.653.96 4,856.47 5,383.27 6,045.45 6.511.47 4.197.30
Cap-Haitien....................... ............. ....... ...... .... ..... ......... 73,190.9G 78,148.81 59,785.71 51,327.32 3.298.88 30,873.76 2,326.34 34,765,72 56,311.58 m
Cayes ............. ........................- ...... ........... ....... 50,932.83 59,707.21 51.304.97 45.567.33 34,492.78 31.25.49 33,400.95 34,942.79 46792.67 '
Fort-Libert...................................................... 3,090.24 5,127.89 3,895.00 4,632.69 6,691.79 7,882.57 10,048.72 3,869.72 >
Glore.................................-...... ..... .................... 860.12 2,674.68 2,404.36 3,854.45 5,67379 5,86.52 6,647.23 7,12061 3,463.33
Gonalves ............................................... .-........................... ....... 37,507.43 40,387.92 28,590.55 21,176.71 18,20075 17,87.24 19,225.72 22,941:96 28,191.53
Jacmel.......................................... ................................................ 48,404.08 50,372.14 34,133.00 30,835.02 23,768 67 24.141.88 21.642.84 21,719.70 3,895.32 m
Jtimie................................................................................................ 29,439.82 33,643.05 27,331.25 28,432.83 24,375.28 28,76.1 29,773.11 30,78.73 29,764.04 z
Miragoinae .......... ...... .-........ 6,098.66 12,136.95 6,780.73 7,362.26 6.10595 6,744.70 7.430.42 9.582.20 7,720.70
Ouanam nthe ........-.................................. ................. .................... 4.10.23 3,414.82 3,103.59 3,165.6 3,639,59 5,136.23 5,733.57 6,259.16 3,737.46
Petit-Golve ............................. .... .............................................. 26,449.52 32,025.21 20,121.16 19.563.72 17,58209 11,787.01 11,559.19 12,70.89 21,956.38 >'
Port-au-Prince ................................................. ............ ............. ........... 256,158.43 310,317.16 265,350.49 230,102.26 217,476.19 393,883.46 541,043.34 865,950.43 292,960.71 '
Port-de-Paix .................................. ..... ....................................... 17,548.24 20.540.82 19,593.69 20,652.45 17,505,06 14,752.42 16,564.83 18,827.73 18,905.2 1 M
Saint-Marc........................................................................................ 22,074.54 27,514.41 21,577.79 25,542.25 21,047.74 19,879.46 20,856.76 21,652.38 23,256.15
Total customs Operations.................. ....... ................... ... 577,888.17 682,188.28 551,895.13 499,601.14 435,014.05 611,00.32 762,797.09 1,107,447.52 579,081.03
Administration ........................................ ....... ............ 423,965.80 509,070.00 666,028.95 565,977.71 490.566.22 704,71.56 718,731.46 765.400.87 534,533.47 w
Total Administration and Operation...................................... 1,001,853.97 1,191,258.28 1,117,924.08 1,065,578.85 925,580 27 1,315,851.88 1.481,528.55 1,872,848.39 1,113,614.50
Repairs and Maintenance ................................................... .. .............. 4,805.46 19.484.45 20,300.11 13135:23 26,231.57 15,425.08 26,592.52 12,674.12
Acquisition of Property...................................................... ................. 122,900.00 278,538.54 32,505.86 9,552.44 5,394.07 15,566.74 17,512.06 8,484.46 84,28635
Fixed Charges........................................................ ............. .. .60,211.91 440,568.91 26,875,15 251,847.73 9.,508.09 .............. ............... .............. 236,609.25
Total Expenditures ............................................ 1,484,965.88 1,915.171L19 1,432,789.54 1,347,279.13 953,617.65 1,355,650.19 1,514.465.69 1,981,925.37 1,447,184.23
--3




74 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 26
OPERATING ALLOWANCE OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE
FISCAL YEARS 1933-24 TO 1946-47
Fifteen per
cent of Fifteen per
internal cent of Total
revenue communal Other operating
receipts receipts accruals allowance Expenses Surplus
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
August and Sept. 192:... 110,195.90 ... -- 110,195.90 75.254.27 34,941.63
1924-............................. 613,488. ............ ........ 613,488.92 350,274.56 263,214.36
1926 23....-... ................. 623,607.59 .... ............ 623,607.59 304,19875 319,403.83
1662 7...................0............... ....... ....... 62393.20 306,308.68 316,684.52
197-2.......... 636.243.02 ................ 636,243.03 462,010.33 174,232.3
1 905,289.72 ...... 9..... -05,289.72 799,076.94 106,21V78
19230,.,...,.,......993.09-4.61 ...... ............ 993,024.61 993,017.74 6.7
13e3............... 774M6.03 ..... ..... ........ 774,062.00 770,681.47 3,9S0.5
19 2 1- 548,436.94 ........... 548,436.94 544.949 58 3,48736
1932-33-.... ...---- 703,415.48 145,573.00 5,607.59 859,893.16 859,895.34 .82
1933.34...............-.,-...... 743,926.66 270,847.67 1,564.42 1.016,33875 1,016,328.75 ...
. 677,92565 267.363.62 .......... 945,289.27 945,289.27 .............
1935-3L,...... .....-.... 704,313.96 266,930.55 ........... 971,244.51 971,221.21 23.30
106-37.......7............... 744.7009 271,506.14 ........... 1,022,207.09 1.023,117.42 89.67
1937-3&.............................. 748.618.09 236,517.43 4,206.35 989,341.87 968.371.16 20,970.71
193839.7-..........,. 753,302.94 237,598.50 6,899.53 997,800.97 997,300 97
19-40 ........................ 786.893.09 216,65.84 6,503.71 1,010.092.64 1,003,672.58 6,420.06
104. ... 731,838.90 222,959.99 6,125.79 960,924 68 937.532.39 25,32.29
1941-42...,....... 800,612.41 369,274.34 7,351.84 1,177.238.59 1.023.960.20 153,288.39
42-4L.1............................. ,300.142.0 427,306.60 65,155.50 1.792.505.00 1,353,269,03 439,335.97
1943-441... .......... .. 1,573,308.32 444.620.29 94,254.63 2,112.3.24 1,651,661.41 460,521.83
1914-45.............. 1.054,952.0* 450,574.54 100,825.66 1,606,353 00 1,511,881.50 94,471.50
1945-44 ............. 1,037v48.23* 436.407.01 124,226.74 1,648,481.98 1,429.966.25 218,515.73
1944-47. 1,193,306.09 495,086.77 199,997.84 1,818,390,70 1,723,251.67 90,139.03
*Effective October 1. 1944 the allowance was reduced from 15% to 10%.




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REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 79
TABLE No. 31
CUSTOMS RECEIPTS BY SOURCES AND PORTS-FISCAL YEAR 1946-47
Port Imports Exports Miscellaneous Total
A in1,077.65 8.770.70 354.35 102.0
Beldr- ------ ... 145.38 .... 2465 $90.03
Cp-Haitin ................... 1.805,733.75 1L454,093.47 6,672.93 3.266,56015
S... 515,552.87 900.955.83 2,068.83 1.418,577.53
Fot-jbrt......................................... 158,167.23 148.795.70 3,1W9.67 310,002.50
Gona ivl............. 476,91806 1.083.310.26 6,580.77 1.56,809.19
Ja c m e L .. 14.42111 1,003,009.43 2,171.90 1.079.6=9.4
J~r~ie................,. ........---.. 574,154.23 971.879.14 7.402.83 1=5343&.20
........ 92,918.99 80,550.73 1,84.00 175.309.72
Pr~tGov.....................,...........,.... 10,537.00 S07,340.08 260.30 318143.44
Por~a-Pinr.....................,..,.......,.34.515.489.92 5.589790.69 509,513.76 40,614.794.27
Por-d.Pix ~ .- -. 70423.87 831,109.00 8,330.25 1,009.N163.1
Saint-Mar ......,,., 228,580.64 871.507.51 1=~10 1.101170Z5
T o t a l ~ii,,M 3R541).4 1.310.9=%5 5497442496&3
TABLE No. 32
CUSTOMS RECEIPTS NY( SOURCES AND MONTHS-ISCAL YEAR 1)0465-1)47
Month Imports Exports Miscellaneous Total
O t b r : 1.789.818.2? 251,765.68 15.910-58 2,037494.sa
Noebr-- ---.1.337.83W.85 66&645.85 18,891.21 2.025.374.91
Det mbe..................... 2806,617.05 967.2D7 94 36,455.70 &.800,250.09
Jaur- _.. ..... 3.818.747.14 1,22.783.51 33,719.66 5,076.2W031
-------------------..-..4.453,973.56 1.097,048.82 56.55770 5 597 5900
. ..... 4.746,056.73 1.149.515.18 69,811.59 Kk96383160
Aprl. .................. -....- -....3.300,127."72 56,158.35 49,117.15 3.914.406.22
3,631,115,85 1.184.,92,31 58,090.23 4.874,108.39
Jun........................................ ,8 46,770.33 1,905,538.61 49.555,32 5.801,864.26
July ............... ....... ...~...... 2.966.M.979 1,357,976.44 55.908.33 4.330.857.61
Augst.....,....................- - -....2.452,105.27 1,535.156.22 34,074.23 4,021,335.72
Setme- __ _..... 3.414.042.33 1.444.2n9.63 71,690.43 4,9300,M44
38.564.M)494 13A310.9785A 619792,4 62,4P4.9ff.72




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82 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 36
ORDINARY, SUPPLEMENTARY AND EXTRAORDINARY APPROPRIATIONS FROM REVENUE-FISCAL YEAR 1944-45 TO 1916-47
1944-45 1946-46 1946-47
Ordinary Ordinary Ordinary
and Supple- Extraordi- and Supple- Extraor- and Supple- Extraormentary nary mentary dinary mentary dinary
Public Debt: Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Goardes Gourdes
Series A loan .......................... 8095 5.90 .................... 484,694.70 .................... 6,894, 4.00 .................
Series C loan ........................... 4,866,250.00 .................... 3,01S.199.40 .................... 1,145,845.15 ................
Interest, transfer charges
and other cost of financing the Public Works
Contract of 193 ............... 4,984,184.10 .................... 2,675,950.65 .................... 4,530,000.00 -................
Internal Loan .............................. ................... .................... .................... ................... 1,092,154.90 ..................
Total Public debt .... 10,660,000.00 .................... 6,178.844.75 .................... 13,662,894.05 ...
International Institutions. -W,836.83 .................... 469.8583.33 .................... 1,573,372,85 ..................
Foreign Relations ....................... 1,430,578.75 10,549.50 1,172,629.62 52,775.00 2,186,813.08 189.021.90
Finances.'.... ............................................ 717,594.70 1,371,177.47 102,000.00 1,298,748.67 409,185.94
Fiscal Department ...................... 1,378,640.00 .................... 1,611 .110.00 .................... 1,98 ,940.00 ..................
Internal Revenue Service 1,571,853.00 .................... 1,626,714.04 .................... 1,818,390.70 ..................
Commerce ..................................... 559,367.50* 96,700.00 646,533.50* 41,000.00- 876,308.50 77,650.00
National Economy ..................... 2,080,659.14 27,215.45 1,=50,061.72 .................... 126,675.00 ..................
Interior ............ 8,945,022.20 6,947.20 9.727,194.38 531,028.52 2,333,098.50 674,694.01
Army of Haiti.......................... 3,036,520.00 66,211.81 3.161,958.30 ............. 11,374,000.08 117,500.09
Public Health .............................. 2,956,894.62 938,185.18 3,482.175.00 55,990.10 3,781,935.57 621,794.41
Public Works .............................. 1,517,767.60 111,400.00 1.700,487.60 1,056,100.10 3,499,293.50 3.838,692.46
Justice ........................................... 39,788.40t ............... t 41,188.40t .................... 1,790,466.00 104,200.00
Agriculture ............................ 2,362,742.49 111,709.70 1,521,910.41 .................... t 41,188.40 ....................
Labor ............................................. 2,884.652.40 263,219.49 3,923,598.79 ................... 140,422.71 40,877.35
Agricultural Service ................. 389.110.15 6,143.75 442,658.50 652,411.25 1,168,487.20 1,607,000.00
National Education .................. 224,80.00 5.177,118.10 198,625.41
Religion ........................................ 30,215.00 628,783.50 39,902.40
Total appropriated from
Revenue ............................ 40,120,433.28 2,355,876.78 38,578,055.81 2,746,319.97 53,359,939.41 7,917,145.78
Total Revenue .................... 41,890,043.22 .................... 44,557,226.75 .................... 65,266,415.49 .................
Total Expenditures from
Revenue ........... .......... 42,516,283.97 ..................... 40,377,217.94 .................... 60,438,416.50 ............
*Commerce and National Economy iAgriculture and Labor




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 83
TABLE No. 37
RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES--FISCAL YEAR 1944-45 TO 1940-47
RECEIPTS 191%4-45 19415-40 1946-47
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Customs. ................................................................ 306,552,601.28 32.799,002.37 52,424,965.72
Internal Revenue .......... .............................. ..... 10,549,5W 99 10.878,4S2.34 11,933,060.90
Miscellaneous ....................................................................... .. 337,339.43 443.335.03 413,302.10
Receipts from Communes* ............................................ 450,574.54 436.407.01 495,086.77
Total Revenue Receipts.......................................... 41,890,043.23 44.557,226.25 65,266.415.49
EXPENDITURES
Public Debt: EXPENDITURES
Series A Loan...................................................... 4,861,353.30 3.012,390.956 6.891,891.00
Series C Loan ............................................................... ........ 781,881.30 480,030.90 1,143,374.80
Interest, transfer charges and other cost of financing
Public Works Contract of 1938................. ........ ......... 4.843.297.05 2.675.950.66 4,524,756.10
Internal Loan. .............................. .............. .......... ............ .... ... 1.092.154.90
Total Public Debt.................................................. 10,486,531.65 .168,372.0 13.652.176.80
International Institutions............. ......... .... 294.869.53 468,567.33 1,568,831.50
Foreign Relations....... ........ ...... ..... ............... 1,429785.88 1.390.404.83 2,351,571.68
Finances....................... ..... ........................ ..................... 1,622,503.15 1,664,432.94 1,62,990.65
Fiscal Department.................................... ............... 1,355,650.19 1,514.466.69 1.981.95.37
Internal Revenue Service ..... ......... ..................... 1,511,881.50 1,429,966.25 1,728,251.67
Commerce ............ .................................................... 683.101.79t 663.920.64t 879,270.3
National Economy.................... ............................. ........... ................ 125,749.33
Interior......................... .................. .................... 2,103,405.74 1,778.1(.39 2.92.03.25
Army ....................................... ........................... .... 8,941,876.53 9.721,686.132 11.464,112.45
Public Health .................................. ....... ......... 3,098,421.77 3,3.972.64 4,338.476.29
Public'Works ............................................... ........................... 3,325.967.35 4,255,130.45 7,182,749.76
IJustice ........................................... ................................... 1,621.953.94 1.663,968.00 L852.330.14
Agriculture........................................................................... 39,788.40$ 41,174.46$ 40,721.53
Labor................ ............................ ........................ ................ 180,165.12
Agricultural Service ........ .......... ................................... 2,407,475.30 2.,000.327.76 2,5683.264.64
National Education ........................................................ 3.168,345.08 3,938,074.15 5,42.579.25
Religion.................................................................... 424,726.17 464,662.80 639,.346.80
Total Expenditures from receipts .......................... ..... 42.516,283.97 40,377.217.94 0,438,416.50
Miscellaneous.................................................. 1,413,965.20- 56 ,650.15 172,731.24Total Payments ................. ...........................41,302.318.T77 40,039.868.00 0.266.5..26
Receipts over expenditures- fisal ................... ........... 4,18,008.81 4,*7.08.99
Expenditures over receipts-fiscal .............................. 626,240.75 ..... -- -............
*Amounts represent payments by various Communes to defray cost of services rendered by Internal Revenue.
Service in the collection of Communal revenue
"Commerce and National Economy.
tAgriculture and Labor.
-Credit.




TABLE No. 38
FUNCTIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES-FISCAL YEAR 1946.47
Percentage of to
Administration Repairs and Acquisition Fixed Trust fund Total total
and operation maintenance of property charges repayments expenditures expenditures Z
C:
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes z
Leiltv.........a... ............. 965,0 5.71 2,600.00 .......... -2. .. ...07657 1.61 >
Judicia.. .............................. 1,82,525.60 2,138.74 8,021.48 ............. ......... 1.839,285.82 3.06
Executive: z
............... ...... ..1.487,243.53 75.393.40 419,242.91 2.550.00 .............. 1,984.429.84 3.29
Foreign Affairs............... ............ 2,297.589.07 18.165.18 18,258,63 1,574,713.70 ...- 3,908,726.58 6.49 m
Financial Administration.................... 3,670,967.65 67.129.80 374,342.22 201,387.50 4.................. 4313,827.17 7.16 e
Trade Promotion....................................... 369,360.70 32,364.65 24,306.75 2,850.00 ..... 428,882.10 .71 m
Health.................... 4,649.301.86 229.028.98 249,271.01- 41,059.95 ................. 4,070.629.78 7.75
Police............. ........._............... 10.958,792.12 129,239.55 378.682.84 2,250.00 ................t 11,468,94.51 19.03
Agricultural Development...................... 2,056,747.81 225,946.21 526,328.58 23.106.30 .............. 2.832.128.90 4.70
Education............ .................... 5,180.113.00 105,296.14 29.604.91 105,684.50 .......... ,420,698.55 9.00
Religion.......... ................ ....... 486,713.40 60.00 275.00 62,298.40. ............... 539,346.80 .89
Transportation.............. .............. 317,401.33 774,591.24 6,341.83* 3,250.00 ........... 1,088,900.74 1.81 C
Communication.......... ... 601,518.33 10.455Z93 2.500.00 2.500.00 616,974.26 1.02 W
Municipal:
Streets........................ ......... 488,353.65 227,253.04 8.332.20 .... ----- 723.938.89 1.20 C
Sewers and Drains..... ........................ ................. ............ .........
Water Service.................................... 10,768.00 10,136.81 75.00 ........... ........... 2,9. 04
Public Works ..................................... 2,388,051.48 2,790.101.28 604,530.81 38,409.98 .......... 5.821,093.65 9.66
Non Functional:
Public debt..... ........ ....... 35.20 ............... -......M. 13,63.141.60 ...... 13.652.176.80 22.65
Pensions................ ...... ..... .... .. ............... .. ..... 394.445.59 ......394,445.59 ,.05
Printing Office and Stores....................... 47.360.31 1.032.65 5536.28 ..... ....................... 53,829.24 .09
Communes. Individuals and Companies..... 738.101.50* 200,285.61 100,350.59 218,572.94 262.377.02* 481,269.38" .80*
Total Expenditures................. 37,066,237.25 4,901.219.21 2.246,375.36 16.315.230.46 262377.02* 00.265.68526 100.00
*Credit




TABLE No. 39
CLASSIFICATION OP ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION EXPENDITURES BY DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES-FISCAL YEAR 1946.47
Salaries Supplies Transport- Communic- Special and
and wages and materials nation ation Service Rents miscellaneous Total O
0
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Foreign e .............................. 1,,011.73 56706-84 678,793. 30,07985 122.00945 2.7.60 7
.........-............. 499,843.04 45,760.08 6,800.94 1,582.87 924.05 83.73592 638.646.90 >
Fiscal Department................................. 1,603,966.18 121,048.73 107.206.27 15,570.20 ................. 25.057.01 L872,848.39
Internal Revenue Service............................. 1,122,830.33 194,671.08 150,803.86 11,296.12 15.828.25 659.58* 1.494,770.06 0
Commerce............................... ................. 478,735.93 73,320.25 275,831.83 9,961.88 1,428.00 21,279.00 80.556.94
Interior............... ----.. 21058,486.63 81,949.09 59.700.45 13.33080 13=935.00 219,933.00 2,447,335.17
Army..................... ................. 8,480,957.50 2,118.611.80 494,443.52 35,152.24 3835.00 25.107.30 11,158,107.36
Public Health........................................-. 2.64432.65 1,0(0.620.03 351,017.82 12,353.30 4,780.70 157,111.57 4.173.121.67
Public Works..-................................, 988,609.31 1.393,311.88 609,438.13 8,446,19 2,703.5 20,144.33 3,022,658.09
Justice........................................--..... 1,725,520.87 28,65.49 9,883.13 34,078.92 38,295.96 6,936.80 1.842.381.16
.............. 34.920.00 844.03 ............... ................ 88500 36.649.03 -4
Agricultural Service ........ ...................... 1,302,921.08 166,995.45 165,944.05 15,606.25 8.772.70 210,845.56 1,871,085.09
Labor..................... ........... 1.11,778.44 20,092.31 2,710.70 486.50 1,462.50 7.923.00 144,453.45
National Economy.............. ............. 8508.33 4,878.92 7,595.98 347.60 150.00 1.689.15 100,269.98
Education.. ................................. 4,466.640.96 370,129.68 80,773.46 7,703.15 164,269.95 90,595.90 5,180,113.00
Religion............. .. ... 434,530.01 1410.34 47,812.50 2,108.55 380.00 472.00 486,71340
Total Expenditures from Revenue_....... 27,426.693.04 5,681,916.50 3.048,755.63 198,144.62 256,770.36 1,026,730.41 37,639.010.56
Non Fiscal Expenditures...................... 3,544,061.21 763,559.60 176,780.02* 1.103,155.93" 92,501.72* 8.507,956.45* 573,7733L*
Total Expenditures_..... 3...... 0,970,754.26 6.445,476.10 2.871.975.41 905,011.31* 164,288.64 2.481,226.04* 37,066.237.25
Pa .................... 83.55 17.39 7.75 2.44* .44 6.69* 100.00
*Credit
00




86 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 40
CLASSIFICATION OF TOTAL EXPENDITURES B' DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES FISCAL YEAR 1946-47
Administration Repairs and Acquisition Fixed Trust fund
and operation maintenance of property charges repayment$ Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Public Debt_ _.... 35.0 ... 13,652.141.60 ................. 13,652,176.80
International Institutions ........................ 34,664.80 ........... ............ 1,534,166.70 ........... 1,568,831.60
Foreign Relations 2,274,600.87 18.165.18 18.258.63 40,547.00 .................. 2,351.571.68
Finance ......................... 638,646.90 11.801.10 77896.96 897,645.69 ................. 1,625,990.56
Fiscal Department 1.872,848.59 26,592.52 82,484.46 ..... .... .................. 1,981,925.37
Internal Revenue
Service ...1............. L494,770.06 24,581.73 202,398.13 6.501.75 1.728,251.67
Commerce ...................... 860,556.94 10,613.43 2,850.00 5,250.00 .......S.. 879,270.37
Interior ......................... 2,447,335.17 26,724.18 418.793.90 28,050.00 2,920,93.25
Army ............. ..... 11,158,107.36 71,764.55 231,990.54 2,250.00 ................ 11,464,112.45
Public Health ............. 4,173,121.67 37,43.34 112,346.33 15,569.95 ............... 4,338,476.29
Public Works ............ 3,022,6%.09 3,830,826.02 322.015.65 4,250.00 ................. 7,182.749.78
Justice .......................... 1,842,38 .16 1,327.50 8,621.48 ........... ........ .................. 1.852,330.14
Agriculture ................... 36M9.03 ............... 112.50 3,960.00 .................. 40,721.53
Agricultural Service... 1,871,085.09 209,962.94 487,709.81 13,506.80 ............ 2,582,264.64
Labor .............................. 144,453.45 243.70 35,467.97 .............. ................. 180,165.12
National Economy..... 100,269.98 L22.60 23,966.75 100.00 .................. 5749.23
Education ..................... 5,180,113.00 106,296.14 29,604.91 108,565.20 ................ ,423,579.05
Religion ........ .... 486,713.40 60.00 275.00 52,298.40 ......... 5.39,346.0
Total Expenditures
from Revenue., 37,M9,010.56 4.37,81.9.93 2.057.783.02 16,364,802.99 ............... 60,438.416.50
Non-fiscal
Expenditures-.... 672,773.31 5M,30.28 187.592 34 49,572.53* 3. 77.02- 17UMS.2
Total Expenditures 37,066,237.25 4.901,219.21 T,.,375.36 16,325,230.46 262=,7.02- 60,265,6%.26
Percentage ........0.. 61. 8.13 3.73 27.0 .43" 100.00
*Credit




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88 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 42
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES AND EXCESS OF REVENUES OR EXPENDITURES FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1946-47
Revenues Expenditures Surplus Dificit
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
106-17 ................................................................ 18.934,634.70 15.884,177.80 3.050,506.90
1917-18 ............... 16,048,390.75 14,614,997.45 1,433,398.30 .................
1918-19 ............................................................... 29,955,33.45 15.499480.45 14,456,4M.00 ....................
1919-20 .............................................................. 33,997,450.79 20,646,866.25 13,350,584.54 ....................
1920-21 ................................................................ 19,946,095.70 32.788,455.90 .................. 12.842,360.20
1921-22 ............ 24,964.795.72 39,775,908.40 ................... 14,811,112.68
1922-23 ............................................................ 31,90.101.24 30,560,113.15 1,39 .988.09 .
1923-24 ............................................................... 32,902.321.33 34,215,495.94 ................... 1.313,174.61
1924-25 ......... . 40,487,667.00 39.218.202.02 1.269,464.98 ... ...
1925-26 ............ .... 45,364,648.10 40,930.725.08 4,433,92302 ..................
1926-27 ... 38.861.534.79 39,747,163.75 ................... 885,628.96
1927-28 ............................................................... 50,421,016.49 40,977,914.49 9,443.102.00 .
1928-29 ....... ...................................... ... 42,521,528.40 44,119,503.94 . .......... 1,597,975.54
1929-30 ......................................................... 38.648.163.39 40,643,229.52 ................. 1,995,066.13
1930-31 ...... ..... 31,746.582.38 36,190,070.45 .................. 4,443,488.07
1931-32 . ... .. 28,023,742.10 32,888,112.00 W............. 4.864,Z69.90
19323 ........... 37,305,298.67 2;258,806 08 4,046,490.69 ...
1963-34 ... ... ?6,752165.28 6,82,25. .................... 60 -10.45
193435 .............................................................. 30,091.640.96 42.355.010.66 ................ 12,26 .70
1935-36 .... ................. 34,598,364.28 36.631,574.03 .................... 2,063,209.70
193637 ...... ..... 34,448,671.19 35,033,437.11 1........... 584,765.92
1937-38 ............................................................ .. 28,109,488.87 28,940,782.51 .................... 831,293.64
1938-39 .................... .. 31.145,584.29 29,584,799.38 1,560,784.91
1959-40 ... .. 26,873,410.55 28,478,637.37 1........... 1,605,226.82
1940-41 ........... . 26,929,882.83 2556.5,824.25 1,364,058,58 .
1941-42 ............................................................. 25.699,255.80 27,726,161.60 ..................... 126,905.80
1942-43 ............................................................ 32.729, 086.58 28,029,991.62 4,699.104.96 ............. .....
1943-44 ........... ... 42,370,364.75 42,021,013.10 349,351.65 ....................
1944-45 ............................................................. 41,890,043.22 42,516.283.97 .......... 626,240.75
1945-46 ................. 44,557,226.75 40,377,217.94 4,180,008.81 ..................
1946-47 .................................. 65,26,415.4.9 60,438,416.50 4,827,99&99 ....................
Total .................. 1,06.3441,555.89 1,056,460,640.44 69,855,214.32 62,874,298.87
Surplus for Period .......................... ..... ....... 6.,980915.45 ..................
TABLE No. 43
TREASURY ASSETS AND LIABILITIES
September 30 September 30 September 30
1945 1946 1947
ASSETS: Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Deposit in Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Haiti:
In New York Funds ..................... .. 169,820.75 164,074.10 103.001.00
In Haiti ......................................................................................... 10,633,020.08 15,451,585.46 22,480,112.25
Cash in hands of disbursing officers ....................... 535,537.46 332,894.06 24,060.92
Fiduciary currency in vault .......................................................... 2,105,950.82 1,196,127.26 422,500.00
Advances by the Government-reimbrsabl ............................... 52.917.04 52,167.04 51,417.04
Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Halti shares .................... 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00
Reserve for outstanding restitution checks.......................... 2,669.14 1,516.10 11,762.80
Reserve for checks issued, unpaid and not regularizedPurchasing Agency Account ......................... 3,126.15 2,2270 ....................
Total .. ... ........ .......8..... S50.051.44 2,200,626.72 29,292,854.01
LIABILITIES
Extraordinary credits ..................1.................................................. 1,0 8.,390.67 1,425,299.28 1,807,644.86
Non revenue credits .......................................................................... 4,080,979.03 3,518,328.93 3,667,297.37
Checks oustanding ........................................................................... 1419,745.39 1,502,716.51 2,603,021.42
Fiduciary currency fund ................................................................... 3,622.500.00 3,622.500.00 3,622,500.00
Advances by the Government-reimbursable ............................ 52,917.01 52,167.04 51,417.04
Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Haiti shares ............. 5.000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00
Outstanding restitution checks .................. . .. 2,669.14 1,516.10 11,762.80
Checks issued, unpaid and not regularized-Purchasing Agency account ....... ... ... .. 3,136.15 2,262.70 ...
Surplus ........................... ......................................................... 3.282,713.97 7,075,836.16 11,529,210.52
Total ...................... .................................. 18,503,051.44 22,20,626.72 28,292,654.01




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-2!:-APPENDICES
89
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90 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 45
EXPENDITURES FROM REVENUE FOR THE PUBLIC DEBT AND RELATION
OF SUCH EXPENDITURES TO REVENUE RECEIPTS---FISCAL YEARS 1945-46 AND 1946-47
Expenses Interest Amortization Total
Fiscal Year 1946-47 Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Series A ..............--....................... 31.997.00 1.571.925.00 5,287.969.00 6.891,891.00
Series C.................................................................... 9,529.65 248.618.70 885,226.45 1.143,374.80
Public Works Contract....................... .... 11,358.80 513,397.30 4,000,000.00 4.524.756.10
Internal Loan. ...............................-.............. 258.821.60 833333.30 1.092,154.90
Total Expenditures........ ..................... 52.885.45 2.52,762.60 11,006.528.75 13652.176.80
Revenue Receipts.... ......... ......... ........... 65,266,415.49
Ratio of public debt expenditures to revenue receipts. .08 3.97 16.86 20.91
Fiscal Year 1945-46
Series A. ........... ............................ 19.140.95 1,703,250.00 1.290,000.00 3,012,390.96
Series C.. ...................... ...--- .---.... ...... 2.336.20 267,694.70 210.000.00 480,030.90
Public Works Contract. ......... ....................... 6,712.30 669,238.35 2,000,000.00 2.675,950.65
Total Expenditures..... ............... 28,189.45 2640.183.056 3.600,000.00 6.168.372.50
Revenue Receipts ts s------.................... . ................. 4 4, 557,226.75
Ratio of public debt expenditures to revenue receipts. .06 5.92 7.8 13.84
TABLE No. 46
NOTES OF THE BANQUE NATIONALE IN CIRCULATION BY MONTHS FISCAL YEARS 1919.-20 TO 1946-47
Average Average Averac Average
S19190- 14-35.- 1939- 1944-45 1945-46 1946-47 1919-201933-34 1938-39 1943-44 194-47
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October 1946......... 8,996,693 7.099,501 ,13,300,631 21,672,047 2 ,477,003 32,499,678 11,129.993
November... .... 10,000,832 7.236,851, 13.522,566 22,752,158 23,771.014 35.011,114 11,976,566
December ............. 10,650,447 7,359.549 14,166.733 24.142,567 25,840.190 35,266,234 12,594.178
January 1947....... 10,545,419 7,473,073 14,005,394 23.434,118 24,768.759 33,895.290 12,416,=03
February.............. 11,6 5.538 8.340.895 15,080.683 24,964,837 25.729.162 33,872,00 13.468.105
Marchb.... ..... 11,964.854 8,672.88 15,643,447 25,665.020 25,394.772 34.167,461 13,796,765
April................. 11.103,329 8,520.823 16,105,249 24.550.069 24.80,628 33,200,877 13,296.266
May................. 10.373,771 8.419,247 16,025,862 24,236,84 24,479,333 31.746,161 12,796,230
June........................ 9,526,724 7.905,169 15,965,089 23,690.592 23.645.,492 80,051,248 12.12.9980
July--........ 8.717.909 7.448.744 15,755,026 22,682,070 23,943.406 28 .512,085 11,497.223
August-......... 8,13,668 7,079,620 15,616,852 22130,791 24,573,056 Z7.931.773 11.078.495
September...... 8.3290.123 7.056,509 15,687,961 21.984.756 27.851.451 28,.080.931 11,306.298
Average............ 10,003,60 7.717.730 15,072.957 23,492,204 24.778,105 32.019.578 12,296,337
TABLE No. 47
LOANS AND DEPOSITS OF BANKS IN HAITI BY MONTHS FISCAL YEAR 1946-1947
Loans and Total loans
discounts and Individual Government Total
in Haiti discounts deposits deposits deposits
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October 31.1946 ................. 9,893.842.59 10,496.395.39 35,013,784.59 17,559.191.78 52,fl2.976.37
November 3n, 1946 ................ .. 10.61,7.700.76 11.606,103.06 37.76241177 15.209,893.44 52,972,305.21
December 31, 1946.................... 12,637,528.82 14,052.031.12 39.865.898.48 15.127,511.72 54,993,410.20
January 31. 1947 ............... ... 9,989.774.94 11,093,15314 38.911,404.23 17.652.453.20 56,563,857.43
February 28, 1947 ........... 10,789,510.49 11.965,918.94 38.624.839.51 20,263,811.11 59,088,650.62
March 31. 1947....... --.. 14,491.07379 15,652,615.09 35,940.417.46 21.787,265.65 57,727.683.11
April 30, 1947............... 17.2S3,.48.34 18.310.465.79 37,591.706.9 23,624,787.28 60,216.49410
May 31, 1947.......... .. 16,400.6392.64 16.779,880.59 35.764,279.91 22,706,5865.61 58,470.865.52
June 30, 1947 ...... 14,947.654.47 15,211,090.12 35,822,273.54 24,890,337.28 60,712,610.82
July 31. 1947......... ....... 15,538,M.263.37 13.611.823.37 60,260.400.26 9,340,560.02 69,.600.960.38
August 31. 1947.... .... 11,870,008.64 12,02.848.64 39,651.480.40 10.096,496.75 49,747.977.15
September 30. 1947....................... 12.845,739.05 13.0035572145 48,424,747.12 9,604.055.81 58.023.802.93
Average.............................. 12.942.0' 2 13.650.407.30 40,319.470.34 17.238.579.13 57.558.049.48




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 91
TABLE No. 48
INTERNAL REVENUE RECEIPTS BY SOURCES
FISCAL YEARS 1944.45 TO 1946-47
1944-45 1945-46 1946-47
Excise: Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Alcohol from cane juice.... .. ........... 385,602.24 408,05.93 514.576.81
Alcohol from other matter.................................. 2,705.00 3.624.86 4,380.78
Spirituous liquors ....................................................... 1,127.06 2.462.36 6,831.45
Vinous liquors .................................. 17,707.43 36.75. 21 29,207.59
Cigars.................... ..... .................... 6.547.82 4.937.62 5.231.34
Cigarettes.................................. ......... 900,701.85 1,276,530.07 1.43.336.10
Gasoline ......... ... ....................................... 6.717.00 -.. ......
Lard substitutes.................................................. 36,746.85 27,73,.02 24,346.30
Manufactured tobacco.......................................... 10,881.11 12,816.17 18,804.30
Soap ........................................................... 26,885.23 15,791.75 45.441.22
Vegetable Oil......... ... ......... ... 151.76350 198.346.54 104,307.39
Total..................--- ........ ....... 1647.53509 1.986,975.52 2,185.468.28
Automobile registration tax............................ 14,823.05 137.995.00 171.180.96
Consular fees................................... ................... 54.367.35 "76,879.20 105,631.65
Court fe es........... ........................................ 8,634.85 6.051.60 8,171.00
Documentary recording fees...................... ............... 776,043.07 719,285.63 864,267.60
Drivers' licenses........... ..... ...................... 73,488.00 77,090.00 98,707.15
Fines and penalties.................. 19,644.88 10.262.01 16.510.75
Foreign residents' permits........ ........................ 6010.00 26,90.50 27.2231.50
Identity cards.............................. 378,205.15 342,.593.46 433.809.54
Income ta.......................... ............................. 4,634,639.81 4.63.924.71 4.844,773 22
Irrigation tax .... .. .. 102,742.45 988.449.61 96.024.24
Mineral exploration fees.................. ................ 109,25.38 156.109.36 176,183.21
Naturalization......... ......... ... ..... 700.00 1,600.00
Occupational tax on foreigners.. .......... ................... 3 3,617.67 335,027.33 364,886.51
Official gazette ....... .................... ........ 2.28.95 2,319.00 2,521.00
Passport................................................................... 12,60.00 ,00.00 33,235.00
Patent and trade mark fees....................... ...... 20,247.80 26,000.00 27,030.00
Post office box rentals........ ........... ........... 10.065.00 9.898.50 10.012.00
Publication fees ...... .........................................................4.... 6,430.00 15.00 .........
Public auction fees ......................................... 1,(0~.62 644,71 2.285.27
Public land rentals....................................... ....... 411,267.68 400.669.49 463.588.64
Radio tax....................-.................................... 22,943.25 20,825.60 21,461.05
Stamp receipts:
Commercial account book.......... ............ 4,649.70 5,365.25 8.001.U
Documentary stamps.................... 814.475.03 909,929.83 1,198,539.49
Postage stamps7...... ........................... 780,610.96 954.21.96 540.,939.19
Stamped per......... ......................... 56,403.12 53.320.50 66,768.35
Stock and bond tax. ........................................ 47,842.15 52,469.24 3,151.75
Visas of manifests..-- ................................ .... 11,045.00 8.555.00 9,480.00
Vital statistics fees.... .............. .......... 116,787.70 76,599.50 90.901.55
Miscellageous................................. ....... ...... ... 3,222.78 5,028.93 715.90
Total .................. ..................... 10.549,527.99 10,878,48.34 11.933.060.90
TABLE No. 49
INTERNAL REVENUE RECIPTS BY COLLECTION DISTRICTS FISCAL YEARS 1944-45 TO 1946-47
1944-45 195-46 1946-47
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
C2p-Haltien ................................................ ......... ............. 604.894.80 501,695.03 669,414.19
Cayes........................................................... .......... ...... ........... .. 307,745.6 301,897.16 407,094.29
Fort-Libert ............. ............................... ................. ...... 599,732.51 693,237.56 1001,979.02
Gonaivcs .................................... ............................................. 207,288.32 179,827.00 231,451.29
Jacmel .............................................. ............ ................. .. 239,2.34 22 6,014.65 298,490.12
S r ie........ ............................. ............................... : ....... 219,162.39 188,895.47 298.551.46
Mirag ne ....... ..................................................... ............ 97,187:52 89,5.5501 103.469.78,
Petit-Golve...................... ................ ............................ 94,699.15 84,001.85 104,739.30
Port-au-Prince .................................................................................... 7,18,070.60 8,71,28'1.0S 8.426.311.66
Port-de-Paix ............................................................................. 118.842.O3 111,482.35 1 30.5,7.22
Saint-M arc..................................................................,.............. .. 242,611.38 226,664.,8 261,022.57
Total ............................................................. 10,649.527.99 10,878,482.34 11,933,060.90
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