Citation
Banque nationale de la République d'Haïti. Département fiscal; Annual report of the Fiscal Department (continues the Americn fiscal report series, see U.S. relations section below, (4-trUS-1933-40)

Material Information

Title:
Banque nationale de la République d'Haïti. Département fiscal; Annual report of the Fiscal Department (continues the Americn fiscal report series, see U.S. relations section below, (4-trUS-1933-40)
Publisher:
Port-au-Prince, Imprimerie de l’Etat, 1941-.
Language:
English

Notes

General Note:
2b-L/E- 1941-50
General Note:
Hollis 005396553

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Harvard Law Library
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Full Text
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Harvard Law School Library




BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
FISCAL DEPARTMENT
SFOR THE FISCAL YEAR
OCTOBER 1941- SEPTEMBER 1942
SUBMITTED TO
THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR FINANCE, COMMERCE AND NATIONAL ECONOMY BY THE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Irnprimerie de I'Etat
PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI







CONTENTS
NARRATIVE SECTION: Pages
Trade Difficulties Increase......................................................... 3
Government Revenues............................................................
Customs Receipts .............................................................. 5
Import Revenues......................................................... 6
Export Revenues......................................................... 7
Internal Revenues...................................................... 8
Miscellaneous Receipts ........................................................ 10
Government Expenditures.......................................................... 10
Improved Public Instruction................................................. 12
Agriculture and Rural Education.............e.............................. 12
Foreign Relations Expenditures Decline .................................. 13
Fiscal Department............:................................................. 14
Customs Administration................................................. 14
Internal Revenue Service ............................................... 15
Inspection Service....................................................... 16
J. G. White Contract Terminated................................................. 17
Treasury Position .................................................................. 17
Public Debt.......................................................................... 19
Functions of Bank Board.......................................................... 20
The Budget.......................................................................... 21
Banking and Currency.............................................................. 22
Supply Service ....................................................................... 23
Increased Foreign Commerce Values.............................................. 24
Trade Position Improves.......................................................... 25
Percentage of Imports by Countries of Origin ...............25
Imports from the United States of America ......... .........26
Imports by Principal Groups....................................................... 26
Prices of Principal Commodities .................................................. 27
Port au Prince Trade Gains..................;..................................... 27
Percentage of Exports by Countries of Destination.............................. 28
Exports to the United States of America........................................ 28
Relative Importance of Exports.................................................... 29
Percentage of Exports by Ports.................................................... 29
Principal Export Products.......................................................... 30
Coffee .......................................................................... 30
Cotton .......................................................................... 31
Sugar .......................................................................... 31
Bananas........................................................................ 32
Export Volume and Values ........................................................ 33
Haitian-Dominican Commercial Convention..................................... 33
Air Transport Gains ............................................................... 35
Change in Membership of Bank Board......I..................................... 35
National Bank Appointed Sequestrator-Liquidator.............................. 36
Port Authority Created............................................................. 36
American Sanitary Mission ........................................................ 37
Soci~t6 Haltiano-Am~ricaine de D~veloppement Agricole (SHADA) ......... 37 Conclusion........................................................................... 39
APPENDICES:
Tables:
1. Value of Imports and Exports, and Excess of Imports or Exports,
fiscal years 1916-1917 to 1941-1942..................................... 43
2. Value of Imports showing countries of origin in percentages, fiscal
Years 1916-1917 to 1941-1942........................................... 43
3. Value of Exports showing countries of destination in percentages,
fiscal years 1916-1917 to 1941-1942 ..................................... 44
560607




IV APPENDICES
Pages
4. Value of Total Foreign Commerce by countries in percentages, fiscal
years 1916-1917 to 1941-1942 ........................................................ 44
5. Value and Percentage of Value of Imports, Exports and Total Foreign
Commerce by countries, fiscal year 1941-1942 .................................... 45
6. Value of Imports by Ports of Entry, fiscal years 1916-1917 to
1941-1942 ......................................................... ................................ 46
7. Value of Exports by Ports of Shipment, fiscal years 1916-1917 to
1941-1942 .......................................................................................... 46
8. Value and Percentage of Value of Imports, Exports and Total Foreign
Commerce by ports, fiscal year 1941-19,42 .................................. i ..... 47
9. Net tonnage of Sailing Vessels in Foreign Commerce Entered. by
Registry and Months, fiscal year 1941-1942 .................................... 47
10. Value of Imports by Registry of Carrying Vessels, fiscal year
1941-42 .............................................................................................. 48
11. Value 'of Exports by Registry of Carrying Vessels, fiscal year
1941-1942 .......................................................................................... 49
12. Value of Imports by Months and Ports of Entry, fiscal year 19411942 compared with 1940-1941 ......................................... .............. 5()
13. Value of Exports by Months and Ports of Shipment, fiscal year
1941-1942 compared with 1940-1941 ................................................ 51
14. Value of Imports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-1917 to 19411942 ................................................................................................... 52
15. Quantity of Imports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-1917 to
1941-1942 ......................................................................................... 53
16. Value of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-1917 to 19411941-1942 ......................................................................................... 54
17. Quantity of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 1916-1917 to
1941-1942 ........................................................................................... 54
18. Quantity and Value of Five Principal Exports by ports, fiscal year
1941-1942 compared with 1940-1941 ................................................ 55
19. Percentage of Value of Exports by Commodities, fiscal years 19161917 to 1941-1942 .............................................................................. 56
20. Quantity and Value of Exports by Commodities and Months, fiscal
year 1941-1942 ................................................ 4 ................................. 57
21. Expenses of Fiscal Department, B. N. R. H., by objects of Expenditures, fiscal years 1916-1917 to 1941-1942 .................................... 58
22. Classification of Administration and Operation Expenditures of the
Fiscal Department, B. N. R. H., fiscal year 1941-1942 .................... 59
23. Classification of Total Expenditures of the Fiscal Department',
B. N. R. H., fiscal year 1941-1942 .................................................... 59
24. Cost of Customs Operations by Ports and Cost of Administration,
Repairs and Maintenance, Acquisition of Property and Fixed Charges,
fiscal years 1919-1920 to 1941-1942 ................................................ 60
25. Operating Allowance of Internal Revenue Service, fiscal years 19231924 to 1941-1942 ........................... .................................................. 61
26. Revenues of Haiti by Sources, fiscal years 1889-1890 to 1941-1942 62
27. Relation between Import and Export Values and Customs Receipts,
fiscal years 1916-1917 to 1941-1942 ................................................ 63
28. Customs Receipts by Months, fiscal years 1916-1917 to 1941-1942 64
29. Customs Receipts by Ports, fiscal years 1916-1917 to 1941-1942 .... 64
30. Customs Receipts by Sources and Ports, fiscal year 1941-1942 ........ 65
31. Customs Receipts by Sources and by Months, fiscal year 1941-1942 65
32. Distribution of Customs Receipts, fiscal years 1916-1917 to 19411942 ............................................................................................... ... 66
33. Miscellaneous Receipts by Sources and Months, fiscal year 1941-1942 66
34. Total Receipts of Haitian Government by Sources, Months and Ports,
fiscal year 1941-1942 .......................................................................... 67




APPENDICES V
Pages
35. Ordinary, Supplementary and Extraordinary Appropriations from
Revenue, fiscal years 1939-1940 to 1941-1942 ................................ 68
3 Receipts and Expenditures, fiscal years 1939-1940 to 1941-1942 .... 69
37. Functional Classification of Expenditures, fiscal year 1941-1942 ........ 70
38. Classification of Administration and Operation Expenditures by
Departments and Services, fiscal year 1941-1942 ............................. 71
39. Classification of Total Expenditures by Departments and Services,
fiscal year 1941-1942 .......................................................................... 72
40. Receipts and Expenditures, fiscal year 1941-1942 ............................ 73
41. Revenues and Expenditures and Excess of Revenues or Expenditures,
fiscal years 1916-1917 to 1941-1942 ............................................... 74
42. Treasury A ssets and Liabilities ............................................................ 74
43. Public D ebt .......................................................................................... 75
44. Expenditures from Revenue for the Public Debt and Relation of
such Expenditures to Revenue Receipts, fiscal years 1940-1941
and 1941-1942 ..................................................................................... 75
45. Profit and Loss Statement, Bureau of Supplies, fiscal years 19401941 and 1941-1942 ............................. 4 ............................................. 76
46. Balance Sheet, Bureau of Supplies ................... 76
47. Notes of the Banque Nationale in Circulation by Months, fiscal years
1919-1920 to 1941-1942 .................................................................... 77
48. Loans and Deposits of Banks in Haiti by Months, fiscal year 19411942 ................................................................................................... 77
49. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources, fiscal years 1939-1940 to
1941-1942 ......................................................................................... 78
50. Internal Revenue Receipts by Collection Districts, fiscal years 19391940 to 1941-1942 ................... I .............. I ........................................... 78
51. Internal Revenue Receipts by Sources and Districts, fiscal year
1941-1942 ......................................................................................... 79
52. Internal Revenue Receipts. by Sources and-Months, fiscal year
1941-1942 ........................................................................................... so
Schedules:
1. Quantity and Value of Imports into Haiti by Countries 'of Origin,
fiscal year 1941-1942 .......................................................................... 83
2. Quantity and Value of Exports from Haiti by Countries of Destination, fiscal year 1941-1942 ................................................................ 102
3. Customs Receipts by Sources, Ports and Months, fiscal year 1941-42 111




BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
OCTOBER 1941-SEPTEMBER 1942




BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
ANNUAL REPORT
of the
FISCAL DEPARTMENT
covering the fiscal year
OCTOBER, 1941-SEPTEMBER, 1942
Port-au-Prince, Haiti, December 10, 1942.
To the
BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE
BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Sirs:
There is submitted herewith the Annual Report of the Banque Nationale de la R~publique d'Haiti, Fiscal Department, for the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942. As in the preparation of previous reports of this character, material of general economic interest, not necessarily directly related to the work of the Fiscal Department, has' been included, It is believed that this practice increases the usefulness of these Reports as a source of information on economic conditions in Haiti.
The fiscal year ended September 30, 1942, was, for Haiti, one of gradual adjustment to war conditions. It so happened that the first year of war coincided with the first year of operation of a reorganized fiscal administration under the Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Haiti. Thus, new problems of an extraordinary character were added to the usual difficulties involved in reorganization and the setting in motion of new administrative processes.
On the first day of October 194 1, the Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Haiti, in conformity with the provisions of the Executive Agreement signed at Washington on September 13, 1941, took over the functions theretofore exercised by the Office of the Fiscal Representative.
Prices had been rising for some months previously. It appeared that satisfactory arrangements for disposing of Haitian crops and for transporting them to markets in the Western Hemisphere could be made. There was, currently, some talk of the possible diversion to other areas of ships normally serving Haitian trade, but no undue alarm was felt on this score. Difficulties encountered a year or so earlier, as a result both of the outbreak




2 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
of war in Europe with consequent disruption of normal trade processes and of theextremely low prices-for Haitian coffee and other crops prevailing at that time were thought to be definitely over. The low point of depression lay behind; prices were rising and the outlook, although necessarily uncertain was, on the whole, relatively bright. The new Board of Directors of the Banque Nationale de la R~publique d'Haliti took office on October 1, 1941, in a general atmosphere of optimism and of cautious confidence regarding the future.
Two months later, on December 7, came the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the almost immediate declaration of war by the United States on Japan and the Axis Powers.
On December 8, by virtue of special authority derived from the PermanentCommittee of the National Assembly, war was declared on Japan by decree of the President of Haiti. This action was followed on December 12th by similar declarations of war against the Axis Powers.
Succeeding months were marked by increasing difficulties not only in transporting Haitian products to market but also in obtaining supplies from abroad. In order to understand the full gravity for Haiti of the disruption,- in 1942, :of regular sea transport services, it seems necessary to recall here, at the -outset, that the country is preponderantly dependent upon customs revenues. In the fiscal year just ended, over 75.6 per cent of government receipts was derived from duties on imports and exports but the. corresponding figure for 1940-41 was 79.6 and in earlier years, the figure often ran as high as 80 or even 90 per cent and over.
In addition to difficulties arising out of the shipping shortage, the effect was felt in Haiti during the first months of war, of the adjustment of the United States to a new basis of war economy. Haitian importers found that they could no longer place orders freely in the United States. New formalities involved in the application of priorities and quotas had to be fulfilled. Furthermore, the Haitian Government itself instituted new systems for allocating and rationing the commodities received from abroad. A6a result of these various developments, trade came almost to a standstill, and it seemed for a time as though the chief sources of Haitian revenue might dry up entirely.
Before many weeks of war had passed, it became evident that new methods would have to be devised and special arrangements made in order to enable the country to ride out the storm.
Faced with so vital a problem, the President of Haiti determined to go himself to Washington in order to discuss there, with the appropriate authorities, ways and means of meeting the emergency.
Proceeding to W'ashington, by air, in March, President Lescot and his associates immediately entered into conversations extending over a period of several weeks. As a result of these Meetings, a Memorandum was made




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 3
public which, in addition to bearing witness to a complete meeting of minds, sketched, in broad outline, bases for effective practical collaboration between the two Governments.
Among the subjects covered in the Memorandum were the disposal ofHaitian cotton crops for the duration of the war; the extension by the Export-Import Bank of a line of credit through the Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Halti; agricultural development and the handling of surpluses; the furnishing, by the United States, of material and other assistance of a military and naval character.
The seed sown at these Conferences in Washington in the Spring of 1942 was to bear fruit over a period of many months. In September, an Agreement was signed by the Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Halti and the Export-Import Bank of Washington. providing for the extension of credit to assistt in the stabilization of Haitian finances at present levels of expenditures and in the maintenance of a supply of dollar exchange essential to Haitian economy.7, Be it noted, in passing that, up to the end of the fiscal year, use of the credit facilities extended proved to be unnecessary, the Government having been able to meet its essential needs out of revenues and reserves. As time passes and new agreements are signed relating to specific aspects of Haitian agricultural, commercial and financial development, it seems likely that the effects of the decisions reached at Washington in March 1942 will be felt over a period of many years.
Trade Difficulties Increase
During the latter half of the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942, Haiti lived, so to speak, from hand to mouth. Sea transport services operated with great irregularity as a result both of enemy submarine activity and of the diversion, by the United States Government, of merchant ships to war purposes. For weeks on end it might be that no ship touched at Haitian ports. Then several arrivals might coincide. During the intervals between arrivals, shortages of one commodity or another might develop in the local market. It should be made of record that at no time during the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942, was there actual suffering or want in Haiti directly traceable to war conditions. The fact remains, however, that the goods finally imported seldom compensated entirely for the shortages which had previously developed, and discounting abnormal price variations in the local market which the authorities did their best to control, the trend was toward trade stagnation and lowered living standards. At the same time, customs receipts shrank to record lows.
In connection with the many difficulties which Haitian importers faced in 1942, it may be pertinent to recall here that the Haitian Government, although obliged to institute new systems of allocation and rationing of goods, recognized the unprecedented character of the situation and took




It BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
steps also to grant certain special facilities to trade. For example, since there was no longer any certainty regarding the receipt of documents, the usual fines for delayed customs declarations became, in certain instances, clearly inequitable, and a law was drafted providing for the waiving of such fines under certain conditions. Furthermore, a new ruling was established whereby storage charges for a period up to one month might be waived on goods declared in bond. These and other measures of the same general character assisted local importers in tiding their businesses over an unusually difficult period.
It was stated above that at no time in 1942 did Haiti experience actual suffering or want on account of war conditions. It should be added that at no time was there any lack of public confidence that the situation would ultimately right itself. That this was so was due not only to the fact that Haiti's danger was recognized at *Washington and that every effort was made to supply the tonnage required at least to meet Haiti's minimum needs and that Haiti was at all times confident that this tonnage would, eventually, be supplied; but also to the psychological effect of the agreements in principle reached during President Lescot's visit to Washington, and to constructive action resulting therefrom taken in the agricultural and other fields. Under the latter heading, the arrival in Haiti in May 1942 of an American Sanitary Mission-the purpose and work of which group are treated more fully elsewhere in this Report-is a case in point.
As the fiscal year drew to its close, the outlook appeared to be clearing. Haiti had more or less adjusted itself to the new conditions of war economy. There seemed to be reason to hope that shipping services would, in the future, tend to become more rather than less, regular. Projects for agricultural development of one sort or another were under way. Notable among these was -the plan for the cultivation on an area of 100,000 acres or almost 33,000 gcarreaux3' of land of cryptostegia, commonly know locally as 'Corne a Cabrit>>, the latex of which produces a rubber of superior quality. Negotiations looking to the financing by the United States of the disposal of the new coffee crop and of previous surpluses were being successfully concluded. Funds were available for meeting such current monthly budgetary deficits as-would occur if adequate shipping services were not maintained. On the whole, the situation, by comparison with what had been feared eight months previously, was relatively good. It was difficult to make any estimate of revenue for the new fiscal year ending September 30, 1943, because the result would depend almost entirely on the provision of ships to transport Haitian products to overseas markets and to supply the import trade. Assuming, however, that the necessary ships would be supplied, there seemed to be no reason to reduce the previous year's estimates of receipts, nor was there, under the circumstances, any sound basis on which a lower figure could be calculated. The new Government budget, therefore, was prepared at practically the same general level of expenditures




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 5
as the budget for 1941-42, and although there had been dark days during the period just ended, the transition to the new year was once again effected in an atmosphere of quiet. confidence regarding the future.
Government Revenues
Fiscal receipts of the Government from all sources during the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942, totalled Gdes.* 25,599,255.80. In the previous fiscal year, total revenues amounted to Gdes. 26,929,882.83.
Government revenues in 1941-42, classified by sources, compared with those of the previous fiscal period, were as follows:
Sources Receipts
1941-42 1941-42 194-41 19M-41
Gourdes Per cent Gourdes Per cent
Customs:
Imports.......................... 15,712,47 2.03 61.4 18,355,239.97 68.2
Exports..........................3,634,259.70 14.2 3,067,543.58 11.4
Miscellaneous ..................... 47,787.08 0.2 43,654.79 0.2
Internal Revenues ................. 5,3 37,4 16.0 4 20.9 4,878,926.03 18.1
Miscellaneous Government
Receipts .................... 498,046.61 1.9 361,558.47 1.3
Receipts from Communes ........... 369,274.34 1.4 222,959.09 0.8
Total Revenues ................. 25,599,255.80 100.0 26,929,882.83 100.0
From the above percentage columns it will be noted that internal revenue receipts accounted for a slightly higher percentage of total revenues in 1941-42 than was the case in 1940-41. This was not due so much to an increase in the yield of the internal revenue taxes as to the fact that customs receipts, particularly those from imports, we re unusually low. Miscellaneous Government receipts, including those from the Communes, also gained in importance.
Customs Receipts
Total customs receipts amounted to Gdes. 19,394,513.81. Not since the drastic deflation which followed immediately upon the short-lived post-war price rise of 1919-20 had receipts from this source been so low. When it is remembered that during past years customs revenues have generally represented form 80 to 90 per cent of total revenues, it will be realized that any sharp decline in customs duties has an immediate adverse effect on total collections and the general treasury situation. The relatively low yield of the import and-export tariffs in 1941-42 was due principally to the irregularity in the shipping services caused by the war. In other words, the tonnage of foreign trade, particularly of imports from which most of the national revenues are derived, was considerably below the
*Oat gourde equals twenty cents. U. S., and the gourde is, by law. exchangeable on demand and without expense at the fixed rate of five gouedes for one .llar. U. S.




6 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE DOHAITI
average annual level. In view of the fact that all export duties are based on weight and since a considerable proportion of imported articles pay specific rates of duty, it is clear that any reduction in the volume of imports and exports is immediately reflected in reduced revenues.
The principal sources of import revenues in order of yield and compared to the yield of the previous year were:
Import Revenues
194l-42 1940-41
Courses Gourdes
Cotton goods................................. 5,014,271.52 5,4 64,282.19
Flour ......................................... 2,461,858.66 2,255,965.10
Gasoline and kerosene .....................1,971,040.17 2,6 47,9 76.46
Cigarettes and tobacco .....................1,13 6,247.74 860,2 54.43
Foodstuffs other than flour,and beverages 1,043,770.6 1 1,471,251.16 Chemical and pharmaceutical products 862,509.28 63 3,83 5.73
Soap ........................................... 774,624.38 893,752.43
Wool, linen, silk goods, jute bags, etc 720,613.79 1,135,653.01
Iron and steel products, machinery and
apparatus .................................. 349,295.11 824,899.74
Paper, etc ..................................... 251,872.57 247,836.32
Cement, lumber, etc .......................... 223,769.03 495,376.29
* Leather, shoes, and leather goods ..... 112,619.42 155,915.55
* Glassware.....................................110,635.25 108,238.55
Autos and trucks .....;........................ 75,781.53 183,764.72
Rubber goods ................................. 12,530.11 265,797.31
Earthenware, etc.............................. 7,912.09 71,496.71
All other ...................................... 583,120.77 638,944.27
Total................................... 15,712,472.03 18,355,239.97
It is interesting to note that some of the sharpest declines in import duties occurred in connection with articles the export of which from the United States was either prohibited or restricted because of the war effort. Gasoline and kerosene, iron and steel products, automobiles and trucks, and rubber goods may be mentioned in this connection, The volume of imported cotton goods was only slightly less than in 1940-4 1. The value of such imports, however, was 36.8%y greater than in the previous year. Yet the duties declined by some Gdes. 450,000, as will be seen from the above table. Since no change in duty rates occurred in the course of the year, this decline merits explanation. In recent years considerable quantities of cotton textiles have been imported from Japan, notwithstanding the application to Japanese products -of the maximum tariff, or 100 per cent more than the rates applied to goods from countries which fulfilled in their trade with Haiti, certain conditions which Japan failed to fulfill. In 1940-41 some 315,000 kilos of cotton goods valued at approximately Gdes. 1,000,000 were imported from Japan, while such imports in 1941-42 were insignificant. The fact that practically all 1 941-42 imports paid only the minimum tariff rates while a considerable proportion of the 1940-41 imports were subject to the maximum rates largely accounted for the decline in the amount of duties paid on cotton goods in 1941-42.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 7
Export Revenues
Returns form export duties increased from Gdes. 3,067,543.5 8 in 194041 to Gdes. 3,634,259.70 for the year under review. Export revenues ate principally derived from the specific duties levied on coffee. Coffee shipped during the year amounted to 18,104,711 kilos, while the duties paid on the shipments totalled Gdes. 2,905,658. During the prior year, coffee shipments amounted to 22,641,275 kilos, but yielded only Gdes. 2,516,001. During most of the fiscal year 1940-41, the export duty rates on coffee were reduced by one-third in order that the exporters might be able to sell to the foreign markets at the low prices which prevailed during that period. As prices showed improvement toward the end of the fiscal year ended September 30, 1941, the full rates were restored; and in February 1942, as an extraordinary revenue measure, applicable until the end of the war, there was established a special export tax ofGdes. 5.00 per bag of 80 kilos of coffee. However, since this special tax was to be applied only to the 1942-43 and subsequent annual quotas, the yield during the year just ended was limited to an amount collected on certain advance shipments authorized under the 1942-43 quota.
Export revenues by sources were as follows in 194 1-42 and 1940-41:
1941-42 1940-41
Goardes Per Cent Gourdes Per Cent
-Coffee................... 2,905,658 79.95 2,516,001 82.02
Sugar..................... 198,142 5.45 8,361 0.27
Sisal ..................... 165,535 4.55 154,325 5.03
Bananas................. 135,899 3.74 216,100 7.05
Molasses ................ 106,715 2.94 .. R.i0
Cotton....................47,991 1.32553018
All other ................ 74,320 2.05' 117,446 3.83
Total ................ 3,634,260 100.00 3,067,543 100.00
It has been remarked that all export duties are collected at specific rates based on weights or measurements. Sugar and molasses, however, when the price of these commodities falls below a certain level on the New York market, are exempt from export duties. When the price rises above this level the rates increase or decrease with the rise or fall in prices. The sharp increase in the duty yield of these commodities during the current year reflects better prices rather than increased volume.
The banana industry has been most adversely affected by the shipping shortage and by the resulting priority given to other export products. The duties paid on bananas, as shown in the above table, were collected in the early months of the fiscal year.
Later on in the year. the export of bananas was almost completely discontinued. Although the growing and shipping of bananas on a commercial scale was started in Haiti less than ten years ago, the industry had developed rapidly to a point where it was one of the principal factors in




8 BANQUJE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE DYHAITI
the country's economic life. It is to be hoped that conditions will soon again be such as to permit the resumption of activity in this field. It seems important from the long term point of view, that gains made in the past should not now be lost.
ISince sisal pays a relatively low rate of duty, the revenues derived directly from this industry in the form of export duties are not important. However, the industry through the employment of thousands of laborers and through its other investments in the country holds an important place in the national economy.
Internal Revenues
Internal revenue collections in 1941-42 were higher than they have been in any previous year, since creation of the Service in 1924, except for 192829 and 1929-30. The favorable showing in 1941-42 was due in some part to revision of tax laws, but it is believed that a more strict application of the revenue laws played a considerable part in the increase.
Receipts from all internal revenue sources totalled Gdes. 5,337,416.04 during the fiscal year. In the preceding year, these receipts amounted to Gdes. 4,878,926.03.
Excise taxes, amounting to Gdes. 1,242,302.90, represented 23.3 per cent of total internal revenues. The excise group includes alcohol, tobacco products, vegetable oils, lard substitutes and soap. The tax on cigarettes totalling Odes. 590,534.48 represented almost half of all excises.
During the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942 public service charges accounted for 20.5 per cent of total internal revenues. In addition to the Post-Office, the Government owns atid operates the telephone and telegraph system, the urban hydraulic systems and, for the most part, the rural irrigation systems;
The following table shows the receipts from and expenditures by these services during the fiscal year 1941-42:
Receipts Expenditures
Gourdes Goudes
Services
Telegraph and Telephone .. ........... 431,982.53 460,698.59
Hydraulic Service..................... 319,463.95 177,898.76
Post Office ............................ 256,184.20 289,939.27
Irrigation .............................. 86,922.19 58,250.11
Total ............................ 1,094,552.87 986,786.73
In the following table sources of internal revenue yielding more than Gdes. 100,000 are listed in the order of yield. The extent to which there were increases or decreases from the preceding year is also given.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTrMENT 9
Internal Revenue Collections
(Categories yielding Gdes. 100,000 or more)
Increase()
Decrease(Amount Coillected as compared with
1941-42 previous year
Gourdes Goeatdes
Inoetax.................................. 6 37,12 3.0 8 165,483.79 *
Cigarettes (excise)......................... 590,534.48 134,973.92 *
Documentary stamps ..................... 541,380.65 61,498.71 *
Telegraph and Telephone................ 431,982.53 10,456.65 *
Registration* fees.......................... 361,038.84 410,0 30.9 9 *
Public land rentals ........................ 360,948.07 3 2,8 40.6 8 *
Identity card fees ........................ 344,317.30 83,726.28 *
Water service charges .................... 319,463.95 22,492.95 *
Alcohol from cane juice (excise) ...317,783;45 11,957.03 *
Postage stamps ............................ 246,830.21 3,531.70
Occupational licences ..................... 206,771.32 2,743.72
Vegetable oil (excise) ...................192,970.39 32,045.19
Vital statistics fees....................... 147,-279.6 3 24,763.23 *
Automobile licence fees .................. 136,849.51 1,362.07 *
It is interesting to note that the income tax was the principal source of internal revenue during the year 1941-42. The relatively favorable showing under this heading, collections being higher than in any year since 1929-30, was due to the increase in the rates provided for by new legislation as well as to the fact that local firms producing and exporting agricultural products received comparatively high prices for their products and showed greater profits.
The next most important source of internal revenue was the excise on cigarettes which increased some Gdes. 135,000 over the preceding year. Since the rates did not increase in the course of the year, it is apparent that the consumption of cigarettes is increasing. Import statistics indicate that the purchase of foreign cigarettes declined by 9 per cent from the previous year. It is, therefore, evident that the local cigarette industry is becoming more important.
The category of internal revenue which showed the sharpest decline was the excise on locally produced '-oil derived from cotton seeds. This decline, amounting to 7 per cent, as well as the decline of about 50 per cent in the, amount of lard and lard substitutes imported from abroad, when comparison is made with the statistics of the previous year, would seem to indicate a sharp reduction in the consumption of fats. However, the extent of this reduction if, in fact, there was a reduction, is not nearly so great as would be indicated by the foreign trade and revenue statistics,




10 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
since it is well known that the local, meat and lard production has increased considerably. Furthermore, the production of cocoanut oil and peanut oil has been encouraged through tax exemption.
Miscellaneous Receipts
Miscellaneous receipts of the Government totalled Gdes. 498,046.61 in 1941-42 compared with Gdes. 361,558.47 in 1940-41. These-receipts may be classified as follows:
Courdes
Communal contributions ..................... 255,931.82
Returns on investments..................... 111,506.30
Conversion of francs........................... 17,516.60
Miscellaneous................................. 113,091.89
Total.....................................498,046.61
Since 1940-41, the Communes contribute 10 per cent of their gross revenues to the Public Treasury. This contribution is designed to aid the Government during the period of comparatively low revenues and to compensate the Treasury in part for the expenditures effected for the public benefit throughout the various Communes.
The principal source of returns on investments was the dividend from the Commercial Department of the Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Ha~ti. Profits of the Bank are assigned as follows: one third to the Public Treasury, one third for the development of projects designed to increase exports, and one third 'to build up the surplus of the Bank. The dividend in 1941-42 amounted to Gdes. 210,000 and one third of this, or. Gdes. 70,000, was taken up as miscellaneous receipts of the Goverment. Other returns on investments include interest on bonds of the Republic held in the treasury investment account and interest on balances on deposit with the Fiscal Agent for the payment of interest and amortization on Series A and Series C bonds.
Receipts from the third source of miscellaneous revenues mentioned above conversion of francs consist of interest on funds held in trust by the National City Bank of New York for the benefit of the remaining bondholders of the 1910 loan until they choose to redeem their bonds. Interest on the funds at the rate of 2-1/2 per cent per annumn is paid to the Haitian Government in francs and converted into dollars.
Government Expenditures
The following table shows expenditures from revenue during 1941-42 by Departments and Services. All disbursements from ordinary, supple-




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 11
mentary (or deficiency), and extraordinary appropriations are included. The second column shows the increase or decrease from the preceding year'.
Increase (
Government Decrease(Expenditures as compared with
1941-42 1940-41
Gocgrdes Gourdes
Garde d'Halti .................................. 6,902,707.64 494,829.60*
Public Debt..................................... 3,523,063.75 313,010.81*
Department of Public Works................ 3,035,333.17 2 16,7 88.18*
Department of Public Instruction.......... 2,397,226.41 224,384.10*
Public Health Service ...................... 2,350,779.13 242,654.02*
Agricultural and Rural Education Service 1,917,952.01 501,340.85*
Department of Interior ....................... 1,903,405.52 229 ,527.94*
Department of Justice........................ 1,287,107.25 218,688.07*
Internal Revenue Service .................... 1,023,9 50.20 86,417.81*
Department of Finance ...................... .904,536.35 151,'067.02
Fiscal Department B. N. R. H............... 899,209.69 110,504.46
Department of Foreign Relations ............ 705,785.34 2 53,47 7.4 8
Department of Religion ............... 453,597.66 121,890.67*
Department of Commerce and National
Economy ..................................... 342,245.92 2 0,15 5.0 0*
International Institutions...................... 44,720.35 17,020.35*
Department of Agriculture and Labor ..... 34,541.21 11,321.09
Total ......................................... 27,726,161.60 2,160,337.35*
From the above table it will be seen that expenditures in 1941-42
exceeded those of 1940-41 by Gdes. 2,160,337.35 and that only the Departments of Foreign Relations, Finance, Agriculture and Labor and the Fiscal Department of the Banque Nationale (the latter by comparison with the expenditures of the Fiscal Representative's Office) showed declines.
During the preceding year, governmental salaries were reduced by 20 per cent. In 1941-42, the general reduction, amounted to only 10 per cent. This partial restoration of government salaries accounted, in large measure, for the increased expenditures, although important additional amounts were allocated and expended in connection with the reorganization of such Departments as Agriculture and Labor, and Public Instruction as well as for service of the public debt.
Expenditures of the Garde d'Haiti continued their preponderant lead over the amounts expended by the other Services of the Government, having amounted to 24.89 per cent of total disbursements from revenue. The Garde d'Ha~iti is not only the country's military'force but its police force as well, and the exigencies of the war situation have necessitated allocation of more funds for-the operation of this organization.
Expenditures for service of the public debt were Gdes. 313,010.81, more than in the preceding year. Of this amount, Gdes. 100,000 represents payment in the form of token amortization of Series A and Series C bonds of the Republic. No payments for this purpose were made in 1940-41. The remainder of the increase covers interest paid on additional advances received under the Public 'Works Contract of 1938, as modified in 1941.




12 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'H-AITI
The increase of Gdes. 216,788.18 by the Department of Public Works is accounted for largely by the payment of greater amounts for supplies and materials and for transportation. The maintenance of the various Public Works projects completed under the contract of 1938 between the Government and the J. G. White Engineering Corporation falls to the Department of Public Works.
Improved Public Instruction
The Department of Public Instruction expended Gdes. 224,384.10 more than in the preceding year. This Department underwent a reorganization in the course of the year. Only teachers holding appropriate diplomas are now being employed, and the scale of pay has been somewhat increased with a view to attracting teaching personnel having the necessary preparation. Furthermore, the Department sent quite a number of teachers abroad to receive advanced and specialized training. Also, relatively large amounts were expended for repair of school buildings and for the acquisition of supplies and equipment.
The expenditures of the National Public Health Service showed an increase of Gdes. 242,654.02. Payments on account of salaries and wages were above last year's figure. This was accounted for primarily" by the fact that, as already explained, part of the salary reduction which was in effect in 1940-41, was restored in 1941-42. Then, the Public Health Service started paying its day laborers street sweepers, drainage workers, etc. the minimum wage of Gdes. 1.50 per day required by law. This second factor will explain to some considerable degree the increased amounts paid for wages by other Departments and Services, such as the Public Works Department and the Agricultural Service. In the course of the year the Public Health Service also organized a corps of sanitary inspectors.
Agriculture and Rural Education
The largest increase in disbursements, amounting to Gdes. 50 1.340.85. was recorded by the Agricultural and Rural Education Service. This Service, like 'the Department of Public Instruction, was reorganized. Some of its activities agricultural colonies which had formerly been financed with non-fiscal funds were transferred to the regular budget. Furthermore, there was transferred to the regular budget of this Service and somewhat amplified, the organization which exercises supervision over the cultivation, preparation and delivery of coffee. One of the principal duties of this coffee section is cup-testing with a view to maintaining quality and uniformity in coffee shipped to foreign markets. The




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 13
activities of the cup-testing laboratory had been financed principally under extraordinary appropriations in past years. Another addition to the budget of the Agricultural Service in 1941-42 was a provision for the supervision of agricultural and industrial enterprises.
The Department of Interior expended Gdes. 1,903,405.52 or Gdes. 229,527.94 more than in the preceding year. In the course of the year, this Department expended Gdes. 150,075.00 from extraordinary appropriations. The largest item was Gdes. 100,000.00 to cover the cost of special police work necessitated by war conditions.
The Department of Justice increased its expenditures by Gdes. 218,688.07. Since this budget is largely a salary budget-: personnel of the Department, Supreme Court, Civil Courts and Justices of the Peace the increase over the preceding year resulted principally from the partial restoration of salaries already referred to; also, there was a reorganization in the Justice of the Peace courts in conformity with a revision of the organic law covering these courts. The standard of the personnel education, experience, etc. has been considerably raised.
Expenditures of the Fiscal Department of the Banque Nationale de la R~publique d'Ha'ti showed a decline from the preceding year while those of the Internal Revenue Service were greater than in 1940-41. Further remarks will be made relative to these expenditures in the succeeding sub-sections.
Disbursements by the Department of Finance were Gdes. 151,067.02 less than in the fiscal year 1940-41. This decline is explained by the fact that-in the prior year a total of Gdes. 500,000 was paid to the Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Hati for its services as Treasury Agent, Gdes. 200,000 of the said amount representing the balance due for the fiscal year 1939-40. In the course of 1941-42, only the contractual amount due for the year, Gdes. 300,000, was paid.
Foreign Relations Expenditures Decline
The expenditures of the Department of Foreign Relations decreased from Gdes. 959,262.82 in the preceding year to Gdes. 705,785.34. This decline was largely due to the fact that the 1940-41 budget carried certain non-recurring appibpriations, notably those for the Caribbean Conference and for coffee publicity, etc., totalling some Gdes. 300,000.
The Department of Religion increased its expenditures by an amount of Gdes. 121,890.67, Gdes. 100,000 of which represented the cost of restoration of the Cathedral at Cap-HaYtien.
The Department of National Economy was created at the beginning of the year and combined with the Department of Commerce. The new




14 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE DHAITI
Department showed an increase in its expenditures of Gdes. 20,155.00 when comparison is made with the expenditures effected by the Department of Commerce in the previous year.
Expenditures in connection with International Institutions covered payment of Haiti's proportionate share in the expenses of the various international associations such as the Pan American Union and InterAmerican Coffee Board, of which Haiti is a member or to which Haiti subscribes. These payments totalled Gdes. 44,720.35.
Disbursements by the Department of Agriculture and Labor, exclusive of those of the Agricultural and Rural Education Service, declined from Gdes. 45,862.30 in 1940-41 to Gdes. 34,541.21.
Table 37 gives a functional classification of expenditures for the fiscal year and shows the percentage of the total expended on each function. Included in the table are all disbursements of the Government, both fiscal and non-fiscal. The net amount of all expenditures was Gdes. 29,554,349.66. The disbursements of the Garde d'Haiti accounted for 23.35 per cent of combined fiscal and non-fiscal expenditures. The payments on account of the public debt represented 11.92 per cent of the total, while education accounted for 11.54 per cent of all expenses. The expenditures under the Public Works Contract of 1938 represented only 8.47 per cent as compared with 21.86 per cent in the previous year.
Fiscal Department
Customs Administration
Prior to the fiscal year 1941-42 the expenses of the Customs Service were paid from a fund consisting of 5 per cent of customs receipts. The Executive Agreement of September 13, 1941, which provided for the taking over, on October 1, 1941, by the Banque Nationale de la R~publique d'Halti, Fiscal Department, of the functions theretofore exercised by the Office of the Fiscal Representative, provided also for the establishment in the general budget of the Government each year of a fixed allocation, to be agreed upon between the Government and the Banque Nationale de la Republique d'Haiti, for the operation of the Fiscal Department of the Bank. The appropriation carried in the 1941-42 budget for this purpose amounted to Gdes. 967,724. However, only Gdes.
899,209.69 were expended and the savings, totalling Gdes. 60,514.31, were returned to the Government at the end of the year. The expenses of the Fiscal Department of the Banque Nationale de la R~publique d'Haiti, which includes the Customs Administration and the Central




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 15
Accounting Service of the Government, in 1941-42, as compared with those of the Fiscal Representative's office, in the preceding year, were as follows: 1941-42 1940-41
Gourdes Gourdes
Salaries and wages .............................. 801,376.38 851,076.24
Supplies and materials ........................ 54,727.53 49,769.36
Transportation ................................... 24,976.59 35,797.14
Communications ................................. 520.10 4,696.85
Rents ................................................. 903.55 2,026.00 *
Repairs and maintenance ................. 10,020.10 10,145.88
Equipment ......................................... 7,018.69 4,632.25
Special and miscellaneous .................... 1,473.85 55,622.43
Total .............................................. 899,209.69 1,009,714.15
The reduction in the salary schedule is explained largely by the fact that the American personnel of the Banque. Nationale de la Ripublique d'Haiti, Fiscal Department, is less than the American personnel of the Fiscal Representative's Office and that special payments on termination of service were made, in 1940-41, to the retiring American members of the Fiscal Representative's Office.
Supplies and Materials and Equipment were the only items which showed increases over the amounts expended in the previous year, and this was due principally to a general rise in the prices of imported articles.
In connection with the decline in Special and Miscellaneous expenditures, it should be remarked that in the preceding year, an amount of Gdes. 47,540.46 was paid to the Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Haiti in partial compensation for its services as Treasury'Agent during 1939-40. The full amount due for Treasury Service during the year under review was carried in the budget of the Department of Finance.
Internal Revenue Service
The Operating Fund of the Internal Revenue Service is derived principally from an allowance of 10 per cent of all internal revenue receipts collected and 15 per cent of the communal taxes collected by the Internal Revenue Service. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942, 10 per cent of internal revenues amounted to Gdes. 533,741.61, and 15 per cent of communal revenues totalled Gdes. 369,274.34. Other accruals to the fund of the Internal Revenue Service, amounting to Gdes. 7,351.84, brought the total to Gdes. 910,367.79. Expenditures of the Internal Revenue Service during the past two years were as follows:
1941-42 1940-41
Gourdes Gourdes
Salaries and wages ............................. 672,845.46 527,633.47
Supplies and materials ........................ 98,759.67 89,165.68
Transportation ................................... 66,006.95 77,332.39
Repairs and maintenance .................... 9,694.65 8,895.53
Equipment ........................................... 4,481.29 11,201.06
M iscellaneous .................................... 19,167.82 3,507.91
Total .............................................. 870,955.84 717,736.04
*Credit




16- BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE DOHAITI
.The increase in salary payments was principally accounted for by two factors. First, the salary reductions which had been in effect in the previous year were not carried over. In the second place, certain internal revenue agents are paid certain percentages, varying with the type of taxes, of the amounts which they collect. It naturally follows that these percentage amounts, which are considered as salaries, increase as the internal revenue receipts increase. Revenue statistics show that internal revenue collections rose by Gdes. 458,490.01 during the period under review.
The increase in the cost of supplies and materials resulted from the general rise in the cost of imported articles and from expenditures in connection with the printing of stamps. The accruals to the Operating Fund of the Internal Revenue Service having amounted to Gdes. 910,367.79 and expenditures having totalled Gdes. 870,955.84, the unutilized balance of Gdes. 39,4 11.95 was returned to the Government.
Inspection Service
*The Internal Revenue Inspection Service was organized in conformity with the provisions of the Accord of August 7, 1933 between the Haitian and United States Governments to function under the Fiscal Representative's Office. When the latter office was abolished on October 1, 1941, under the terms of the Executive Agreement of September 13, 1941, the Inspection Service was reorganized through the recall to the center of Inspectors previously resident in the provinces. These inspectors now make periodic inspection trips, covering both Customs and Internal Revenue business.
The operating fund of the Inspection Service is derived from an allowance of 5 per cent of all internal revenues collected. These accruals amounted to Gdes. 266,870.80 while expenditures totalled only Gdes. 152,994.36. The balance of Gdes. 113,876.44 was returned to the Public Treasury.
Details of the expenditures of the Inspection Service in 1941-42 and those of the Internal Revenue Inspection Service in 1940-41, were as follows:
1941-42 1940,41
Gourdes Gourdes
Salaries....................................10o4,394.96 128,612.28
Supplies................................ **- ,372.14 6,882.62
Transportation............................. 42,957.34 80,923.68
Equipment................................... 1,614.62 1,528.63
Repairs ...................................... 482.80 603.06
Miscellaneous............................... 172.50 1,246.08
Total ................................152,994.36 219,796.35
The same factors which, in the case of the Fiscal Department, resulted in a saving on account of salaries in 1941-42 as compared with 1940-41,




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 17
applied also in the case of the Inspection Service. The greatest saving in the latter Service occurred under the heading of Transportation, which declined from Gdes. 80,923.68 to Gdes. 42,957.34. Formerly, official cars, operated at Government expense, were used by certain chiefs of Service. This practice was discontinued in 1941-42, thus accounting for part of the decline in transportation expenses for the year.
J. G. White Contract Terminated
Under the contract signed July 6, 1938 between the Haitian Government and the 3. G. White Engineering Corporation, as modified by a further contract dated September 30, 1941, the J. G. White Engineering Corporation undertook to execute in Haiti a .program of public works to cost not more than Gdes. 27,500,000. At the end of the fiscal year 1940-41 total expenditures under this program had reached Gdes. 24.,747,362.42. The J. G. White Engineering Corporation continued to carry out certain projects to the end of May, 1942, when its cumulative disbursements under the contract had reached Gdes. 26,695,089.05. At the latter date, under an agreement between the Haitian Government, the J. G. White Engineering Corporation, the Export-Import Bank of Washington and the Socifti Haitiano-Amiricaine de D6veloppement Agricole (SHADA), the J. G. White Engineering Corporation was relieved from further obligations under its two contracts with the Government and SHADA was authorized to complete certain projects undertaken under the original program provided, however, that the cost of such work should not exceed the unexpended balance of the original authorization of Gdes. 27,500,000. The amount which remained available to SHADA at the end of May, 1942, was Gdes. 804,910.95. Expenditures during the last four months of the fiscal year totalled Gdes. 554,892.25, bringing cumulative expenditures under the program to Gdes. 27,249,981,30 and leaving Gdes. 250,'018.70 as a maximum yet to be expended on the uncompleted projects. These projects include:
Completion of the road from Anse d'Hainault to Source Chaude; Completion of the buildings of the rubber nursery at Marirane; Construction of masonry platforms for drying coffee; Operation of existing coffee nurseries;
Drilling of wells and installation of irrigation pumps; Purchase of spare parts for sprayers being used to combat the banana plant disease known as Sigatoka.
Treasury Position
Government receipts declined by Gdes. 1,330,627.03 in 1941-42 while disbursements increased by Gdes. 2,160,337.35 when comparison is made with the revenue and expenditures statistics of the preceding fiscal year. It is, therefore, evident that the treasury position suffered. In fact, treasury




18 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
liabilities at the end of the year exceeded treasury assets by Gdes. 121,039.37, whereas at September 30, 1941, there was an unobligated surplus of Gdes. 1,857,859.49.
Treasury assets and liabilities at the end of the fiscal year 1941-42 were as follows:
Assets
Gourdes, Gourdes
Current assets
Deposit in banks:
Government gourde account ......................... 2,161,077.62
New York current account ........................... 46,227.55
Receipts not deposited ...................................... 674.45
Cash in hands of disbursing officers ................ 378,549.79
Public Works Contract and other checks ........ 36,934.26 2,623,463.67
Investments
Capital stock of Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Haiti ............................................ 5,000,000.00
Bonds of the Republic .................................... 532,737.25 5,532,737.25
Other assets
Fiduciary currency in vault ............................ 2,932,830.25
Advances to Communes and others ................ 624,239.56 3,557,069.81
D eficit ....................................................................... 121,039.37
Total treasury assets ...................................... 11,834,310.10
Liabilities
Current liabilities
Outstanding checks .......................................... 751,020.02
Balance of extraordinary appropriations .......... 10,495.58
Balance in non-revenue accounts .................... 1,789,120.68
Public Works Contract and other checks ........ 36,934.26 2,587,570.54
Other liabilities
Capital stock Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'H aiti ............................................... 5,000,000.00
Fiduciary currency fund .................................. 3,622,500.00
Advances to Communes and others .................. 624,239.56 9,246,739.56
Total treasury liabilities .......................... 11,834,310.10
In connection with the deficit at the end of the fiscal year, it is pertinent to recall here the remarks made in the introductory paragraphs of this report, relative to an arrangement, agreed to in principle between the Haitian and American Governments, whereby certain advances may be made to Haiti by the Export-Import Bank of Washington to assist in the stabilization of Haitian finances at present levels of expenditures and in the maintenance of a supply of dollar exchange essential to its economy*. The agreement in question was signed on September 22, 1942. Fortunately, it was not necessary to take advantage of its terms before the close of the fiscal year.
It is also pertinent to state that, after the close of the fiscal year, arramgements were made for the payment into the Public Treasury of an amount




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 19
equivalent to the deficit at September 30 from the surplus built up by the communal administrations of the Republic, whose receipts and expenditures, since October 1, 1941, have been supervised by the Banque Nationale de la Rip'ublique d'HaYti under the terms of the Executive Agreement of September 13, 1941. The said payment, will be treated as a reduction in the amounts advanced to the Communes by the Government in past years.
Public Debt
The gross public debt of the Republic of Haiti at September 30, 1942 amounted to Gdes. 70,468,212.60, not including the amount of Gdes. 121,039.37 representing the Treasury deficit at that date. Table No. 43 presents a statement of the public debt at the end of each fiscal year since 1915. For convenient comparison, the portion of that table which shows the debt as September 30 of each year since 1924 (the year in which, through refunding operations and consolidation, the amount of the debt was fixed in dollars) is reproduced here:
Year Gourdes Year Gourdes
1924 ............................ 121,048,501.20 1934 60,830,435.79
1925 ........ ........... 115,231,263.80 1935 54,930,599.85
1926 ............................ 108,307,079.30 1936 49,092,715.80
1927 ............................ 99,706,855.09 1937 44,317,295.95
1928 ............................ 94,438,115.05 1938 43,950,094.29
1929 ............................ 88,677,396.00 1939 52,137,491.99
1930 ............................ 82,705,649.35 1940 60,871,550.33
1931 ............................ 78,357,576.10 1941 68,096,049.72
1932 ............................ 72,625,870.96 1942 70,468,212.60
1933............................ 66,901,412.84
The public debt of the Republic of Haiti consists of the amounts of the Series A and Series C bonds of the 1922 loans still outstanding, the advances received under the Public Works Contract of 1938 and fiduciary currency not covered by reserves. These items at September 30, 1942 and at the end of the preceding year were:
Sept. 30, 1942 Sept. 30, 1941
Gourdes Gourdes
Series A bonds ............................ 34,107,015.70 34,218,728.20
Series C bonds ............................ 5,488,715.55 5,507,459.10
Public Works Contract of 1938 .... 27,249,981.35 24,747,362.42 Fiduciary Currency ........................ 3,622,500.00 3,6 22,500.00
Total .................... .............. 70,468,212.60 68,096,049.72
The figures shown for Series A an C bonds are net amounts, after deduction of sums remaining in the Sinking Fund at September 30, 1942. These unapplied amounts were:
Gourdes
Series A sinking fund ............................ 45,484.30
Series C sinking fund ............................ 8,216.35
T otal ................................................ 53,700.65




20 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
-Total expenditures from revenue for service of the public debt amounted to Gdes. 3,523,063.75 during the fiscal year under review. Expenditures for interest, amortization and handling charges on Series A bonds, Series C bonds, and the advances under the Public Works Contract of 1938 were as follows:
Interest Amortization Expenses Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Series A bonds ........... 2,05 1,25 0.00 86,000 18,402.30 2,155,652.30
Series C bonds............ 330,140.65 14,000 2,803.70 346,944.35
Public WVorks Contract 1,012,6 76.0 5 7,791.05 1,02 0,46 7.10
Total ................. 3,3 94,06 6.70 100,000 28,997.05 3,523,063.7 5
All interest for the year on the outstanding indebtedness of the Republic was paid in full. None of the notes issued under the Public Works Contract fell due in the course of the year. At the beginning of the year it was foreseen that, as a result of the war, the revenue level would remain low and it was recognized that if the essential Services of the Government were to be maintained it would be impossible to pay the full amounts for amortization of Series A and Series C bonds called for by the loan contracts. In consequence; a supplementary Executive Agreement was signed on September 30, 1941, between the Haitian and American Governments, providing for the payment in 1941-42 of interest in full on Series A and Series C bonds but of only an amount of Gdes. 100,000 toward amortization of these bonds. This was a renewal of similar agreements signed in recent years, except that the one for the preceding year did not provide for the payment of any amount on account of amortization.
Functions of Bank Board
The Executive Agreement of August 7, 1933 provided for the setting aside and crediting to the Fiscal Representative of the amounts needed for payments connected with the execution of the Series A and Series C loan contracts. This Agreement was replaced by the Executive Agreement of September 13, 1941, which provided for the abolition of the offices of the Fiscal Representative and of the Deputy Fiscal Representative. The latter Agreement was summarized in the Annual Report for 1940-4 1 but certain of its terms seem to warrant repetition here. Under the terms of the 1941 Agreement, the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti is charged with certain specified fiscal functions. The Board of Directors of the Bank consists of an Honorary President and six voting members. The Haitian Minister of F inance or, in his absence, the acting Minister of Finance, is the ex-officio Honorary President. Under the terms of the Agreement, three of the voting members are always to be citizens of the Republic of Haiti while the other three voting members are always to be citizens of the United




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 21
States of America. The Haitian members of the Board of Directors are appointed by the President of the Republic of Haiti while the American members are chosen by mutual agreement of the two Governments. All voting members of the Board are appointed for a period of five years and may be removed only for cause. The Agreement further provides that there shall be two co-Presidents of the Board of Directors of the Bank, one of whom, the Haitian Minister of Finance, acts as Honorary President. One of the three American members of the Board of Directors is the other coPresident. Among his duties, -under the terms of the Agreement of September 1 3, 1941, which went into effect on October 1, 1941, is to represent the holders of the bonds of 1922 and 1923 and to receive from the National Bank of the Republic of Haiti, as sole depository of all revenues, the sums contractually due for the payment of interest and amortization on Series A and Series C bonds of the Republic of Haiti.
As already stated, the full contractual interest on these bonds was paid in 1941-42 but only a token amount of Gdes. 100,000 was paid toward amortization, the latter payment having been authorized by the supplementary Executive Agreement of September 30, 1941 which modified in part, for the fiscal year 1941-42 only, the provisions of the Executive Agreement of September 13, .1941 relative to service of the public debt.
The Budget
The 194 1-42 budget, as promulgated, fixed authorized expenditures at Gdes. 27,336,814.26. The original appropriation covered with reasonable adequacy all government operating requirements although, as usual, there were a number of additions to the budget during the year in the form of supplementary appropriations to cover deficiencies which developed in the ordinary budget, particularly in connection with matters of National Defense. These supplementary appropriations totalled Gdes. 700,624.87 but they were largely compensated by cancellations from vaikious appropriations authorized in the original budget. The Internal Revenue Service is authorized by legislation to expend a certain percentage of its effective receipts to defray the cost of collection. Due to the fact that collections by the Internal Revenue Service were much higher than the amounts originally estimated, the accruals to the operating account of this Service were considerably in excess of the nominal amount carried in the general budget of the Government.
After allowing for supplementary credits not compensated by cancellations and for the additional accruals to the operating account of the Internal




22 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Revenue Service, the total budgetary allocations for the year amounted to Gdes. 27,892,620.61. This figure compares with recent years as follows:
Haitian Government Budget
Fiscal Year
Ordinary and
Supplementary apprcpriations
Gourdes
1937-38 ........................... 28,733,757.83
1938-39 ................................................ 29,376,693.87
1939-40 ................................................ 28,683,861.18
1940-41 .......................... 25,396,998.55
1941-42 ................................................ 27,892,620.61
Allocations during 1941-42 for extraordinary, or non-operating, expenditures amounted to Gdes. 248,024.55. The ways and means for some of these appropriations were covered by cancellations from budgetary or other accounts.
While ordinary and supplementary appropriations amounted to Gdes. 27,892,620.61 and extraordinary allocations amounted to Gdes. 248,024.55, or a total of Gdes. 28,140,645.16, only Gdes. 27,726,161.60 were expended. Balances of budgetary appropriations not utilized at the end of the fiscal year are automatically cancelled. Extraordinary appropriations, however, may be expended over a two-year period. The balance of the latter appropriations at September 30, 1942 amounted to Gdes. 10,495.58.
The budget of the new fiscal year 1942-43 authorizes expenditures of Gdes. 27,528,000 as compared with actual expenditures of Gdes. 27,726,161.60 during the fiscal year ended September 20, 1942.
Banking and Currency
Haiti is served by two banks, the Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Haiti which is owned by the Haitian Government, and the Royal Bank of Canada. The latter has its only Haitian office in Port-au-Prince. The Banque Nationale de la R~publique d'Ha'iti, besides its headquarters office at Port-au-Prince, maintains branches and agencies at the twelve other open ports of the Republic. In addition to its ordinary commercial operations the Banque Nationale is the Government bank of issue and the sole depository of all revenues and public funds of whatsoever nature of the Government of Haiti.
I The two banking institutions referred to above reported average loans and discounts during 1941-42 totalling Gdes. 7,564,504.58. The corresponding figure in 1940-41 was Gdes. 5,735,578.29.
Bank deposits increased in amount over the previous year. Excluding government accounts, deposits in 1941-42 averaged Gdes. 15,271,935.62 is compared with an average of Gdes. 13,762,277.36 during 1940-41.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 23
Currency circulation on September 30, 1942 and on the same date of the previous year is shown in the table below:
September 30, 1942 September 20. 1941 Gourdes Gourdes
Notes of the Banque Nationale
de la R~publique d'Haiti ...15,668,790.00 10,502,98 0.00
Subsidiary currency.............. 4,29 0,627.40 4,22 4,047.50
United States currency
(estimated) .............. 3,000,000.00 2,500,000.00
Total.................. 22,959,417.40 17,227,027.50
Inclusive of United States dollars, total currency in circulation at the end of each of the past ten fiscal years has been estimated as follows:
Gourdes
September 30, 1933..................................... 13,417,448
September 30, 1934..................................... 14,176,331
September 30, 1935..................................... 12,368,005
September 30, 1936..................................... 12,844,031
September 30, 1937..................................... 13,252,235
September 30, 1938..................................... 13,579,154
September 30, 1939..................................... 15,292,752
September 30, 1940..................................... 16,087,122
September 30, 1941 ................................... .. 17,227,027
September 30, 1942..................................... 22,959,417
Table No. 47 presents the circulation of gourde bank notes by months. It is believed that several factors were responsible for the increase in currency circulation. For example, Haitian agricultural workers and processors received some Gdes. 5,000,000 more for their products shipped abroad in the course of 194 1-42 than they received in the previous year. Furthermore, employment in new agricultural developments, such as rubber and sisal, rose sharply. Presumably a considerable proportion ,of the additional amounts received by the peasants for their commodities and services is being saved (hoarded) by them. This saving or hoarding is presumnably due to inability to buy imported articles in the volume or in the variety of former years because of war conditions.
It is also believed that, prior to Haiti's entry into the war, the local German and Italian residents withdrew from the banks (and hoarded) gourde notes of a considerable value.I
In the course of the year certain detachments of the United States armed forces were stationed in Haiti or in Haitian waters. The increased currency circulation reflected in the Above tabulation doubtlessly is explained. in some part, by the disbursements effected by these organizations.
Supply Service
The Central Supply Office known as the eBureau de Fournitures. continued, as a division of the Fiscal Department, to furnish stationery, office supplies and equipment to the several Departments and Services of




24 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
the Haitian Government. Due to forward buying, the Bureau was able to maintain fairly adequate stocks of the various supplies required by the Government offices. However, certain difficulties in connection with the execution of orders, and delays in shipment were encountered as a result of war conditions. For example, the manufacture of certain qualities of paper has been discontinued. Also steel equipment such as filing cabinets, typewriters and adding machines are difficult or impossible to obtain.
The profit and loss statement of the srBureau de Fournitures for the fiscal year 1941-42 appears in Table No. 45 while the balance sheet as of September 30, 1942 is carried in Table No. 46.
During the year under review, a change occurred in the organization of the Office of the Purchasing Agent for the Haitian Government in the United States. Since 1925, Mr. H. L. Hershey of New York City had served in the latter capacity executing orders placed not only by the cBureau de Fournitures7 but also by other Departments and Services of the Haitian Government. In 1942 Mr. Hershey informed the Haitian Government that, in future, other business would occupy all of his time and, at his request, the long association was terminated. It is desired to make of record here the value of the services rendered by Mr. Hershey over a period of seventeen years. In Mr. Hershey's place, the Mohegan Trading Corporation of New York City has been appointed Purchasing Agent of the Haitian Government in the United States.
Increased Foreign Commerce Values The value of Haitian exports during the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942, exceeded the value of imports by a slight margin. The figures were Gdes. 42,886,390 and Gdes. 42,285,166 respectively.
For the first time in five years, during 1941-42, an export balance was built up. Not since the fiscal year ended September 30, 1936 had the annual value of Haitian exports exceeded the value of Haitian imports. The figures for the period mentioned were as follows:
Exports Imports Excess Exports Excess Imports
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
1935-36 ...................... 47,238,594 37,920,626 9,317,968
1936-37 ....................... 44,854,450 46,075,660 1,221,210
1937-38 ...................... 34,731,952 37,973,889 3,241,937
1938- 9 ...................... 36,338,175 40,903,683 4,565,508
1939-40 ...................... 26,995,200 39,700,574 12,705,374
1940-41 ...................... 33,286,537 37,155,548 3,869,011
1941-42 ...................... 42,886,390 42,285,166 601,224
The increase over the previous fiscal year of Gdes. 9,599,853 in Haitian export values in 1941-42, compared with an increase of only Gdes. 5,129,618 in import values.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 25
Trade Position Improves
Because export values exceeded import values and showed a relatively greater increase than import values, Haiti's trade position as of September 30, 1942, was substantially stronger than at the end of the previous fiscal year. The result was due entirely to the higher prices which Haitian export products commanded in foreign markets. The volume of trade, because of the disruption of shipping services, declined. On the whole, however, because of increased values, trade results for the year were, notwithstanding transport and other difficulties occasioned by the war, relatively satisfactory.
The trade balance, it is true, is only one item in a complicated account. Past attempts, however, to establish an accurate balance of Haitian payments have not been entirely convincing. The process is more difficult today than ever before because of the setting up of joint enterprises such as SHADA and the supplying of material under eLend-Lease* Arrangements. Suffice it, therefore, to say here that the excess of Haitian exports established in 194 1-42, although small, was none the less an indication of a generally healthy trend.
Percentage of Imports by Countries of Origin
The following table shows the percentage of Haiti's imports from the principal countries of origin, including colonies, dependencies and dominions, for the~fiscal year 1941-42 and 1940-41: 1941-42 1W4-41
Per cent Per cent
United States ....................... 76.44 83.58
Mexico................................ 10.08
British Commonwealth ............. 7.02 8.53
Netherlands...........................3.42 2.69
All other .............................. 3.04 5.20
100.00 100.00
It is of interest that the share in Haiti's import trade of the United States of America and of the British Commonwealth declined in 1941-42 and that Mexico took a place as an important supplier of Haitian import requirements. The sudden rise in the percentage of imports from Mexico was accounted for almost entirely by Haitian purchases of cotton textiles in that country. Cotton textiles, as will be seen from a subsequent table, made up 42.6 per cent of total Haitian imports for the year.




26 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Imports from the United States of America
The value of imports from the United States by principal commodities
for the past three fiscal years, is shown below:
1941-42 1940-41 1939-40
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Cement .................................................. 462,655 881,049 814,523
Fish ...................................................... 329,706 313,873 420,636
,W heat Flour .......................................... 2,097,784 1,796,830 2,168,565
Automobile arid trucks ................ ... 615,980 1,300,221 1,395,739
Perfumery ............................................ 611,772 345,418 278,704
Beverages .............................................. 218,310 198,365 131,551
Lumber ................................................ 229,958 601,575 825,991
Gasoline ................................................ 294,945 251,477 440,117
Kerosene ............................................... 319,645 352,342 441,076
Soap ...................................................... 1,518,048 741,504 529,801
Cotton and manufactures of .................... 11,980,872 8,758,837 7,833,185
Lard ...................................................... 408,246 491,558 424,909
Glass and glassware .................... 363,415 312,073 231,004
Machinery and apparatus ...................... 1,331,111 1,833,487 2,189,456
Paper and manufactures of ...................... 742,013 651,426 496,396
Tires and tubes for vehicles ................... 243,242 599,894 506,801
Silk and manufactures of ....................... 868,454 1,649,138 150,356
Tobacco and manfactures of .................. 828,248 603,699 702,016
All other ................................................. 8,759,049 9,203,346 8,855,650
32,223,453 30,886,112 28,836,476
The increased import values shown in the above table are due, in almost every case, to higher prices prevaling rather than to greater volume of
trade.
* Imports by Principal Groups
The following table shows the relative importance of the leading import
groups for each of the last three years:
1941-42 1910-41 1939-40
Goardes % Gourdes % Gourdes %
Textiles and clothing ...... 18,036,736 42.6 12,777,736 34.4 12,215,611 30.8 Foodstuffs ..................... 4,717,153 11.1 4,966,700 13.4 5,359,321 13.5
Gasoline, kerosene, etc... 1,850,555 4.4 1,367,214 3.7 1,399,444 3.5
Iron and steel products.. 1,134,351 2.7 1,692,829 4.5 2,736,174 6.9
Soap ........... ........ 3,010,033 7.1 1.572,740 4.2 2,010,902 5.1
Automobiles and trucks 618,430 1.5 1,302,821 3.5 1,405,291 3.5
Lumber ..................... 233,436 0.6 615,290 1.7 835,050 2.1
Chemical and pharmaceutical products .......... 952,022 2.2 762,742 2.1 810,833 2.0
Household utensils ......... 740,484 1.8 857,138 2.3 523,997 1.3
Agricultural implements,
etc. .................... 560,368 1.3 541,834 1.5 366,552 1.0
jute bags, etc ............. 905,276 2.1 271,458 0.7 721,920 1.8
Tobacco products .......... 840,986 2.0 609,366* 1.6 709,028* 1.8
Liquors and beverages.. 2S7,275 0.7 260,234 0.7 403,947 1.0
All other imports ........... 8,398,061 19.9 9,567,446* 25.7 10,202,504* 25.7
42,285,166 100.0 37,155,548 100.0 39,700,574 100.0
*Co:rcction of figures published in previous reports.




* REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 27
The shifts in the relative importance of the items listed above appear to have been due, largely, to the application by the United States of war emergency restrictions on exports of certain categories of goods such, for instance, as iron and steel products and automobiles and trucks. The increase in 1941-42 in the value of Haitian imports of textiles and clothing was noteworthy.
Prices of Principal Commodities
The table below shows C.I.F. prices as computed from customs records
for leading commodities during the past four years: 1941-42 1940-41 1939-40 19Z8-39
Gowudes Go~udes Gourdes G~urdes
Cement ................................ Kilo 0.12 0.09 0.08 0.07
Fish .................................... Kilo 0.67 0.46 0.43 0.39
Wheat Flour.......................... Kilo 0.31 0.28 0.29 0.24
Meats .................................. Kilo 1.91 1.47 1.31 1.27
Rice .................................... Kilo 0.55 0.49 0.38 0.27
Beverages ............................. Liter 1.25 1.24 1.28 1.22
Lumber ................................ Cubic Meter 146.81 135.41 105.58 102.17
Gasoline............................... Liter 0.14 0.09 0.11 0.09
Kerosene .............................. Liter 0.15 0.13 0.15 0.14
Soap.................................... Kilo 0.97 0.51 0.56 0.54
Cotton textiles........................ Kilo 6.21 3.63 3.53 3.52
The figures illustrate strikingly the more recent acceleration of a generally consistent rise in prices over a period of years.
Port-au-Prince Trade Gains
Already in 1940-41, almost 80 per cent of Haiti's imports were landed at Port-au-Prince. W~ar conditions stimulated the process still further. That Haitian foreign commerce has tended to concentrate in Port-auPrince at the expense of the provincial ports is shown by the following table:
Percentage of Imports by Ports
1941-42 I94-41
Per cent Per centr
Port-au-Prince ...................... 85.96 79.61
Cap-Haitien.......................... 3.57 6.66
Saint-Marc ........................... 2.89* 3.36
Cayes ..................................2.04 2.62
Gonaives ............................. 1.13 2.42
j&rmie................................ 1.57 1.40
Other ports ........................... 2.84 3.93
100.00 100.00
Whether or not Port-au-Prince will in future, under more normal conditions, maintain its preponderant lead as a port of entry into Haiti remains to be seen.




2 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
Percentage of Exports by Countries of Destination
The percentage of Haitian exports taken by the various countries of destination including colonies, dependencies and dominions during the fiscal years 194 1-42 an 1940-4 1 is shown below:
1941-42 194041
Per cent Per cent
United States ........................ 79.46 87.92
British Commonwealth............. 13.37 5.95
All other .............................. 7.17 6.13
100.00 100.00
The increase in the percentage of exports to the British Commonwealth in 1941-42 was accounted for largely by increased shipments of sugar to the United Kingdom. During the fiscal year 1940-41, exports of raw sugar to the United Kingdom amounted to 5,079,268 kilos, valued at Gdes. 420,006, whereas during 1941-42, 18,185,248 kilos of raw sugar, valued at Gdes. 5,010,806, were exported to that country.
Exports to the United States of America
The following table shows the value of exports to the United States by principal commodities for the last three fiscal years:
1941-42 1M4-41 IM3-40
Gourdes Gourdes Gourde,
Coffee ............................ 17,311,967 11,810,862 5,687,297
Sisal .............................. 8,050,617 4,065,407 3,360,597
Bananas........................... 4,545,062 7,759,795 3,147,878
Cacao ............................. 988,343 683,242 488,718
Goatskins......................... 393,308 419,060 391,980
Sugar (raw and refined) ..... 18,404 2,131,731 58,954,
Logwood .......................... 88,575 113,785 125,819
Molasses.......................... 795,022 202,979 233,364
Oil of Lime...................... 132,338 ......... ........
Oil of Lemon Grass .............. 44,622 ......... ........
Oil of Neroli .................... 158,900 9,000 ........
Straw hand bags ................. 91,313 ......... ........
Sisal hand bags.................. 245,425 117,016 ........
Mahogany ware .................. 125,661 ......... ........
All other......................... 1,079,342 1,901,490 442,588
34,068,899 29,214,367 13,937,185
Significant among the trade developments of the year, illustrated by the above table, was the extent to which Haiti's banana industry was affected by the disruption of sea transport facilities and the decision to allocate shipping space first to more essential commodities.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 29
Relative Importance of Exports
The relative importance of the leading export commodities is shown in the following table:
19n-42 1940-41
Gourdes Per cent Gourdes Per cent
Coffee ................................ 17,382,890 40.53 12,918,466 38.81
Cotton ............................... 2,359,852 5,50 2,313,791 6.95
Sugar ................................ 5,426,468 12.65 2,046,122 6,15
Sisal ................................. 8,464,810 19.74 4,316,865 12.97
Bananas ............................ 4,547,122 10.60 7,761,732 23.32
Cacao ................................ 988,343 2.31 683,242 2.05
Goatskins .......................... 393,308 0.92 419,060 1.26
Cottonseed cake .................. 41,727 0.10 491,520 1.48
Logwood ............................ 88,575 0.21 113,785 0.34
Molasses ............................ 795,022 1.85 202,979 0.61
All other ............................. 2,398,273 5.59 2,018,975 6.06
42,886,390 100.00 33,286,537 100.00
As will be seen from the above table, coffee holds, preeminently, first place among Haitian export products. The substantial increase of 35 per cent in the value of coffee exported during the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942, was due entirely to the higher prices obtained for the crop. The volume exported during the fiscal year actually declined by some 20 per cent.
Exports of sugar from Haiti more than doubled in value during the fiscal year under review. The volume of sugar exported, however, was less by 2,631,000 kilos in 1941-42 than in 1940-41.
The effect of war conditions on the banana industry, several times referred to elsewhere in this Report, is again strikingly illustrated by the figures given above.
Percentage of Exports by Ports
The percentage of exports shipped through the various Haitian ports is shown in the following table:
19414 1940-41
Per cent Per cent
Port-au-Prince ................................ 42.14 42.12
Fort-Libert6 .................................... 16.06 11.05
Cap-Haitien .................................... 10.36 11.81
Cayes .............................................. 6.43 8.76
Saint-M arc .................................... 6.00 3.18
Jacm el ............... .................... 5.88 6.50
Gonaives ........................................ 4.18 5.19
Port-de-Paix .................................. 3.53 5.82
Jr~m ie ........................................... 3.19 1.16
Petit-Goive .................................... 1.22 3.25
M iragofine ................ ...................... 1.00 1.15




30 BANQUET NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
The remaining 0.01 per cent of exports in 1941-42 was shipped through the three Dominican frontier ports.
Special factors, such as the proximity of plantations, affect export traffic through provincial ports. Port-au-Prince, however, which headed the list of ports of entry into Haiti is also the chief port for shipment of Haitian products to foreign markets.
Principal Export Products
Details of *1941-42 operations involving certain of Haiti's principal export products are reviewed below:
Coff ee
Although the amount of Haitian coffee exported in the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942 was some 4,536,000 kilos less than. the amount exported in the previous year, the value increased by Gdes. 4,464,424.
The following table shows the quantity of coffee exported during the last two fiscal years by countries of destination: 1941-421940-41
Kilos Per cent Kilos Per rent
Canada.................. ...........................2,037,762 9.0
Switzerland ............... 40,000 0.2 40,000 0.2
United States ............ 18,033,709 99.6 20,541,885 90.7
All other ................... 31,002 0.2 21,628 0.1
18,104,711 100.0 22,641,275 100.0
As shown by the above figures, the United States in 194 1-42 took almost 100 per cent of Haitian coffee exports. Canada which had figured as a buyer of Haitian coffee in 1940-4 1 made no coffee purchases in 194 1-42.
.Through various~adjustments, the United States Coffee Quota for 194142 was raised from 206,250 to approximately 305,000 bags of 80 kilos. 'While lack of shipping space made it impossible for Haiti to take full advantage of this increase, exports of coffee applied to this quota were substantially greater than the basic amount of 206,250 bags.
Early in October 1942, the United States Army contracted to purchase some 50,000 bags of coffee in Haiti. In view of the fact that this coffee was to be old crop and that it was advisable to take advantage of the shipping space thus guaranteed by the United States Government, it was decided to register the'sales under this contract outside of local quotas. Exporters with stocks benefited by this sale.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 1 31
The basic quota (206,250 bags) has been raised for 1942-43 to 258,000 bags of 80 kilos and with the short crop which may not exceed 200,000 bags, the problem of a non-exportable surplus loses its character of urgency to the point that the special financing as provided for in the Export-Import Bank coffee credit may nor be needed unless lack of shipping space forces an accumulation of exportable stocks.
Part of the carry-over of previous years has been absorbed by the increas e in the 1941-42 quota and much of what remains of that surplus will be taken care of by the excess of the 1942-43 quota over the estimated yield of the present crop.
Cotton
The price received for Haitian cotton in 1941-42 was substantially
higher than the price received for the previous year's crop and although a slightly smaller amount was sold abroad during the year under review, than during the previous year, the value of cotton exports increased. In 1941-42, exports of 2,289,539 kilos of Haitian cotton were valued at Gdes. 2,359,852. whereas the 2,630,405 kilos exported in the previous fiscal year were valued at Gdes. 2,313,791.
'The average prices received for Haitian cotton during the last ten. fiscal years are shown below:
Cotton Prices
Gourdes Per Kilo
1941-42 .................................................. 1.03
1940-41 .................................................. 0.88
1939-40............................................. ..... 0.98
1938-39 .................................................. 0.95
1937-38 ........................................... ... 1.12
1936-37............................................. :....1.42
1935-36 .................................................. 1.26
1934-35 .................................................. 1.24
1933-34 .................................................. 1.29
1932-33 .................................................. 0.79
One hundred per cent of c commercial exports of Haitian cotton in 194 142 went to Colombia.
Sugar
A sharp rise in the price of raw sugar in 1941-42 resulted in an increase in the value of exports of this commodity from Gdes. 2,046,122 in 194041 to Gdes. 5,168,635 during the year under review. Thus the value of sugar exports more than doubled, although the amount exported in 194 142 was 1,097,5 18 kilos less than in the previous year. The United tXingdom took practically all of the 1941-42 sugar crop. In the previous fiscal year the major portion of the crop was sold in the United States.




32 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
The average F.O.B. prices for sugar for the past twelve years, as computed from customs records, are given below:
Sugar Prices
Gourde Per Kilo
1941-1942 ......................................................... 0.276
1940-1941 .......................................................... 0.103
1939-1940 .......................................................... 0.158
1938-1939 .......................................................... 0.131
1937-1938 .......................................................... 0.111
1936-1937 ......................................................... 0.124
1935-1936 ................................................ ........ 0.108
1934-1935 .......................................................... 0.106
1933-1934 .......................................................... 0.108
1932-1933 .......................................................... 0.090
1931-1932 .......................................................... 0.108
1930-1931 .......................................................... 0.140
Not since 1928-29 when the F.O.B. price was Gde. 0.326 per kilo has the sugar crop commanded the price averaged in 1941-42.
Banana Exports
That the fiscal year under review was a most difficult one for the Haitian banana industry has been indicated elsewhere in this report. Because of the war, shipping services were irregular and space priority was given to commodities other than bananas.
The following table shows the number of stems of bananas exported during the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942, the values and the ports of shipment, compared with those of the previous fiscal year:
1941-42 1941-42 1940-41 1940-41
Siems Gourdes Stems Gourdes
Cap-Haitien .................... 317,991 755,736 1,223,600 2,939,770
Cayes .............................. 142,787 335,650 228,391 537,192
Fort-Libert ................................... .......... 8 19
Gonaives .......................... 27 63 6 14
Jacmel ............................ 94,095 221,122 174,260 409,513
Miragoicne ....................... 39,085 91,851 76,239 179,161
Port-au-Prince ................ 302,080 709,886 598,000 1,406,565
Port-de-Paix .............. 354,470 833,006 709,830 1,670,719
Saint-M arc ...................... 680,770 1,599,808 263,311 618,779
1,931,305 4,547,122 3,283,645 7,761,732
Banana shipments decreased by 41.18 per cent in quantity and by 41.41 per cent in values as compared with those of 1940-41.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 33
Export Volume and Values
The following table shows Haitian export tonnage and values of certain commodities, for the fiscal year 194 1-42 compared with 1940-41: 1941-42 1940-41
Metrict tons Gourdes metric tons Gourdes
Coff ee ...................... 18,105 17,382,890 22,641 12,918,466
Cotton...................... 2,290 2,359,852 2,630 2,313,791
Cacao....................... 1,247 988,343 1,505 683,242
Sugar ...................... 19,366 5,426,468 21,997 2,566,342
Bananas...................37,776 4,547,122 64,228 2,761,732
All others ..................32,595 12,181,715 28,074 7,042,964
Total.................... 111,379 42,886,390 141,075 33,286,537
The extent of the decline in the volume of Haitian exports in 1941-42 and of the rise in the corresponding export values is clearly shown by the above table.
Haitian-Dominican Commercial Convention
On March 23, 1942, ratifications were exchanged,"at Ciudad Trujillo, of a Commercial Convention between Haiti and the Dominican Republic, signed some seven months previously at Port-au-Prince.
'The instrument deals, specifically, with facilities to be accorded by the Dominican Republic to Haitian labor used in Dominican agricultural enterprises and, in addition to establishing preferential tariff rates for specified goods entering the respective countries, fixes also, in a 4:Protocol>) attached to the Convention, special conditions for frontier traffic arising out of the operation of the several markets established in a restricted area on either side of the boundary line. In brief, the Convention was designed to promiote the freer circulation of goods, capital, services and persons between. the two countries and was hailed, as stated in its preamble, as an evidence of the mutual understanding and happy relations existing between the two parties.
The United States, in order to facilitate execution of the Convention agreed to waive rights accruing from a prior Most-Favored-Nation agreemnent.
Among the items of Haitian production to which the Dominican Republic, Under the Convention, applies special preferential rates of duty are empty sisal bags, handbags, and novelties made of sisal and high grade Haitian rum. Raw sisal was, among other items, subsequently added to the original list by an exchange of Notes between the two Governments.
Among the items of Dominican production to which Haiti, under the Convention, applies special preferential rates of duty are tobacco, cigars, toilet and laundry soaps, perfumery, cheese, butter and butter substitutes arnd beer. Empty sisal bags were subsequently added to the original list by




34 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
an exchange of Notes between the two Governments, the situation originally existing between the two countries with respect to this particular item having been thus restored.
Up to the end of the~fiscal year on September 30, 1942, there had Ibeen six months of Haitian-Dominican trade under the Commercial Convention. This traffic, by months is reviewed below:
Total Haitian Exports to the Dominican Republic by months, April-September inclusive, 1942, compared
with April-September inclusive, 1941.
194 value 19a1 value
Goeudes Gourdes
April ................................... 3,087 184
May ..................................... 18 179
June .................................... 143 220
July..................................... 519 95
August ................................ 94,697 93
September............................98,313 68
196,777 839
Total Haitian Imports from the Dominican Republic by months, April-September inclusive, 1942, compared
with April-September inclusive, 1941.
1942 value 194 value
Gourdes Gourdes
April ................................ 40,685 6,013
May ................................. 32,112 9,294
June ............................... 116,958 6,753
July ................................. 44,080 2,589
August............................... 20,258 940
September.......................... 20,942 3,573
275,035 29,162
It will be seen from the above tables that there was a.very great rise in the value both of imports into Haiti from the Dominican Republic -and of exports from Haiti to the Dominican Republic during the six months in question as compared with the corresponding six months of the previous. fiscal year. It is of interest that in the case of imports into Haiti of Dominican products, the increase was consistent, by months, with a fairly. large representation of commodities including beer, butter and butter substitutes, live animals and soap, as well as certain items not mentioned in the Convention, whereas exports of a single commodity, namely, raw sisal, shipped in the three months of April, August and September, made up practically 100 per cent of Haitian exports to the Dominican Republic during the period in question.
The details of Haitian -Dominican trade will be found in the tIlmport Scheduled on pages 83 to 101 of this Report.
It is perhaps premature to draw conclusions from the record of only six months of commercial exchanges between Haiti and the Dominican Republic under the Commercial Convention of 1942, a period during which




..REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT .35
special war conditions existed. It is clear, however, that during the six months in question, the value of Haitian imports from, and exports to, the Dominican Republic showed a very great rise as compared with the corresponding period of the previous fiscal year. It appears to be a fact too that, ,although the value of Dominican shipments to Haiti was substantially higher than the value of Haitian shipments to the Dominican Republic during the six months, the advantage was not entirely disproportionate.
Air Transport Gains
As was to be expected in view of the disruption of sea transport services, air transport between Haiti and continental and Caribbean areas made substantial gains during the months immediately following the outbreak of war. The experience made it clear how vitally important to the wellbeing of Haiti are the facilities for passenger traffic and for the shipment of mail and parcels by air, which have been developed by Pan American Airways during the period which has elapsed since the first World War.
The number of planes maintaining regular schedules to and from Haiti was substantially increased in 1942 in order to take care of the additionnal traffic diverted to this means of transportation as A consequence of. the disruption of ocean shipping facilities.
The number of incoming passengers during the twelve months ended September 30, 1942,, totalled 1,041. This represented a gain of some 78 per cent over the 586 who arrived during the twelve months ended December 31, 1941. The latter period is used as *a. basis for comparison since earlier available records are not divided into fiscal periods. It is believed that the figures for the calendar year will serve the purpose in view.
The number of outgoing passengers was 1,567 or a gain of some 40 per cent over the 1, 117 recorded for the calendar year 19 41.
Air express carried in 194 1-42 also showed substantial gains. The number of incoming shipments totalled 1,352 as against 1,026, or a gain of approximately 32 per cent during the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942, as compared with the calendar year 1941. The comparable figures for outgoing shipments were 682 as against 419, or a gain of approximately 63 per cent.
Change in Membership of Bank Board
One change occurred, during the fiscal year 194 1-42, in the membership of the Board of Directors of the Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Ha~iti.
As of June 17, 1942, Mr. Jules Faine, former Senator and distinguished Haitian scholar, took his seat on the Board, by appointment of the President of Haiti, to replace Mr. Edouard Estive who resigned after some eight months of service as a Board member.




36 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
National Bank Appointed Sequestrator-Liquidator
By decree-law dated December 18, 1941, modified, notably, by decreelaw of December 29, 1941, the Banque Nationale de la R~publique d'Hafti was named Sequestrator-Liquidator General of enemy properties and of properties of allies of the enemy, and was given the necessary powers to administer, or liquidate, under such conditions as it might deem most advantageous, the sequestered real and personal properties.
The legislation provides that the Sequestrator-Liquidator General shall act as Agent of the Haitian Government; that it shall be accountable for its administration of the properties only to the Departments of Finance, Commerce, and Justice, and that no suit may be filed against it or its agents either directly or indirectly, except by the State. Provision is also made for the continued operation, with the authorization of the Departments of Finance, Commerce and Justice under the control of the Sequestrator-Liquidator General, of certain commercial institutions, firms, or associations, either enemy or allies of the enemy, if the public interest or the interest of Haitian or neutral creditors so demands. Furthermore, provision is made for the exploitation of agricultural enterprises and for the operation of industrial establishments with the existing personnel under the control of the Sequestrator-Liquidator. By decree-law dated June 15, 1942, the Government was authorized to draw, for purposes of national defense, on funds realized from the liquidation of enemy properties.
Port Authority Created
Of interest, administratively, to the Fiscal Department although, primarily, a military measure designed to meet new problems arising out of the war emergency, was the creation, towards the end of the fiscal year 194142, of a Central Port Authority.
By decree dated September 18, 1942, the President of the Republic of Haiti provided for the creation of a special service, within the framework of the Customs Administration, under the direction of the Fiscal Department, to provide increased protection for Haitian ports. Under the plan, authority in the port areas, heretofore devided between several services both civil and military, is centered in the Fiscal Department and delegated by the latter to the Directors of Customs. A detachment from the Haitian Coast Guard will be assigned to duty in each port, key officials in the Customs Administration having been granted commissions in the Haitian armed forces with a view to establishing their authority over the enlisted personnel and the better to assure discipline. It is believed that the plan, by defining responsibilities and fixing authority and through better coordination of customs and police activities will simplify administrative processes and tend to increase security in the various ports.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 37
American Sanitary Mission
The American Sanitary Mission was organized in 1942 to undertake health and sanitation activities in Haiti. The ground work for the enterprise was laid in March during the visit of President Lescot to Washington.
The American Sanitary Mission is a unit of the Institute of InterAmerican Affairs which is a Delaware corporation designed to prosecute health and sanitation work in Latin America. The Institute is controlled by the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs.
The Mission is organized as an independent unit but reports directly to the Director of the Division of Health and Sanitation of the Office of the Coordinator. It works in cooperation with the Haitian &Service National d'Hygiine", undertaking projects proposed by the latter organization and work suggested by its own investigations and surveys. All health and sanitation activities generally are prosecuted only after complete agreement with the .rService National d'Hygine2.
The projects that the Mission may undertake include installation or improvement of water supplies, sewerage systems, malaria and mosquito control, general sanitation activities in the control of various communicable diseases. Fellowships and scholarships in sanitary engineering, public health nursing, public health medicine will be sponsored by the Institute, for local candidates.
In addition to this work in cooperation with the Haitian Government the Mission, as a representative of the Defense Supplies Corporation, will execute and supervise health and sanitation programs on the plantations of La Plantation Dauphin S. A. and the Haitian Agricultural Corporation, producers of sisal fiber. These companies have a health and sanitation agreement with the Defense Supplies Corporation.
The first projects of this Mission were started on June 1st, 1942; these were Units I and 2, malaria control drainage projects, in the Port-auPrince district. Since that time, other health and sanitation units have been started in the Port-au-Prince area and district offices have been opened in Aux Cayes, Petit-Goive, Cap-HaYtien and M61e St.-Nicolas. Work is at present under way in these places and plans are under consideration for initiating work in Port-de-Paix, Gonaives, Jacmel, Jrimie and Pitionville. .
Soci6t6 Haltiano-Am6ricaine de Developpement Agricole (SHADA)
Notwithstanding difficulties arising out of war conditions, the fiscal year ended September 30, 1942, was one of expansion for the Socift6 HaitianoAm6ricaine de Diveloppement Agricole, commonly known as SHADA. Organized in August 1941 by joint action of the Haitian and United




38 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
States Governments with a view to developing Haitian agricultural resources on a sound basis, SHADA is today one of the most important factors in Haitian economic life.
SHADA began activities in Haiti on August 16, 1941, by taking over work that had been started at Bayeux with funds provided by the United States Department of Agriculture. At that time, 269 persons were employed at Bayeux and five additional persons made up the Port-au-Prince, or Central Office force. On September 30, 1942, SHADA's total personnel numbered 17,211 of whom 20 were American supervisors and technicians; 398 were Haitian supervisors and technicians, and 16,793 were laborers.
Producing sisal, lumber, essential oils, cacao, handicrafts, rubber, fruits and spices, SHADA's operating organization, aside from the central office, was composed as of September 30, 1942, of six main Divisions. Four of these divisions are geographical, each area producing its special crop, and the other two are the Forestry and Handicrafts Divisions.
SHADA started operations at Bayeux and in the Port-au-Prince office on August 16, 1941. The Grande Anse and Forestry Divisions were established at the same time but they did not begin to function until about October 1st, 1 941. Operations were conducted on the basis of these three divisions until Februray 1942 when the Handicrafts Division was established. The St. -Marc and Cap-Haitien Divisions were added to the list as of August 1st, 1942.
Each of SHADA's geographical divisions reported satisfactory progress through September 30, 1942.
The Forestry Division is designed to improve the forest resources of Haiti. The felling of timber trees is accompanied by the cutting out of all dead snags, weed trees and malformed trees to improve the future timber stand. The lumber production of SI-ADA's Forestry Division during the first year of operation was 755,942 board feet. This amount proved to be inadequate to meet the demands of the local market and the construction program of SHADA. In addition to its other activities, the Forestry Division is experimenting with turpentine and rosin production and has established a quinine nursery.
The Handicrafts Division is designed to encourage the individual production of needlework, embroidery of various kinds such as mats and doilies and novelties. This Division was handicapped in 1942 by the irregularity of shipping services and other difficulties arising out of war conditions. For the last three months of the fiscal year, however, a profit was reported and it is believed that in the coming year the Handicrafts Division will be self-supporting.
At the close of the fiscal year, following experiments which began in May, it was clear that negotiations undertaken with the United States Board of Economic Warfare and the Rubber Reserve Company for the cultivation in Haiti of the vine 4cryptostegia grandiflora; would soon be




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT 39
brought to a successful conclusion. The importance for Haiti of this development, to which reference has been made in an earlier section of this report, cannot be over emphasized. It is planned to plant up to 100,000 acres of 4tcryptostegia2., and it is expected that the program will give employmnent to some 100,000 Haitians. The budget for the work provides for an expenditure in 1942-43 of over $7,000,000. SHADA's total budget for 1942-43 provides for expenditures of approximately $9,300,000.'
Conclusion
The fiscal year which ended September 30, 1942, was an extraordinary and completely abnormal period for Haiti. Following the declarations of war on the Axis Powers by the United States of America and by Haiti in December 1941, a variety of unprecedented factors began at once to make themselves felt. The normal flow of trade was affected by enemy submarine activity, by the decision to divert a part of the available merchant tonnage to war purposes and by the decision to allocate such shipping space as was left for commercial use, first to commodities considered essential to successful prosecution of the war effort.
*For all of these reasons, it would be unwise to draw final conclusions from comparison of the year's commercial and financial results with those for other fiscal periods during which totally different conditions prevailed. With this reservation, however, it may be stated, with satisfaction, that the fiscal year which ended on September 30, 194 *2, showed, on the whole, results very much better than those which had at one time, some eight months previously, been feared. The period might easily have proved to be disastrous. Thanks to the timely and energetic action taken by the President of Haiti, in going himself to Washington, and to the cooperative attitude of and practical assistance given by the Government of the United States of America, Haiti withstood the first economic shocks of the war with a minimum of suffering and difficulties.
In times so disturbed as these it seems useless to try and look far ahead. New economic forces have been set in motion. The bases on which the world's economic structure have, heretofore, rested, are shifting. What the future holds in store, what the new organization of the future will be must, necessarily, for the present, remain obscure.,
For these reasons, the-scope of the present report has been limited to the presentation of a single fiscal year's results; the abnormal and extraordinary period ended September 30, 1942. No attempt has been made to relate these results to an unknown future. It has seemed unnecessary to repeat what has been said, under more normal conditions, in previous reports, that no year can be considered entirely satisfactory so long as temporary arrangements have to be made for the servicing, only in part, of




40 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
the country's foreign debt. This problem and its relation to the future of Haiti will be considered elsewhere, at some more appropriate time. For the present, it is enough to record the fact that Haiti has successfully met the many and various new problems created by the outbreak of war and that, relying on the quality of Haitian leadership and on the assurances and evidences of practical help given by the Government of the United States of:America, the country faces the future with confidence.
Respectfully submitted,
THOMAS PEARSON
Vice President, Fiscal Department, Banque Nationale de la R6publique d'Haiti.
W. H. WILLIAMS
Co-President of the Board of Directors and General Manager of the Banque Nationale de Ia R6publique d'Haiti.




TABLES







REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 43
TABLE No. 1
VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS, AND EXCESS OF IMPORTS OR EXPORTS FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941.42
Excess Excess
Imports Exports Total Imports Exports
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
116-17.... .......................... ....... 43,030,428 44,664,428 87,694,856 ................... 1.634,000
1917-18 ......................................... 50,903.468 38,717,650 89,621,118 12,185,818
1918-19 .................................................... 85,588.041 123.811,096 209,399,137 ................... 38,223,055
1919-20 .................................................. 136,992,055 108,104,639 245,096,694 28,887,416 ...
'-21 .... ... .................... ...... 59,76,029 32,952,045 92,738,074 26,833,984 ..................
192122. ................................................ 61,751,355 53,561,050 115,312,405 8,190,305
1922-23.. ... ...................................... 70,769,815 72.955,060 143,744,875 ............I Z165,245
19=3-24 ............................................... 73,480,640 70,881,610 144.362,250 2,599,030 .................
19A+25 ...... ................................... 101,187,825 97,018,810 198,06,65 4,169,015 ...
1925-26 .......................................... 94,257,030 101,241.025 195,498,055 .................... 6,983.995
19=-27 ....................................... ... 78,756,600 76,495;442 155.252,042 2,261,158 ......
1927-28 ................................................. 101,241,283 113,336,230 214,577,513 .................. 12,094.947
1928-29 .................. 86.189,612 83,619,167 169,808,779 2,570,445 ...
192M-30 ... .. 64.208,132 70,722,835 134,930,967 ................... 6,514.703
U930-31... ....................... 47,881.591 44,817,093 92.698,684 3,064,498 ..........
131-32 ............................................. 37,305,551 36,106,394 73,411,945 1,199,157
19-3 ........... 38,333,943 46,650,366 84,984,309 .......... 8,316,423
193-34...... ................................. 45,685.208 51.546.191 97.231,399 .................. 5,860,983
1934-35 .. ............................. 41,161,621 35,629,205 76,790,S26 5,532,416 .......
1935-36 ................................................ 37.920,626 47,238,594 85,159,220 9............. 9,317,968
196-37 ..... ......... 46,075,660 44,854,450 90,930,110 1,221,210 ..................
1937-38.... ... 37,973,889 34,731,952 72,705,841 3,241,937 ....................
1938-39 .......... 40.903,683 36,338,175 77,241,858 4,565,508 .......
1939.40.... ... 39.700,574 26.995.200 66,695.774 12,705,374 ...................
1940-41............................ 37,155,548 33,286,537 70,442,085 3,69,011 ....................
4-42 .. .... .............................. 42,285,166 42,886,390 85,171,556 ......... 601,224
Total .............................. 1,600.545.373 1,569.161,634 3,169,707,007 123,096,282 91,712.543
TABLE No. 2
VALUE OF IMPORTS SHOWING COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN IN PERCENTAGES
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941.2
Average Average Average Average
Country of Origin 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936.37- 1940-41 1941-42 1916-171925-26 1935-36 I940-41 1941-42
Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent France ................. ................................... 5.45 6.25 3.05 0.12 0.13 5.38
United Kingdom ...... ............................... . .. 6 .81 8,66 11.97 6.29 2.81 7.81
United States ................................ . .. 82.58 64.60 64.66 83.12 76.21 74.41
Japan..... ......... ............................... 4.71 4.07 2.88 0.02
Babana Islands ............................................................... 0,05 0.07 0,09 0.14
Belgium ........................................................................... 1.22 198 0.01 0.01
British India ..... .............. ............................................... 0.07 0.50 0.24 0.76
Canada ........................................................ ..... 0.74 1.85 1.60 3.01
Canal Zone ................................................ 0.14 0.09 0.06 0.01
Cuba, ..... .. ....... ................... 0.22 0.41, 0.73 0.94
Curacao .............. 1.61 1.82 2.58 3.30
Czechoslovakia ................................................................... 0 15 0.43 ............ ............
Denmark ......................................................................... 0.30 0.17 .......... ..........
Dominican Republic ............................................ 5.16 0.48 0.96 0.22 0.91 12.40
Cermany ........................... ................. 4.80 3.85 0.01 ...........
Guiana, British ....... ..... 0.09 0.01 ............ ............
Italy ... ..... ............................ .............. ................... 0.87 0.77 0.06 0.01
Jamaica ... ............... ......... ....................................... 0.11 0.08 0.05 0.05
Netherlands . .. ........................ ............................. 2.53 1.17 ............ ..........
Norway ............. ... .... 0.28 0.18 ............ .........
Puerto Rico ............................................................................ 1.42 0.55 0.40 0.22
Spain ........................................................ ........................... 0.13 0.03 0.05 0.01
Sweden .................................................................................... 0.06 0.11
Switzerland .................................................................... 0.14 0.22 0.26 0.13
Trinidad ............................... ............................................. 0.02 0.01 0.02 ----Venezuela ......................... ............... ........................... 0.11 ...... ..........
All other ......... .................. ..... 0.24 1.69 1.21 11.43
S........................ 100.00 100.09 10.0 10.00 100.09 100.00




44 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 3
VALUE OF EXPORTS SHOWING COUNTRIES OF DESTINATION IN PERCENTAGES
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941-42
Average Average Average Average
Country of Destination 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1940-41 1941-42 1916-171925-26 1916-36 1I40-41 1941-42
Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent
France ............................................................................. 52.96 49.24 10.57 ......... .......... 43.83
United Kingdom............................................................ 2.93 9.95 15.37 1.27 11.69 6.57
United States .................................................................. 27.91 9.05 48.90 87.77 79.44 23.13
Japan .... .................................................................. 0.40 158 3.55 ...........
Bahama Islands .. .. 0.06 0.28 0.43 0.92
B elgium ................................ ............................................ 7.45 8.94 ............ ..... ....
Canada ................................................................................. 0.65 1.63 4.16 0.73
Canal Zone ..................... .............. ........ 0.10 0.07 0.09 0.01
Cuba ............................................................................... 0.67 0.01 0.02 0.15
Curagao ........ ................................................... 0.20 0.40 0.07 0.94
D enmark .......................................................................... 7.50 3.39 ......... ............
Dominican Republic ........................................................... 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.47
Finland ................................................................................. 0.10 0.16 .......... .
French Africa ................................................................... 16.20 0.13 0.05 .....26.47
Germany .......................... 3.70 1.87 ............ ..........
Italy ....... ... .................................... ..... ............... ....... 6.32', 1.95 ......... ............
Jamaica ............................................................................. 0.02 0.05 0.09 0.03
Netherlands ................................................................ 1.58 1.39 . ...... ..........
Norway .......................................................................... 0.32 0.63 .......... ...........
Puerto Rico ....................................................................... 0.17 0.01 ........... ...........
Spain ......................................................................................... 1.70 . ... ........ ..........
Sw eden ............................................................................... 0.46 0.85 ............
Sw itzerland ........................................................................................ 0.51 0.08 0.11
Virgin Islands .................................................................... 0.08 0.34 0.0G ..........
All other .......................................................................... 0.14 1.14 2.40 5.50
Total..... ........................................ 10000 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00
TABLE No. 4
VALUE OF TOTAL FOREIGN COMMERCE BY COUNTRIES IN PERCENTAGES FISCAL YEARS 1916.17 TO 1941-42
Average Average Average Average
Country 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1940-41 1941-42 1916-171925-26 1935-36 1940-41 1941-42
Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent
France .................................................. ... 27.78 28.35 6.67 0.05 0.06 24.41
United Kingdo m ........................................................ 4.99 9.27 13.32 3.92 7.28 7.20
United States .......................................................... 56.89 36.16 57.40 85.34 77.84 49.02
Ja an.... .. ........ .............................. l2.62 2.91 3.20 0.01
Bahama Islands...........................0.05 0.17 0.26 0.53
Belgium ................. ........................................ 4.42 5.21 ...........
British India ............................................ 0.03 0.27 0.13 0.28
Canada ............. .............. .... .................... 0.69 1.72 2.81 1. /
Canal Zn........................... .......... 0.11 0.08 0.06 0.01
C ..............................................0.44 0.22 0.39 0.49
Curga ..... ................. ..... .... ...... !0.89 1.16 1.39 2.1
Czechoslovakia ... .............. 0.07 0.35 .........
Denmark_ .... .................. .................. ...... .... 3.98 1.69 .... .
Dominican Republic. ........ ............................ 0.24 0.14 0.12 0."6 '9
Fnand.............................................................. 0.05 0.13 0.10
French Africa_....-.. ............... 0.06 0.03 ....
Germany ... ...... ............... ......... ............ ..... 10.34 4.21 2.90 ........ .......
Guiana.. British ............................ 0.05 0.01 ......... .... 19.37
tamaia...... .... .. ............. .. .. ......... ...0 0 ...........
S............ 3.65 1.36 0.03 0.01
Jmia-----0.06 0.07 0.07 0.04
Martinique ................. ........ 0.01 0.03 0.07
S2.05 1.27
.031 0.39
Puerto Rico .......................................................... 0.79 0.30 0.21
Spai n .......... .............. ......... 0.93 0.02 0.03.....
Swiden .................................... ..... 0.27 0.43 ..
0.07 0.45 0.17.0.1
.............................. ............... 0.05 ......... 0 ..
Virgin Island .............. 0.05 0.11 0.03
All othe .............................. 0.15 1.15 1.58 ........44
....................................... 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPEND ICES 45
TABLE No. 5
VALUE AND PERCENTAGE OF VALUE OF IMPORTS, EXPORTS AND TOTAL FOREIGN COMMERCE BY COUNTRIES-FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Imports Exports Total
Country
Gourdes Per cent Cow-des Per cent Gowrdes Per cent
Ar bi .. .. ...................3....................3........ ... .................11 ......Argentina ...........-............................... 285,132 0.67 45 ...... 285.177 0.34
Australia .................................................... 36,8= 0.09 ............ ............ 36,835 0.04
Bahama Islands............................................. 8.589 0.14 393,502 0.92 452,091 0.53
Belgium........................I................... 2,197 0.01 ................-.- 2,197 ......
Brazil................................................. ........ 4.7,60 0.01. -.............. ............ 4.760 0.01
British Africa............................................. 18.243 0.04 ............... ............ 18,243 0.02
British Guiana ...................................... ........ ..1 1,817 ...... 1,817 ......
British India ................................................ 319.405 0.76 .............. ............ 319,406 0.38
British Malaya_.......................................... 10.132 0.'02 ............... ............ 10,132 0.01
Bulgary ....................... .I..................... 4 ........... ................ ............ 4 ......
Canada ... ........................................ 1.274.00W 3.01 314.441 0.73 1,588,447 1.87
Canal Zone ..... ........................................ 3.971 0.01 1.904 0.01 5.875 0.01
Ceylon .. ................................. .......... 31,423 0.08 .............. ............ 31,423 0.04
Chile .......... ........................................ 17.019 0.04 ............... ............ 17.019 0.02
China ....... ........................................ 45,878 0.11 ...................... 45.878 0.06
Colombia .................................................. 1,469 ...... 2,359.852 5.50 2,361,321 2.77
Cuba ........................................................... 355.851 0.84 63,82 0.15 419.680 0.49
Curaao.................................................... 1.394,963 3.30 404,428 0.94 1,799,191 2.11
Cyprus .......................................................... 44 ........... ................ ............ 44 ......
Dominican Republic...................................... 3831=3 0.91 201.172 0.47 584,510 0.69
Dutch East Indies ........................................ 51,202 0.12 ......... ...... 51,202 0.06
Dutch Guiana.......................................... 27 ........... ................ ............ 27 ......
Ecuador ... ................ ........................ 6.578 0.02 ......... ...... 6,678 0.01
Egypt........................ ........................ 128 .......... .................... 128 ....
France...................... ... ....................... 52.625 0.13 ............... ............ 52.625 0.06
French Indo-China ..................................... 6.748 0.02 ........... .......... 6,746 0.01
Germany ..... ......... ............................ 1.254 .. ........ ....... 1,254 .... .
Guatemala................................................... 3 ......... ................ .........3 ......
Honduras ................................................. ................ ............. 125 .... 125 ......
HongKong.............................................. 26,465 0.06; ..................... 26.465 0.03
Italy.... .......... ...... .......... ........ 5,205 0.01 ............... ............ 5,205 0.01
,imaica........................................................ 22,881 0.05 13.3n1 0.03 36,252 0.04
Japa ... .................................................. 9.438 0.02 ........ ........ 9,438 0.01
Madagascar.................................................... 1.420 ...... ......._ ....... 1.420
Martinique ...... ......... 52 ................-................ &1 ...... ......... .......32 ......
Mexico .. ............................................... 4,261.049 10.08 ................ ..., 4,261.069 5.00
Netherlands................... .................. 691 ............ ....... 691
New-Zealand ............................................ 21,156 0.05 ............ ......... 21,156 0.03
Palestine ........ .... 1......................... ... I ...... ...... ......... 1 ....
Persia ...................... ..................... 7 2 4 ........ ..._ 724 ......
Peru ...- ....... ................................... 547 ...... -.-...... ..... 547 .....
Philippines............... ............................. 1.199 ........ ..................... 1.199 ......
Portugal................................................ 2.786 0.01 ...... ..... 2.786
Puerto Rico ...... ................................. 93.086 0.22 6.018 0.01 99,104 01
Russia.,..... .......................................... 27 .......... ........ .......... 267 ......
Salvador ..................................................... 49 ....... ...49 ......
Spain. .......................................................... 4,134 0.01 16 4.302
Straits Settlements...-. ............................... 3.581 0.01 ....................... 3,581 ......
Swijtzerland ............. .............................. 56.351 0.13 45.600 0.11 101.951 0.12
Trinidad _... ...................................... 21 .......... ................... 21
United Kingdom ........................................ 1,188.50 2.81 5,011.144 11.69 6.199,647 7.28
United States .............. ........................ 32,223,453 76.21 34.068.899 79.44 66,252,352 77,83
Urugay .... ........................................... ................ ............ 6 50 .- ... 6
Venezuela....................................... 1.22 ...... 25 ....... 147
Virgin Islands. ......... ..................................... 64 ....... ....... ...... 64
Yugoslavia ......................................... 86 ....... ..... 86
Total, ............. ... ......,... .................... 42.285.166 1_00-00 42,W6,390 100.00 85,171,556 100.00




46 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 6
VALUE OF IMPORTS BY PORTS OF ENTRY
FISCAL YEARS 1916.17 TO 1941-42
Average Average Average Average
Port of Entry 1916-17- 1926-27- 193-37-- 1940-41 1941-42 1916-171925-26 1935-36 1940-41 1941.42
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Aquin ..................... ... 138,469 7,801 852 154 74 56,424
Belladire .................................................... 3,241 101,408 63,159 26,879 83,197 55,596
Cap Haltien ............................................ 9.140.330 5.562,835 2,895,820 2,473,550 1,509.989 6.270,028
Caye ............................................................. 6,941.638 3.611,826 1,570.564 972.574 861,171 4,394,178
Fort Libert ..................................................... 433 185,259 372.167 465,084 282,870 153.872
Glo 40,783 27.538 7,726 6,794 6,183 28,001
rGonaves .. ................................. 3,827.411 2,427,296 1.153.560 899,316 477.516 2.645.862
Jacmel ..... ................................................. 4.181.124 2.358,491 465,794 362,727 197,628 2.612,413
Jrmie ............................................ 1,761,355 1.493.372 645,467 520,291 662,414 1.401,424
Miragoine ....................-............ 737,298 525,629 123.347 71.426 41,549 511,060
Ouanaminthe................................................... 157,025 88,359 7,686 3,356 105.869 99,928
Petit-Golve ............................... .......... 2.378,240 1,016,732 201,348 60,364 83,386 1.347,686
Port-au-Prince ................................ ............ 43,800,513 37,570,158 31,087,S09 29,580,143 36,349.510 38,672,894
Port-de-Paix ............ .............. 2,073.102 1,252,321 592,156 464.870 402,304 1.408.359
Saint-Marc......................... ................... 2.595,702 1.639,392 1,174,416 1,248,020 1.221,506 1,901,713
Total ....................................................... 77.776.669 57,868,417 40,361.871 37.155.548 42,285,166 61,559,438
TABLE No. 7
VALUE OF EXPORTS BY PORTS OP SHIPMENT
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941-42
Average Average Average Average
Port of Shipment 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1940-41 1941-42 1916-171925-25 1935-36 1940-41 1941-42
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Aqui............................................. 885,740 230.984 72,419 ......... ....... 443,436
Belladire...... .................. .................. 26 5.218 687 63 1,626 2,212
Cap Hatien................................. 10.198.117 7,334.037 3.125.869 3.929.861 4,444,478 7,534,437
Cyes ...................... ........ ........... 5.597,901 5,048,557 3.220,716 2,915,867 2.757,739 4.820,227
Fort Liberti ......... ........-....... 192.902 956,600 3,174,146 3.678,030 6,889,179 1,317,497
Glore .......................................... .. 5.507 109 295 1,370 717 2,244
Gonaives .................................................... 5.776,860 5,661,902 2,259,227 1,728,890 1,792,791 4.902,944
Jacmel ..................................................... 9,323,878 7.955.531 2,293,026 2.164.248 2,521,672 7,183,880
Jrimie ......................................................... 3,283.170 3.585,632 754,795 387,707 1,368,195 2,841,546
Miragone...................................... 1,410.325 1.797.392 733.111 384.539 429,205 1,402,767
Ouanaminthe ................................................. 8,150 2,111 1,317 251 910 4,235
Petit-Golve ... ....................................... 7,002,317 5,810.627 1,600,940 1,081,179 522,427 5,256,022
Port-au-Prince ..................................- 21,165,030 14,301.396 14,047,079 14,020.174 18.072,197 17,037,373
ort-de-Pai ......... ............................. 3.994.537 2,915,228 1,446,895 1,936,076 1,512,062 2.994.027
-Saint-Marc..... ............. ................ 5.511,232 4,960,828 2,510,741 1,058,282 2,573,192 4,609,519
Total... ...... ............. ................. 74,390,742 00,616,152 '35,241,363 33,286,537 42,686,390 60,362,371




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 47
TABLE No. 8
VALUE AND PERCENTAGE OF VALUE OF IMPORTS. EXPORTS AND
TOTAL FOREIGN COMMERCE BY PORTS-FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Imports Exports Total
Gourdes Per cent Gourdes Per cent Gourdes Per cent
Aquin .. .............. ... ..................... ... .......................... 7/4 . .. . . .......... 74 ...........
Belladire ......... .......... .............................. 83,197 0.19 1,626 ......... 4,823 0.10
Cap Haltien ........................................................ 1,509,989 3.57 4,444.478 10.36 5.954.467 6.99
ays.... ............. .............. 861,171 2.04 2.57,739 6.43 3.618,910 4.25
Fort Liberti ..................................................... 2.870 0.67 6,889,179 16.06 7.172.049 8.42
Glore-............... 6,183 0.01 717 ........ 6.900 0.01
Gonalves ........... ......... 477,516 1.13 1.792,791 4.18 2,270,307 2.67
Jacmel ....................................... .. 197,628 0.47 2,521,672 5.88 2,719.300 3.19
Jirimie .......... ......... ........ 662.414 1,57 1,368,195 3.19 2,030,609 2.31
Miragoine ............................................................ 41,549 0.10 429.05 1.00 470.754 0.56
Ouanaminthe ............................. 105.869 0.25 910 ....... 106,779 0.1L,
Petit-Golve .... .......... ....................... 8,386 0.20 5.427 1.22 605.813 0.73
Port-au-Prince ..................................................... 36,49,510 85.96 180197 42.15 54,421,707 63.89
..................................... 402,104 0.96 1,512,062 3.53 1,914.366 2.25
Saint-Marc ........ .. ..... 1,221,06 2.89 .573,192 6.00 3,794,698 4.V
Total .................................................................... 42,285.16 100.00 42,886. 0 100.00 85,171,556 100.00
TABLE No. 9
NET TONNAGE OF SAILING VESSELS IN FOREIGN COMMERCE ENTERED BY REGISTRY AND MONTHS-FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Sailing Vessels Entered
American British Haitian All other Total
Months
No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage No. Tonnage
October 1941 .. ........ 26.223.......... .. ...... ............ 26 223
November .................................. 1 16 20 165 ........ 21 181
December ................................. 1 610 20 194 ... ........ ........ 21 804
January 1942 ................................. .. 17 160 ......... 17 160
February ..................................2........ ............ ?4 228 2 70 ....2. .. ............2 M
March ........................................ ...... ....... 24 204 ....... ....... .... ........... 24 204
April ......................................... 1 16 29 277 . ...... ............ 30 293
May .................. 1 16 28 276 1 60 ............ 30 352
June ......................................... 1 16 30 302 ........ ....... .. .... ...... 31 318
July ............................................. 1 16 41 396 2 137 ...... ........... 44 549
August ....................................... 1 16 24 214 2 106 ...... ............ 27 338
Scptembet .................................. 1 16 31 303 5 3 .2.. ......... 7 452
Total ................................. 8 722 314 2942 12 5o ........ 334 4.171,0




48 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 10
VALUE OF IMPORTS BY REGISTRY OF CARRYING VESSELS--FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Merchandise Merchandise
Country free of subject to American British Dutch French Norwegian All other Ttal Per cent
duty duty
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gaurdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes .
A rabia .................................................................. .................... 13 13 ..................................... 13 ..................
Argentina............... 70 285,062 12,969 ...... ......... 137,191 ......... ........... 1.475 133,497 285,132 0.67
Australia ............................................................. ............. 36,8 5 1$,115 ................... 18,716 .................... 4 ................... 36,835 0.09
Bahama Islands.... .......................................... 01 58,288 422 57,726 18 .................... .................... 423 58,589 0.14
Belgium ................................................................ .................... 2.197 00............ .......................1,87 .197 0.0
Brazil .................................................................... .................... 4,760 44 ................ 329. 3,68 699 4,760 0.01
British Africa .................................................... .................... 18,243 4,976 13,27........................ ................... 18,243 0.04
British India ....................................................... .................... 319,405 7,223 179,267 126,7291 .................... 6,186 319.405 0.76
British M alaya .................................................. ............... .. 101.3 .................... ................................................ 10,132 0.0.
B ulgary .................................................................I .................... 4 ................ .. ..................* 4 .................... ............... ... i .................... 4 .................. .
Canada .................................................................. 22.557 1,251,449 70,287 2,793 691,492 .................... 36,700 472,734 1,274.006 3.01
Canal Zone ........................................................ 21 3.950 3,899 ................26..................... .................... 46 3,971 0.01
Ceylon ................................................................ .................... 31,423 0.................. ................... 31,423 ............. ...... 31,42, 0.08
Chile ............. .................................... 17.019 .................... 17019 ....................... .................... 17,019 0.04
China .................................................................. 45,83 38,266 7,612 ........... ........................ 45,8 0.1
Colombia ........................................................... 71 1,39 533 875 .................... ................,469 .......
Cuba...................................................... ..2 ,6 329,2 93,258 10 68.062 41 194,480 355,8510
Curagao .............................................................. 53,001 855,962 1,044.,50 ................... 144,141. 20,262 1,394,963 3,30
Cyprus ................................................................... .... 44 44 ................................ ..................................44 ............
Dominican Republic ....................................... 10,520 372,818 844 .... ............... ................ ... 7,963 374,531 383,338 0.91
Dutch East Indies .................................... . ................. 51,202 2,112 ............ ...... 39,0 ................ .. 51.2 0.12
D utch Guiana .................................................. ................... 27 13 .................... 10 .............2.7..
Ecuador .............................................................. 172 6,406 418 2.654 459 3,047 6,578 0.02
Egypt .............................................. 12... 5123..... .. .................. 125 ........................................ 128 ...................
France .................................................................. 800 51,825 16,718 14 14,057 441 ... 21,395 52,025 0.13
French Indo-China ..................................... 6,746 2,877 ................... 3,869 ............... ......... ................... 6,746 0.02
Germany .............................................................. 1,254 1,007. .................. 48 .............. ............... 199 1,.54 ....................
Guatemala ................................. . ... .................... 3 3 ..................................... ...........
Hong-Kong .... ..................... 26,465 8,674 ......... 17,71 .................... ........... 26,465 0.06
Italy .. ... ........... ................................................... ................ ... 5,20,5 4,108 ......... 1,9 W I........................ 5,205 0.01
Jamaica ................................................................. 20,521 2,360 21,606 6 97 I............. ............... 1,172 22.881 0.05
Japan ............................................... . . ................... 9.438 5,993 1 3,44 .................... ................... 9,438 0.02
Madagascar ......................................................... ................... 1,420 1,42D ............. .... ... 3.420 .................
M artinique ........................................................ .................... 3 32 ............... 32............ .
Mexico ................................................................. 9,785 4,251.284 127, 205,645 1,447,774 2,410.631 4,261,069 1o.0s
N etherlands ...................................................... .................... 691 654 .................... ................. ................... .................... 691 ....................
New-Zealand ...................................8 21,148 20,160................... 2,.................... .................... 21,156 0.05
Palestine ........................................................... .................. 1 .... . . .. ................ 1 1 .........
Persia ...................................................................105 619 .7.. ........... 724 .................. ......... .......... 7 ....................
Peru ................................................................... .................. 547 .................. 523 241 ...................547................
Philippines ........................................................ ................... 1199 1,199 ............ . I................... .... ................. 1,199 ............ .
Portugal ............................................................... .................... 2,786 1,866 ................... 9 .................... .................... .................... 2,786 0.01
Puerto Rico ...................................................... 49,0412 44,044 90,698 .................... ..................... 2 8.................... .................. 2,388 93,0 6
R ussia .............. ................................................ .................... 26 ........ .......... ................. 1/2 .................... .................... 175 267 ....................
Salvador ................................................................ .................... 49 ...... ... ........ .... ............... 49 ... .. ............. .................. ..... .............. 49 ...................
Spain ............................................................ .. .. ...... ... 4,134 3,80,0 .. ..... .. .................... .. ..........5..... 4,1 4 .01
Straits Settlements ....................................... 3,581 3.581 ............... ..... ...... .. 3.581 0.01
Switzerland ......................................................... 443 55908 27,511 17 21 337.5 '...4.5,28 56,351 0.13
Trinidad .................................................... 21............ 21 .........................I.............. 21 ................
United Kingdom ............................................ 86.855 1.101,648 184.220 6,986 853,490 ................... 44 143,763 1,188.503 2.81
United States .................................................... 2.814,362 29,409,091 8,551,144 2,271,226 10,732 420 .................... 5,161,102 5,507,661 32,223,453 76.21
V enezuela ........................................................... ............ 10 .................... 9! .................... 21 122 ..................
Virgin Islands ................................................... ....64 4 ............................. 16.64
Yugoslavia ................................................... 86. ......... .............. 86
Total ...................................................... 3,..91,405 38.703,761 10,382.490 2,727,74 441 523014 9,46 4285,166 0.0
Per cent. ...........847 91.3 24.55 6.45 34. .................... 12.52 22.44 .......................................




TABLE No. 11
VALUE OF EXPORTS BY REGISTRY OF CARRYING VESSELS-FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Merchandise Merchandise 0
Country free of subject to American British Dutch Norwegian All other Total Per cent
duty duty
0
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Q
4 ........... ..........-5 .......... ... . ........45 ..........
Argentina ....................................... . .......... .............. . .................. >............ 5 .
Bahama Islands .... ............... .............. ... ... ..................... ....... 24,681 368,821 ..........,....... '329.52 .................... ........... .. .... 63,977 393,502 0.92
Canada ................................................................................... 1 314,440 154.716 .................. 134,76 .................. 24,929 314.441 0.73
Canal Zone ............. .. .. .... ............................... ................... 1.904 1.904 ................ ................. .................. ................... 1.904 0.01 '
Colombia ................. ... ........... 2,359.852 .......... ..................2359,852 ......... 2,359,852 5.50 >
Cuba ................................................ ............. 55,780 8,049 5,120 ................... .................. .................. 58,709 63,829 0.15
Curaao ........................ .... .. ............... .............. .. 404.42 ................... 345.361 59,067 404,428 0.94 -1
Dominican Republic ......... ........ 371 200,901 . ......... .. 201.172 201,172 0.47
Guiana British. ........ .......................... .............. 1,817 .. ....... ............. 1,817 ....................
H:onduras ........................................ ................ . .. .. ......... ... M 2 .... ........... ... .. ...... -.................. . .................. 1...... 5 125 ............... ...
Jamaica ........................ ............ 13,371 10 7,W 0 ..................... 6,266 13,371 0.03
Puerto Rico .......................... .......... .. .... ........... ... 6,018 5.966 .......... ........... 50 6,018 0.01
Spain ........................................................................ .................. 168 .................. ... 168 ...................... 168
Switzerland ............ ... ..... ......... ....... -.... ............................] .................... 45,600 .................. ................ .. 45.00 .................... ............ 45,600 0.11 M
United Kingdom .............. 501. . .......... 5.................. ,0 4 ................... . ... ................... ................ 45,601 144 11.60 Z
United. Knd .. ........... 5.1.4U.501l'..............- 601141.3 '
United States.......................... .................. 308,414 33,760,485 3,974,647 2,.503,99. 15,772.631 2.444,355 9.373,273 34,068,899 79.44
Uruguay .............................. .... ... ... ... .......... .. ..... ....... 50 50 .................. .................... ............ ..... ... .............. 60 ..........
Venezuela ........................ ...... ........... .................... ............. ..... ...5...... ..... ... .. ............. ................ ... .................. 25 25 ....................
Venzuea,........... ........ ...........~ 5...........252.........................co.27 4.9.4 8a
Total. ............................................... 39.247 42,497,143 4,142.413 7.853,574 1S,658,485 2,444,355 9,787,593 42,886,390 100.00
Per cent ................... 0.91 99.09 18.31 43.51 5.70 22.82 ........... ...............




O
TABLE No. 12
VALUE OF IMPORTS BY MONTHS AND PORTS OF ENTRY
FISCAL YEAR 1941-42 COMPARED WITH 1940-41
zO
Novem- Septem- Total Total
Port of Entry October ber December January February March April May Jane July August ber 1941-42 1940-41 Increase Decrease
z
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Courdes Courdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes i
Aquin.... ............ .............. ............ ........... 74 ...... ........................ ........ 74 154 ................80
Belladire............. 481 463 3.286 4,282 4.423 13.180 21,032 3,007 2342 1.294 3.582 4,742 83.197 26.879 56.318 ............
Cap-Haitien...... 158,276 217,285 210.475 189.344 169,160 184,820 31.621 55.753 12:413 87,299 92.505 101,038 1,509.989 2.473,550 ................ 93,561
Cayes.................. 73,98 123,434 129.099 130.062 17.765 136.918 77.037 54,907I 38,629 823 16.364 60.152 861.171 972.574 ............. 111,403
Fort Liberti........ 7,147 30,149 48,271 71.417 8,294 .......... 31,182 ............ 13,897 10.849 61.664 282.870 465,084 ............... 182.214 F
Glore.................... 167 175 108 198 463 485 527 996 1.112 793 548 611 6.1893 6,794 ................ 611
GonaYives............. 69.281 50,483 91,128 55,618 50,184 103,092 30.690 14,484 3,392 1,342 7.341 481 477.516 899,316 ................ 421.800
Jacmel................. 27,662 34.644 40,375 52.066 3,427 27,370 4.701 847 842 98 3,073 2,523 197.628 362.727 ................ 165,099
Jirimie................ 43,716 94.610 26,119 152.237 64,913 5,941 50,599 18,235 7,426 71,310 34,745 42,563 662,414 520.291 142.123
Miragoine............ 8 752 8.355 11.741 110 5,887 4.615 131 5 10 33 1,823 87 41.549 71.426 ................ 29877
Ouanaminthe....... 222 184 5,819 157 204 178 233 9,351 47.978 35,014 1.557 4.972 105,869 3,3M 102,513 ............
Petit-Gove......... 8,995 17.965 12.946 21.454 17,274 4 775 29 6 719 ........... 3,219 83,386 60,364 23,022 .
Port-au-Prince... 2,660,100 2,910.029 3,413.464 2,879.101 1.611,471 3.031.613 2,438,242 2,499,440, 44,38537 3,417.651 2.885.910 4,217,952 36.349,510 29,580.143 6,769.367
Port-de-Paix....... 45.297 49,241 40,947 60.525 31,876 44.746 23,673 51,515 1.540 12.047 8,460 32,437 402,304 464,870 ........... 62,586
Saint Marc........... 76,015 232,555 90,103 100,964 228,537 155.586 103,419 38,959 5,678 11,190 134,545 43.955 1,221,506 1,248,020 ................ 26,514 U
Total 1941-42..... 3.180,092 3.771,572 4.123,881 3,717,535 2.213.952 3,758,548 2,813,862 2,747,528 4,526,983 3.653.510 3,201,302 4.576,396 42,285,166 ................ 7,093.343 1,963.725
Total 1940-41..... 3.168.895 3.230,739 3,425,682 3.625,095 2,833,417 3,653,968 2.963,.219 2.864.430 2.737,159 2.627.265 3.061,980 2,963,69. ................37155,548 ....... ............
Increase 1941-42. 11,197 540.833 698.199 92.440 ............ 104.580 ............ ............ 1,789.829 1.026,245 139.322 1.612,697 ................ ................ ................ .
Decrease 1941-42 ............ ............ .......... ........... 619.465 149,357 116.902 ............ ............ ............ ....... . . .......... ......... .. ............




TABLE No. 13
VALUE OF EXPORTS BY MONTHS AND PORTS OF SHIPMENT
FISCAL YEAR 1941-42 COMPARED WITH 1940-41
"o
0
Port of Novem- Septem- Total Total
shipment October ber December January February March April May June July August ber 1941-42 1940-41 Increase Decrease 0
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes t
elladire ............... 20 312 311 600 310 45 ............ ............ 18 ............ 4 ............ 1.626 63 1.563 ............
ap-Haitien ............. 612.992 422,485 374,340 409,488 477,946 31,633 633,520 195,723 2.90 24,925 310.534 947,985 4,444.478 3,929,861 514,617 .
!ayes ......................3... 64,809 689,144 851,960 342,884 33.250 409,339 35,685 15.567 15.101 ............ ................... 2 757 739 2915 867 ................ 158 128 '
ort Liberti ............ 2,101 677.983 376.039 673.643 717,753 ............ 304,353 969,042 ...........1,152,671 406,554 1,609,040 6,889,179 3.678.030 3,211.149 ...... .
tore.....8 14................... 84 111 143 45 ............ 4 ............ 125 104t 74 27 717 1,370 ................ 653
onaves................... 100.220 487.762 553,819 192.578 10.204 9,172 59.911 239337 58.395 38,887 33,920 8,586 1,792.791 1,728.890 63,901
acmel....................... 772.014 637.30 511,119 197,592 19,188 286,189 71,898 13,426 I 12,8-6 ............ ............ ............ 2521,672 2,164,248 357,424 ...........
rimie...................... 81.303 314.604 ............ 758,235 ............ 200.748 8 000C 5.300 ............ ............ ............ 1,368,195 387.707 980,488
firagoine............... 23,095 77,091 94,326 63,694 8,265 136,216 12.890 6.023 7.605 ............429,205 384.539 44,666
uanaminthe........... 253 68 282 83 100 1; 20 1 .......... 32 15 21 910 251 659 .
etit-Golve............. 37.917 227.848 126,168 54.866 41,340 .................. 34,2S8 ........... ... ........................522,427 1.081.179 ................ 558,752 >
ort-au-Prince........ 1.10 9.084 2.133.477 1,313,501 92.6,522 575.751 2,287.766 1,927.388 342,229 1.80.766 112.663 153.224 5.449.826 18,072.197 14,020.174 4,052,023 ............
ort-de-Pai............ 342.218 280.013 208.978 332,129 93,628 36.813 25.617 141.560 20.512 7.602 20.346 2.646 1.512,062 1,936,076 ............... 424.014
95.636-ax 144,128 160,748 2,573,19 1.05,28 1,514.91081
aint Marc............... 91.299 99,097 278.744 213,920 310,701 207,110 240,296 471.640 25,853 93,65 144,128 163,748 2,573,192 1,058,282 1,514,910 ............
oral 1941-42.......... 3.597,420 6.047.375 4,689,730 4,166.27 2.288,436 3,605,053 3.311,578 2,436,83 t 2.039.448 1,433.540 1,068.799 8,181.879 42,886,390 ................ 10741,400 1,141,547
oral 1940-41.......... 1,270.327 2.210,240 2,389,168 2,787,911 2.253,296 2,669,742 3.218.155 3,692.149 3.089.646 2.566.308 2.986.748 4,152,847 ................ 33.286.537 ................ ............
,crease 1941-42..... 2.327,093 3,837.135 2.300,562 1,378,38 35,140 935,311 93.423 ............ ............ .................... 4.029,032
decrease 1941-42..... ............ ............ ............ ........ ... ............ ............ ............ 1255. 1 0,198 1,132,768 1,917.94 .................. ................ ....... . .
1.132.68 1.17.94
In




.52 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 14
VALUE OF IMPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941-42
Average Average Average Average
Commodity ... 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1940-41 1941-42 193-371925-26 1935-36 1940-41 1941-42
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Agricultural implements ............................... 519.459 580.634 541.834 560,36S 541,133t
Books and other printed matter ............... 304,603 154,793 74,160 98,330 244,895t
Cement .............................................................. 439.939 507.531 685.328 905,147 504,593 515,613
Chemical and pharmaceutical products 786.512 898.614 890,065 762,7421 952,022 855,908
Cotton, and manufactures of, other
than textiles ................................................ 2,683,915 1,872,145 1,605,637 1,438,052 2,352,371t
Fibers, vegetable, and manufactures of,
other than cotton and textiles ............ 1,985,766 902,308 603,854 296,077 932,449 1,262,787
Foodstuffs:
Fish ................ ; .......................................... 2,834,858 2,421,726 992,927 691,313 498,927 2,231,900
Wheat flour ........................................... 11,358,139 7,355.141 2,598.855 1,8M6,495 2,113,232 7,778,473
Meats ..................... . 1.290.986 889,513 312,374 293.155 169,895 905,260
Rice ............................................................. 1,514.508 1,070,103 212,272 64,030 6.272 1,035,144
All other ................................................... 6.165,680 4,328,423 2.037.244 2,109.707 1.928,827 4,502,157
Household utensils: crockery, porcelain,
glassware cutlery and kitchen utensils, of aluminum, iron and steel 976,787 715,108 857,138 740,484 880,243t
Iron, steel and manufactures of. other
than specified ............................................. 3,435,862 2.589,013 2,015,721 1.692.829 1.134.351 2.748.450
Leather .......... .. 782,971 236.078 126.014 105,764 100,159 420,028
Liquors and beverages ................................. 1.331,634 767,839 404,868 260,234 287,275 896.398
Lumber ............ 1,200,249 1.185,705 751.088 615,290 233,436 1,071.093
Motor vehicles:
Automobiles, passenger .................... 1,181,318 777,925 870.778 395,893 1,006.169"
Trucks ....................... ..... 376,626 505.418 432,043 222.=37 407.243t
Oils. mineral:
Gasoline .......................... .......... 605.051 1,691,092 953,679 95600 1,350.197 1,118,463
Kerosene........ 1,021.852 1,087,209 572,053 411.714 500.358 940.430
All other ................................................. 268.425 621,409 708.277 1.016.433 878.034 512,221
Shoes ...............644,295 219.938 179,064 324,079 479,23t
Silk, and manufactures of, except
textiles ...... . .. 168.961 171.252 340,68 183,823 170,06 t
Soap ................................................................... 3,455.115 2.163.551 1,799,171 1.572,740 3,010.033 2.622,790
Textiles, cotton .............. 20,429,296 11.978.376 10,686,461 9.143,067 15,533.882 15.117.035
All other ............ 2,059,320 600,655 683,141 1.551,251 786.976 1.184.709
Tobacco:
Leaf ......................................................... 1.889.739 125,356 116,313 193,2D8 371.900 811,709
All other ....... ............................ 86,087 144.525 57.784 111.918 154.129t
Cigarettes ............................. i0w,390 365,768 352,067 343,985 203,339t
Wool, hair and manufactures of, except
textiles ...................................................... 171.378 117.538 112,480 66,830 148,019t
All other ...................................................... 14,920,761 9,228,856 7,587.122 7.283,185 6.706.049 8,441.491
Total .................................................... 77,776.669 57,868,417 40.361,871 37,155,548 42,285,166 61.559,43S
*No separate figures available.
tAverage for sixteen years only.
fAverage for eleven years only.




TABLE No. 15
QUANTITY OF IMPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941-42
Average. Average Average Average
Commodity Unit 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1940-41 1941-42 1916-171925-26 1935-36 1940-41 1941-42
-0
Cement ................................................................................................................................ Kilo 4,597,3 3 7,15.719 9,082.308 9,660,111 4,1 2,865 6,681,720 0
Cotton. and manufactures of, other than textiles ................................... 341,885 366,293 233,158 157,557 3,2:992t "II
Fibers. vegetable, and manufactures of ........ ....... .. 717,223 641,405 219.960 688,583 691,721t
.Foodstuffs: u
Fish ................................... 3,232,765 4,447,649 2,423,651 1,501,184 743,420 3,448,685
W heat flour ............................................................................................................. 20,257.680 20,.554,890 8,064,074 6,356,.82 6.838,491 17,510.944
Meats -...... ..... ... .. ...... ........ .... 711,649 814201 "" 231,994 198,750 89.110 614,907
Rice ......................................................................................................................... 1,767,490 3,085,040 695,307 128.830 11,487 ,0 0,512 0
Leather ................................................................................................................... 15.874 10. 61 6,114 5,106 13,635t M
Liquors and beverages ..................................................... .. Liter 906,193 576,101 325,760 210,279 229.328 641,580 n
Lumber ........................................................................................................................... Cubic Meter 10,545.36 11,343.14 7.000.70 4,543.77 1,589.61 9,771.08
Motor -ehicles: H
Automobiles, passenger .............................................. . .. Number 325 19 190 76 264f
Trucks............................................... 103 116 103 40 103t z
Oils, mineral: Gasoline................................................. . Liter 1.400,81 7,550.57Z 9,787,423 10,966.949 9.5%1,398 5,690,502
Kerosene ............ ........ ................ ......... ............................. W3,259,14 4,354,341 :678.383 3,074.265 3.188,729 3,765,980t
Shoes .............................................................................................................. .......................... Pair M12 .385 40.700 22 69 13.215 93,785" ,
Sills, na:ural and artificial, and manufactures of, except textiles................. Kilo-- 2,943 6,038 12,935 5,259 4,0551 m
Soap ................................................................................................................... 3.218,001 3,423,817 3,286,193 3,081,482 3.090,745 3,305.i Z
Textiles, cotton .................... 3.196,716 2,809.010 2.833.803 2,520.109 2,501,966 2,951,086
All other ................................................................... .................................. 180,894 63,257 77,977 143.004 58,797 11L16
Tobacco: Leaf ......................................................................................... ............................ 758,446 73,003 28.819 43.471 73.403 328,153
All other ........................................................................... ...................... 16,763 24.090 8,896 16.297 27.670t
Cigarettes __............................................. Number 7.47.730 28,272,302 26,89.126 24,606,60 22.227,767t
Wool, hair, and manufactures of, except textiles ...... ......... ............ Kilo 11,000 7,762 5,877 2.462 9,45
*No separate figures available.
tAvcrage for sixteen years only.
'Average for eleven years only
t'




54 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 16
VALUE OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS .1916-17 TO 1941-42
Average Average Average Average
Commodity 1916-17-- 1926-27- 1936-:9- 1940-41 1941-42 1916-171925-26 1935-36 1940-41 1941-42
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Bananas ............................ 290(3) 195,641(9) 3,521.883 7,761,732 4.547,122 927,532(18)
Beeswax ............................ 32,024 4,428 34,606 65,169 247.445 30,192
Cacao, crude .................... 1,983,464 951,342 696,139 683,242 988.343 1,300,658
Cashew nuts .................. 9.080(1) 76,927(10) 35,44G 135,493 6.330 36,996(17)
Castor beans ............... 401.955 20.397 86,694 263,496 278,737 189,836
Coffee ................. 53,718,438 44,392,313 16.522,037 1918,466 17.382,890 41,580,791
Corn ................ ..... 56.152(8) 19,599(10) 40,739 86,082 106,436 229,525(24)
Cotton ................................ 7.391,395 7.024,090 4,541,140 2,313,791 2.359,852 6,508,438
Cotton seed ...................... 594,945 108.562 ................ ................2............... Z70,579
Cottonseed cake .............. 55,989(7) 535,593(10) 429,839 491,520 41.727 311,798(23)
Cowhides ........................... 215,544(9) 14,457(6) 71(2) ............................ 88.000(17)
Goatskins .......................... 743,940 572,097 488,490 419,060 393308 615,236
Honey.......................... 569,305 311,766 88,462 1,127 5,665 W56,103
Lignum vitae ................... 318,458 41.450 32,438 61,395 67,993 147,280
Logwood .......................... 4,215,686 1,615,158 308,950 113,785 58,575 2,305.491
Molasses ........ ................... 852(1) 294,886(8) 397.170 202,979 795,022 0,702(15)
Pitneapples, canned ........ ................ 102,099(9) 143(2) N93 ............. 34,721(11)
Pineapples, fresh ............. ............... 20,978(10) 1,334 1,947 62 8,328(16)
Rum .................................... ................ 56,925(10) 34,566 10,805 12,30 29,015(16)
Sisal .................................... 48.464 1,034,169 3,488,929 4,316,865 8.464,810 1,412,915
Sugar, raw ........................ 2.140,187(9) 2,496.005(10) 3,852.322 2,046,122 5,168,35 2.722,775(25)
Sugar. refined ................... ................ 165,774(8) 258,970 520,220 257,833 123,478(14)
Turtle shells .................... 78,177 35,730 14,574 ........... .... I--- 46,613
All other exports ............ 1,326,397 525.767 365,671 872.548 1,673,300 854,769
Total ........................ 74,390,742 60,616,152 35,241,263 33.286,537 6 603 71
Figures in parenthesis indicate that the commodity was shipped only for that number of years instead of for the total number indicated by the heading to the column.
TABLE No. 17
QUANTITY OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941-42
Average Average Average Average
1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1940-41 191-42 1916-171925,26 1935-36 1940-41 1941-42
Kilos Kilos Kilos Kilos Kilos Kilos
Bananas ................. "144(3) *145,580(9) -2,054,416 "3,283,645 '1.931,305 *525,368(18)
Beeswax .................. .... 11.094 2,196 16,608 28,256 59,727 10.603
Cacao, crude .................. 1933.755 1,493,832 1,506,469 1,501.570 1,246,822 1,655.963
Cashew nuts .................... 4,635(1) 51,410(10) 24.627 77,993 4,303 24,853(17)
Castor beans .................. 640,917 55,481 384,648 1,072,435 801,982 372.661
Coffee ................... 30,684,024 31,311,467 23,596,493 22,641,275 18,104,711 29,078,542
Corn .............................. 1,13,120(8) 168,643(10) 411,702 906,521 837,069 623,585(24)
Cotton ................................ 3,191.787 5,276,827 4,09G,127 2,630,405 2,289,539 4,132,935
Cotton seed ............. 4.02,471 1.076,769 ............ 1.968,938
Cottonseed cake .............. 897.5S9(7) 6,355,354(10) 4,45,616 3,344,265 531,986 3,645,750(23)
Cowhides .. ................... 6G,107(9) 8,511(6) 476(2) .............. ................ 28,791(17)
Goatskins ......................... 141,206 192,393 180,963 198,575 134,454 166,356
Honey ................................ 639,893 538,887 246,230 2,491 12.68 501,204
Lignum vitae ................... 3.373,770 342,491 609,513 1,241,871 1,207,978 1,593,006
Logwood ..... ................ 41,343,196 20,50,34 7,795,562 3,257,024 2,493,000 25,411.793
Molasses ...................... 997(1) 6,375,098(8) 12,215,661 5,578.298 11.713,936 5,252,046(15)
Pineapples, canned ........ ................ 162.549(9) 408(2) 2,011 .............. 56.598(11)
Pineapples. fresh ............. ................ 57,331(10) 5.350 7,686 393 23.094(16)
Rum. ................ t13,086(10) t9,073 +2,585 t3.396 6."909(16)
Sisal ,,............... ,..... t2.259 2,464.029 7,916.107 10,797,222 11,607,076 2,940,404
Sugar' raw ....................... 4,637,247(9) 18,250,128(10) 30,333,891 19,819,590 18,722.072 15,356,357(25)
Sugar, refined ................... ................ 676,320(8) 1,194,857 2177.815 644,286 514,569(14)
Turtle shells .................... 1,57 1.031 568 ......... ...... ............... 1,105i
Figures in parenthesis indicate that the commodity was shipped only for that number of years instead of for the total number indicated by the heading to the column.
*Stems tLiters




TABLE No. 18
QUANTITY AND VALUE OF FIVE PRINCIPAL EXPORTS BY PORTS
FISCAL YEAR 1941-42 COMPARED WITH 1940-41
hri
0
Coffee Cotton Sisal Sugar Bananas
0
Port 0
Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Sterns Gourdes
Cap Haien ............ ..................... 2,519,780 2,691,365 .. ............ .......... 627,612 526,389 2,041 600 S17,991 755,736
Cay s ......................................................................................................... 2,876.640 2,376,432 .. .. ............... ............. ................ ................ ................ 142,787 335,650
Fort Liberti ........................................................................................... ................ ................ ................ .............. 9,238.152 6,845,528 ................ ................ ............... .............
GIonalves ................................................................ .................... ................ 1,6G6,800 1,4466,286 ................ . ....... ... ................ ....... ....... 67,452 18,953 27 6
jacr eel ...................................................................................................... 2,450,'0 2,252,= ................ .............. ................ ................ ................ ................ 4,095 221.12
Jrimte ........................................................................................................ 2,45 800 66,814 ................ ............. ................ ............. ...... ......... ................ 21. 122...... H
M iragolne .................................................. ...... ......................................... 316.000 301,302 ........ ...... ... ......... ......... ....... I....... ........ ....... 39,085 91 R I5
.lirithe.................................. .. .................. ................ 66612......... ........... ..............
P e i t G o l n e .. . . . . . . .... . . . . .. ... . . . . . . .... . 3 1 0 3 0 1 3 2 .... ........ . 3 9 0 8 .8 .. ..
.................... .... .... 258 1853 "
Petinte.. ..................... .4283...448,400.........................17..4.0.69,176........... .
Port-au-Prince ............. ................................................. 3 ..................7 209.720 6,301, 2 2,359.= 1,211.410 72.786 19,--A,865 5,406,915 302,M 73 6
Port-de-Paix .................................................. ............................................ 622,560 580,348 ................ ................ ................ ................ ................ .............. 354.87 8 .0
Saint M arc ................................................................................................. 345,371 317,827 : ... ... ....... 353,234 299,746 ................. ................ 680.770 1,599,808
Total 1941-42 ....................................................... f ............................ 18,104,711 17,382.890 2.8,539 2.359,852 11,607,076 8,464,810 14,766.358 5,426.46-8 1,931,305 4,547,122
Total 1940-41 ................................................................................ 22.641,275 12,918,46 2,630,405 2,313,791 10.797.222 4,316,865 21,997,405 2.566,342 3,2S3.645 7,761.732
Incr,-ase 1941-42...................................................................., .6424601 8985 41794280.6
D ecrease 1941-42 ........ ........................................................... ... .......... .4 46 ,4 4 ..... ......... .... ........... .......... ... ....... .. ......... ,631,047 ........... ..... ....2.3....,...,..
4ecrease194142 .. .453654 340,866 ..2,631047 1.352,340 3.214,610
L'




56 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 19
PERCENTAGE OF VALUE OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941-42
Average Average Average Average
Commodity 1916-17- 1926-27- 1936-37- 1940-41 1941-42 1916-171925-2 1935-36 1940-41 1941-42
Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent Per cent
Coffee .............. .. 72.21 71.81 46.07 38.81 40.53 68.90
Cotton ....... .... . ......... 9.94 12.25 12.53 6.95 5.50 10.78
Logwood ................................................................................ 5.67 2.40 0.82 0.34 0.21 3.82
Sugar ...................................................................................... 2.88 4.95 12.05 7.71 12.65 4.72
Cacao, crude ............................................................................ 2.67 1.42 1.96 2.05 2.31 2.15
Sisal .................. .. 0.07 2.28 10.14 12.97 19.74 2.34
Cottonseed cake ................................................................... 0.21 0.95 1.20 1.48 0.10 0.52
Molasses .................... . . ....... 0.55 1.15 0.61 1.85 0.36
Goatskins ................................................................................ 0.99 0.94 1.37 1.26 0.92 1.02
Bananas ........ ...................................................................... ............ 0.40 10.54 23.32 10.60 1.54
All other ......................................................................... . 5.36 1.99 2.17 4.50 5.69 3.85
Total ... ....... ............... . .. 1 00.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.0 100.00




TABLE No. 20
QUANTITY AND VALUE OF EXPORTS BY COMMODITIES AND MONTHS
FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
'a
0
All 0
Coffee Cotton Sisal Sugar Bananas All other Exports 'a
Month
E C-"
Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Kilos Gourdes Stems Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
i
__ _____ ___ ___ '
October 1941 ....................................... 2.456,425 2,128,942 ................. .......... 319,494 160,498 76,046 18,865 908,508 730.587 558,528 3,597,420 W
November ............ 3,919.630 3,552,924 .............. 1.379.774 747.991 1,031,249 591,293 242,598 572,138 583,029 6,047.375
)eccember ............... ...... .. .......... 3,503.229 3,227.768 ..... .......... 851,598 471,263 27,186 7,834 295.879 696,243 286.622 4,689,730
January 1942 ..................................... 2.247,040 2,176,832 ... ........-.............. 1.220,057 738,180 17,936 5,413 243,153 571,409 674,445 4,166,279 Z
February..,. ................ 567,120 567,565 1,296,997 955,812 186.956 63,275 212,724 499,902 201,52 2,288,436 H
brMach .......................................... 1.9538.512 2.091.657 523.458 549.631 174,237 121.783 397,718 129.809. 140,088 329,208 382,965 3.605,053 1
April. .................. 450,566 .526,035 1,356.729 1,390,647 623.8 342,366 242.038 90.931 132,151. 310,553 651.046 3,311.578 >
May .................... ..................... 528.263 521,992 6 ............... 1,381.355 1,098.012 2.721 925 154.081 362,093 453,831 2,436,813 'a
June ..................................................... 2 ................ 409.341 419,574 78,629 66.742 3.204.446 967,487 87,862 206,476 399,169 2,059,448
July ..... ............ 160 150 ...... ............. 1,342.537 1,133.786 2.337 805 46,717 109.783 189,016 1.433540 to
August ...................................................... 179,873 144,930 2 ......... 712.441 598,688 4.499 1,535 67,173 157,858 165,788 1,06879
September .................. 2,23,891 2.444.095 3 2,226,157 2,029,689 12.143.206 3.548,296 371 872 158,927 8,181:879
Total .................................... 18.104.711 17,382.890 2.289,539 2,359.852 11,607,076 8,464.810 19.,6,358 5,426,468 1.931,305 4,547,122 4,705,248 42.886,350
U.,.




58 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 21
EXPENSES OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT B.N.R.H. BY OBJECTS OF EXPENDITURES FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941-42
Adminis. Customs Repairs and Acquisition Fixed
tration operation maintenance* of property charges Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
September 1916 ................ ........................................ ............... .. .............. 89,860.15
1916-17. ....... ....... .................. .................... ........ ........ .. .............. ........... ... ...... ........... 79,625.70
1917-18.. ... ....... ......................................... ................. 741,06.80
1918-19 ................................ .................... .......... .................... ................... 700,035.60
1919-20 ................................ 329,634.00 508,570.75 .................. 114,500.00 427,755.85 1,380,460.60
1920-21 .... .. 426.498.70 547,194.55 ............... 478,379.85 1,452,073.10
1921-2? ......................... 404,251.70 605,773.60 ........ 269,116.95 1,279,142.28
1922-23 ................................ 503.997.40 600,627.10 333,881.65 1,438,506.15
1923-24 ................................. 455,447.21 648,959.62 .............. 00,000.00 291,925.25 1.89.332.08
1924-25 .......................... 461,316.07 673.495.96 ................ 57.745.41 656,980.06 1,849,537.49
1925-26 ............................... 467,996.66 669,394.41 .............. 155,040.47 405,.94832 1.698,379.86
1926-27 ....................... .... 523,192.77 712,154.94 706,274.83 336,618.76 22Z78,24L30
1927-28 ......... ... 514,017.30 684,563,61 .................... ,5.0 450,82.93 1,884,994.88
1928-29 ...................... 578.827.16 671,332.50 24,027.32 238,038.92 352,476.50 1,864,702.40
1929-30. ................. .. 640,263.91 637,588.57 27,567.10 115,479.47 3,390.75 1,729,289.80
1930-31 ........................... 583,723.66 582,541.63 9,703.22 U,544.62 255,627.84 1,443,140.97
1931-32. ....... 507,252.19 496,013.59 20,544.75 L284.14 133,363.10 1.158.457.77
1932-33 541,340.28 519,438.88 24,319.00 17.770.70 312,662.24 1,415,531.12
133-34 557,564.73 53.893.01 15,288.16 16,450.36 304,33L82 1,417,528.08
1934-35 ............. ... 597.777.34 534,129.65 21,216.57 13,037.48 243,149.69 1,409,310.63
135-36................ 588,807.95 507,537.91 15,977.73 7,51369 289,433.66 1.409.270.94
1936-.............. 556,198.88 506,301.07 45,899.70 15,019.43 227,428.73 1,410.847.81
19M7-38 ............................. 551,284.56 483,753.96 8,897.51 4,435.71 203,M.46 1,252,25720
1938-39,...................535,819.80 466,283.12 9,509.01 7,755.90 235,341.24 1,254,709.07
193-40............................ 521,173.21 451,254.44 7,574.66 2,432.13 ............. 982,434.44
1940-4 ....... 524,348.50 423,047.06 10,145.88 4,632,25 47,540.46 1,009,714.15
1941-42 .......................... 440,719.20 441,451.70 10,020.10 7,018.69 .......... 899,209.69
Average 1919-20
to 1941-42 .............. 513,541.44 560,665.28 10,899.59 97,024.66 28,046.03 1,470,177.00
*Prior to 1923.29 repairs and maintenance expenses were charged to administration or customs operation.




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 59
TABLE No. 22
CLASSIFICATION OF ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION EXPENDITURES OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT B.N.R.H.-FISCAL YEAR 1941.42
Supplies Commu- Special and
Salaries and Transpor- nication Rents Miscel- Total
and wages materials tation service laneous
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October....................... 68,159.50 3,165.13 1,332.75 39.00 115.00" 94.35* 72,487.03
November..................... 68,025.80 2,872.93 1,681.70 13.80 25.00 8.95 72,628.18
December..................... 67,636.86 4,535.33 2,370.25 72.60 7.50" 213.15 74.820.69
January......................... G6,751.54 6,848.54 1,561.50 4.80 25.00* 1.90 75,143.28
February...................... 66,656.26 3.671.34 229.17 .20 442.50" 175.00 70,289.47
March........................... 66,384.06 2.846.27 1,180.10 .70 70.00 ............... 70,481.13
April............................ 66,183.14 8,783.24 493.63* 127.45 337.50" .50 74.263.20
May................ ......... 65,639.00 1.634.93 1,401.13 ............. 265.00" ................ 68.410.06
June........................ 66,339.00 5.920.96 1,098.30 ............... 40.00 12625 73,52451
July....................... ...... 66,366.65 2.160.53 1,250.50 112.60 65.00 ............... 69,955.28
August....................... 66,539.49 3,059.49 1,721.65 60.00 40.00 ................ 71,420.63
September................... 68695.08 9,228.84 11,643.17 88.95 48.95 1,042.45 88,747.44
Total..................... 801,376.38 54,727.53 24,976.59 520.10 903.55" 1,473.85 882,170.90
Percentage.................. 90.84 6.20 2.83 .06 .10* .17 100.00
Credit
TABLE No. 23
CLASSIFICATION OF TOTAL EXPENDITURES OF THE FISCAL DEPARTMENT B.N.R.H.
FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Administration and Repairs and Acquisition
operation maintenance of property Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October.................. ......... ........... ................. 72.487.03 939.27 542.04 73,968.34
November ............................. 72,628.18 545.95 33.25" 73,140.88
December.... ................................................................. 74,820.69 313.60 661.17 75,795.46
January....................................................... 75143.28 451.49 5,006.25 80,601.02
February..................................................................... 70,289.47 297.45 6.00 70,592.92
March................................................................. .......... 70,481.13 449.23 15.00" 70,915.36
April ........................................................................... 74,263.20 672.30 ............. 74,935.50
May ............................................................................... 63,410.06 584.86 42.15*" 68.952.77
June.............................................................................. 73,524.51 2,026.95 6.00 75,557.46
July...... .................................... .... .. .... ......... . 69.955.28 576.80 ................ 70,532.08
August........................................................................... 71,420.63 893.95 103.37 72,417.95
September................ ........................................................ 88,747.44 2,268.25 784.26 91.799.95
Total ........................................................ .. 882,170.90 10,020.10 7,018.69 899.209.69
Percentage ..................................................... ...... 98.11 1.11 .78 100.00
*Credit




TABLE No. 24
COST OF CUSTOMS OPERATIONS BY PORTS AND COST OF ADMINISTRATION, REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE, ACQUISITION OF PROPERTY AND FIXED CHARGES
FISCAL YEARS 1919-20 TO 1941-42
Average Average Average Average Average X
1919-20- 1924-25- 1929-3- 1934-35-- 1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1919-20- 0
1923-24 1928-29 1933-34 1918-39 1941-42
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes z
Aquin ........................................................................... .....4...... 4,144.35 3,130.94 2.266.19 3466.97 2,563.75 2,331.39 2,569.80 3,152.53
Belladire ........................................................................................................ 898.96 5.083.92 4,421.56 4,653.96 4,707.53 4.286.91 4,647.98 3.867.15
Cap-Haitien .................................................................................................. 73190.96 78,148.81 59.785.71 51.327.32 42,127.20 37,9}6.01 33,178.94 62,005.92
Cayes ................................................................................................................. 50,932.83 59,707.21 51,304.97 45,567.32 41,781.87 38,201.24 36,697.08 50,184.43 0
Fotr-Libert6 ...................................................................................................... .................... 3,090.24 5,127.89 3.8M5.00 4,533.91 4,058.63 4,380.28 3.197.32 M
cl re ................................................................................................... .............. 860.12 2,674.68 2,404.36 3,854.45 5,746.03 5,801.92 5,658 .39 2,817.15 t
Gcnaivcs ........................................................................................................... 37,507.43 40,387.92 28,590.55 21,176.71 18.158.01 17,395.40 19,361.03 30,140.33
Jacmel .............................................. .................................................... ............ 48,404.08 50,372.14 34,133.00 30,.&M.02 28.613.70 21,514.27 23,284.38 38,788.41
iir~mie ................................................................ ......................... ................... 29,439.82 33.G43.05 27,331.25 -98,432.83 27,818.89 25,157.73 23.160.09 29,146.69 mr
.% I irago! n e .......................................................... ................................... .......... 6,"9.56 12,136.95 6,780.73 7,30'.26 7,36;1.69 6,797.89 6,916.71 7,955.17 M0
OuaLnamninthe .......................... ............................. ....... ................................... 4,1S0.33 3,414.82 3.103.59 3,165.62 2.9S0.29 2.804.49 3.305.33 3.409,21
Petit-Go~ve .............................................. ..................... ..................... 26,449.52 32,02.5.21 20,1-21.16 19,566.72 17,062.43 16.323.62 18.314.68 23,613.64
Port-au-Prince ................................................................................................. 256.158.43 310,317.16 265,350.49 230.102.26 200,949.21 197,988.28 219,258,.83 257,732.09 ,
P-rt-de-Paix .................................................................................................... 17,548.24 20,540.82 19,593.69 20,65-9.45 19,542.77 18,516.02 20,693.34 19,583.83 C:
Saint-Marc ................................ ................................................. ..... ............... ?9,074.54 27,514.41 21,577.79 25.542.25 26,107.13 23,903.26 20,024.84 24,068.70 m
Total customs operation .................. ............................. .................... 57,8.7 682,189.28 551.895.13 499,601.14 451,254.44 423,047.06 441,451.70 559,V22.47
Administration ................................................................................ .............. 423,.65.80 509,070.00 W6,028.95 565,977.71 521,173.21 52t,348.50 44,0,719.20 513,541.44
Total administration and operation .................................................. 1.001,853.97 1,191,258.28 1,117,924.08 1,065,578.85 97'2,427.65 947,395.5G. 982,170.90 1,073,263.91
Repairs and maintenance ........................ .................................................... .................... 4,805.46 19,4S4.45 20,300.11 7,574.66 10,145.88 10,020.10 10,899.60
Acquisition of property .................................. ......... ................................. 122,900.00 Z78,538.54 32,505.86 9,552.44 2,432.13 4.632.25 7,018.69 97,0-94.66
Fixed charges .............................................................................. ................... 300,211.91 440,568.91 262,875.15 251.947.73 .................... 47,540.46 .................... 288,04,6.04
Total expenditures .... ................................ ........................................... 1,484.9G5.88 1.915,171.19 1,432.789.54 1,347,279.13 9&2,434.44 1,009,714.15 899,209.69 1,469,234.21




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 61
TABLE No. 25
OPERATING ALLOWANCE OF INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE FISCAL YEARS 1923-24 TO 1941-42
Fifteen per
cent of Fifteen per
internal cent of Total Expenses Surplus
revenue communal Other operating
receipts receipts accruals allowance
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
August and Sept. 1924.... 110,1935.90 ................... .................... 110,195.90 75,254.27 34,941.63
1!24 25.................................. 613.488.92 .................... .................... 613,488.92 350,274.56 263,214.36
1925-26............................... 623.607.50 ..................:. .................... 623,607.59 304,198.76 319.408.83
1926-27................................. 622,993,20 .................... ............... 23,993.20 306,308.63 316,684.52
1927-23 ............................... 2,243.02 .................... .................. 636,243.02 462,010.33 174,232.69
1928-29 ................................ 905.2,9.72 .................. .................... 905,289.72 799,076.94 106,212.78
1929-30............................... 993,024.61 ................... ................ 993,024.61 993,017.74 6.87
1930-31................................. 774,02.00 .................... .................. 774,062.00 770,681.47 3,380.53
1931-32 .........................9.......... .43.9 ....................................... 548,436.4 544,949.58 3,487.36
1932-33................................ 708.615.48 145,673.09 5,607.59 859,896.16 859,895.34 .82
1933-34.............................. 743,92.66 270,847.67 1,564.42 1,016,338.75 1.016,338.75 ....................
1934.35 ............................... 677,925.65 27,363.62 .................... 945.289.27 945,289.27 ....................
1935-36 ................................. 701,313.96 266,930.55 .................... 971,244.51 971,221.21 23.30
1936-37 .................................. 744.700.95 277,506.14 ................... 1,022,207.09 1,022,117.42 89.67
1937-38 ............................... 748.618.09 236.517.43 4,206.35 *989.341.87 968,371.16 20,970.71
1938-39 .................................. 753.30,2.94 237.598.50 6,899,53 997,800.97 997,800.97 ................
1939-40 .................................. 785,8.93.09 216,695.84 6,503.71 1,010,092.64 1,003,672.58 6,420.06
1940-41................................ 731.838.90 222,959.99 6,125.79 960,924.68 937,532.39 23,392.29
1941-42 ................................ 800,612.41 369,274.34 7,351.84 1,177,238.59 1,023,950.20 153,288.39




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REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 65
TABLE No. o30
CUSTOMS RECEIPTS BY SOURCES AND PORTS-FISCAL YEAR 1941.-42
Ports Imports Exports Miscellaneous Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourd., Gourdes
Aquin................................................ ............................ ....278.00 ............. ..... 27,43 3 .43
Belladire ......................................................................................... 16,353.67 118.42 1.411.77 17,883.86
Cap-Haitien .................................................................................. C76.444.16 440,192.47 2,284.75 1,118,921.38
Cayes ..................................... ............. ................................. 3380,8 .30 463,679.59 1,054.90 795.541.79
Fort-Libert ....... ................................................... 36,817.38 132,295.62 95.93 169,2 08 93
Glore ..................................... ............ ...................................... 82 .37 62.68 ..... ......... 889.06
Conaives........................................................................................ 248,597.05 275,723.72 311.74 5324,631251
Jacmel................................................ ...... 142,97514 397,676.32 940.58 541,592 04
J..mie......248,564,28 106,753.55 3,471.65 35,8,789,48
J&4omie ............................................................................................ 248,56428 106,753.55 3,471.65 358.78948
Miragoine ................................ 19.35327 54,431.30 1,056.87 74,841.44
Ouanaminthe........................................................................ 13,291,50 28.46 .................. 13.319.96
Petit-GoSve......................................................................... .. 35,576.02 70,186.66 258.44 106,021.12
Port-au-Prince.................................................................. ........ 13,639.805.74 1.449,083.90 33,850.66 15,122,740.30
Port-de-Paix, ............................................................ 185,823.40 134,067.49 2,113.00 32,03.89
Saint-Marc ........................................................................ ........ 116,958.76 109.959.52 909 36 337.82. 63
Total....................................................... ............... 15,712,472.03 3,634,259 70 47,787.08 19,3946518.81
TABLE No. 31
CUSTOMS RECEIPTS BY SOURCES AND BY MONTHS-FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Months Imports Exports Miscellaneous Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Octoberb1,433,017.31 458,63111 5,158.69 1.876,827.11
llove-nbe~tbr .. ............................... ............. ....... ........ ....... 1,433,037.31 438,63112 4..948V.18 2.114,724.621'7'Lf1
December. -..... ... ..,....... 1,438.6=15 671,370.29 4,3.8 21,7.6
a) 1,625,305.51 571,2236.8 3,389.37 2.199.918.46
enar .................... .......................................... ....... . 1,416,895.43 384,653.42 2,841.76 1,804,390.61
I.ar ....... .. ................ .......89,717.20 122.67227 1,870.93 994,260.40
Marih. .......................................... 1427,614.29 360,769.6 1,877.98 1,790,261.33
bt r.......... 1,471.2 1,779,0
April ...1,494,171.65 131,877.02 2,775.26 1,628.923.93
.. ,. '...... ... ......................... ...... ... ......:[: 1,494,171.65
855,227.08 135,240.29 3,845.60 994,012.97
June .... ................ .1,523,300.60 62,563.83 7.87919 1,593,743.62
Jly.. ... ... ............. ......1.............................. 017,41667 24,482.44 4,22625 1,046,125.36
A ust ".". 1,373,127.10 123,412.58 3,446.54 1,497,986.22
Septem ... ................... ... 1,238.032.4 609.463.81 5,948.33 1,853.444.18
Total .. ................. ....................... 15,712.472.03 3,634,259.70 47.787.08 19.394,518.51




66 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 32
DISTRIBUTION OF CUSTOMS RECEIPTS-FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941-42
Receipts Receipts Miscellaneous
from from customs Total
imports exports receipts
Pet cent Per cent Per cent Per cent
19W6-17 ...................................................................................... 53.45 46.52 .03 100.00
1917-19 ........................... ... 51.45 48.46 .09 100.00
1918-19 ........................................................................................... 42.61 57.34 .05 100.00
1919-20 ....................................................................................... 58.92 40.98 .10 100.00
1920-21 ..................... 54.44 45.9 .17 100.00
1921-22 ............................................................................... 56.69 43.13 .18 100.00
1922-23 .................. ...................................................... 57.60 42.18 .22 100.00
1923-24 .......................... ............................................................. 64.83 33.34 1.83 100.00
1924.25 ......................................................................................... 65.60 29.70 4.70 10O
1925-26 ...................................................................................... 64.46 31.19 4.35 100.0
1926-27 ....................................................................................... 70.03 29.75 .22 100.00
1927-28 ......................................................................................... 68.62 31.14 .24 100.00
1928-29 ......................................................................................... 71.76 27.92 .32 100.00
1929-30 ......................................................................................... 61.01 38.75 .24 100.00
1930-31 ........ ................ 65.24 34.51 .25 100.00
1931-32 .......................................................................................... 66.18 33.60 .22 100.00
193-33 .............................................................................. 56.43 42.30 1.27 100.00
1933-34........................................................................................ 63.73 35.78 .49 100.00
19 4-35 ........................................................................................ 73.06 2 .27 .67 100.00
1935-36 ................................................................................. 60.36 39.14 .50 100.00
1936-37 ....................................................................................... 71.88 27.90 .22 100.00
1937-38 ....................... ............. .. ................. 77.93 21.72 .35 100.00
1938-39 .... ............ ... 81.02 18.69 .29 100.00
1939-40 ................................................ . .... ................... 86.17 13.48 .35 100.00
1940-41 ............................................................................... 85.51 14.29 .20 100.0
194.1-42 .................................................................................. 81.01 18.74 .25 100.00
Average .............................................................................. 66.45 32.76 .79 100.00
TABLE No. 33
MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS BY SOURCES AND MONTHS-FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Return on Conversion Communal
investments of francs Miscellaneous Contributions Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gosrdes Gourdes Gourdes
October_-_..._....... _.... ................ 5.400.00 1,434.10 107,067.37 9486.76 123,38.23
November ......................... .................. 1,481.90 2,690.75 31,020.17 35,192.82
............................ 3,079.05 ........... 9,487.49- 29,186.62 22,778.18
January .......................... .. ..... 2,916.00 10.25.98 34,646.21 47,715.19
February ...................... 70,000.00 .................. 250.O0 34,156.37 104,406.37
March ................................................... 12,301.40 2.916.00 ................... 18,622.13 33,839.53
April ... .. . ................ 5,459.60 .................. 34.65 16,854.32 22.348.57
May .................. ...... ....... ....... ............... 15,204.74 15,204.74
June .................... ....... .4,350.10 17,8M,31 22,460.21
July 3,764.40 2,916.00 .................. 14,460.68 21,141.0(
............... .... .... .................. . 14,626.38 14,626.29
September ................. 11,501.85 1,50250 1,98283 19,958.13 34,945.31
Total ....................... 111,506.30 17,516.60 113,091.89 X35.931.82 498,046.61
*Debit.




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:68 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 35
ORDINARY. SUPPLEMENTARY AND EXTRAORDINARY APPROPRIATIONS FROM REVENUE FISCAL YEARS 1939-40 TO 1941-42
192-40 1940-41 1941-42
Ordinary Ordinary Ordinary
and supple- Extraor- and supple- .Extraor- and supple. Extraormentary dinary mentary dinary mentary diaxey
Public debt: Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Series A loan .............. 2,177,500.00 .................... 2072,250.00 ........... ...... 2,160,350.00 ................
Series C loan ............... 349,900.00 .................. 333,215.40 ........ 348.465.40 .................
International Institutions .............................. 90,000.00 .................. 48,000.00 ................ 60,000.00 ....
Interest, transfer charges
and other cost financing the Public Works
Contract of 1938 675,000.00 ................... 939,000.00 ................... 1,095,000.00 ..........
Total public debt 3,292.400.00 ............. 3,392.465.40 ............... 3,663,815.40 ................
Foreign relations ........... 761,407.10 46.600.00 966,906.60 6,500.00 639,264.41 76,019.30
Finance ............................. 632,910.05 .................... 598,978.32 509,526.46 923,045.84 750.0
Fiscal Department 1,061,364.37 .............. 1,073,321.92 ................ 967,724.00 ................
Internal Revenue
Service .......................... 1,010,092.64 .................... 960.924.68-----------... 1,177.238.9 ...............
Commerce ...................... 401.201.36 .................... 337,615.53 .................. 378,988.55 6.850.00
Interior....-............- 1,979,483.18 -0 ............... 1,640,761.30 35,000.00 1,75633.01 150,75.00
Public Health Service.. 2,542,472.38 .................... 2,108,415.44 ...... ..... 2.350.915.87 ...................
Guard ................ 7,603,132.70 15,900.00 6,410,681.10 .....-. 6.906,356.46 ..................
Public Works ............... 3,255.6310.64 ....-....... 2.844,733.80 33,473.43 3,024,267.15 8,330.25
Justice ............................. 1,306.761.87 1.......... 1.069.437.28 .................. 1.294.509.88 ....................
Agriculture and Labor. 59,679.31 .................. 45,496.80 1,500.00 33,534.00 ...............
Agricultural Service..... 1,716,454.22 10,000.00 1,412,402.49 ........... 1,916,164.49 6,000.00
Public Instruction ..... 2.635.273.30 ................. 2,175,838.79 20,511.30 2.384,728.36 .................
Religion ............... .-.. 425,558.16 ................... 359,019.20 ......... 475.728.60 ..................
Total appropriated
from revenue .......... 28,683,561.18 72,500.00 25,396.998.55 006,511.19 27.892,620.61 248,024.6
Total revenue .,,.......... 26,873,410.55 .................. 26,929.882.83-----------. 25.599,255.80
Total expenditures
from revenue....... 28,478.637.37 ........... 25,665,824.25 ..2............ 97,726.161.60 ---------




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 69
TABLE No. 36
RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES-FISCAL YEARS 193-40 TO 1941-42
1939-40 1M4-41 1941-42
RECEIPTS Gosardes Gou-den Gou-den
customs ............................................................................... 21,227.287.42 21.4G6,438.34 19.394,618.81
Internal Revenue ........................... .................................... 5,245,953.95 4,8892.03 5,337.416,04
Miscellaneous ...............................................................................18S3,473.34 361,558.47 498,046.61
Receipts from Communes*............................................................. 216,695.84 22,959.99 369,274.34
Total fiscal receipts ...................2.... ........................ 6,873,410.55 26,9M,882.83 25.599,255.80
Public Works Contract 1938............................................ 8,855,,W.69 7,253,698.44 2,502.618.88
Total receipts ........................... ........................35.728.796.24 34.183.681.27 28,101,874.68
EXPENDITURES
Public debt:
Series A loan ..................................-................................... 213015.16 2,066,407.91 2,155,652.30
Series C loan ............................................................ .... 346,874.49 33,375.44 346,944.35
Interest, transfer charges and other cost of financing the Public
Works Contract 1938............ ...........o ...................... 94,926.18 811,269.59 1,020,467.10
International Institutions ......... ................................. 75,162.30 27,700.80 44,720.35
Total .......- ........................ ................................. 3,169,9M.13 3,237,752.94 3,567.784.10
Foreign Relations ................. ................................... .............. 879,773.37 959,262.82 705,785.34
Finance............................................................................ 622,773.10 1,055,803.37 904,536.35
Fiscal Department........................................................ 982,434.44 1,009,714.15 899,209.69
Internal Revenue Service ...... .......................................... 1,003.672.58 937,532.39 1,023,950.20
Commerce ...........,.......... ............... ... .... .......... ....... 366,923.51 32,090.92 34.245.92
Interior......................................................................... ...... 1,967.534.44 1,673,87.58 1.903,405.52
Public Health Service ................................................................... 2,542,050.64 2,108,125.11 2,320.779.13
Guard................................................ 7.465,651.53 ... .....6,4....7,878.....0746,66,902,707.64 6,0270.6
Public Works ......................................................................... 3.361,849.04 2,818,544.99 3,05,3317
Justice. .................................. ...... ................................. 1,503,745.58 1,068,419.18 1.27,107.25
Agriculture and Labor ................................................................... 59,108.06 45,862.30 34,541.21
Agricultural Service..................................., .................. 1,722,162.18 1,416,611.16 1,917,952.01
Public Instruction ....................- ................. ..... ................ 2,624,835.34 2,172.84U.31 2,387,226.41
Religion ............. ..... ............... .....,...... ................ .............. 406,145.43 331,706.99 453,587.66
Total expenditures from receipts .......................................28478.=737 25,565.824.25 27,726.161.60
Miscellaneous......................................................... ..... 640,114.56 365,364.63 674,430.82t
Public Works Contract 1938 ............................ ....................8,855,385.69 7.253,698.44 2,502,618.88
Total payments ............ ,..........................................37.974,137,62 33.184,587.332 29,554,349.66
Receipts over expenditures ................................................... .......... 1,364,058.58 .........
Expenditures over receipts ........ ... ..................................... .... 1,605,226.82 .............. 2,126,9W5.80
*Amounts represent payments by various Communes to defray cost of services rendered by the Internal Revenue Service in the collection of Communsl revenues.
tCredit.




TABLE No. 37
FUNCTIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES-FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Administration Repairs and Acquisition Percentage
and operation maintenance of property Fixed Trust fund Total of total
charges repayments Expenditures expenditures >
z
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes z
Legislative ................................................................................................................. 95,758.33 22300 ................. .................. ....... 897,991.38 3.04 ;
Judicial ....................................................................................................................... 1,281,307.30 3.184.95 2,615.00 ................... .................... 1,287,107.25 436 H
Executive: aCeneral ...................................................................................................... 996,03.41 41,481.73 226.50 .................... 1,037.791.64 3.51 a
Foreign affairs ................................................................................................ 640,716.15 867.50 61.801.69 47,12.3 .................... 750.505.69 2.54
Financial administration ... ... ......... . 2,109,699.78 24,737.70 49,070.84 01,558.30 ................... 2.485,066.62 8.41
Trade p:omotion ............................................................. .......................... 49,516.15 514.80 ....... 2.700.00 ......... .. 52,730.95 .18 0
licalth .................................... ............... ......... ................. ............................... .. 2,321,587.70 82,861.49 ""0,'70.88 32,M4.59 ........... ........ 2,497,760.66 8.45
Police .................................... ....... .................................. 6,893,487.49 2,463.55* 11,154.40 .................... 1,084.00* 6,901,094.34 23.35 r"
Agricultural development ............. .. 949.036.96 20,151.98 13.083.22 17,128.40 148.95" 999,251.61 3.39
Education .......................................................................................................... 3,198,582.14 47,831.18 37,378.77 127.840.79 ................... 3,411,632.88 11.54
Religion ............................................................................................................. 317,984.52 1,229.14 100,000.00 38,736.00 .................. 457949.66 1.55 m
Transportation ................................................................................................ 181,916.44 341,895.18 48,450.41 .................... .................. 572,262.03 1.94 "
Communication .................................................................................................. 289,887.88 158.20 106.81* .................... ................... 289.939.27 .98
Municipal:
Streets ........................................................................................................... 55.587.89 131,460.56 12,564.50 .................... 172.50 799,785.44 2.71
Sew ers and drains ................................................................................ .................... .................... .................... .................... .................... .................... ...................
Water service ........................................ .. .. . .............. ..... 85,857.19 90,176.97 1,864.66 .................... .................... 177,898.76 .60
Public works ...................................................................................... 1,150,S23.49 48,918.59 77,653.31 .................... .................... 1,122,088.77 3.80
Non functional:
Public debt ..................................................................................................... ................... .................... ................... 3,523,063.75 .................... 3. ,063.75 11.9
Pensions ......................................................................................................... .................... ................... .................... 342,617.20 .................... 342,617.20 1.16
Printing office and stores ............................................................................ 28,229.21" 6,670.0* 3,827.82 .................... .................... 131,072.19" .44*
Communes, individuals and companies .................................................... 493,743.42* 67,195.25 31,793.75 18,537.91 47,518.42- 423,734.93* 1.46"
Public works contract 1938. ...................................................................... 4,79,729.56 .................... 2.297,110.68* ........ ........... ................... 2,502,618.88 8.47
Total expenditures ................................................................................. 26,195,589.79 895.763.87 1,940,268.431 74,451,843.29 48.578.87- 29.554,349.66 100.00
*Credits.




TABLE No. 38
CLASSIFICATION OF ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATION EXPENDITURES BY DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES-FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Salaries Supplies Communication Special and 0
and wages and materials Transportation service Rents miscellaneous Total
0
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Public debt .............................. .......................................................................... ................... ................... .................. ................ ............. ..... .................. ....................
International Institutions ............................................................................... .................... ................... .................... ........... ........ ................. ....................
Foreign Relations ............................................................................................ 504,025.25 21,222.84 97,287.73 18,015.33 15.00 150.00 640,716.15 t,
Finance .................................................... ......................................................1.... 18,653.06 18,183.65 5.523.05 3,131.50 677.46 5,695.74 219,864.46
Fiscal Department ............................................................................................ 801,376.38 54,727.53 24.976.59 520.10 903.55 1,473.85 882,170.90
Intc:nal Revenue Service ................ ............................ .......................... 777,240.42 102,131.81 108,964.29 103.15 1,314.00 17,923.17 1,007,676.84 T
Commerce .......................................................... ... . ......... 178,184.31 16,038.22 136,525.13 1.54.45 865.92 5,811.00 339,379.03
Interior ...................................... ........ ,708,226.16 60.399.18 80,379.00 11,480.80 886.95 21.653.93 1,873,0602
Public Health Service ...................... .................................................. L503,881.13 522,650.96 208,228.04 2,311.70 6,457.10 20,336.65 2,263.865.58
Guard ........................................................................................................... 5.395,537.26 1.078,041.73 402,128.90 1,155.10 4,844.00 12,309.80 6,&%:016.79 tr
Public Works ..................... ... 1.074,135.13 900,613.55 233,395.97 2,8M9.84- 17,062.97 12,765.69 2,235,163.47 X
Justice ..................................................................................... .......................... 1.227,262.76 16,681.17 4,184.00 ................... 30,429.37 2,750.00 1,2 1,307.30
Agricultural and Labor ......................... ............. 28,281.21 1,643.94 677.06 22.00 .................... 260.00 30,884.21
Agricultural Service ............................................................................................. 1.377,125.97 154,761.17 146,623.15 1,311.10 55,069.25 127,252.77 1,862.143.41 >
Public Instruction ................................................................................................... 1,926,306.17 129,721.62 34,02.24 83.00 106,319.96 12,522.73 2,208.976.72
Religion .................................................................................................................... 3 ,250.26 723.28 5,640.62 .................... .................... 247.50 314.861.66
Total expenditures from revenue ... .......... .16,996,485.47 3,067,540.65 1,488556.77 37,278.39 223,038.43 241,152.83 22,054.052.54
Non-fiscal expenditures ........... ....... 1,220,774.83 133,999.86 148,985.88" 217.61 14,680.40 1,878,879.16" 658,192.31"
Public Works Contract 1938 .................................................................. 1,364,938.17 3,239,247.59 218,571.22 1,120.13 ................. 24,147.55" 4.799,729.56
Total expenditures .......................................................................... 19,582,198.47 6.440,788.10 1.558.142.11 38,616.16 237,718.83 1,661,873.88n 26.195,589.79
Percentage ................................................................................... 74.75 24.58 5.95 .15 .91 6.34" 100.00
*Credits.
1.2




TABLE No. 39
CLASSIFICATION OF TOTAL EXPENDITURES BY DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES-FISCAL YEAR 1941-42
Administration and Repairs and Acquisition Fixed Trust fund .0
operation maintenance of property charges repayments Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes H
Public debt ...................................................................................*................................................ .................... .................... .................... 3,523,063.75 .................... 3,523.063.75
International Institutions ................................................................................................................. .................... ................... .................... 44,720.35 .................... 44,720.35 Z
Foreign Relations ........................................................................................................................... 640.716.15 867.50 61,801.69 2,400.00 .................... 705,785.34
Finance ...................................... .............................................. . ....................................... 219,864.46 4,540.15 35.956.24 644,175.50 .................... 904,536.35 l
Fiscal Department ........................................................................................................................... 682,170.90 10,020.10 7,018.69 .................... .................... 899, 209*69
Internal Revenue Service .. ............. ..... ... ....................... ..... ..... .............. ................................ 1.007.676.84 10,177.45 6.095.91 .................... .............. ..... 1,023.950.2D
Commerce ....................................................................................................................... ...... 339,379.03 273.70 106.81C 2,700.00 .................... 342,245.92
Interior .................................................................................................................................. 1,873.026.02 2,645.50 194.00 27,540.00 .................... 1,903,405.52 t"
Public Health Service .... ......... ................................ .................. ....... .... ..... ............................... 2,263,965.68 48,412.48 33,500.48 5,000.59 ................... 2.350,779.*13 >
Guard ........................................... .... .... ..................... ............... ......................... 6,894,016.79 2,463.55" 11,154.40 .................... .................... 6.902,707.64
Public Works ............................................................................................................................ 2,235,163.47 704.110.46 96,059.24 .................... .................. 3.035,3317 tO
Justice .............................................................. ....................... ................. .. ... ....... 1,281,307.30 ,184.95 2,615.00 .................... .................... 1,287,107.25 '
Agriculture and Labor .................................... ........... ................ ...................... 20,S84.21 3.00 90.00 3,568.00 .................... 34,541.21
Agricultural Service ......................................................................................................... 1,862,143.41 7,012.65 18,023.60 30,774.35 .................... 1,917.952.01
Public Instruction ................................................................................................................ 2,208.976.72 48,029,23 29,589.0 110,630.84 ............... 2,397226.41 .0
Religion ...................................................................................................................................... 314,561.66 .................... 100,000.00 38,736.00 .................... 453,597.66
Total expenditures from revenue .............. ... ... ..... ................. ... ............. ............................... 22,054,052.54 836,8183.62 401,990.06 4.433,305.38 .................... 27.726,161.60 0
Non-iscal expenditures .................................................................. ....... 658,192.31" 58,950.25 45,147.80" 18,537.91 48,578.87'* 674,430.82*
Public Works Contract 1938 ........................................I............................................................ 4,799,729.56 .................... 2,297,110.68" ........................... 2,502.618.88
Total expenditures ................................................................................................................... 26,195,589.79 895.763.97 1,940,268.42" 4,451.843.29 48,578.87" 29,554,319.66
Percentage ........................................................ .. .......................................................... 88.64 3.03 6.57" 15.06 .16" 100.00
*Credits.




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74 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 41
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES AND EXCESS OF REVENUES OR EXPENDITURES
FISCAL YEARS 1916-17 TO 1941-42
Year Revenues Expenditures Surplus Deficit
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
1916-17 .... ....... ...... 18,934,684.70 15,884,177.80 3,050,506.90 ..................
1917-18 ................................................................................. 16,048,390.75 14,614,997.45 1,433.393.30 ..................
1918-19 .......... .......... ............................. 29.955,933.45 15,499,480.45 14,456,453.00
1919-20 ................................................................................. 33,997,450.79 20,646,866.25 13350,584.54 ..................
1920-21 ................................................................................ 19.946,095.70 32,788,455.90 ................... 12,842,360.20
921-22 .............. ................... .................. . 24.94,795.72 39,775,908.40 ................... 14,811.112.68
1922-23 .................................................................................. 31,950,101.24 30,560,113.15 1,389,988.09 .................
1923-24 .......................... . . ....... 32,902,321.33 34,215,495.94 ................... 1.313,174.61
12A-25 .............................................................................. 40,487,667.00 39,218.202.02 1,269,464.98 ...................
1925-26 .................................................................................... 45,364,648.10 40,930,725.08 4,433,923.02 ..................
1926-27 .......... ........... 38,861,534.79 39,747,163.75 .................. 885.628.96
1327-28 ............................................ ................................. 0,421,016.49 40,977,914.49 9,443.102.00
1928-29 ............................................. ............................... 42,521 =528.40 44,119,503.94 ................... 1,597,975.54
1929-30 .............................................................................. 38,648,163.39 40,643,229.52 ......... 1.995,066.13
1930-31 ............................. ............ ...... 31,746.582.38 36,190,070.45 ................... 4,443,488.07
1931-32 ......... ............................. 28.023,742.10 32,888,112.00 .................. 4864,369.90
1932-33......................................................................... 37,305,298.67 33,258.808.08 4.046,490.59
1933-34 ..................... 36,752.165.28 36,02,275.73 ....... 50,110.46
1934-35 ................... .......................................................... 30,091,640.96 42,355,010.66 .................. 12.263,369.70
1935-36 ..................... ....... 34,598,364.33 36,631,574.03 .................. 2,033,209.70
1936-37 .................................................................8............ S4,448,671.19 35,033,437.11 .................... 584,765.92
1937-38 ............................................................................... 28,109,488.87 28,940,782.51 ................... 831,293.64
1938-39 ................................................................................ 31.145,584.29 29,584,799.38 1,560.784.91
1939-40 ................................................................................ 26,873,410.55 28,478,637.37 ................... 1,605,226.82
1940-41 ........... . ..... .... 26.929,882.83 25,565,824.25 1,364,058.58 .............
1941-42 ................................................................................ 25,599,255.80 27,726,161.60 ................ 2,126,906.80
Total .......................................................................... 836628,419.10 843.077,727.31 55,798,749.91 62.248,058.12
Deficit for period............................................................ ................... ................. ................. 6,449,308.21
TABLE No. 42
TREASURY ASSETS AND LIABILITIES
September 30, September 30, September 30,
1940 1941 1942
ASSETS
Deposit in Banque Nationale de Ia Ripublique d'Haiti Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
In New York funds ................... 539,58.10 315,568.50 296,416.75
In Haiti .......................................................................... ........................... 2.185,866.81 4,26.327.72 2,729,686.14
Cash in hands of disbursing officers ....................................................... 96,224.91 73,093.37 93,489.32
Fiduciary currency in vault .................................................................... 3.532,433.78 3,198,197.57 2,932,830.25
Advances by the Government-reimbursable ........... 651,202.36 622,767.37 624.239.56
Receipts not deposited ..................................................................................... 550.03 241.12 674.45
Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Halti shares 5.000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00
Public Works Contract-Reserve for outstanding checks ............. 252,759.31 119,639.49 28,804.55
Reserve for outstanding restitution checks .................... . .. 4,074.65 8,129.71
Reserve for checks issued, unpaid and not regularized-Purchasing
agency account .......................................................................................... ................... 7,655.80 ....................
D eficit ............................................................................................................ ................... ............. 121.039.37
Total ....................................... ............................ 12.456,M25.30 13,567,565.59 U.834.310.10
LIABILITIES
Extraordinary credits ... ....... ..... 14,523.06 58,114.35 10.496.58
Non revenue credits ......... ........ ...................... ................. 1.552.776.02 1.187,409.53 1,789.120.8
Fiscal Representative five per cent fund for customs service ................... 105,802.07 169.409.84 ..............
Internal Revenue Inspection Service five per cent fund ....... ...... 23392.29 ............
Bank's Service ......... ......... .............. ......... 247,540.46 ................... .................
Checks outstanding .............................. 653,588.90 894,742.78 751,020.02
Fiduciary currency fund ............... ............................. 3,622,500.00 3,622.500.00 3.622.500.00
Advances by the Governmen-rimbursable........................ 651,202.36 622,767.37 624,239.56
Banque Nationale de la Ripublique d'Haiti shares ........................... 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 5,000.00.00
Public Works Contract-outstanding checks ............ ........................ 252,759.31 119,639.49 2S.808.55
Checks issued, unpaid and not regularized-Purchasing agency account .............. 7,655.80 ...........
Outstanding restitution checks ... .................. 4.074.65 8.129.71
Surplus .............................. ............................................... 355,933.12 1,857,859.49 ...................
Total .................... 12456625.30 1-,567,565.59 11,834,310.19




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 75
TABLE No. 43
PUBLIC DEBT
Fiduciary Public Works
Series A Series B Series C currency Contract 1938 Total
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gotrdes Gourdes Gourdes
September 30, 1915 ..107,821,656.45 37,185.657.60 8.853,754.80 153.861.068.85
September 30, 1916 .. 113.455,856.35 38,974,237.85 8,352,W.15 160.782,757.35
September 30, 1917 .. 119,089.179.15 42,093.154.00 7.786,974.80 168,969,307.95
September 30, 1918 124,722.501.95 45,014,560.65 .............. 7,510,837.75 ... .. 177,247,900.35
September 30, 1919 90,556.662.00 48,774,145.85 ................. 7,245,000.00. ............ 146,575,707.85
September 30, 1920 33.487,414.30 51.078,637.35 ........ 7.245,000.00 ................. 91,811,051.65
September 30, 1921 32,225,464.30 53,090,692.40 ................. 6,080,3=.50 ............... 91,396,509.20
September 30, 1922, 33,505,429.95 52,945,770.25 .................. 6,080,362................ 92.531,562.70
September 30, 1923 79,235,000.00 25,000,000.00 ................ 6,080.36250 .. .... 110,315,36.50
September 30, 1924... 78,242.500.00 23,566980.60 13,158,711.10 6,080.309.60 ................. 121.048.501.20
September 30. 1925 75,183,419.30 21,747,462.30 12,640,072.70 5,660,309.50 115,231,263.80
September 30, 1926, 71.474,157.35 19,775,074.65 11,825,524.80 5,232.322.50 ........ 108,307.079.30
September 30, 1927.. 68,939,916.15 14,552,976.44 11.401,640.00 4,812.322.50 ............. 99,706,835.09
September 30, 1928 ....6. 6,039.039.40 13,106,431.55 10,901.321.60 4,392.322.50 94.438,115.05
September 30, 1929 62.751,128.35 11,603,630.80 10,352,636.85 3,970,000.00 ................... 88,677.396.00
September 30, 1930 59,190,194.70 10,001,593.30 9,749,761.35 3,764.100.00 ................ 82.706,649.35
September 30, 1931 56,712,940.95 8,697,405.33 9,32,729.82 3,622,500.00 ................. 78,357,576.10
September 30, 1932 53,221,413.85 7,103,321.31 8,678,635.80 3,622,5W.00 ................... 72,625,870.96
September 30, 1933 49. 0.677.60 5,655,492.39 8,022,742.85 3,622,600.00 ............ 66,901,412.84
September 30, 1934 5 ,731,829.55 4,049,744.94 7,426,361.3D 3,622,500.0 .... ....... ...... 60,830,435.79
September 30, 1935.., 42,207,694.65 2,235,319.85 6,865,085.45 3,62,500.09 ............ 54,930,699.85
September 30, 1936 28,663,841.80 537,109.90 6.269,2G4.10 3,622,500.00 .................. 49,092,715.80
September 30, 1937 35.036.040.70 5,658,755.25 8,622.500.00 ................... 44,317,2956.95
September 30, 1938..,, 34.459,585.75 .................. 6,550,890.85 3.622,500.00 317,117.69 43,950,094.29
September 3. 1939 34,345.903.85 ................. 5,530,810.85 3,622.500.00 8,638,278.29 52,137,491.99
September 30, 1940 34,22,537.40 5,512,848.95 3.622.600.00 17,493,663.98 60,871.550.33
September 30. 194L.... 34,218,728.20 ................. 5,507,459.10 3,622,500.00 24,747.362.42 68,096.049.72
September 30. 1942,, 34,107,015,70 ... 5.488,715.55 3,62250.00 27.249,981.35 70,468.212.60
TABLE No. 44
EXPENDITURES FROM REVENUE FOR THE PUBLIC DEBT AND RELATION OF SUCH
EXPENDITURES TO REVENUE RECEIPTS-FISCAL YEARS i940-41 AND 2941-42
Expenses Interest Amortization Tota.
Fiscal year L940-41 Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Series A ................... ...................................... -. ...... 11,757.91 2.053,350.00 1,300.00 2,066.407.91
Series C ....... ............ ...................... .................. 1,660.19 330,465.40 249.85 332,375.44
Public Works Contract .......... .........3..... ......................... 16,285.95 794,983.64 ................. 811,269.59
Total expenditures ........................................................ 29,704.05 3,178,799.04 1,549.85 3,210,052.94
Revenue receipts .. ................................. .:................... .............. ... .................... .................... 26,929,882-.83
Ratio of public debt expenditures to revenue receipts.. .11 11.80 .01 11.92
Fiscal year 1941-42
Series A ............. ....................................... ..... 18.402.30 2,051,250.00 86,000.00 2,155,652.30
Series C ............................. .................... .......................... 2.803.70 330,140.65 14,000.00 346,944.35
Public Works Contract ........................................... 7.791.05 1,012,676.05 .................. 1,020.467.10
Total expenditures......................... ..... 2,997.05 3.394,066.70 100,000.00 3,52.,0 3.75
R ti ofu b revenue receipts--. -.. 2 3 1,599,5.8
Ratio of public debt expenditures to revenue receipts.. .11 13.26 .39 13.73




76 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 45
PROFIT AND LOSS STATEMENT-BUREAU OF SUPPLIES FISCAL YEAR 1940-41
Gourdes Gourdes
G ross Sales ...................................................................................................... .......................... 258,480.47
Inventory September 30. 1940 ............................................................................................. 172,005.13
Purchases ............................................................................................................................... 235,677.66
T otal ......................................................................................................................... 407.GS2.79
Inventory September 30, 1941 ............................................................................................... 170,643.74
Cost of merchandises sold ................ .................................... ............................ 237,039.05
G ross Profit ............................................................................................................ 21.441.42
Operating expenses ............................................................................................. 17,920.66
N et profit ............................................ .................................................................. 3,520.76
FISCAL YEAR 1941.42
Gourdes Gourdes
G ross Sales ................................................................................................................................. 286,238.6S
Inventory September 30, 1941 ......................................................................................... 170,643.74
Purchases ...................... ......................................................................................................... 246,417.18
T otal .................................................................... ......................................... 417,00 .92
Inventory September 30. 142 ........................... ....................................... 160.0,58.68
Cost of merchandises sold ................................. ......................"............................ 257,002.34
Gross Profit .... ....... .................................. 29,236.34
Operating expenses ................................. .................................... 21,692.78
Net Profit ......... ............... .................. ................... 7.643.56
TABLE No. 46
BALANCE SHEET-BUREAU OF SUPPLIES
September 30, September 30.
1941 1942
Assets Gourdes Gourdes
Cash .......................... .. 1.320.49 15.988.48
Petty Cash Fund ................................ ........................... 2%.00 200.00
Accounts Recevablec ib.... ._..........e......... ...32,496.17 20,309.55
Inventory ..................................... ..................................................... 170,643.74 10D,058.,8
Equipment ............ .................................................................................................... 3,258.70 3,258.70
Total............................................................ 207,919.10 199,815.31
Liabilities
Accounts payable .................... .............. ................ .17,215.75 1,568.40
r................................. . .......... 190,703.35 198,24.91
Total ............ .................. ....................................................... 207,919.10 199,815.31




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 77
TABLE No. 47
NOTES OF THE BANQUE NATIONALE IN CIRCULATION BY MONTHS FISCAL YEARS 1919-20 TO 1941-42
Average Average Average
1919-20- 1934-5- 1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 1919-201933-34 1938-39 1941-42
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October ....................... 8,996.693 7,099.501 7,912,179 8,033,125 11,103,801 8.586,827
November ..................... ... 19.000,832 7,236,851 7,670,145 8,218,821 11,310,344 9,278,089
December 10.650,447 7.359,549 7.989,883 8,213,143 13,170,247 9,822.940
January ... ............ 10,545,419 7,473,073 7,722,884 7,761,191 13.258,628 9,751,710
February ........... 11,695.538 8,340,895 8,446,567 8,493,083 14,389,976 10,802,920
March ................................................................... 11.964,854 8,672,822 8,840,718 8.536.355 15,300,475 11,109.325
April .................................................................... 11.103,329 8.520,822 9,059,238 8,892,276 15,542,586 10,549,919
May ..................................................................... 10,373,771 8.419,247 8,732.927 9,304,494 15,817,895 10,067,744
June ...................................................................... 9,528,724 7,905,159 8,750,379 9.917,330 15,707,824 9,426,182
July ........................ 8,717,909 7,448,744 8.306,952 10,029,800 15,792,560 8,788,768
August ......................................... 8,138,653 7,079.620 8,215,2M 10,193,885 15,752,674 8,331,731
September .............. ......... 8,329,123 7,056,509 7,928.232 10.502,980 15,668,790 8,448,669
Average ............... ............. 10,003,608 7.717,730 8,297,948 9,007,2D7 14,401,316 9,580,402
TABLE No. 48
LOANS AND DEPOSITS OF BANKS IN HAITI BY MONTHS FISCAL YEAR 1941-1042
Loans and Total loans
discounts and Individual Government Total
in Haiti discounts deposits deposits deposits
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
October 31, 1941 ..................................... 4,740,371.29 4,888,515.24 13,104.313.69 7.433,771.21 20.538,084.90
November 30, 1941 ................................ 4,657,369.58 4,867,S61.63 14,159.405.61 8,007,744.14 22,167,149.75
December 31, 1941 .................................... 5,804,126.88 6,130,851.88 14,744,725.08 8,281.962.12 23,026,687.20
January 31, 1942 .................................. 6,218,599.45 6,602,33105 14,759,199.29 8,293.846.54 23,053.046.13
February 28. 1942 ...................... 6,35.974.41 6,666,927.41 14,660,127.63 7,784,544.07 22,444.671.70
March 31, 1942 ........ 8,311.311.68 8,531,278.58 15,373,658.67 7,901.367.34 23.275.026.01
April 30, 1942 ..................................... 8,141,395.49 8,141,95.49 15,494,879.40 8,130,835.90 23.625.715.30
May 31. 1942 .. .. 9,2,256.31 8,305,979.96 15.577,658.88 7,241,747.13 22,819.406.01
June 30. 1942 ................................. 7,136,402.72 7,136,402.72 16,021,013.33 7,120,790.41 23,141,803.74
July 31. 1942. .................. 7,349.265.84 8,285,621.89 16,194,887.75 5.845,002.82 22,39.890.57
August 31, 1942 .................................... 8,593,647.68 10,142677.18 16,114.301.41 5,421,981.80 21,538,283.21
September 30, 1942 ........................... 8.849,507.79 11.074.211.94 17,059,055.56 5,483,382.91 22,542,438.47
Average ............................................. 7,038,435.76 7,.554.508 15,271,935.52 7.245.581.39 22,517,516.91




78 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
TABLE No. 49
INTERNAL REVENUE RECEIPTS BY SOURCES-FISCAL YEARS 19M9-40 TO 1941-42
193-40 1940-41 1941-42
Excise; Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Alcohol from cane juice .......................................................................... 318,087.09 305,826.42 317,783.45
Malt liquors ............................................................................. . ........ 1.42 .............
Spirituous liq us ............................................ 3,023.19 2,675.00 2,571.30
Vinous liquors .......................................................................................... 2.16 19.242.34 21,760.37
Cigars ................................................ . ................................ 4,633.P9 4,106.13 5,498.08
Cigarettes ....................................................................................... 512.835.65 455,560.56 590,534.48
Gasoline .............................................................................................. 2.0 3000 21,250.00 16,250.00
Lard substitutes .................................................................................... 102,655.75 65.026.80 40,707.55
Manufactured tobacco ....................... ......... .. 23.639.43 17,618.12 17.300.54
M atches ..................................................... ............................................. 26.87 300.77 ...................
Salt ....................................... ................................................................ 70,879.35 38.288.98 28.72
Soap ......................... .......................... 2G,103.86 26,312.35 36,898.05
Vegetable o ..................................... 233,998.46 225,015.58 191,970.39
Total ........ ..... ....................... 1.298.535.73 1,181,224.47 1,242,302.90
Automobile registration tax ......................................... 137,420.86 138,211.58 136,849.51
Consular fees ............ .............. ................ 71,904.00 68,559.00 53,305.15
Court fees ..................................................................... ........................... 6.447.50 6,358.00 6.526.75
Documentary recording fees .................................. 488.358.65 351,007.85 361,038.84
Drivers' licenses ......... ...,................... .... .. 74,102.75 77,065.50 78,027.85
Fines and penalties ................................................. 10,225.02 4,944.30 13,051.58
Foreign residents' permits ................................ 30,521.50 29,990.00 30,948.40
Identity cards ........ ........... ............................ 321,818.19 260,591.02 344,317.30
Income tax ................. ... ...................................... 468,929.50 471,639.29 637,123.08
Irrigation tax ................................................. 84,227.36 71,480.92 86,922.19
Naturalization ............................ .. ............ ... ... 6,100.00 1,200.00
Occupational tax on foreigners___............................................ 231,710.35 209,515.04 206,771.32
Official gazette ........................... 2,437.30 2.165.00 2,174.0y)
Patent and trade mark fees .................... 8,970.00 1,0650.00 8,130.70
Post office box rentals .................................... 8,837.68 9,252.94 9,353.99
Publication fees ............................. ................................................. 3,820.50 2,830.00 4.020.00
Public auction fees ............................................... 1,009.58 729.40 657.59
Public land e ...........t..a.............. 339,511.27 325,107.39 160,948.07
Radio tax ............... .... 20,327.15 25,520.75 25,305.50
Stamp receipts:
Commercial account books o. ...... .............................. 3,708.90 3,739.90 4.509.W0
Documentary stamps .... .............................. 402,159.79 396,590.74 503,760.55
Postage stamps................ ...................... 242,433.41 250,361.91 246,830.21
Stamped paper ......... ......................................................... 389.00 79,551.30 33,110.69
Stock and bond tax ...................... ... .. .. .......................................... 34,644.34 36,929.30 36,757.34
Telegraph and telephone ser v. c ...................... 424,478.17 421,525,88 431,982.7'
Visas of manifests ........................................ 6,565.00 5,607.60 3,300.21Vital statistics fees ...................... . .................................... 130,074.35 122,516.40 147,279 C "
Water service rents ................................................................................. 29)0625.75 296,071.00 319,463.95
Miscellaneous ........................................... ..................................... 16,757.35 9,189.55 1,446.81
Total ............................. 5.25,953.95 4,878,926.03 5,337,416.04
TABLE No. 50
INTERNAL REVENUE RECEIPTS! BY COLLECTION DISTRICTS FISCAL YEARS 1939.40 TO 1941-42
Districts 1939-40 1940-41 1941-42
Gourdes Gourdes Gourdes
Cap Haltien ....................................................................................................... 311,690.62 33S,310.23 372,647.51
Cayes ............................................................................................................ 237,685.40 2D9,804.52 2.50,556.11
Fort Liberti ........................................................................................................ 12S.290, 61 175,730.30 306,960 .')
Conalves ........................................................................................................... 177.452.22 161,114.57 146,859.1
Jacmel .............................................. ......................................................... 170,511.81 146,721.60 192,812.
Jirimie ... ....... ...... ......... ......... ..... ... .. ... ........ ... ....... ......................... ............. 153,278.57 141.461.78 179,133.33
Miragoine .................... ................................ 84,84.96 70,915.23 86,168.7'
Petit Golve .............................. .. 89,836.39 68,492.44 76,695.12
Port-au-Prince ........................................................................................ 3,430,346.89 3,13392.03 3,4Z3,"'
Port-de-Paix ................. ...... 90,108.22 84,729.11 94,291.91
Saint Marc .................................. ....... ................................ 371,708.26 328.25 22 247,710.82
Total ..... ........ ............ 524593 95 4,878,926.0 5,337.416.04




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SCHEDULES,







REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 83
SCHEDULE No. I
QUANTITY AND VALUE OF IMPORTS INTO HAITI BY COUNTRIES OF ORIGIN
OCTOBER 1941-SEPTEMBER 3.942
AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY, TOOLS AND IMPLEMENTS: Gourdes
C anada ....................................... 3,395
Dominican Republic .............................. 1,337
United Kingdom ................................ 75,127
U nited States ................................... 480,509
560,368
ANIMALS, LIVE: Kilos
Dominican Republic ..................... 111,116 54,699
U nited States ......................... 49 774
111,165 55,473
BOOKS AND OTHER PRINTED MATTER:
A rgentina ..................................... 88
Baham a Islands ........................ I ........ 3
Canada ........................................ 23,588
C olom bia ...................................... 71
C uba .......................................... 2,244
Dominican Republic .............................. 159
France ........................................ 5,704
Jam aica ....................................... 3
M exico ....................................... 14
P alestine ............................ *'***'*'** I
Puerto R ico ..................................... 61
Sw itzerland .................................... 613
United Kingdom ................................. 1,978
U nited States ................................... 63,803
98,336
CARS, CARRIAGES AND OTHER VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES:
Automobiles- Number
Dominican Republic .................... 1 2,40
United States .......................... 75 393,443
76 395,893
Trucks United States ......................... 40 222,537
All other- Bahama Islands ................................. 135
C uba ........................................ 453
U nited Kingdom ............................... 4,125
U nited States ................................... 218,831
223.544
CEMENT: Kilos
Cuba 187,951 41,938
United States ......................... 3,994,914 462,655
4,182,865 5o4,50




84 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
CHEMICAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL SUBSTANCES AND PRODUCTS:
Crude substances and products- Kilos Gourdes
A rabia .............................. 2 13
C anada ............................. ........ 3
C uba ............................... 56 70
Dominican Republic .................... 3,077 371
F rance .. ... .... .. .... .. ... ... ... .. .. .. .. 5
M ex ico .............................. 1 6
Persia .............................. 89 589
United Kingdom ...................... 2 48
United States ......................... 77,718 39,109
80,945 40,214
Chemical and pharmaceutical products
Calcium carbide
United States ......................... 15,054 15,629
Patent medicinesBabam a Islands ...................... ........ 3
Canada ............................. 148 2,064
Canal Z one ............................ 1 26
China .............................. 9 34
Colom bia ............................ 3 129
C uba .... .. .. .. .. .. ... .. ... .. .. .. .... .. 8
Dominican Republic .................... 5 44
France .............................. 2 162
Puerto R ico .......................... ........ 16
Switzerland .......................... 93 1,708
United Kingdom ...................... 59 1,519
United States .......................... 5,629 44,066
5,949 49,779
All otherA rgentina ..................................... 5,724
Babam a Islands ................................. 6
B razil ........................................ 1,060
British A frica .................................. 95
British India ................................... 487
B ulgary ....................................... 4
Canada ....................................... 44,153
C hile ... .. .. .... .. .. ... .. .. .... ... .... .. ... .. 13 1
C hina ........................................ 7
Colom bia ..................................... 287
C uba ......................................... 10,193
Dominican Republic ............................... 398
Dutch East Indies ................................ 13,950
E gypt ........................................ 128
F rance ........................................ 7,84 1
H ong Kong .................................... 9
Italy ......................................... 646
Jam aica ....................................... I
Japan ............................. 1,223
M exico ....................................... 5,574
P ersia ........................................ 30
Peru ......................................... 547
Portugal ...................................... 60
Puerto Rico .................................... 19
R ussia ........................................ 92
Salvador ...................................... 39
Spain ........................................ 2,305
Sw itzerland .................................... 33,175
United Kingdom ............ ................... 6,836
U nited States ................................... 639,019
V enezuela ..................................... 91
774,130




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 85
CHEMICAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL SUBSTANCES AND PRODUCTS: (C)
Chemical and pharmaceutical products- (continued)
Oils, fats, waxes and their derivatives- Gourdes
Argentina...................................... ..... 44
Australia.......................................... 30,783
Bahama Islands..................................... 1,721
British Malaya...................................... 10,132
Canada.............................................. 1I
Ceylon............................................ 31,370
Dominican Republic................................... 251
United States...................................... 233,157
307,459
All otherBritish Africa....................................... 719
Canada............................................. 16
Chile.............................................. 124
United States........................................ 18,721
19,580
CLOCKS AND WATCHES:
Canada.............................................. 44
Colombia............................................ 5
Cuba............................................... 43
Curaqao............................................. 49
Puerto Rico.......................................... 3
Switzerland............................... ......... 15,276
United States....................................... 15,352
30,772
COAL, COKE, BRIQUETTES AND OTHER FUEL:
Coal- Kilos
Cuba................................... 6.195 1,225
United States............................. 5,965 857
12,160 2,082
COPPER AND ALLOYS AND MANUFACTURES OF:
Canada............................................. 480
Canal Zone.......................................... 6
China...........................................5
Cuba............................................... 38
Dominican Republic.................................. 1,048
France............................................. 141
Jamaica.............................................. 13
Japan.............................................. 25
Mexico..........................562
United Kingdom.......................184,
United States...................................... 250,517
253,019
CORK AND MANUFACTURES OF:
Spain.................................... 17 486
United States............................ 567 4,819
584 5,305
COTTON AND MANUFACTURES OF:
UnmanufacturedDominican Republic........................ 3,575 682,
United States............................. 6,762 9,425
10,337 10,107




86 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
COTTON AND MANUFACTURES OF: (Continued)
Blankets and blanket cloth- Kilos Goardes
M exico ............................. 97 411
United Kingdom ...................... 44 439
United States ......................... 3,784 27,710
3,925 28,560
Cloths, plain wovenBleached or unbleachedBahama Islands ........................ 1 4
China .............................. 14,999 36,867
M exico .............................. 187,628 964.959
United Kingdom ...................... 12,914 37,718
United States ......................... 273,544 1,411,018
489,086 2,450,566
Dyed or printedBaham a Islands ....................... ........ 4
Canada ............................. 250 2,450
Japan .............................. 1,272 4,585
M exico ............................. 352,045 2,531,817
United Kingdom ...................... 24,126 187,342
United States .......................... 1,005.132 6,940,636
1,382,825 9,666,834
EmbroideredU nited States ......................... 2 16
Cloths, twilled or figured in the loomBleached or unbleachedM exico ............................. 8,239 56,940
United Kingdom ...................... 225 2.034
United States ........................... 69,009 430,105
77,473 489,079
Dyed or printedCanada ............................. 99 1,337
Dominican Republic .................... 1 5
Jam aica ............................. ........ 3
Japan .............................. 239 1,042
M exico ............................. 75,615 567,507
United Kingdom ...................... 18,128 128,779
United States ......................... 452,200 2,195,326
546,282 2,893,999
EmbroideredUnited Kingdom ...................... 17 370
Belts and hosieryA ustralia ............................ ........ 3
Canada ............................. 1 17
C anal Z one .......................... ....... 1
C uba ............................... i 133
Italy ................................ 106 3,493
Jam aica ............................. ........ 6
M exico .............................. 43 1,345
Puerto R ico .......................... ... *6''' 3
United States ......................... 1 434 175,634
10,589 180,635




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES, 87
COTTON AND MANUFACTURES OF: (Continued)
Clothing (except knit goods)- Goardes
Bahama Islands....................................... 62
Canada............................................. 63
Canal Zone ............................ 12
China ............................................. 4
Cuba.............................................. 268
Cura~ao............................................. 8
Dominican Republic................................... 196
Jamaica.............................................. 26
Japan.............................................. 11
Mexico............................................ 3,797
Puerto Rico......................................... 261
United States...................................... 70,427
75,135
Duck- Kilos
United States............................ 5,773 26,412
Velvety fabricsUnited States.............................. 21 66
Knit goodsBahama Islands............................ 21 1,47
Canada................................... 1 4
China............................................*'* '*1
Cura~ao......................................... 4
Japani.................................. 356 1,955
Mexico................................. 3,203 36,835
Puerto Rico ................. ........ ................6
United States.............................12,62 173,419
16,143 212,371
Piu- United States.............................. 487 6,540
Yarns and manufactures ofBahama Islands.............................. ........ 5
Cuba..................................... 55 850
Dominican Republic......................... 17 646
Mexico.................................. 761 16,578
United Kingdom......................... 28,867 306,928
United States............................ 16,855 167,710
46,555 492,717
All other- B h m sad . . . .. . . . .3
Bahama sln.......................................... 356
Canada................................... .......... 4
Caina Zoe........................................... 46
Colombia........................................... 22
Cuba.............................................. 144
Cura~ao............................................. 7
Dominican Republic................................... 133
Jamaica.............................................. 18
Japan.............................................. 37
Mexico............................................ 2,689
Puerto Rico......................................... 134
*Switzerland......................................... 488
United Kingdom.................................... 88,282
United States...................................... 346,428
438,527




88 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
EARTHENWARE, PORCELAIN, CLAY, AND POTTERY: Kilos Gourdes
Bahama Islands ....................... 60 60
C anada ............................. ... 3
Cuba ............................... 2*6'46 1' 3,013
Japan .............................. 202 112
New-Zealand ........................ 1 8
United Kingdom ...................... 10,509 10,652
United States ......................... 37,524 50,649
68,727 64,497
EXPLOSIVES:
CartridgesUnited States .......................... 3,251 27,685
FEATHERS, INTESTINES AND MANUFACTURES OF:
Puerto R ico .................................... 15
U nited Kingdom ................................ 197
U nited States ................................... 11,331
11,543
FERTILIZERS:
F rance .............................. .. ..... 5
United States ......................... 217,698 112,479
217,698 112,484
FIBERS, VEGETABLE, OTHER THAN COTTON AND MANUFACTURES OF:
Jute bagsBritish India ......................... 275,161 280,223
United States .......................... 385,794 589,616
660,955 869,839
Yarns, threads, twines, ropes, and cords
Dominican Republic .................... 6 86
Philippines .......................... 1,036 1,199
United States .......................... 11,268 34,152
12,310 35,437
All otherA ustralia ...................................... I
Belgium ...................................... 1,897
C anada ....................................... 6 1
Canal Z one .................................... 3
C hina ........................................ 16
Dominican Republic .............................. 6
Salvador ...................................... 10
United Kingdom ................................ 29,454
U nited States ................................... 28,461
59,909
FOODSTUFFS:
MeatsBeef, mutton, and pork, freshDominican Republic .................... 93 88
United States ......................... 713 2,176
806 2,264
Lard
Dominican Republic .................... 35 95
United States ......................... 242,595 408,246
242,630 408,341




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTWNT-APPENDICES 89
FOODSTUFFS: (Continued)
Lard substitutes Kilos Gourdes
U nited States .......................... 609 1,482
PickledArgentina ........................... 14,835 13,442
United States ......................... 32,686 32,665
47,521 46,107
Salted or smokedDominican Republic .................... 9 52
Hong Kong .......................... 3 9
United States ......................... 644 2,327
656 2,388
SausageDominican Republic .................... 114 300
Hong Kong ............. : ............ 3 15
U nited States ................. ....... 214 843
331 1,158
Tongues, heads, tails, feetUnited States ......................... 5,501 2,765
Fish
Pickled or smokedCanada ............................. 74,531 57.353
Dominican Republic .................. 5 3
United States ......................... 346,689 223,873
421,225 281.229
Salted or driedBahama Islands ........................ 204,126 36,929
Canada .............................. 54,481 72,154
Dominican Republic .................... 5 10
United States .......................... 43,318 73,553
301,930 182,646
Fresh or refrigeratedUnited States ......................... 800 732
Grains, fruits, vegetables, and preparations ofBeans, peas, and pulse, driedDominican Republic .................... 1,209 658
Hong Kong .......................... 2 5
Mexico .... 61 78
United States ........................... 3,399 4,246
4,671 4,987
Bread, biscuit, and crackersCanada ............................. 1 5
Jam aica ............................. ........ 2
United Kingdom ...................... 17 24
United States ......................... 51,233 127,782
51,251 127,813
Flour, wheatBahama Islands ........................ 18 3
Canada ............................. 53,844 15,394
Dominican Republic .................... 59 51
United States ......................... 6,784,570 2,097,784
6,838,491 2,113,232




90 BANQUE NATIONALE DR LA REPUBLIQUE D'HAITI
FOODSTUFFS: (Continued)
Grains, fruits, vegetables, and preparations of- (continued)
Onions and garlic- Kilos Gourdes
Argentina ........................... 6,640 12,544
Chile ............................... 7,465 12,077
E cuador ............................ ... *''*' 5
M exico ............................. 11,989 17,073
United States ......................... 31,010 28,629
57,104 70,328
Potatoes, and other tubers, freshDominican Republic .................... 31,695 9,773
United States ......................... 74,281 24,163
105,976 33,936
Rice
Dominican Republic .................... 20 13
United States ......................... 11,467 6,259
11,487 6,272
Sugar, refinedPuerto Rico .......................... 1 7
United States ......................... 5,409 4,251
5,410 4,258
Vermicelli, macaroni, and pastes
C anada ............ .......... ....... ........ I
Dominican Republic .................... 2 3
United States ......................... 30,501 29,895
30,503 28,899
All otherArgentina ........................... 650 850
British India ......................... 45 58
Canada ......................... I .... 31,929 11,121
C uba ..... .......................... .... ... I
Dominican Republic .................... 1,312 293
Jam aica ............................. ........ 5
Hong Kong .......................... 4 7
M exico ............................. 70 92
Puerto Rico .......................... 3 13
157,827 165,976
191,840 178,416
Liquors and Beverages
Malt liquors- Liters
Dominican Republic .................... 23,436 26,073
United Kingdom ...................... 5,971 13,726
United States ......................... 113,903 119,516
143,310 159,315
Spirits, distilledCanada ............................. 176 1,071
Dominican Republic .................... 3 26
United Kingdom ...................... 1,963 15,145
United States ......................... 1,624 8,113
V irgin Islands ........................ 1 16
3,767 24,371




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 91
FOODSTUFFS: (Continued)
Wines- Liters Gourdes
A rgentina ............................ 720 1,720
Chile ............................... 3,346 4,687
France .............................. 1,080 6,000
M exico ............................. 3 31
N etherlands .......................... 85 467
United States ......................... 52,565 64,620
57,799 77,525
All otherDominican Republic .................... 1 3
United States ......................... 24,451 26,061
24,452 26,064
Miscellaneous foodstuffsButter- Kilos
Argentina ........................... 8,982 26,574
Australia ............................ 1,814 6,048
B razil .... .... ... .. .. .. ... .. ... .. ... .. .. ... I
Cuba ............................... 41,564 129,496
Dominican Republic .................... 3,029 12,174
New Zealand .......................... 5,809 21,148
United States ......................... 1,956 7,338
63,154 202,779
Oleomargarine and butter substitutesDominican Republic .................... 2,075 5,526
United States ......................... 3,268 6,115
5,343 11,641
Oils for table useDominican Republic .................... 2,406 4,658
Italy ............................... 136 442
Mexico 43 77
United States .......................... 19,697 44,798
22,282 49,975
SpicesBritish Africa ........................ 6,730 17,429
British India ........................... 2,719 13,431
C anada ............................. ........ 3
Ceylon ............................. 14 53
China ............................... 2,436 8,823
Cyprus ............................. 9 44
Dutch East Indies ...................... 26,616 37,252
French Indo-China .................... 2,350 6,746
Hong Kong ... ....................... 6,241 26,410
M adagascar .......................... 668 1,420
M exico ............................. 9 14
N etherlands .......................... 14 187
Spain .............................. 1 275
Straits Settlements ..................... 3,002 3,581
Sw itzerland .......................... 5 461
17, United Kingdom ...................... 6,848 9,136
United States ... ..................... 11,295 25,381
68,957 150,646




92 BANQUE NATIONALE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'HA[TI
FOODSTUFFS: (Continued)
Miscellaneous foodstuffs- (continued)
Canned or preserved goodsFish- Kilos Gourdes
Canada.................................... 1 36
Dominican Republic......................... 4 10
Portugal................................. 525 2,726
United States............................. 18,935 31,548
19,465 34,320
FruitArgentina................................. 5 5
China.................................... 3 4
Cuba..................................... 8 19
Hong Kong................................ 4 6
United States............................ 19,027 27,481
19,047 27,515
MeatsArgentina............................... 11,811 27,209
Canada..........................*** ..........1 7
Dominican Republic ...... ...................2 6
United States............................ 22,352 87,585
34,166 114,807
VegetableArgentina................................. 37 77
China.................................... 7 10
Hong Kong................................ 2 4
United States............................. 9,833 13,872
9,879 13,963
CheeseArgentina................................. 1,375 5,746
Brazil................................. ........I
Canada................................ .... ...I
Cuba................................... 5,184 13,366
Dominican Republic....................... 2,056 6,877
United States............................ 24,106 89,797
32,721 115,788
ConfectioneryCanada................................... 8 59
Cuba................. ..... ......... ....-' '3 10
Dominican Republic......................... 10 37
Jamaica................................... 1 6
Mexico.................................. 178 408
United States............................ 37,048 106,272
37,248 106,792
Condensed, malted and fresh milkArgentina................................. 11 64
Jamaica................................... 1 13
Switzerland............................... 804 3,954
United States............................ 136,033 222,453
136,849 226,484
OlivesUnited States............................. 3,327 8,840




REPORT OF FISCAL DEPARTMENT-APPENDICES 93
FOODSTUFFS: (Continued)
Pickles and sauces- K .lo Gourdes
Argentina................................. M8 189
Cuba..................................... 1 7
United States............................ 14,710 22,274
14,839 22,470
All other foodstuffsArgentina........................................... 150
Canada............................................. 54
Canal Zone........................................ 3,200
Cuba............................................. 12,826
Curagao............................................. 1I
Dominican Republic.................................. 3,020
United States...................................... 108,490
127.,74 1
GLASS AND GLASSWARE:
Bahama Islands...................................... 170
Canada............................................ 1,632
Canal Zone.......................................... 8
China............................................... 5
Cuba.............................................. 109
Cura~ao.............................................. 2
Dominican Republic......................... ......... 125
Dutch. Guiana....................................... 10
France............................................. 118
Jamaica............................................ 630
Japan............................................... 7
Mexico.............................................. 4
Netherlands.......................................... 37
Puerto Rico.......................................... 1I
Switzerland.......................................... 11
United Kingdom...................................... 50
United States...................................... 363,415
366,334
GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM AND MANUFACTURES OF:
Cura~ao............................................ 14
Jamaica............................................. 89
United Kingdom..................................... 690
United States....................................... 11,904
12,697
HATS AND CAPS:
Bahama Islands....................................... 85
Canada.................................... ......... 16
Curagao............................................. 8
Dominican Republic................................... 119
Ecuador........................................... 1,336
Mexico............................................. 41
United Kingdom .......................................4.713
United States...................................... 125,655
131,973
HIDES AND SKINS AND MANUFACTURES OF:
Tanned hides and skins, curried, dyed or dressedDominican Republic......................... 9 25
United States............................. 5,097 100,134
5,106 100,159