Citation
Teacher's guide to creating a classroom museum in the Philippines

Material Information

Title:
Teacher's guide to creating a classroom museum in the Philippines
Creator:
Villafranca, Ethel D. ( Dissertant )
Willumson, Glenn ( Thesis advisor )
Tillander, Michelle ( Reviewer )
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2011
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Art exhibitions ( jstor )
Art museums ( jstor )
Childrens museums ( jstor )
Classrooms ( jstor )
Constructivism ( jstor )
Learning ( jstor )
Museum exhibitions ( jstor )
Museums ( jstor )
Schools ( jstor )
Students ( jstor )
Art exhibitions ( JSTOR )
Art museums ( JSTOR )
Childrens museums ( JSTOR )
Classrooms ( JSTOR )
Constructivism ( JSTOR )
Learning ( JSTOR )
Museum exhibitions ( JSTOR )
Museum of Fine Arts (Saint Petersburg, Fla.) ( FLORIDIANS )
Museum of Science and History (Jacksonville, Fla.) ( FLORIDIANS )
Museums ( JSTOR )
Orlando (Florida) ( GEO )
Schools ( JSTOR )
Students ( JSTOR )
Tate High School (Pensacola, Fla.) ( FLORIDIANS )
Washington County (Florida) ( GEO )

Notes

Abstract:
Museums offer many great opportunities for learning regardless of visitor's age, interests, or background. Museums make ideas more accessible, help facilitate intellectual connections, arouse visitors' curiosity and interests, encourage self-confidence, and motivate visitors to pursue future learning. The museum experience results in a more holistic learning because it impacts all three learning domains: cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. Numerous studies show that school field trips to museums have long-term positive impact on students and are salient experiences especially to elementary school children. One study in the United States found that nearly 100% of participating students can still recall one or more content-related detail from a trip that happened several years ago. Another study in the United Kingdom found that both teachers and children viewed their museum visit in an extremely positive way and students benefited academically by gaining new knowledge, skills, and inspiration as a result of their visit. If visiting museums is highly beneficial to school children, then it is logical that all students go to museums. Unfortunately, in the Philippines, both financial and geographic obstacles make it difficult for school children to visit museums. Major museums are concentrated in the National Capital Region and not all provinces have a local museum. Since the Philippines is an archipelago, traveling to a museum is a time-consuming and expensive endeavor, especially for schools in remote provinces. Museums in the Philippines also do not have enough outreach programs and teacher resource materials to provide even a limited kind of museum experience to millions of students who lack physical access to museums. To help with this problem, I developed a Teacher's Guide to Creating a Classroom Museum in the Philippines. If school children cannot go to museums, and museums do not have the means to reach them, then schools should create classroom museums to give students a museum experience. Aside from the benefits of having access to a museum, students' participation in creating the classroom museum is both academically and personally enriching. Using principles of the Constructivist Theory of Learning, I designed learning modules that will equip students with analytical tools, content mastery, critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication and collaboration skills. By participating in the creation of a classroom museum, students learn important skills they can apply inside and outside the classroom and also engender a positive attitude toward museums. These students, who will fondly remember their classroom museum experience, could become future museum visitors, patrons, and advocates.
General Note:
Museum studies terminal project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Author retains all rights.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text





TEACHER'S GUIDE TO CREATING A CLASSROOM
MUSEUM IN THE PHILIPPINES

















By

ETHEL D. VILLAFRANCA


SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE:
GLENN WILLUMSON, CHAIR
MICHELLE TILLANDER, MEMBER











PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO
THE COLLEGE OF FINE ATS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
MASTER OF ARTS

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2010

































2010 Ethel D. Villafranca



























To my Mom and Dad.









ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to express my sincerest gratitude to a long list of people for a very

enriching graduate school experience. First of all, I thank my committee chair, Dr. Glenn

Willumson, and my committee member, Dr. Michelle Tillander for their guidance and

unwavering support, not only during the completion of my project, but throughout my

graduate study. Their encouragement and support enabled me to pursue many

opportunities I would not have explored on my own. I am also grateful to all the

professors I took classes under and the staff at the Ham Museum and Florida Museum

who have all been generous about sharing their knowledge, experience, and expertise.

I also thank my museum studies peers for all the fun, adventures, earnings, even

frustrations, and most of all, for making me feel welcomed in this (not so) foreign

country. Special mention goes out to Dushanti Jayawardena, for extending the hands of

friendship even before I arrived in the US as well as for the encouraging words while I

was writing my project; To Tracy Pfaff for sitting through my practice presentation and

offering thoughtful suggestions, and for being craziest and most fun museum studies

student I had the pleasure of knowing; and to Heather Barrett for helping me edit the

Teacher's Guide.

I thank my Pinoy UF friends (most especially Jean Palmes, Star Gonzales, and Jill

Dumanat) for helping me keep my sanity during those gloomy days. For their gift of

friendship and for generously sharing their culture with me, I wish to thank the Fulbright

and other international students at UF. I also thank Ms. Debra Anderson for being my

mom away from home. Thanks also go to Carmel Baseleres, Joanne Lim, and Hazel

Pangilinan, for their never-ending moral support and continued friendship.









I am also grateful to Fulbright and the University: without their scholarships I would

not have been able to pursue my graduate studies.

I am blessed to have amazing parents who worked very hard to ensure that I get

the best education they can afford. I would not be where I am today if not for the

unconditional love of my family who always supported me in pursuing my dreams.









TABLE OF CONTENTS

page

A C K N O W LE D G M E N T S .................................................................................. ......

A B S T R A C T ...................................................................................... 7

CHAPTER

1 IN T R O D U C T IO N .................................... .................... .... 9

2 WHY SHOULD TEACHERS CREATE A CLASSROOM MUSEUM?.................... 14

Overview of the Constructivist Theory of Learning .............................................. 14
Traditional Versus Constructivist Classroom .................................... ................... 15
Principles of Constructivism that Support the Creation and Use of a Classroom
Museum ............................................................................ 20
Q questions During Classroom Discussion .......................................... ................. 21
How Do People Learn in Museums? ............ ................................ ............... 25
Summary ........ ................................... ................ 27

3 DEVELOPING THE TEACHER'S GUIDE TO CREATING A CLASSROOM
M USEUM IN THE PHILIPPINES ................................................................. ...... 29

O v e rv ie w ....................................................... .... ........ ................. ............... 2 9
Resource Materials Preference of School Teachers in the Philippines......... 31
Teacher Resources/Programs Offered by Philippine Museums ................... 33
From Learning about Museums to Creating a Classroom Museum..................... 35
Summary ........ ................................... ................ 38

4 CONCLUSION ..................................... ............. ......... 40

APPENDIX

A TEACHER'S GUIDE TO CREATING A CLASSROOM MUSEUM IN THE
PHILIPPINES ............ ............ ................... ... .. ...... ....... 43

B MUSEUM RESOURCE MATERIALS PREFERENCE OF SCHOOL TEACHERS IN
THE PHILIPPINES ........... .. ................ ........... .......... ........ 93

LIS T O F R E FE R E N C E S ..... ............................................................. ............... 97

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH ............... .. ........ ................. 101











Abstract of Project in Lieu of Thesis
Presented to the College of Fine Arts of the University of Florida
in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the
Degree of Master of Arts

TEACHER'S GUIDE TO CREATING A CLASSROOM
MUSEUM IN THE PHILIPPINES

By

Ethel D. Villafranca

December 2010

Chair: Glenn Willumson
Major: Museology

Museums offer many great opportunities for learning regardless of visitor's age,

interests, or background. Museums make ideas more accessible, help facilitate

intellectual connections, arouse visitors' curiosity and interests, encourage self-

confidence, and motivate visitors to pursue future learning. The museum experience

results in a more holistic learning because it impacts all three learning domains:

cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains.

Numerous studies show that school field trips to museums have long-term

positive impact on students and are salient experiences especially to elementary school

children. One study in the United States found that nearly 100% of participating

students can still recall one or more content-related detail from a trip that happened

several years ago. Another study in the United Kingdom found that both teachers and

children viewed their museum visit in an extremely positive way and students benefited

academically by gaining new knowledge, skills, and inspiration as a result of their visit. If

visiting museums is highly beneficial to school children, then it is logical that all students









go to museums. Unfortunately, in the Philippines, both financial and geographic

obstacles make it difficult for school children to visit museums. Major museums are

concentrated in the National Capital Region and not all provinces have a local museum.

Since the Philippines is an archipelago, traveling to a museum is a time-consuming and

expensive endeavor, especially for schools in remote provinces. Museums in the

Philippines also do not have enough outreach programs and teacher resource materials

to provide even a limited kind of museum experience to millions of students who lack

physical access to museums.

To help with this problem, I developed a Teacher's Guide to Creating a

Classroom Museum in the Philippines. If school children cannot go to museums, and

museums do not have the means to reach them, then schools should create classroom

museums to give students a museum experience. Aside from the benefits of having

access to a museum, students' participation in creating the classroom museum is both

academically and personally enriching. Using principles of the Constructivist Theory of

Learning, I designed learning modules that will equip students with analytical tools,

content mastery, critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication and collaboration

skills.

By participating in the creation of a classroom museum, students learn important

skills they can apply inside and outside the classroom and also engender a positive

attitude toward museums. These students, who will fondly remember their classroom

museum experience, could become future museum visitors, patrons, and advocates.









CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION

Museums offer many great opportunities for learning, and are uniquely capable

of providing a diverse range of learning experiences to a wide variety of visitors

regardless of their age, interests, or background (Hirzy, 1992). Knowledge is a

commodity that museums readily offer to visitors (Hooper-Greenhill, 1992). According to

Meredith, Fortner, and Mullins (as cited in McComas, 2006) learning in museums is

capable of impacting all three learning domains (cognitive, affective, and psychomotor),

and therefore leads to a more holistic learning experience. However, Lord (2007)

believes learning in museums is more affective and transformative and the value of the

museum experience lies in its ability to change visitors' attitudes, interests, appreciation

and beliefs.

For school children, "museums can offer a counterbalancing curriculum,

stressing the development of critical judgment, awe, piety, sensitivity, empathy,

affection... provide an alternative set of experiences that seek to transform and improve

learners, not merely to improve their statistical performance" (Hirzy, 1996, p. 64).

Howard Gardner, a developmental psychologist best known for his multiple intelligence

theory, said museums can engage students, stimulate their understanding, and

encourage them to take control of their future learning (McCommas, 2006). Studies

have shown that school field trips to museums have long-term impact on students (Falk,

& Dierking, 1997) and that these are salient experiences especially to elementary

school children (Falk, & Dierking, 1995). A study by Falk and Dierking (1997) found that

nearly 100% of participating students are still able to recall one or more things learned

during the trip that they went to many years ago. The majority of what students recalled









was content or subject matter-related. Another study involving 26,000 school children

and 1,600 teachers who visited 69 museums across the United Kingdom found that

both teachers and children viewed the visit in an extremely positive way. Teachers felt

that students benefited educationally by gaining new knowledge, skills, and inspiration

as a result of their museum visit (Hooper-Greenhill et al., 2006).

The Institute for Museums and Library Services report on 21st century skills

stated that school-aged children spend a vast majority of their waking hours in non-

school settings like museums and libraries. In these settings, they learn 21st century

skills such as problem-solving, collaboration, global awareness, and self-direction that

they take back with them and use in their classrooms (IMLS, 2009). A report published

by the National Research Council added that informal settings, which include museums,

help students develop awareness, interest, motivation, and social competencies and

practices. Their museum experience can help students in gaining incremental

knowledge, habits of mind, and identities that make them want to learn more (National

Research Council, and Bell, 2009). In fact John Dewey's vision of a model school

included a museum (Alexander and Alexander, 2008). Dewey is an American

developmental psychologist and education reformer who is acknowledged as the father

of experiential learning.

All these research and reports validate the value of the museum experience for

school children. However, even with all these evidences on the positive impact of

museum visits, a number of factors still prevent students from going on field trips to

museums. In the United States, the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) policy implemented in

2002 has been pointed out as one of the major reasons for the decline of museum field









trips. With increased emphasis on achieving high scores on standardized tests,

teachers became reluctant to take students away from the classroom (Popescu, 2008).

For schools, "the decision to make a museum visit has increasingly become curriculum

focused" (Black, 2005, p. 159). This means schools only allow their students to visit

museums with exhibits and activities that address specific topics under their states'

curriculum standards. Activities that do not directly contribute to high test scores, such

as field trips to museums, are no longer considered a priority. The NCLB policy, plus the

economic downturn that prompted wide-scale budget cuts in schools, definitely

contributed to a substantial decline in school field trips to museums (Latshaw, 2009).

In the Philippines, funding of school field trips for public school students is almost

non-existent. Aside from the financial challenges, the geographic structure of the

Philippines poses as an additional deterrent that limits school children's access to

museums. The Philippines is an archipelago composed of over seven thousand islands.

It has three major islands: Luzon, where the country's capital, Manila, and the National

Capital Region (NCR) are located; Visayas; and Mindanao. The NCR is the economic,

political, cultural and educational center of the country. The National Museum, along

with most other major public and private Philippine museums, is located in the NCR. I

recently learned that museums in Mindanao are steadily flourishing in numbers. There

are currently 85 museums in Mindanao, more than the number of museums in Manila

(Montalvan, 2010). Unfortunately, other parts of the country are not as progressive in

establishing museums, which means that a large number of school children still have

limited access to museums.









While it is definitely possible for schools to arrange for field trips, travelling to

museums from distant provinces remains inconvenient, time consuming, and very

expensive. Furthermore, most museums in the Philippines are not able to provide

outreach programs and resources to school children that do not have access to

museums. Last year, I conducted a research study among Philippine museums to find

out what types of resources and programs are being offered to school teachers. A more

detailed discussion of this research study is in chapter three. Through the research

study, I found out that only three museums, out of the 29 I surveyed offered lesson

plans/curriculum connections to school teachers. With 598,812 elementary and high

school teachers and 20,450,501 elementary and high school students (Department of

Education, 2009), clearly these three museums are not capable of providing outreach

service to all of them. Imagine the number of school children that are deprived of the

benefits of a museum experience!

As a possible solution to this problem, I developed a Teacher's Guide to Creating

a Classroom Museum in the Philippines (Appendix A). If school children cannot go to

museums, and museums do not have the means to reach them, then schools can

create classroom museums so that students are provided a museum experience. Aside

from the benefits of having access to a museum, students' participation in creating the

classroom museum will be both academically and personally enriching.

In chapter two, I will elaborate on how the process of creating and using a

classroom museum can help teachers achieve important goals of education such as

content mastery, critical thinking capacity, problem-solving ability, and collaboration

skills. Since I developed the Teacher's Guide with the Constructivist Theory of Learning









in mind, I briefly discuss this theory and how specific Constructivist principles apply to

the activities in creating a classroom museum. To emphasize the difference between a

constructivist and a traditional classroom setting, I provide a comparative analysis.

Finally, I expound on how learning occurs in the classroom museum using Falk and

Dierking's (2000) Contextual Model of Learning.









CHAPTER 2
WHY SHOULD TEACHERS CREATE A CLASSROOM MUSEUM?

To understand the benefit of creating classroom museums it is important to

examine first how learning happens and how individuals construct knowledge. I used

the Constructivist Theory of Learning as a guiding principle in structuring lessons and

activities in the Teacher's Guide to Creating a Classroom Museum in the Philippines

(Appendix A).

Overview of the Constructivist Theory of Learning

The Constructivist theory defines knowledge as temporary, developmental, and

both socially and culturally mediated (Grennon Brooks, & Brooks, 1993). This theory

postulates that knowledge is constructed in the minds of individuals, through methods

the learner has chosen. In other words, learners are responsible for their own learning,

which requires that they actively participate in the process using not only their minds but

their hands as well.

In constructivism, learning occurs when individuals reconcile their pre-existing

knowledge and experience with new information they encounter. When confronted with

an idea, object, or phenomenon that does not make sense to them, individuals either

interpret this to conform to their present set of rules for explaining and ordering the

world, or they create a new set of rules that would accommodate what they think is

happening (Grennon Brooks, & Brooks, 1993).

Constructivism, which takes its roots from works of developmental psychologists

such as John Dewey, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky, is a theory about learning and

knowledge. While all three supported the Constructivist view that knowledge is self-

constructed, each of them has a slightly different approach on the theory. Dewey









believed in experiential learning, which means that individuals learn better if they are

given the opportunity to engage in activities that require them to apply whatever concept

they are trying to learn (Hein and Alexander, 1998). Jean Piaget, major proponent of

cognitive constructivism, theorized that an individual's capacity to construct knowledge

increases as the individual graduates to higher stages of cognitive development.

Vygotsky, a social constructivist, emphasized the importance of language and social

interaction in learning (Atherton, 2010).

Hein (1998) explains that the opposite of Constructivism, represented by the

absorption-transmission theory of learning, considers individuals as passive learners.

Knowledge exists independent of the learners: it is "out there" to be discovered and

learned. Learners are viewed as empty vessels waiting to be filled with knowledge by an

authority.

Traditional versus Constructivist Classroom

For the purpose of this paper, I will refer to school environments where teachers

do not base their practice on constructivism as a traditional classroom. In a traditional

classroom, the teacher is considered an authority figure: the person who "transmits"

knowledge that students "absorb", as in the absorption-transmission theory of learning.

In contrast, the teacher in the constructivist classroom acts more as a guide or

facilitator for students' learning. But more importantly, the teacher takes on the role of a

"co-explorer who encourages learners to question, challenge, and formulate their own

ideas, opinions, and conclusions" (Abdal-Haqq, 1998). Teachers still follow structured

academic goals. However, they are no longer compelled to teach lessons based on the

strict cover-to-cover order of the textbooks used in class. The Constructivist teaching









approach works better because studies have shown that children learn better when they

are given a greater sense of control over their own learning (Falk, & Dierking, 2000).

In a constructivist classroom, questions are used as powerful tools for teaching

and learning (Yaeger, 1991). Not only are questions from students encouraged but they

are considered valuable. Questions are viewed as expression of students' interest in the

subject matter, not of their ignorance. It is important, therefore, for the teacher to create

a learning environment where students feel comfortable asking questions. Student

questions are also used by teachers to guide the direction of the classroom discussion.

Instead of just providing answers to students' questions, teachers could ask the rest of

the students to suggest answers, or provide guidance in the student's quest to discover

the answer to his/her own question. When posing questions to their students, teachers

use open-ended questions that allow students the opportunity to expound on their

answers. There is not one right answer to a question, or one right solution to a problem.

When students give inaccurate responses, instead of immediately judging these as

wrong or incorrect, teachers ask them to elaborate in order for him/her to understand

how and why the student arrived at these conclusions. As students reflect on and

articulate their reasons, teachers also gain insights into their students' thinking

processes. Provocative questions are used to probe students' preconceived notions,

challenge traditional views and encourage self reflection, which usually result in

students generating innovative ideas about themselves and the world around them.

Activities in a constructivist classroom are chosen based on their potential for

developing student's critical thinking skills. These activities are characterized by active

engagement, inquiry, and problem solving. Students are given time to reflect on new









concepts presented to them; to make sense of this new concept; and then an

opportunity to apply these to practical use.

One teaching approach frequently mentioned in constructivist literature is the use

of group collaboration. "Constructivist teachers of science promote group learning,

where two or three students discuss approaches to a given problem with little or no

interference from the teacher" (Yaeger, 1991). Students learn from each other and each

member contributes his/her prior knowledge to the collective knowledge of the group.

By working in groups, students have the opportunity to see different perspectives about

one concept, various solutions to a problem, or varying points of view about issues. This

exposure and sharing of knowledge can help them reconcile issues they are facing and

thereby result in better understanding. If each member of a group contributes one

approach to solving a problem, then a group of six students is automatically provided

with six possible solutions to one single problem. Even if none of the proposed solutions

work, at the very least, the opportunity to test all of them would result in the students

learning six ways of how not to solve this particular problem.

Constructivists generally maintain that when information is acquired through the

transmission model of learning, it is not always well integrated with prior knowledge and

is often accessed and articulated only for formal academic occasions such as exams

(Abdal-Haqq, 1998). In a traditional classroom, learning is measured by the students'

ability to repeat what has been taught by the teacher. To assess learning, teachers use

multiple-choice or short-answer test questions. As a result of this practice, students with

good memorization skills do well in standardized tests. However, the same students

often lack the ability to integrate new information into their prior knowledge or apply it to









practical use in their life. Therefore, after taking the exam (generally deemed by most

students as the reason they need to learn this information) students no longer

remember what they "learned" (Grennon Brooks, & Brooks, 1993). Teachers who

subscribe to the Constructivist theory of learning allow their students to express their

acquired knowledge in a variety of ways. These assessments can be in the form of a

presentation, play, musical, poems, journals, artwork, researches, invention, or

exhibition. Table 2-1 shows features of traditional and constructivist classrooms.









Table 2-1. Traditional versus Constructivist classrooms


Traditional classrooms Constructivist classrooms

Curriculum is presented part to whole, Curriculum is presented whole to part
with emphasis on basic skills. with emphasis on big concepts.


Strict adherence to fixed curriculum is Pursuit of student questions is highly
highly valued, valued.


Curricular activities rely heavily on Curricular activities rely heavily on
textbooks and workbooks. primary sources of data and
manipulative materials.

Students are viewed as "blank slates" Students are viewed as thinkers with
onto which information is etched by the emerging theories about the world.
teacher.

Teachers generally behave in a didactic Teachers generally behave in an
manner, disseminating information to interactive manner, mediating the
students. environment for students.

Teachers seek the correct answer to Teachers seek the students' points of
validate student learning, view in order to understand students'
present conceptions for use in
subsequent lessons.
Assessment of student learning is Assessment of student learning is
viewed as separate from teaching and interwoven with teaching and occurs
occurs almost entirely through testing. through teacher observations of
students at work and through student
exhibitions and portfolios.
Students primarily work alone. Students primarily work in groups.




Source: Grenon Brooks, J., & Brooks, M. (1993). In search of understanding: The case
for the constructivist classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.









Principles of Constructivism that Support the Creation and Use of a Classroom
Museum

Drawing upon works of Constructivist theorists Dewey and Piaget, Hein (1992)

identified several principles of learning. From these principles, I selected four that are

most relevant to my project: 1) learning is an active process; 2) construction of meaning

is mental; 3) learning is a social activity; and 4) motivation is crucial to learning. In this

section, I discuss how each principle is applied in the process of creating and using a

classroom museum.

First, learning is an active process in which the learner uses sensory input and

constructs meaning out of it. In setting up a classroom museum, students are expected

to actively participate in all phases of the creation process: from conceptualization,

research, collecting or creating of exhibit objects, installing the exhibition, advertising

the exhibition, and welcoming visitors to the exhibition's public opening. Activities

included in the modules leading up to the exhibition set-up not only involve discussions

and lectures but also opportunities for students to interact with physical objects.

Students will learn skills, such as writing catalog entries, labels, and laying-out the

exhibition, and then put these new skills immediately to practical use. If the teacher

decides that students will actually create objects that will be included in the exhibition

(i.e. science experiments, artworks, replicas of artifacts, dioramas), opportunities for

learning increase as this process involves multiple sensory experiences, more time, and

layered opportunities for learning.

It is also recommended that hands-on or interactive component (such as objects

that can be played with, solved, touched, or activities people can participate in) be

included in the exhibition. Other students not involved in creating the exhibit, and









visitors from outside the school community, also benefit and learn from the exhibition

through their interaction with the objects on exhibit, the interactive components, and

activities provided (Hein and Alexander, 1998).

Second, the crucial action of constructing meaning is mental. Although physical

action, or hands-on experience, is deemed necessary for learning, it is not sufficient by

itself. For children to learn, their minds must also be engaged: "minds on" as well as

"hands on". Modules in the Teacher's Guide to Creating a Classroom Museum always

involve classroom discussions. In these discussions, teachers use questions that will

encourage students to think about what they already know, and then guide them in

integrating their prior knowledge with newly introduced concepts. One crucial step in

creating a classroom museum involves students doing research on their chosen topics.

Conducting research and making sense of the information are activities that require

higher-order thinking skills such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation. These skills form

the top three levels of the cognitive domain in Benjamin Bloom's taxonomy of learning.

Bloom identified three learning domains: cognitive, affective, and psycho-motor. Each

domain consists of several levels of learning objectives that require more skills as the

level increases (Atherton, 2010). Since students are mentally involved in finding

information, instead of it passively being transmitted to them by their teacher, students

are more likely to learn this information.

Questions During Classroom Discussion

Classroom discussion and questioning are an integral part of the activities in the

Teacher's Guide. Using provocative and open-ended questions, teachers can

encourage students to express their understanding of concepts, or issues they are









grappling with (Fairbairn, 1987). This approach also provides an opportunity for

students to share their individual knowledge with the rest of the class. After a classroom

discussion, students are divided into groups for further discussion and to work together

in accomplishing their assigned tasks. In module three, the class is divided into smaller

groups, and each group is given an exhibition topic. Groups are asked to conceptualize

an exhibition based on their assigned topic and later present this to the whole class.

Part of their task is to think of an exhibition title, big idea, objective, sub-topics, objects,

interactive/multimedia components, and education programs for their exhibit.

Third, learning is a social activity. Hein posits that communicating and interacting

with other individuals is crucial in the learning process. This interaction between

individuals through discussions and conversation helps them articulate their

impressions, navigate through difficult concepts, explore ideas and share their

understanding with each other. Activities in the Teacher's Guide's modules always

involve interaction among students through class or group discussions and activities.

For example, in module one, students are given the chance to create their own

museum. After making a collage of their museum, students are asked to share in class

the name of their museum, what can be seen inside it, and why they decided to create

that museum. Through this activity, students can learn about other possible museum

concepts that they may not have personally thought of, or considered. Students are also

given an opportunity to share their ideas in class especially during the brainstorming

sessions. Although students may be assigned individual research assignments within a

group, they are expected to share results of their research with their group and then









later with the whole class. Students must work and learn together to successfully create

their classroom museum.

Fourth, motivation is a key component in learning. According to Hein (1992),

motivation not only helps in learning, but essential for learning to occur. He adds that

unless individuals know why they should learn something, then they will not be

compelled to apply new-found knowledge to practical use. The classroom museum can

be a great source of motivation and pride for students as this is an opportunity for them

to showcase their mastery of concepts and creativity.

In creating the classroom museum, students are learning skills and acquiring

knowledge that are not tested on paper. Instead, they are required to apply these newly

acquired skills and knowledge in creating their classroom museum. These skills include

analysis, creativity, innovation, critical thinking, problem solving, interpersonal

communication, and collaboration. Students will also need to process knowledge

acquired through their research into a cohesive narrative that can effectively convey the

story or concept of their classroom exhibit. The time, energy, and passion they put into

the activities will yield tangible outcomes.

Motivation can also stem from students playing the role of knowledgeable

museum staff to engage visitors, answer questions, conduct demonstrations, and lead

activities. Since they are expected to be knowledgeable about the whole exhibition, they

could be motivated to learn the full content of the exhibition (D'Acquisto, 2006).

Therefore, they will learn about specific topics they personally researched and also

topics the other students researched.









But D'Acquisto (2006) contends that perhaps the most compelling reason to

consider creating a classroom museum is that students like them. Below are comments

from two students involved in creating their classroom museum:

I think it was brilliant... It was really fun because we got to (use) different ideas
and come up with what we wanted to do... We put it all together (to) actually see
what we knew... to put our minds to the test... to see if we accomplished) what
we needed) to learn. Brownwyn, 6th grader

"It was hard work at the end. I think it was really fun and creative. One of my best
days was (writing) the book because it was really hard work, but it was fun
showing it off". Kianna, 2nd grader


These comments from students clearly show that the students not only enjoyed

participating in the project and also expressed a sense of accomplishment from

completing their task.

Shifting from the traditional to the constructivist approach to teaching is not easy.

A constructivist approach will requires that teachers invest more time and energy in

preparing lessons, resources, and materials. The Constructivist approach requires

flexible and sometimes more spontaneous negotiations of classroom management

strategies. And most importantly, the Constructivist approach requires the patience to

draw out student understanding, facilitate paths to learning, and pace teaching rhythm

to accommodate students' abilities and interests. Creating a classroom museum makes

more work for teachers who must secure permission from the school to embark on a

project that is not traditionally part of the curriculum. Teachers also need to find a venue

for the exhibition, help students borrow or create objects to include in the exhibition, and

acquire supplies to be used in installing the exhibition. However, creating a classroom









museum promises immense learning opportunities for students, and that alone should

be worth considering.

How Do People Learn in Museums?

When the classroom museum is opened up to the rest of the school, and even

the outside community, then the learning potential extends beyond the students

involved in its creation. For this reason, I deemed it necessary to discuss how the

museum experience results in learning.

Regardless of where the museum is housed (in a building, classroom, park, or

even a bus for some mobile museums), certain factors necessary for learning remain

the same. From reading various literature related to my research (learning theories,

teaching strategies, adult and children learning, and educational role of museums), I

observed increased interest by researchers in studying how individuals learn in

museums (Falk, & Dierking, 2000; Hein, 1998; Hein and Alexander, 1998; Hooper-

Greenhill, 1992; Lord, 2007). Although great strides have been made in understanding

the role and nature of learning in museums, much work is needed before we can begin

to understand completely, if that is even possible, how learning occurs in museums.

One theoretical framework that aims to map out learning in museums is the Contextual

Model of Learning proposed by Falk and Dierking (2000). Their framework suggests

that learning is influenced by the interplay of the following three distinct contexts:

personal context
socio-cultural context
physical context


The personal context (Falk, & Dierking, 2000) characterizes learning as a very

personal experience dependent on several factors including motivation and









expectations; prior knowledge, interest, and beliefs; and choice and control. Falk and

Dierking recognize that learning is prompted by personal motivation and emotional cues

but facilitated by personal interests. While the decision for students to visit a classroom

museum may not be intrinsically motivated, the paths they follow in viewing the

exhibition, as well as specific objects they choose to examine are dictated by their

personal interests. As in Constructivism, the personal context of the Contextual Model

of Learning also puts value on student's prior knowledge as crucial to learning. Since

the exhibition's theme is connected to the academic curriculum, it is highly probable that

concepts introduced in the exhibition are the same concepts the students are learning in

class. The potential for learning is increased because students' prior knowledge about

the concept is reinforced by additional information present in the exhibition.

A museum visit is a social event. The socio-cultural context (Falk, & Dierking,

2000) positions learning as both an individual and group experience. Both

Constructivism and the Contextual Model of Learning (Falk, & Dierking, 2000) view

learning as socially mediated. Individuals do not learn in isolation. Learning is a shared

process between a community of learners where each learner contributes individual

knowledge and prior experiences. This also holds true for a classroom museum. Visiting

a classroom museum provides students an opportunity to engage in conversations with

other students about their experience, especially if the topic of the exhibition is

something they are learning together in class. Students can also learn from each other

by sharing what they already know about the topic. Communication of ideas is also

viewed as socio-cultural in nature, which explains why individuals have better chances









of remembering information when it is delivered in a story or narrative form (Dierking,

2002), such as a classroom museum exhibition.

The physical context (Falk, & Dierking, 2000) explains that learning occurs

through an individual's interaction with the physical world. Sights, sounds, smell, and

sensations all contribute to the learning experience. Research suggests that when

asked to recall their museum experience, most individuals even after 20 or 30 years,

easily remember what they saw, did, and felt during their museum visit (Dierking, 2002).

Included in the physical context are the objects an individual encounters in a museum.

As Paris (2002, xvi) states, "authentic, unique, and first-hand experience with objects

stimulate curiosity, exploration, and emotions." Creating and visiting a classroom

museum is a good way for students to encounter a tangible representation of abstract

concepts they are learning in class. In addition, students visiting a classroom museum

are given the opportunity to interact with objects, reflect on them and construct personal

meanings through them. In Constructivism, emphasis is placed on use of primary

sources of data, such as actual objects, and manipulatives to test concepts and ideas.

Interacting with actual physical objects, such as those in the classroom museum,

provides opportunities for students to conduct their own observation and test their own

theories.

Summary

The value of creating a classroom museum not only lies in providing students

access to a museum but also in developing critical skills that students gain from

participating in the creation process. Students' involvement in creating the classroom

museum can help increase analytical skill, creativity, innovation, critical thinking,









problem solving, interpersonal communication, and collaboration skills that they could

definitely use in and out of the classroom.

One characteristic of a Constructivist teaching approach is the use of questions

(Yaeger, 1991). In the class discussion sections throughout the modules, I provided

questions teachers can use to direct the discussion and encourage students to share

their thoughts and ideas. The activities were also designed to encourage teachers to

engage their students and allow them to make decisions in every step of the classroom

museum development process, instead teachers making all the decisions themselves

and giving students orders. Involving students in decision making gives students a

greater sense of control over their learning, another characteristic of the constructivist

teaching approach, which leads to more successful learning (Falk, & Dierking, 2000).

Finally, since Constructivism views learning as a social activity (Hein, 1992), a number

of activities in the Teacher's Guide require students to work together in small groups.

While each student has individual responsibilities, the success of creating the classroom

museum depends on all students' ability to learn and work together.

In chapter three, I discuss details of how I developed the Teacher's Guide to

Creating a Classroom Museum in the Philippines and elaborate on each of the four

modules.









CHAPTER 3
DEVELOPING THE TEACHER'S GUIDE TO CREATING
A CLASSROOM MUSEUM IN THE PHILIPPINES

Overview

The impetus to develop a Teacher's Guide to Creating a Classroom Museum in

the Philippines came from my desire to create educational materials that could help

bridge the gap between schools and museums in the Philippines. My first job after

completing my undergraduate degree in 1998 was as Continuing Education Assistant at

Ayala Museum, an art and history museum located at the heart of the business district

in the Philippines. I managed the museum's public programs for both children and

adults. These programs primarily consisted of visual art workshops and a few exhibition

related lectures. From browsing through websites of museums outside the Philippines, I

realized that there was more to public programs than just workshops. However, it was

not until 2001 when I was awarded a grant by the Asian Cultural Council (ACC), an

affiliate of the Rockefeller Brothers Foundation, to visit museums in the United States

that I became aware of the breadth of education programs offered to the public by

museums in the United States. The grant from ACC enabled me to visit and observe

education programs of over seventy museums in various cities in the United States

including New York, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, Louisville, Salem, San Diego, and

Washington DC. There were family events, demonstrations, guided tours for various

ages (even as young as toddlers), performances, activity sheets, exploration boxes,

travelling suitcases, partnerships with schools, and so much more! I was also able to sit

down and discuss a few of these programs with education staff from several of the

museums I visited. The experience was both overwhelming and inspiring!









After returning to the Philippines from the five-month ACC grant, I started

exploring and developing a few of the programs I saw during my visit to the United

States. Programs that helped reinforce the United State's national and state educational

standards were among the kinds of museum education programs that strongly

resonated in me. As a result, I developed and implemented a new program that focused

on Ayala Museum's current exhibits and collections to target specific learning objectives

under the prescribed Philippines' Department of Education (DepEd) Revised Basic

Education Curriculum (RBEC).1 The program had three modules, with each module

targeting specific grade levels that ranged from pre-school to grade six. Each module

consisted of a brief lecture, a gallery tour, an educational game, and an art activity.

I wanted to develop a wider variety of educational programs but I came to realize

that what I learned during my observation tour and reading books about museum

education and children's learning and development were not enough. This is why I

decided to pursue a graduate degree in museum education. I knew I needed to learn

and understand the theoretical basis for creating effective education programs in a

structured learning environment. Pursuing my master's degree in museum studies, with

a specialization in education, at the University of Florida was made possible by a

Fulbright Fellowship grant.

I knew early on that for my project, I wanted to create resource material

elementary school teachers in the Philippines could use in their classrooms. Since I

wanted to make sure my project would help address a need in the Philippines, I



1The RBEC is the prescribed standard that public school students from grades one to six and first to
fourth year high school have to learn in school. Public school are required to follow these standards while
private school are given the option to develop their own.









conducted a study to find out what types of resources and programs are already being

offered to school teachers by Philippine museums.

Teacher Resources/Programs Offered by Philippine Museums

To get started on my research, I needed a list of museums in the Philippines. I

sent a request for information to the National Commission for Culture and the Arts

(NCCA), Philippines, through their website. The NCCA is the official government agency

mandated to oversee policy making, coordinating, and grants for the preservation,

development, and promotion of Philippine arts and culture. One of the national

committees of NCCA, the National Committee on Museums, is responsible for the

development of Philippine museums as repositories of national cultural heritage

committed to the education and enlightenment of the Filipino people. Unfortunately, I did

not receive any response. Given that I was doing my research from the United States, I

was limited to using the internet to find museums in the Philippines. By using search

engines such as GoogleTM and Yahoo!R I was able to generate a list that consisted of

107 museums. It is important to note that this is most likely not an exhaustive list of

museums in the Philippines. However, since I needed a way to contact these museums

to ask them to participate in my survey, I deleted from the list any museum without

phone numbers or email addresses. This brought down the total to only 29 museums. I

then sent messages to museums that had websites and email addresses and solicited

assistance from a former colleague based in Manila to call museums that only listed

telephone numbers in their contact information.

Twenty out of 29 museums (69%) are located in the NCR. Nine museums (30%)

are spread in various regions including regions I, II, III, IV and VII. Since the Philippines









has a total of 17 regions, I can deduce that residents from other regions may not have

access to a museum. Results from my data analysis indicated that 14 out of 29

museums (48%) offer resources and programs to teachers. However, only five

museums provide this information on their website. These resources and programs

include lectures and seminars, teacher training, teacher tours, lesson plans/curriculum

connections, and other unspecified programs. Based on the types of programs

enumerated by the museums, I surmised that there is a scarcity of resources that

teachers can use outside of the museum. With only three museums (21%) offering

lesson plans/curriculum connections, I came to the conclusion that developing resource

materials for school teachers that can be used in their classroom is a worthwhile

endeavor for me to pursue.

However, I was still left with two issues to resolve. First, I wanted this resource

material to be multi-disciplinary, meaning teachers could use it regardless of whether

they teach science, history, language, art, or mathematics. I needed to find topics that

could be applied to lessons across multiple disciplines to attract more teachers to use

the resource material in their classroom. Second, I wanted to offer my project as a

model that different types of museums (science, history, and art) in the Philippines can

easily adapt and replicate using their own collections. While I thought of developing

different sets of materials that are discipline-specific ( one each for science, history, and

art), in the end, I decided against it since I knew that I did not have enough time to

develop three different sets of materials. Then, I considered focusing on only one type

of museum for my project and perhaps developing additional sets after I graduate and

settle back in the Philippines.









I was still contemplating these questions when I presented results of my research

in last year's Research Methods in Art Education class. After hearing these two issues I

was grappling with, and the possibility that numerous school children in the Philippines

do not have access to museums, Dr. Robin Poynor suggested I create a resource

material that focused on teaching Filipino school children about museums. I thought this

was a brilliant suggestion as it resolves both issues! Since I wanted to ensure that

teachers in the Philippines would be encouraged to use the resource material I will

develop, I needed to find out what format teachers would prefer to use. This, therefore,

required a second research study.

Resource Materials Preference of School Teachers in the Philippines

The research study, which collected data specifically from elementary teachers of

both public and private schools, had one critical objective: find out the format of

resource material school teachers in the Philippines would prefer to use if museums

made it available to them. Respondents were given three formats to choose from:

1) online curriculum resource units (lesson plans and materials that can be downloaded

from a website); 2) traveling museum suitcases (museum objects, information and

activities sent to schools in a suitcase); and 3) multi-media resource loans (video, audio,

poster, slides on specific topics). I limited the choices to these because these are the

three formats I felt that I had enough skills to competently develop.

Due to limited financial resources, I had to carry out the research while I was in

the United States, and therefore, had to utilize resources offered by the internet for my

research study. I used Survey Monkey, a simple and free online survey software tool, to

gather data. To reach school teachers, I used various strategies that included sending









an e-mail to my personal list of contacts, as well yahoogroups (listserves) of teachers,

and art and culture enthusiasts. Since not all the people in my contact list are teachers,

my cover letter included a request for them to forward my message and the link to the

online survey to teachers they know. I also posted the survey's link on various social

networking websites, such as Facebook, Multiply, and Friendster, in an attempt to reach

more teachers. A copy of the survey is included in the appendix (Appendix B).

My goal was to collect at least 50 responses. While responses from 50 teachers

may not be an accurate representation of possible responses from over 400,000 public

and private elementary school teachers in the Philippines, I felt that asking 50 teachers

was better than assuming that I knew what format they would prefer.

Since my study involved human subjects, I submitted a request for approval to

conduct the study to the University of Florida's Institutional Review Boards (IRB).

However, IRB replied that because of the format of my data collecting method

(surveys), a permit was not required. The survey was launched on March 6 and ended

on April 15. A week after I sent out the first wave of emails, I noticed that the number of

responses I was getting was quite low. I was worried that I would not reach my target

number of respondents, so I asked a few friends and family members to print out the

survey and physically distribute these to teachers in schools they have access to, and

then send me a copy of the completed survey forms.

A total of 65 school teachers responded to the survey but only 53 responses

were valid since 12 skipped some of the questions. The number one preference was

multi-media resource loans chosen by 22 respondents (41.5%). Materials that could be

downloaded from the internet were chosen by 16 respondents (30.2%), and museum









suitcases were chosen by the remaining 15 respondents (28.3%). These results

dictated that I develop a physical (meaning not an online version) resource material with

accompanying multi-media resources.

From Learning about Museums to Creating a Classroom Museum

The idea of creating lessons to introduce students to the concept of what a

museum is, what it does, and its important contributions to society, evolved into a guide

teachers could use to help them create a museum in their classroom. The Teacher's

Guide remained inter-disciplinary, which means that students will be required to use,

and as a result develop, skills from various academic subjects including science, math,

language, history and art, in completing their project. Exhibitions can be developed from

a wide spectrum of topics that support Philippine's DepEd's RBEC. Hence teachers

can use the Teacher's Guide regardless of the academic subject they are teaching.

While I was looking for resources that could help provide theoretical support for

the value of creating classroom museums, I came across a book written by Linda

D'Acquisto entitled Learning on display: Student-created museums that build

understanding. Published in 2006, the book walks the reader through an eight-step

process of developing a classroom museum project. These steps include 1) introducing

the museum project to students; 2) visiting a professional museum; 3) researching the

museum topic; 4) designing the exhibits; 5) writing for a museum audience;

6) constructing the exhibition; 7) learning the full exhibition; and 8) opening the museum

to the public. Also included in the book are photographs of classroom museums created

by students from different schools in the United States, as well as sample activity

worksheets and evaluation rubrics.









While D'Acquisto's book is similar in content to the Teacher's Guide, I would like

to point out several differences. First, in D'Acquisto's book, one of the steps in

developing a classroom museum involved a visit to a museum. I developed the

Teacher's Guide specifically for students who do not have access to museums and may

not have visited a museum before. As a substitute for a physical visit, I provided

photographs taken inside museums that teachers can show their students. I also

included additional online resources that listed museums offering virtual tours and

online exhibitions both students and teachers can explore.

Second, D'Acquisto's book is structured like a textbook, or reference material,

providing a wealth of information regarding the process of creating a classroom

museum. However, teachers will still need to create their own lesson plans from all the

information provided. The Teacher's Guide is structured like a traditional lesson plan,

which contains background information, learning objectives, duration of module,

materials needed, guide questions for class discussion, and activities. While I do not

undermine the significance of the book as a valuable resource for teachers, I think a

simpler structure would be more attractive to teachers because they can just take the

Teacher's Guide and start using it in their classrooms. From conversations with

museum education colleagues both in the United States and in the Philippines, I learned

that teachers prefer to use museum resource materials structured like traditional lesson

plans because such materials require less work for them. I have also observed that

many big museums around the globe such as The Smithsonian, The Getty, Art Institute

of Chicago, Tate Museum, Royal British Columbia Museum, Museum Victoria









(Australia), just to name a few, have lesson plans as part of their teacher resource

offerings.

Third, and most importantly, the Teacher's Guide was specifically designed for

teachers teaching Filipino students. I wanted Filipino students to be able to relate to the

lessons by providing activities, discussion questions, and examples that they would be

familiar with. For example, in Module one, after providing information about famous

museums abroad, I added information about the National Museum of the Philippines. In

Module three, the topic of the two examples I provided in fleshing out the exhibition

concept were drawn from specific lessons listed in DepEd's RBEC.

The value of D'Acquisto's book to the development of my project was in providing

proof that students are truly capable of creating classroom museums, that they learned

from the creation process, and that they enjoyed participating in the project. I initially

wanted to develop the Teacher's Guide to cater only to grades four to six. However,

after reading examples of classroom museums created by students from lower grade

levels, I realized that a classroom museum can be created by students who are younger

or older. Therefore, I decided to remove the target audience in hopes that teachers from

lower grade levels as well as teachers at the college level might find the Teacher's

Guide useful.

A complete copy of the Teacher's Guide is included in the appendix (Appendix

A). The Teacher's Guide is divided into four modules, with module containing the

following sections:

Objectives
Duration of module
Materials needed
Background information









Class Discussion
Activity
Evaluation
Reference/s

The first three modules will prepare the students in creating their classroom

museum by teaching skills such as creating catalog entries, writing labels, and thinking

of objects and programs for the exhibition. The fourth module focuses on the process of

creating the classroom museum. The number of sessions required to complete the

fourth module will depend on how much time the class needs to finish creating their

classroom museum. The number of sessions can vary depending on the topic of the

exhibit, the number of students, and the age and skill levels of the students. The class

discussion and activities have been combined but divided into different steps in creating

a classroom museum.

Looking back to what I learned about museums, putting together exhibitions, and

creating education programs, there was much information that I wanted to include in the

Teacher's Guide. But I always had to stop and ask myself "how much information is too

much information?" and "which information is relevant?" In the end, I realized that I was

developing a guide, not a step-by-step manual, and that I had to leave room for

teachers' creativity and allow them to discover a few things for themselves, or with their

class.

Summary

The value of creating a classroom museum is not only in providing school

children with a museum experience but also in offering learning opportunities that come

from their participation in the process of creation. Students' involvement in developing a

classroom museum will equip them with critical skills (such as analysis, content









mastery, critical thinking, problem-solving, communication, and collaboration) they can

use inside and outside the classroom setting.









CHAPTER 4
CONCLUSION

The Teacher's Guide to Creating a Classroom Museum in the Philippines is a

culmination of courses throughout my graduate studies, previous professional

experience working for museums (and other non-museum institutions), internships in

various museums, conferences attended, and conversations with colleagues, mentors,

and peers. While it would have been ideal for me to have developed the Teacher's

Guide in partnership with a specific museum in the Philippines, obstacles such as

geographical distance and limited funding have prevented me from doing so. However, I

have come to realize that creating teacher materials not associated with a specific type

of museum in the Philippines actually increases the material's potential to be useful for

a wider audience. Although the Teacher's Guide was developed as a multidisciplinary

resource, being tied to one specific type of museum (a science, history, or art museum)

could potentially limit who might be interested in using it. From my experience, most

teachers in the Philippines have yet to embrace an inter-disciplinary approach to

teaching. Hence, history teachers would likely consider only history museums as a

possible source of resource materials to help enhance their classroom teaching. They

would not think of contacting an art museum for lesson plans that address learning

competencies in history using art works from the museum's exhibition or collections. A

solution I would have explored if I had more time and financial resources, would be to

partner with multiple institutions in the Philippines and develop the Teacher's Guide as a

collaborative project among the various museums involved.

To help students visualize how museums look from the inside, I used existing

photographs of museums in the United States that I have taken throughout my travels. I









would have preferred to include photographs and videos from museums in the

Philippines. Unfortunately, I did not have any on file, nor were there any available on the

internet. It would have been better if I were able to take videos and photographs of

Philippine museums. I would have reproduced these photographs as posters or

transparencies (for use with an overhead projector).

Before the Teacher's Guide is finalized, it should be pilot tested by school

teachers. Volunteer teachers could be recruited to try the modules in their classroom to

help evaluate its effectiveness, completeness, and ease of use. After using the

Teacher's Guide, teachers could be interviewed about specific aspects of the different

modules they think worked well or did not work. Their opinion on how activities could be

improved, if needed, could also be solicited. They could also be asked if information and

resources provided are sufficient or if additional resources are needed to successfully

create a classroom museum. Results from this evaluation can be used to revise and

improve the Teacher's Guide. Just like the teachers, participating students could also be

interviewed to find out how they felt about the project. What part of the project did they

like most? What would they do to make the lessons more enjoyable? Would they be

interested in repeating the experience in other subjects? I think the museum community

could also benefit from a research study to learn whether the students' involvement in

creating a classroom museum resulted in making students want to visit museums on

their own. If results are positive, then museums could use information gleaned from the

research as leverage in raising funds to support school-museum partnerships.

Since results of the survey indicated that teachers prefer physical resources with

accompanying multi-media components, this is the format I followed when I developed









the Teacher's Guide. However, I feel that in addition to the printed lesson plans, an

electronic version of the Teacher's Guide should also be uploaded on the internet to

reach a wider audience. While I developed the Teacher's Guide particularly for teachers

in the Philippines, I know that it can also be used by teachers from other countries

whose schools have limited physical access to museums. By making the Teacher's

Guide available online, teachers from these countries will also be able to download and

use it their classrooms. However, the teachers will have to add information about their

local museums and revise some of the examples in the class discussion to concepts

relevant to their students.

Experiences that generate powerful emotions are believed to be more

memorable and easier to retrieve (Reisberg & Heuer, 2004). My hope is that students

involved in creating their classroom museums will remember their experience positively.

I think that this could encourage students to voluntarily seek out museums and therefore

could have positive implications for developing future museum visitors, patrons, and

advocates.









APPENDIX A
TEACHER'S GUIDE TO DEVELOPING A CLASSROOM MUSEUM IN THE
PHILIPPINES


INTRODUCTION

Museums offer many great opportunities for learning regardless of a visitor's age,

interests, or background (Hirzy, 1992). Museums make ideas more accessible, help

facilitate intellectual connections, arouse visitors' curiosity and interests, encourage self-

confidence and motivate them to pursue future learning. Research studies have

supported the fact that people learn in museums. Studies have also shown that school

field trips to museums have long-term impact on students (Falk, & Dierking, 1997) and

that these are salient experiences especially to elementary school children (Falk, &

Dierking, 1995).

Unfortunately, not all schools can send their students to field trips in museums.

To help with this problem, I developed this Teacher's Guide to Creating a Classroom

Museum in the Philippines. If school children cannot go to museums, and museums do

not have the means to reach them, then schools should create classroom museums so

that students are provided with a museum experience. Aside from the benefits of having

access to a museum, I strongly believe that students' participation in creating the

classroom museum will be both academically and personally enriching.

Using principles of the Constructivist Theory of Learning, I designed learning

modules that will equip students with analytical tools, content mastery, critical thinking,

problem-solving, communication, and collaboration skills. The classroom museum is not

only valuable because it will provide school children with a museum experience but it









will also offer learning opportunities that come from their participation in its creation

process.

The modules in this Teacher's Guide are not discipline-specific and should apply

easily to art, history, math or science. Modules one to three will introduce the students

to the concept of a museum, museum collections, and museum exhibitions and

education programs. Lessons and activities in these first three modules will prepare

students in creating their own classroom museums. The fourth module will guide you

through the classroom museum creation process and will require your students to apply

skills that they will learn in the first three modules.









MODULE ONE: WHAT IS A MUSEUM?


Objectives

At the end of this module, students will be able to:

Define a museum
Understand various types of museums
Create a concept for their own museum
Share with their classmates the museum they created

Duration of module

One class period



Materials needed:

Images inside museums (included in this packet)

Magazines, postcards, and other sources of images

Scissors

Glue

Markers

Blank sheets of paper



Background information

The International Council of Museums (ICOM) defines a museum as:

"A non-profit making, permanent institution in the service of society and of its

development, and open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches,

communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education and enjoyment,

material evidence of people and their environment."

45











A shorter and simpler definition is provided by the American Association of Museums

(AAM). According to AAM, a museum is an institution that provides a "unique

contribution to the public by collecting, preserving, and interpreting the things of this

world."



Museums come in various shapes and sizes. There are very small museums that may

only be as big as your classroom. But there are also very large museums, such as the

State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, that has a total of 365 rooms.

Museums in the Philippines have equally diverse structures. The National Museum of

the Philippines, located in Manila, is composed of three buildings. The National Art

Gallery is located inside the National Museum Main (formerly the Old Congress

Building). The Museum of the Filipino People is housed in the former Finance Building,

and the future Museum of Natural History will occupy what was formerly the Department

of Tourism Building.



There are different kinds of museums, and what you can see inside depends on what

kind of museum it is. Works of art, such as paintings, sculptures, drawings,

photographs, decorative objects, even furniture can be seen inside art museums.

History museums houses historic artifacts or objects, memorabilia of famous people,

antique objects, photographs, or old clothes and shoes. Dinosaur bones, fossils,

different types of rocks, preserved animal specimens, scientific apparatuses and

instruments, and experiments explaining scientific concepts are just some of the things









you can explore inside science museums. Children's museums are especially

designed for children to explore and learn while having fun. A number of children's

museums have a combination of art, history and science themes.



Class discussion

Start the discussion by asking students what they think a museum is. Then ask who

have been to a museum before. Allow a few students to share their experience by

answering the following questions:

What is the name of the museum you visited?
When did you visit?
What did you see inside the museum?
What else did you do while at the museum?


Share the definition of museums provided by ICOM and AAM. Then discuss different

types of museums. Use the pictures provided in this resource packet to show the

students what museums look like inside. Ask the students what other types of museums

they can think of. Possible answers include zoos, aquaria, arboretums, anthropology

museums, and planetariums.



If your classroom has internet access, you can show your class a virtual exhibit or take

them on a virtual tour of some museums. A list of websites is included at the end of this

resource packet.



Activity









The students will now have a chance to create their own museum! Review the different

types of museums discussed and what can be seen inside. Ask the students to imagine

what kind of museum they would build if they were given the chance to create one.

Where will their museum be located? How big will it be? Who do they think will visit their

museum?



Next, students will cut out pictures from magazines and create a collage of what they

want visitors to see inside their museum. Then they have to choose a name for their

museum.



Provide an opportunity for students to share their museum concepts with their

classmates. They can talk about why they decided to create that kind of museum,

where they will build it and what they think people will like about their museum.

Students in higher grade levels can write an essay about their museums.



Keep the collages for future modules. These may be used as references in succeeding

activities or even displayed as part of the classroom museum.



Extension

The best culminating activity for this module is to bring your class to a local museum, if

there is one in your area. If possible, make arrangements with the museum staff for a

behind the scenes tour of the facility. Students will benefit from the opportunity to hear

about the museum staff's job and their responsibilities.









Evaluation

Students can be evaluated through their participation in classroom discussion. The

collage they made and how they talk (or write for older students) about it during the

sharing exercise can also be used to evaluate how well students understood and

applied what they learned in this module.


Additional reference

Hirzy, E. (1992). Excellence and equity: Education and the public dimension of
museums. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Museums.









MODULE TWO: WHAT IS A COLLECTION?


Objectives

At the end of this module, students will:

Research the concept of museum collecting
Share with their classmates a sample of their collection
Create catalog entries or document objects


Duration of module

Two class periods



Materials needed

Catalog template (included in this packet)

Ruler/tape measure

Pencil or drawing materials

A set of objects you personally collect to share and discuss with the class



Background information

People collect different objects for various reasons. Some people collect for sentimental

reasons, to tell stories, as a financial investment, or for learning. Others collect certain

things because they are really just interested in them.



Collections can be as simple as a bag of marbles with varying sizes and colors, or as

grand as a collection of houses and airplanes. Naturalist Charles Darwin collected

plants and animals, which he studied and use to help him formulate his Theory of









Evolution. Former Philippine first lady, Imelda Marcos, has a famous collection of shoes

that are now at the Marikina Shoe Museum.



Some people donate their collections to museums so that others can see, appreciate,

and learn from these objects. In 1753, Sir Hans Sloane bequeathed his collection of

71,000 books, antiquities and natural specimens to the UK government; this became

the British Museum's founding collection. Solomon R. Guggenheim, an American

businessman, donated his art collection to the Solomon Guggenheim Foundation, which

later established the Guggenheim Museum. When putting together exhibitions,

museums sometimes borrow objects from private collectors (people who have

collections) to add to objects from their collection.



Objects in the museum are cared for by the museum's Collections Manager or

Registrar. They make sure that objects in the collection are properly handled, stored,

and displayed. They also make sure that the objects are documented properly. Details

such as the name and dimension of the object, who made it, when it was made, what it

is made of, as well as descriptions and other information about the object are recorded

and stored in a database. Pictures or illustration of the object are also added for easier

identification.



Many objects in the museum's collection, especially old objects, are fragile and

irreplaceable. This is one of the many reasons why museums do not allow visitors to

touch objects on exhibit. Museums have to take good care of their collection to ensure









that future generations will also have the opportunity to see and learn from these

objects. However, there are also museums, in particular children's and science

museums, that allow visitors to touch objects on exhibit. These types of museums rely

on hands-on experience to teach visitors about concepts in the exhibition. Most of the

objects in their exhibition are intended to be repaired or replaced when damaged.



Class discussion

Day One:

Review what students learned about museums from the previous module. Focus the

discussion on the objects that can be seen inside museums as segue to discussing the

concept of collecting. You can facilitate the discussion by asking students the following

questions:

What do you collect?
Why do you collect those objects?
Where did you get those objects? Were they gifts, did you buy, or make them?
How many of these objects do you have?
How do you take care of your collection?



Share your collection with the students. You can also use the questions above to talk

about your collection. You can display your collection on a table or shelf so students can

examine them. If your objects are not fragile, and you do not mind that they are

handled, you can pass them among the students so they have a chance to closely

examine them.









It is important to highlight that while one object may be valuable for someone, it may be

considered worthless to another. There are a lot of objects that are collected not for its

monetary value but for its historic, scientific, cultural, or emotional significance.

Objects included in the collection could also tell something about the person who

collected them.

What can the students tell about you from the collection you brought? Let them
explain how they came to that conclusion.
Ask students to imagine that each of them is preparing a personal time capsule
that will be opened 100 years from now. What objects would they put inside the
time capsule to let people in the future know about who they are? Why?
How about if they are putting a time capsule about their class, their school, or
even their town? What objects would be useful to include in the time capsule?


Draw a large version of the catalog template on the board (or on a big piece of paper)

and choose a few objects from your collection to catalog with the class.



For the next session, ask students to bring a set of objects they collect. Also make five

copies of the template for students' use.



Day Two:

Ask students to share and talk about the collection of objects they brought. You may

choose to divide the class into groups and students discuss their collection within their

group. If you have enough space, you can even display all the objects (or choose

several students to show theirs) on a table so everyone can have an opportunity to









examine them. Owners of the objects can stand around the table to talk about their

collection.



Activity

Distribute copies of the catalog template to students. They are now going to catalog the

objects from their collection.



Evaluation

Students can be evaluated through their participation in classroom discussion.

Completeness and accuracy of catalogue entries they prepared can also be used to

evaluate how well they understood the lesson.


Additional reference

Buck, R., Gilmore, J., & American Association of Museums. (1998). The new museum
registration methods. Washington, DC: American Association of Museums.









CATALOG ENTRY TEMPLATE

CATALOG ENTRY

Accession Number

Object

Artist/Maker

Title

Date made

Where made

Medium/Materials

Dimensions

Value

Provenance/Owner

Date received


Description


Catalogued by

Date catalogued


Picture/illustration









MODULE THREE: WHAT IS AN EXHIBITION?


Objectives

At the end of this module, students will:

Articulate the concept of a museum exhibition

Enumerate the steps in creating an exhibition

Write object labels

Create, as a group, a proposed exhibition complete with title, big idea, objectives,

objects and education programs

Present their exhibition proposal to class




Duration of module

Two class periods



Materials needed

Images inside museums (included in this resource packet)

Completed catalog entries from module two

Sample wall text and labels (included in this resource packet)



Background information

According to Beverly Serrell (1996) an exhibition is "a defined room or space, with a

given title, containing elements that together make up a coherent entity that is

conceptually recognizable as a display of objects, animals, interactive, and









phenomena". The key word here is coherent. An exhibition is not just a group of

random objects put together in a room. These objects, when taken together, should tell

a story, introduce ideas, or teach a phenomenon.



The person primarily responsible for conceptualizing and putting together an exhibition

is called a curator. In big museums, the curator works with group of people (collectively

they are called Curatorial Department) to help his/her in organizing an exhibition.

However, in small museums, curators often work alone or with people outside of the

museum.



Below are the steps in creating an exhibition. Please note that there are more steps

involved in creating an exhibition depending on its magnitude. Some museums develop

a catalog or book, souvenirs (cups, shirts, postcards, etc.) or videos for the exhibition.



Topic the focus of the exhibition.



Big Idea a sentence stating what the exhibition is all about.



Objective exhibitions are put together with specific objectives in mind. This is what the

museum/curator hopes to achieve through the exhibition. The exhibition objective could

be to teach visitors an idea or concept, a new way of doing things, advocate a cause, or

perhaps tell a story about something or someone.









Title name of the exhibition. A good title is concise but clear and can arouse visitor's

curiosity about the exhibition.



Object list these are the things that will go into the exhibition. The curator works with

the registrar or collections manager to borrow objects from the museum's collection or

from private collectors.



Exhibition lay-out physical design of the exhibition. Once the objects are identified

and collected, the exhibit designer, as the title suggests, designs the space where the

exhibition will be installed. Together with the curator, the designer plans the lay-out of

the exhibition. They decide where each object will be placed, how it will be displayed,

and whether it will be clustered with other objects or displayed alone.



Labels written words that provide visitors with information about the exhibition. There

are different types of labels in an exhibition:



Introductory label introduces the visitors to the exhibition and tells them what to

expect from it. Introductory labels should not be too long, otherwise visitors may

not be interested in reading them. Serell (1997) recommends introductory labels

to have between 20 to 300 words. Some introductory labels could also include

pictures. Below is an example of an introductory label created for an exhibition

about the American Thanksgiving, an annual family tradition celebrated by

families in the United States:











GIVING THANKS: THE REAL FIRST
THANKSGIVING


When do you celebrate Thanksgiving?


"Giving Thanks: The First Real Thanksgiving" tells the
story of the real first thanksgiving celebrated fifty six
years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock.
The exhibition is divided into three aspects that were
so integral to this event in St. Augustine: the people,
celebrations, and foods.


Meet the Spaniards who played crucial roles in the
celebration of the first Catholic mass as well as the
Timucuans who celebrated with them.


See accurate representations of Timucuans based on
information from historians and archeologists.


Compare concepts of giving thanks then and now.


Discover the food they shared during the feast.


Share your family's Thanksgiving recipes and
traditions.

*Section or group labels provides information about a sub-topic of your

exhibition. It can also be a label explaining why objects are grouped together.

Below is a group label for the same exhibition above:










Feasts typically followed masses of thanksgiving.
This section concentrates on the food shared by
Menendez and his men with the Timucuans in St.
Augustine. Contrary to the traditional tale, this
Catholic ceremony was the first celebration of
Thanksgiving in the New World. Also included are
recipes of two contemporary Thanksgiving dishes
enjoyed by many American families.


Captions- are labels for specific objects. Captions provide basic information

about the objects on exhibit such as: name of object/title of artwork; name of

artist; date created; place created/origin; medium (what it is made of);

dimensions; owner (if borrowed from a private collector or other museums).

Captions are placed next to the object- but NEVER on the object itself!


Example of a simple caption for a painting:

Burst of sunshine
Felisimo Andres
Philippines, 1973
Oil on canvas
36" X 48"
On loan from the National Museum


Example of a simple caption for a capiz shell jewelry box:

Jewelry box
Cebu, Philippines
Capiz shell
Donated by a private collector










Captions that provide more than the basic information about the object are

described as interpretative labels/caption. These may be more effective because

they make visitors take a closer look at details of the object or share interesting

information about the object. Below is an example of an interpretative caption for

a painting:


Chief Outina
Theodore Morris
America, date unknown
Oil on canvas
26" X 17"
Courtesy of artist


Timucuans were already occupying the area of
what would later be known as St. Augustine when
Menendez landed on September 08, 1565. This
is a portrait of the chief of the Timucuans, Chief
Outina, as rendered by Theodore Morris. The
Tattoos and the red paint on the Chief's body
signify his nobility. His hair is worn at the top of
his head in a knot, said to make him appear taller
and add to his commanding appearance. He also
has long and pointed fingernails, and his ears are
adorned with small inflated fish bladders.

Captions for interactive objects provide directions on how to use them. Below are

examples:









Press the button on the left to hear a current version
of Te Deum laudamus.


Press the button on the right to hear Father Lopez
narrate the sequence of events that led up to the
mass.


Education programs

As soon as the exhibition concept is finalized and approved by the Museum Director,

the Museum Educator starts to think about programs and activities that will help visitors

better understand the exhibition and maximize their opportunities for learning. If budget

permits, educators also develop guides and activity sheets for the exhibition. It is the

educator's job to ensure that visitors to the museum get the best possible educational

experience from their visit. Education programs for exhibitions can include lectures,

informal discussions, demonstrations, arts and craft activities, story-telling sessions, and

performances. Some of these programs are held during the exhibition opening

reception.



Marketing/Promotion

Museums make sure people know about their exhibition through a variety of ways. They

send out press releases to TV and radio stations, newspapers and magazines. They

also produce banner, posters, fliers, and postcards. Exhibitions are also announced at

the museum's website.



Exhibit Opening









After exhibition installation is completed, the museum holds an exhibit opening

reception. This marks the formal opening of the exhibit to the general public.




Class discussion


Day One:

Show pictures taken from the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and Orlando

Science Center to your class. Encourage the students to look closely at each of the

pictures. Ask the following questions to direct your classroom discussion:

What objects do you see in this picture? (let them enumerate as many objects
they can see)
Based on the objects you can see, what do you think this exhibition is all about?
What do you think is a good title for this exhibition?
Aside from objects what else do you see? Draw their attention to the small pieces
of paper next to the objects. These are called captions.
How do you think this exhibition was put together? Can you imagine what people
at the museum did to put this exhibition together? (possible answers: thought of a
good topic, thought of a title, borrowed instruments from musicians, wrote
captions, assembled the dinosaur bones, asked old people for pictures, etc.).
Write down on the board their answers.


Start discussing the steps in creating a museum exhibition. As you discuss the steps,

take special notice to student answers that are correct or close to the idea of the steps

being discussed. You may choose to discuss the section about labels right before the

label writing activity. Practice conceptualizing an exhibit by going through the exhibit

creation process using specific topics. Below are a few examples of exhibition topics









that may help your students understand how to conceptualize an exhibition. Please note

that these examples have been simplified.


Example #1
Topic: Dengue
The Big Idea:Dengue: Cause, symptoms, and prevention
Objective: Introduce visitors to the deadly disease and teach them
preventive measures to avoid getting infected


Sub-topics: (Introduction) What is dengue?
(Diagnosis) What are its symptoms?
(Aedes mosquito) How does one get infected?
(Prevention) How can we avoid getting infected?


Objects: Pictures illustrating symptoms of dengue
Diagram of how a blood test is conducted
Stethoscope, blood pressure apparatus, blood test kit, and other
medical tools
Picture of the Aedes mosquito, a diagram of its life cycle, and
illustrations of its breeding sites
Mosquito net, insect repellents, long sleeved shirts, pants, socks,
and other objects that could help keep prevent being bitten
by mosquitoes


Interactive/multimedia components:
Videos of a children taking about their dengue experience
A big jigsaw puzzle of the aedes mosquito
Q&A board about symptoms of dengue
Posting board where visitors can leave their suggestions in
stopping the spread of dengue in the community









Education programs:
Invite a doctor to talk about dengue
Design a poster/slogan on dengue prevention


Example #2
Topic:
Big Idea:




Objective:




Sub-topics:








Objects:


Simple Machines
Simple machines make our daily lives easier by allowing us to
accomplish work with little effort.


Help visitors understand the six different kinds of simple machines,
how these work, and where they have been used to make
our everyday lives easier.
The six types of simple machines
Compound machines
Mechanical innovations that use simple machines
Everyday challenges simplified with the help of simple machines
The future of simple machines


Simple machines
Example of everyday objects that use simple machines (bicycle,
screws, slides, door stopper, scissors, pliers, hammers, etc.)
Illustrations of other simple machines at work (elevator,
escalator, ramp, see-saw etc.)
Inventions, gadgets, tools created by students using simple
machines


Interactive/multimedia components:
Videos of how simple machines work
Challenge corner: list a number of common day problems (in school
or at home) and ask visitors to design a gadget that uses
simple (or compound) machines to solve them









A set of small simple machines that visitors can explore


Education programs:
Demonstrations on how simple machines work
Inventor-challenge (use simple machines to create an invention)



Divide the class into small groups. Assign an exhibition topic to each group. You can

also assign the same topic to all groups to see which group could come up with the

most creative ideas. In the following session, each group will present their exhibition

concept complete with a title. This activity will help them prepare for the actual creation

of their classroom museum.



Day two:

Group presentations.



Activity

Remind the students again about the captions in the exhibition. Share examples of the

labels. It is now their turn to write captions for the objects they brought in during the

previous module. Use the information listed in the catalog entry for the objects.



Below are a couple of reminders about writing captions:


When writing labels, remember to K.I.S.S keep it short & simple.
If this object can speak, what would it say to you?









What is the most interesting information about this object: is it the person who
made it, how he made it, or where it came from?

What is unique about this object?

Evaluation

Students can be evaluated through their participation in classroom discussion. Captions

that students write individually should demonstrate how well they the concept of writing

labels, particularly captions. Students should also be evaluated based on their

contribution to the group presentation.



Additional reference

Serrell, B. (1996). Exhibit labels: An interpretive approach. Walnut Creek: Alta Mira
Press.









MODULE FOUR: CREATING YOUR CLASSROOM MUSEUM

This final module is the culmination of the first three modules. Skills that your students

learned from activities in modules one to three will be applied in this module.



Objective

At the end of this module, students will:

Create their classroom museum



Duration of module

Number of class periods required to complete the classroom museum



Materials needed

Images inside museums (included in this resource packet)

Catalog template (from module two)

Tape measure

Art materials

Pedestals/tables/boards for mounting exhibit objects

Objects for the exhibition

List of museums with virtual tours and online exhibitions (included in this packet)



Background information

Information needed will depend on the topic of the exhibition









Class discussion and activities


Start by choosing a topic for your classroom museum. Remember that you can create

an exhibition about practically any topic in your academic curriculum. How about an

exhibition on fractions, whole number or even integers? Maybe your class would like to

put together an exhibition about verbs, nouns, adjectives. Perhaps even an exhibit on

Philippine idiomatic expressions. One of the great things museums are able to do is to

help make abstract ideas become more accessible to visitors. How you can achieve that

is the challenge to you and your students.



Once you have identified your topic, you need to decide on the Big Idea. This statement

will help your students think about what to include and not include in the exhibition.

These steps should involve your students:



A. Brainstorming session to establish objective and sub-topics of the exhibition


Review group presentations from module three to remind students about the

conceptualization process. During this session, you should encourage students

to contribute ideas freely. Remind them that no idea will be considered silly or

ridiculous and the every single idea will be considered. You might be surprised

with what your students come up with once they become confident about voicing

their ideas and thinking out of the box.

What story will your classroom museum tell? What new knowledge do you wish

to impart on your visitors? When thinking of an objective for your classroom

museum, consider what you want visitors to get out of their classroom museum









experience. Do you want them to view something in a different light? For

example, you want students to think that math is fun, or history is exciting, or

science is not limited to textbooks, then your class can put together an exhibition

that will results in visitors feeling this way.

Once the objective has been established start discussing what will be included in

the exhibition. Write down all the ideas that students suggest. Cluster together

similar ideas and see if a bigger idea emerges from them. Review the list and

choose four to five clusters of ideas that support the topic identified. Assign each

cluster of ideas to a group.



B. Research

Each group will have to research their assigned topic. Information from their

research will help them decide what objects to include in their exhibition as well

as what to write in the exhibition labels.



C. Agree on Title

As discussed in module three, titles should tell visitors what the exhibit is about

as well as arouse their curiosity about it.



D. Generate an object list

Students can create objects for the exhibition or borrow them from the school or

community. Remind students to think of specific objects that will help tell the

story of their exhibition. Objects can be photographs, illustrations, art works,









videos, artifacts, or costumes. Students can borrow or create these objects

themselves. Make sure that a catalog entry is prepared for each object as this

will help facilitate return of objects to their rightful owners. Review how to write

catalog entries from module two.



E. Layout exhibition

Decide how the exhibition will be installed. Students can draw a map of the

exhibition space to help them plan where objects will be placed and how they will

be presented. Unless they are very large, avoid putting objects directly on the

floor as it might make it difficult for visitors to see them. Putting objects on the

floor could also damage them. Avoid sticking pins or applying glue or adhesive

tapes directly to photographs (or objects) and attaching them directly on the

walls/exhibition boards as this will make it difficult to remove them later and result

in damaging the objects.



F. Write text and labels

Review guidelines on writing captions and labels from module three. Exhibition

text should be written in the language that most of your visitors will understand.

Some museums provide bi-lingual or multi-lingual text to accommodate visitors

speaking different languages. Consider writing your text in English and your local

language. Labels should be big enough that people can easily read them. Place

labels at a height that visitors will easily see. Since your primary target visitors

are students, place labels at the eye level of a student with an average height.









Again, avoid putting labels directly on the objects. Also make sure that the labels

are not obscuring visitors' view of the objects.



G. Think of programs and activities

The type of education programs and activities you can organize depends on the

focus of your classroom museum. Refer to module three to get ideas on types of

that can complement an exhibition. Your class can invite an artist to conduct a

painting or drawing demonstrations. You can also provide a corner in your

classroom museum where visitors can try their hands at painting, drawing, or

creating something relevant to your exhibition. Consider inviting an expert to

come to your classroom museum and talk about a specific subject within the

topic of your exhibition. Explore your community for people who have firsthand

experience or interesting stories that relate to your exhibition. For example, your

exhibition is about natural calamities. Perhaps one of your students has a parent

who is a geologist; your class can invite him or her to come to class to talk about

earthquakes.



H. Promote the museum

Think of creative ways to invite other classes (or grade levels even other schools)

to visit your classroom museum. Students can create flyers and posters to

promote their exhibition.



I. Open museum to the public









Your classroom museum can have an opening reception. You may choose to

invite family and friends of your students to visit the classroom museum. This will

provide your students with an opportunity to showcase their work and be proud of

what they have accomplished. Some students can play the role of a museum

guide during the opening to engage visitors, answer questions, conduct

demonstrations, and lead activities.


Evaluation

Students can be evaluated based on their participation and contribution in the

classroom museum creation process. For older students, you can ask them to write an

essay about their experience, what they liked most about the process of creating their

classroom museum and why, and what they would change if they had a chance to re-do

the exhibition. For younger students, ask students to list down what they learned from

the experience. Other forms of evaluation could include asking students to maintain an

individual journal to record their personal reflections, or a scrap book to document their

participation.




Additional reference

D'Acquisto, L. (2006). Learning on display: Student-created museums that build
understanding. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum
Development.









PICTURES OF MUSEUMS


* Baltimore Museum of Art
Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America
http://www.artbma.org/

* National Museum of American Indian
Washington, DC, United States of America
http://www.nmai.si.edu/

* Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum
Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America
http://countrymusichalloffame.org/

* Orlando Science Center
Orlando, Florida, United States of America
http://www.osc.org/

* Strong National Museum of Play
Rochester, New York, United States of America
http://www.museumofplay.org/



















LTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART


*'
;si.
Ir;;" :. I*
;~)d .'I:;: -..:'.:*

:"; : 'P lii;
I
*r,. *I"


.-1.











I TIlfDINIF = 1f


ART


.4..










BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART










NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN
















































78










NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN






























79

















79










NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN
















































80









COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM
















































81










COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM















































82










COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM















































83












COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM





















84

....... .. :









































84










ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER
















































85










ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER
















































86










ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER
















































87













































e
a~ ...
9;
~~is~e~-~ ~~g~L~-.5U~
"j; r5"f:!~r ~- ""':'










SII A 1


II


Castoff
Cove


, if


..F .


'R









STRONG NATIONAL MUSEUM OF PLAY
















































90









ADDITIONAL ONLINE RESOURCES

If your school has access to the internet, I recommend that you explore a few of these

websites with your students. I have listed two types of museum websites, those that

offer virtual tours of their museum and those that have online exhibitions. The virtual

tours will provide you and you students with an opportunity to see and explore real

museums virtually. You can use websites that have online exhibitions to get inspirations

on topic, theme, content, and even activities for your classroom museum. Observe

labels and text of the online exhibitions and use these as reference and example in

helping your students write their own text and labels for your classroom museum.


VIRTUAL TOURS

Louvre (France)
http://www.louvre.fr/llv/musee/visite_virtuelle.jsp

State Hermitage Museum (Russia)
http://www.hermitagemuseum.org/htm I_En/08/hm88_0. html

The Monticello Explorer (US)
http://explorer.monticello.org/


ONLINE EXHIBITIONS

Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (US)
This offers an opportunity for users to select objects from the museum's collection, save
them, view online, and share with others. They can even create labels and descriptions
of their chosen objects. It's like setting up your own exhibition!
http://africa.si.edu/collections/createselections.asp

Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (US)
Online exhibitions
http://americanhistory.si.edu/exhibitions/category.cfm?category=online

Natural History Museum (UK)
Online exhibitions
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/online-exhibitions/index.html










National Gallery of Art (US)
Online exhibitions
http://www.nga.gov/onlinetours/index.shtm

British Museum (UK)
Online exhibitions
http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/online_tours.aspx

UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology (US)
Online exhibitions
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu

Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (US)
Online exhibitions
http://www.mnh.si.edu/exhibits/virtual.html

Exploratorium (US)
A collection of online exhibitions, hands-on activities, articles videos, and more.
http://www.exploratorium.edu/explore/exhibits.html

Museum of Science Boston (US)
Online exhibitions
http://www.mos.org/events_activities/virtual_exhibits

Florida Museum of Natural History (US)
Online exhibition
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/staugustine/

The Micropolitan Museum (UK)
Online exhibition
http://www. microscopy-uk.org.uk/micropolitan/index.html

The Franklin Institute (US)
Online exhibition on the human heart
http://www.fi.edu/learn/heart/









REFERENCES


Falk, J., & Deirking, L. (1995). Recalling the museum experience. Journal of Museum
Education, 20(2), 10-13.

Falk, J., & Dierking, L. (1997). School field trips: Assessing their long-term impact.
Curator, 40, 211-218.









APPENDIX B
MUSEUM RESOURCE MATERIALS PREFERENCE OF SCHOOL TEACHERS IN THE
PHILIPPINES SURVEY


Certificate of Informed Consent



My name is Ethel Villafranca and I am a Filipino graduate student pursuing my

master's degree in Museum Studies at the University of Florida. I am conducting a

thesis project entitled Building Bridges: Museum Outreach Resource Material for School

Teachers in the Philippines. My faculty advisor is Dr. Glenn Willumson and he may be

contacted at gwillumson@arts.ufl.edu or +1 352 273-3062.

Part of the project is a research study to determine what format of museum

outreach resource materials (travelling suitcases, online resource materials, or posters

and slides) school teachers in the Philippines would use if it were made available to

them. Data collected from this study will inform the direction of the resource material

that I am developing as my thesis project. The resource material will aim to introduce

students to what a museum is, what they do and their important contribution to society.

Lessons and activities, which will be aligned with the Philippine Department of

Education's Revised Basic Education Curriculum, will teach how museums fulfill their

educational role through collections and exhibitions. The resource material will be

designed for multi-disciplinary use and can be applied to lessons in science, history,

math or art. As a culmination, students will collaborate to create their own classroom

museum.

This is a very short survey composed of only nine questions and should not take

you more than ten minutes to complete. If you choose to participate in this study you will









be asked to indicate the format (travelling suitcase, online resources materials, or

posters and slides) of the resource materials that you would be willing to use if

museums developed and made these available to you. You will also be asked to

provide basic information about yourself, such as location and type (private or public) of

the school where you currently teach, the number of years you have been teaching, and

the grade level of your students. Your personal details will remain private. There is no

compensation for participating, and there are no risks associated with participation in

this study. There are no direct benefits to you for participating in the study. Your

participation is voluntary and you may withdraw your consent at anytime without

consequence.

I may be contacted at ethelvillafranca@ufl.edu for any questions about the study

and the project.

By answering this survey, you agree that you are at least 18 years old and that

you read, understand, and accept the above information.









MUSEUM RESOURCE MATERIALS PREFERENCE OF SCHOOL TEACHERS IN
THE PHILIPPINES SURVEY



1. Name:
2. E-mail address:

3. Where do you currently teach? (Please indicate city and region)
4. How many years have you been teaching?
LO less than one year
L less than three years O less than ten years
O less than five years O more than ten years

5. What grade levels do you teach?
[OGrade 1
O Grade 2 LIGrade 4
O Grade 3 OGrade 5
Other: Please specify IGrade 6

6. Have you ever brought your students to a museum for a field trip? Please
specify names of museum.
Iyes
L no
Please list names of museums where you have taken your students:



7. What educator/teacher resources offered by museums have you used to
support traditional classroom teaching techniques? Check all that are applicable.
LO None, I have never used any
LO Pre-field trip guidelines/activities
LO Field Trip Worksheet
LJ Curriculum Resource Units (Printed lesson plans and materials)
LO Online Curriculum Resource Units (Lesson plans and materials that can be
downloaded from a website)
LO Traveling Museum Suitcases (Museum objects, information and activities sent to
schools in a suitcase)
LO Multi-media Resource Loans (Video, Audio, Poster, Slides)
Others: Please specify


8. Please provide name of museums where you got these resources from.










9. What type of school teacher resources from museums you would use in your
classroom if it was made available to you? (Note: Resources will support DepEd's
Revised Basic Education Curriculum) Please choose only one.
LO Online Curriculum Resource Units (Lesson plans and materials that can be
downloaded from a website)
LO Traveling Museum Suitcases (Museum objects, information and activities sent to
schools in a suitcase)
LO Multi-media Resource Loans (Video, Audio, Poster, Slides on specific topics)

10. Other comments and suggestions.









LIST OF REFERENCES


Abdal-Haqq. (1998). Constructivism in Teacher Education: Considerations for Those
Who Would Link Practice to Theory. ERIC Digest. Washington, DC: ERIC
Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education.

Alexander, E., & Alexander, M. (2008). Museums in motion: An introduction to the
history and functions of museums (2nd ed). Lanham, MD: Altamira Press.

Atherton J. (2010). Learning and Teaching: Piaget's developmental theory. Retrieved
from http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/piaget.htm.

Atherton J. (2010). Learning and Teaching: Bloom's taxonomy. Retrieved from
http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/bloomtax.htm.

Black, G. (2005). The engaging museum: Developing museums for visitor involvement.
New York, NY: Routledge.

D'Acquisto, L. (2006). Learning on display: Student-created museums that build
understanding. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum
Development.

Department of Education. (2009) Fact Sheet September 2009. Retrieved from
http://www.deped.gov.ph/cpanel/uploads/issuancelmg/Factsheet2009%20Sept%
2022.pdf.

Dierking, L. (2002). The role of context in children's learning from objects and
experiences. In Paris, S. (Ed.), Perspective in object centered learning in
museums (pp. 3-18). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

Fairbairn, D. (1987). The art of questioning your students. The Clearing House: A
Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas, 61(1), 19- 22.

Falk, J., & Deirking, L. (1995). Recalling the museum experience. Journal of Museum
Education, 20(2), 10-13.

Falk, J. H., & Dierking, L. D. (1997). School field trips: Assessing their long-term impact.
Curator, 40, 211-218.

Falk, J., & Dierking, L. (2000). Learning from museums: Visitor experiences and the
making of meaning. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira Press.

Grenon Brooks, J., & Brooks, M. (1993). In search of understanding: The case for the
constructivist classrooms. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.









Hein, G. (1991). The museum and the needs of people. CECA (International Committee
of Museum Educators) Conference, Jerusalem Israel, Oct. 15 22, 1991.
Retrieved from
http://www.exploratorium.edu/ifi/resources/constructivistlearning.html.

Hein, G. (1998). Learning in the Museum. New York, NY: Routledge.

Hein, G. E., & Alexander, M. (1998). Museums: Places of learning. Washington DC:
American Association of Museums Education Committee.

Hirzy, E. (1992). Excellence and equity: Education and the public dimension of
museums. Washington, DC: American Association of Museums.

Hirzy, E.(Ed.).(1996). True needs, true partners: Museums and schools transforming
education. Washington, DC: Institute of Museum Services.

Hooper-Greenhill, E. (1992). Museums and the shaping of knowledge. London:
Routledge.

Hooper-Greenhill, E., Dodd, J., Gibson, L., Phillips, M., Jones, C., & Sullivan, E. (2006,
April). What did you learn at the museum today? Second study. Retrieved from
http://www.le.ac.uk/ms/research/Reports/Whatdidyoulearn2.pdf.

Institute of Museum and Library Services (2009). Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century
Skills (IMLS-2009- NAI-01). Washington, DC.

Latshaw, G. (2009) Cash-strapped schools cancel field trips. USA Today (29 April,
2009). Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2009-04-29-
field-trips_N.htm

Lord, B. (2007). The manual of museum learning. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

McComas, W. (2006). Science teaching beyond the classroom. The Science Teacher,
73(1), 26-30.

Montalvan, A. (2010) Mindanao, island of museums. Philippine Daily Inquirer (25
October, 2010). Retrieved from
http://lifestyle.inquirer. net/artsandbooks/artsandbooks/view/20101025-
299548/Mindanao-island--of-museums.

National Research Council (U.S.), & Bell, P. (2009). Learning science in informal
environments: People, places, and pursuits. Washington, DC: National
Academies Press.

Popescu, R. (2008). No child outside the classroom. Newsweek, 151(6), 12-12.









Reisberg, D., & Heuer, F. (2004). Memory for emotional events. In Reisberg, D., &
Hertel, P.(Eds.), Memory and emotion (pp. 3-41). Oxford, UK: Oxford University
Press.

Yaeger, R. (1991). The constructivist learning model: Towards real reform in science
education. The Science Teacher, 58(6), 52-57.


100




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E1J4OT4H8_762SY1 INGEST_TIME 2017-08-14T20:13:19Z PACKAGE AA00000312_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

1 TO CREATING A CLASSROOM MUSEUM IN THE PHILIPPINES By ETHEL D. VILLAFRANCA SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE: GLENN WILLUMSON, CHAIR MICHELLE TILLANDER MEMBER PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ATS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2010

PAGE 2

2 2010 Ethel D. Villafranca

PAGE 3

3 To my Mom and Dad.

PAGE 4

4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to express my sincerest gratitud e to a long list of people for a very enriching graduate school experience. First of all, I thank my committee chair, Dr. Glenn Willumson, and my committee mem ber, Dr. Michelle Tillander for their guidance and unwavering support not only during the completion of m y project but throughout my graduate study. Their encouragement and support enabled me to pursue many opportunities I would not have explored on my own. I am also grateful to all the professors I took classes under and the staff at the Harn Museum and Flor ida Museum who have all been generous about sharing their knowledge experience, and expertise I also thank my museum studies peers for all the fun, adventures, learnings, even frustrations, and most of all for making me feel welcomed in th is (not so) foreign country. Special mention goes out to Dushanti Jayawardena for extending the hands of friendship even before I arrived in the US as well as for the encouraging words while I was writing my project ; To Tracy Pfaff for sitting through my pra ctice presentation and offering thoughtful suggestions and for being craziest and most fun museum studies student I had the pleasure of knowing ; and to Heather Barrett for helping me edit the I thank my Pinoy UF friends ( most especially Jean Pal mes Star Gonzales and Jill Dumanat ) for helping me keep my sanity during those gloomy days. F or the ir gift of friendship and for generously sharing their culture with me, I wish to thank the Fulbright and other international students at UF I also thank Ms. Debra Anderson for being my mom away from home. Thanks also go to Carmel Baseleres, Joanne Lim, and Hazel Pangilinan, for their never ending moral support and continued friendship.

PAGE 5

5 I am also grateful to Fulbright and the University : without their scholarships I would not have been able to pursue my graduate studies. I am blessed to have amazing parents who worked very hard to ensure that I get the best education they can afford I would not be where I am today if not for the uncondi tional love of my family who always supported me in pursuing my dreams.

PAGE 6

6 TABLE OF CONTENTS page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ................................ ................................ ................................ .. 4 ABSTRACT ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 7 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 9 2 WHY SHOULD TEACHERS CREATE A CLASSROOM MUSEUM ? ...................... 14 O verview of the Constructivist Theory of Learning ................................ ................. 14 Traditional Versus Constructivist Classroom ................................ .......................... 15 Principles of Constructivism that Support the Creation and Use of a Classroom Museum ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 20 Questions During Classroom Discussion ................................ ............................. 2 1 How Do People Learn in Museums? ................................ ................................ ..... 25 Summary ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 2 7 3 DEVELOPING THE TO CREATING A CLASSROOM MUSEUM IN THE PHILIPPINES ................................ ................................ ............ 29 O verview ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 29 Resource Materials Preference of School Tea chers in the Philippines ......... 31 Teacher Resources/Programs Offered by Philippine Museums ................... 33 From Learning a bout Museums to Creating a Classroom Museum ........................ 35 Summary ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 38 40 APPENDIX A PHILIPPINES 4 3 B MUSEUM RESOURCE MATERIALS PREFERENCE OF SCHOOL TEACHERS IN THE PHILIPPINES 93 LIST OF REFERENCES ................................ ................................ ............................... 97 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH ................................ ................................ .......................... 10 1

PAGE 7

7 Abstract of Project in Lieu of Thesis Presented to the College of Fine Arts of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts TO CREATING A CLASSROOM MUSEUM IN THE PHILIPPINES By Ethel D. Villafranca December 2010 Chair: Glenn Willumson Major: Museology Museums offer many great opportuniti es for learning regardless of interests, or background. Museums make ideas more accessible, help facilitate intellectual conn confidence, and motivate visitors to pursue future learning. The museum experience results in a more holistic learning because it impacts all three learning domains: cognitive, affective, an d psychomotor domains Numerous studies show that school field trips to museums have long term positive impact on students and are salient experiences especially to elementary school children. One study in the United States found that nearly 100% of parti cipating students can still recall one or more content related detail from a trip that happened several years ago. Another study in the United Kingdom found that both teachers and children viewed their museum visit in an extremely positive way and students benefited academically by gaining new knowledge, skills, and inspiration as a result of their visit. If visiting museums is highly beneficial to school children, then it is logical that all students

PAGE 8

8 go to museums. Unfortunately, in the Philippines, both f inancial and geographic obstacles make it difficult for school children to visit museums. Major museums are concentrated in the National Capital Region and not all provinces have a local museum. Since the Philippines is an archipelago, traveling to a muse um is a time consuming and expensive endeavor, especially for schools in remote provinces. Museums in the Philippines also do not have enough outreach programs and teacher resource materials to provide even a limited kind of museum experience to millions o f students who lack physical access to museums. To help with this problem, I developed a to Creating a Classroom Museum in the Philippines If school children cannot go to museums, and museums do not have the means to reach them, then schoo ls should create classroom museums to give students a museum experience. Aside from the benefits of having academically and personally enriching. Using principles of the C onstructivist Theory of Learning, I designed learning modules that will equip students with analytical tools content mastery, critical thinking, problem solving, and communicati on and collaboration skills. By participating in the creation of a classroom m useum, students learn important skills they can apply inside and outside the classroom and also engender a positive attitude toward museums. These students, who will fondly remember their classroom museum experience, could become future museum visitors, pa trons, and advocates.

PAGE 9

9 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Museums offer many great opportunities for learning, and are uniquely capable of providing a diverse range of learning experiences to a wide variety of visitors regardless of their age, interests, or backgrou nd (Hirzy, 1992). Knowledge is a commodity th at museums readily offer to visitors (Hooper Greenhill, 1992). According to Meredith, Fortner, and Mullins (as cited in McComas, 2006) learning in museums is capable of impac ting all three learning domains ( cognitive, affective, and psychomotor ) and therefore lead s to a more holistic learning experience. Ho wever, Lord (2007) believes learning in museum s is more affec tive and tran sformative and the value of the museum experience lies in i ts ability to change visitor attitude s interest s appreciation and belief s stressing the development of critical judgment, awe, piety, sensitivity, empathy, ternative set of experiences that seek to transform and improve learners, not merely to improve their statistical performance Howard Gardner, a developmental psychologist best known for his multiple intelligences theory, said muse ums can engage students, stimulate their understanding, and encourage them to take control of their future learning (McCommas, 2006). Studies have shown that school field trips to museums have long term impact on students ( Falk, & Dierking 1997) and that these are salient experiences especially to elementary school children ( Falk, & Dierking 1995). A study by Falk and Dierking (1997) found that nearly 100% of participating students are still able to recall one or more things learned during the trip that t hey went to many years ago. The majority of what students recalled

PAGE 10

10 was content or subject matter related. Another study involving 26,000 school children and 1,600 teachers who visited 69 museums across the U nited K ingdom found that both teachers and chi ldren viewed the visit in an extremely positive way. Teachers felt that students benefited educationally by gaining new knowledge, skills, and inspiration as a result of their museum visit (Hooper Greenhill et al., 2006) The Institute for Museums and Libr ary Services report on 21 st c entury skills stated that school aged children spend a vast majority of their waking hours in non school settings like museums and libraries. In these settings, they learn 21 st century skills such as problem solving, collaborat ion, global awareness, and self direction that they take back with them and use in their classrooms (IMLS, 2009). A report published by the National Research Council added that informal setting s which include museums, help students develop awareness, inte rest, motivation, and social competencies and practices. Their museum experience can help students in gaining incremental knowledge, habits of mind, and identities that make them want to learn more (National Research Council, and Bell, 20 09). In fact John a model school included a museum (Alexander and Alexander, 2008) Dewey is an American developmental psycho logist and education reformer who is acknowledged as the father of experiential learning All these research and reports validate the val ue of the museum experience for school children. However, even with all these evidences on the positive impact of museum visits, a number of factors still prevent students from going on field trips to museums. In the U nited S tates th e No Child Left Behind (NCLB) policy implemented in 2002 has been pointed out as one of the major reason s for the decline of museum field

PAGE 11

11 trips. With increased emphasis on achieving high scores on standardized tests, teachers became reluctant to take students away from the classroom (Popescu, 2008). T his means schools only allow their students to visit museums with exhibits an d activities that address specific topics under the ir state curriculum standards. Activities that do not directly contribute to high test scores, such as field trips t o museums, are no longer considered a priority. The NCLB policy plus the economic downturn th at prompted wi de scale budget cuts in schools, definitely contributed to a substantial decline in school field trips to museums (Latshaw, 2009). In the Philippines, funding of school field trips for public school students is almost non existent. Aside fro m the financial challenges, the geographic structure of the Philippines poses as an additional deterrent that limit s museum s The Philippines is an archipelago composed of over seven thousand islands. It has three major islands: the National Capital Region (NCR) are located; Visayas; and Mindanao. The NCR is the economic, political, cultural and educational center of the country. The National Museum, along with most other major publi c and private Philippine museums, is located in the NCR. I recently learned that museums in Mindanao are steadily flourishing in numbers. There are currently 85 museums in Mindanao, more than the number of museums in Manila (Montalvan, 2010). Unfortun ately, other parts of the country are not as progressive in establishing museums, which means that a large number of school children still have limited access to museums.

PAGE 12

12 While it is definitely possible for schools to arrange for field trips, travelling to museums from distant provinces remains inconvenient, time consuming, and very expensive. Furthermore, most museums in the Philippines are not able to provide outreach programs and resources to school children that do not have access to museums. Last yea r, I conducted a research study among Philippine museums to find out what types of resources and programs are being offered to school teachers. A more detailed discussion of this research study is i n chapter t hree. Through the research study I found out t hat only three museums out of the 29 I surveyed offered lesson plans/curriculum connections to school teachers. With 598,812 elementary and high school teachers and 20,450,501 elementary and high school students (Department of Education, 2009), clearly t hese three museums are not capable of providing outreach service to all of them. Imagine the number of school children that are deprived of the benefits of a museum experience! As a possible solution to this problem, I developed a to Creati ng a Classroom Museum in the Philippines (Appendix A) If school children cannot go to museums, and museums do not have the means to reach them, then schools can create classroom museums so tha t students are provided a museum experience. Aside from the benefits of having access to a museum classroom museum will be both academically and personally enriching. In chapter two I will elaborate on how the pr ocess of creating and using a classroom museum can help teachers achieve important goals of education such as content mastery, critical thinking capacity, problem solving ability, and collaboration skills. Since I developed the with the Con structivist Theory of Learning

PAGE 13

13 in mind, I briefly discuss this theory and how specific Constructivist principles apply to the activities in creating a classroom museum. To emphasize the difference between a constructivist and a traditional classroom s etting, I provide a comparative analysis Finally, I expound on how learning occurs in the classroom museum using Falk and

PAGE 14

14 CHAPTER 2 WHY SHOULD TEACHERS CREATE A CLASSROOM M USEUM? To understand the benefit of creating classroom museums it is important to examine first how learning happens and how individuals construct knowledge. I used the Constructivist Theory of Learning as a guiding principle in structuring lessons and activities in the to Creating a Classroom Museum in the Philippines ( Appendix A ). O verview of the Constructivist Theory of Learning The Constructivist theory defines knowledge as temporary, developmental, and both so cially and culturally med iated (Grennon Brook s & Brooks, 1993). This theory postulates that knowledge is constructed in the minds of i ndividuals, through methods the learner has chosen. In other words, learners are responsible for their own learning, which requires that they actively participate in the process using n o t o n l y their minds but their hands as well In constructivism, learning occurs when individuals reconcile their pre existing knowledge and experience with new information they encounte r. When confronted with an idea, object or phenomenon that does not make sense to them individuals either interpret this to conform to their present set of rules for explaining and ordering the world, or they create a new set of rules that would accommodate wha t they think is happening ( Grennon Brooks, & Brooks, 1993 ). Constructivism, which takes its roots from works of developmental psychologists such as John Dewey, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky, is a theory about learning and knowledge. While all three suppo rted the Constructivist view that knowledge is self constructed, each of them has a slightly different approach on the theory. Dewey

PAGE 15

15 believed in experiential learning, which means that individuals learn better if they are given the opportunity to engage in activities that require them to apply whatever concept they are trying to learn (Hein and Alexander, 1998). Jean Piaget, major proponent of increases as the individual graduates to higher stages of cognitive development. Vygotsky, a social constructivist, emphasize d the importance of language and social interaction in learning (Atherton, 2010). Hein (1998) explains that the opposite of Constructivism, represented by the absorpti on transmission theory of learning, consider s individuals as passive learners. Knowledge exists independent of the learner s : learned. Learners are viewed as empty vessels waiting to be filled with knowledge by an autho rity. T raditional versus C o n structivist Classroom For the purpose of this paper, I will refer to school environments where teachers do not base their practice on constructivism as a traditional classroom. In a traditional classroom, the teacher is conside red an authority figure : as in the absorption transmission theory of learning. In contrast, the teacher in the constructivist classroom acts more as a guide or learning. But more importantly, the teacher takes on the role of a explorer who encourages learners to question, challenge, and formulate their own Haqq, 1998). Teachers still f ollow structured academic goals H owever, they are no longer compelled to teach lessons based on the strict cover to cover order of the textbooks used in class. The Constructivist teaching

PAGE 16

16 approach works better because studies have shown that children learn better when they are given a greate r sense of control over their own learning ( Falk, & Dierking 2000). In a constructivist classroom, questions are used as powerful tools for teaching and learning (Yaeger, 1991). Not only are questions from students encouraged but they are considered valua subject matter, not of their ignorance. It is important therefore for the teacher to create a learning environment whe re students feel comfortable asking questions. Student question s are also used by teachers to guide the direction of the classroom discussion. the students to suggest answers, or provide gu quest to discover the answer to his /her own question. When posing questions to their students, teachers u se open ended questions that allow students the opportunity to expound on their answers. There is not one right answer to a question, or one right so lution to a problem. When students give inaccurate responses, instead of immediately judging these as wrong or incorrect, teachers ask them to elaborate in order for him /her to understand how and why the student arrived at these conclusions. As students re flect on and articulate their reasons, teachers also gain process es challenge traditional views and encourage self reflection, which usually result in students generating innovative ideas about themselves and the world around them. Activities in a constructivist classroom are chosen based on their potential for developing student s critical thinking skills These activities are charac terized by active engagement, inquiry, and problem solving. Students are given time to reflect on new

PAGE 17

17 concepts presented to them; to make sense of this new concept; and then an opportunity to apply these to practical use. One teaching approach frequ ently mentioned in constructivist literature is the use where two or three students discuss approaches to a given problem with little or no (Yaeger, 1991). Students learn from each other and each member contribute s his /her prior knowledge to the collective knowledge of the group. By working in groups students have the opportunity to see different perspectives about one concept, various soluti ons to a problem or varying points of view about issues. This exposure and sharing of knowledge can help them reconcile issues they are facing and thereby resu lt in better understanding. If each member of a group contributes one approach to solving a problem, then a group of six students is automatically provided with six possible solutions to one single problem. Even if none of the proposed solutions work, at the very least, the opportunity to test all of them would result in the students learning six ways of how n ot to solve this particular problem. Constructivists generally maintain that when information is acqu ired through the transmission model of learning, it is not always well integrated with prior knowledge and is often accessed and articulated only for formal ac ademic occasions such as exams (Abdal ability to repeat what has been taught by the teacher. To assess learning, teachers use multiple choice or short answer test questions. As a result of this practice, students with good memorization skills do well in standardized tests. However, the same students often lack the ability to integrate new information into their prior knowledge or apply it t o

PAGE 18

18 practical use in their life. Ther efore, after taking the exam ( generally deemed by most students as the reason they need to learn this information ) students no longer remember what they Grennon Brooks, & Brooks, 1993 ). T eachers who subscribe to the C onstructivist theory o f learning allow their students to express their acquired knowledge in a variety of ways. These a ssessments can be in the form of a presentation, play, musical, poems, journals, artwork, researches, invention, or exhibition. Table 2 1 shows features of traditional and c onstructivist classroom s

PAGE 19

19 Table 2 1 Traditional versus Constructivist classroos Traditional c lassrooms Constructivist c lassrooms Curriculum is presented part to whole, with emphasis on basic skil ls. Curriculum is presented whole to part with emphasis on big concepts. Strict adherence to fixed curriculum is highly valued. Pursuit of student questions is highly valued. Curricular activities rely heavily on textbooks and workbooks. Curricular activities rely heavily on primary sources of data and manipulative materials. onto which information is etched by the teacher. Students are viewed as thinkers with emerging theories about the world. Teachers gene rally behave in a didactic manner, disseminating information to students. Teachers generally behave in an interactive manner, mediating the environment for students. Teachers seek the correct answer to validate student learning. Teachers seek the stude present conceptions for use in subsequent lessons. Assessment of student learning is viewed as separate from teaching and occurs almost entirely through testing. Assessment of student learning is inte rwoven with teaching and occurs through teacher observations of students at work and through student exhibitions and portfolios. Students primarily work alone. Students primarily work in groups. Source: Grenon Brooks, J., & Brooks, M. (1993). In search of understanding: The case for the constructivist classrooms. Alexan dria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

PAGE 20

20 Principles o f Constructivism t hat Support the Creati on and Use o f a Classroom Museum Drawing upon works of Constructivist theorist s Dewey and Piaget, Hein (1992) identified several principles of learning. From these principles, I selected four that are most relevant to my project: 1) l earning is an active pr ocess; 2) construction of meaning is mental; 3) l earning is a social activity; and 4) m otivatio n is crucial to learning. In th is section, I discuss how each principle is a pplied in the proc ess of creat ing and us ing a classroom museum. First learning is an active process in which the learner uses sensory input and constructs meaning out of it. In setting up a classroom museum, students are expected to actively participate in all phases of the creation process : from conceptualization, researc h, collecti ng or creati ng of exhibit objects, installing the exhibition, adver tising the exhibition, and included in the modules leading up to the exhibition set up not only involve discussi ons and lectures but also opportunities for students to interact with physical objects. Students will learn skills, such as writing catalog entries, labels, and laying out the exhibition, and then put these new skills immediately to practical use. If the t eacher decides that students will actually create objects that will be included in the exhibition (i.e. science experiments, artworks, rep licas of artifacts, dioramas ), oppo rtunit ies for learning increase as this process involve s multiple se nsory experiences, more time, and layered opportunities for learning. It is also recommended that hand s on or interactive component ( such as objects that can be played with, solved, touched, or activities people can participate in ) be included in the exh ibit ion Other students not involved in creating the exhibit and

PAGE 21

21 visitors from outside the school community, also benefit and learn from the exhibition through their interaction with the objects on exhibit, the interactive components, and activitie s provided (Hein and Alexander, 1998). Second, the crucial action of constructing meaning is mental Although physical action or hands on experience, is deemed necessary for learning, it is not sufficient by itself. For children to learn, their minds must also be engaged : as well as Modules in the to Creating a Classroom Museum always involve classroom discussions. In these discussions, teachers use questions that will encourage students to think about wh at they already know, and then guide them in integrating their prior knowledge with newly introduced concepts One crucial step in creating a classroom museum involves students doing research on their chosen topics. Conducting research and making s ense of the information are activities that require higher order thinking skills such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation These skills form t axonomy of learning Bloom identified three learning domains : cognitive, affective, and psycho motor Each d omain consist s of several levels of learning objectives that require more skills as the level increases (Atherton, 2010). Since students are mentally involved in finding inf ormation, instead of it passively being transmitted to them by their teacher, students are more likely to learn this information Questions During Classroom Discussion Classroom discussion and questioning are an integral part of the activitie s in the Using provocative and open ended questions, teachers can encourage students to express their understanding of concepts, or issues they are

PAGE 22

22 grappling with (Fairbairn, 1987). This approach also provides an opportunity for students t o share their individual knowledge with the rest of the class. After a classroom discussion, students are divided into groups for further discussion and to work together in accomplishing their assigned tasks. In module three, the class is divided into smal ler groups, and each group is given an exhibition topic. Groups are asked to conceptualize an exhibition based on their assigned topic and later present this to the whole class. Part of their task is to think of an exhibition title, big idea, objective, su b topics, objects, interactive/multimedia components, and education programs for their exhibit. Third, learning is a social activity. Hein posits that communicating and interacting with other individuals is crucial in the learning process. This interactio n between individuals through discussions and conversation helps them articulate their impressions, navigate through difficult concepts, explore ideas and share their understanding with each other. Activities in the modules always involve interaction among students through class or group d iscussions and activities. For example, i n module one, students are given the chance to create their own museum. After making a collage of their museum, students are asked to share in class the name of th eir museum, what can be seen inside it, and why they decided to create that museum. Through this activity, students can learn about other possible museum concepts that they may not have personally thought of, or considered. Students are also given an oppor tunity to share their ideas in class especially during the brainstorming sessions. Although students may be assigned individual research assignments within a group, they are expected to share results of their research with their group and then

PAGE 23

23 later with the whole class. Students must work and learn together to successfully create their classroom museum. Fourth, motivation is a key component in learning. According to Hein (1992), motivation not only helps in learning, but essential for learning to occu r. He adds that unless individuals know why they should learn something, then they will not be compelled to apply new found knowledge to practical use. The classroom museum can be a great source of motivation and pride for students as this is an opportun ity for them to showcase their mastery of concepts and creativity. In creating the classroom museum, students are learning skills and acquiring knowledge that are not tested on paper. Instead, they are required to apply these newly acquired skills and kno wledge in creating their classroom museum. These skills include analysis creativity, innovation, critical thinking, problem solving, interpersonal communication, and collaboration. Students will also need to process knowledge acquired through their re search into a cohesive narrative that can effectively convey the story or concept of their classroom exhibit. The time, energy, and passion they put into the activities will yield tangible outcomes. Motivation can also stem from students playing the role o f knowledgeable museum staff to engage visitors, answer questions, conduct demonstrations, and lead activities. Since they are expected to be knowledgeable about the whole exhibition, they could be motivated to isto, 2006). Therefore, they will learn about specific topics they personally researched and also topics the other students researched

PAGE 24

24 consider creating a classroom museum i s that students like them. Below are comments from two students involved in creating their classroom museum: to) actually see we need(ed) to learn. Brownwyn, 6 th grader days was (writing) the book be cause it was really hard work, but it was fun Kianna, 2 nd grader These comments from students clearly show that the students not only enjoyed participating in the project and also expressed a sense of accomplishment from completing the ir task. Shifting from the traditional to the constructivist appro ach to teaching is not easy. A c onstructivist approach will require s that teachers invest more time and energy in preparing lessons, resources, and materials. The Cons tructivist approach require s fle xible and sometimes more spontaneous negotiations of classroom management strategies. And most importantly the Constructivist approach requires the patience to draw out student understanding, facilita te paths to learning, and pace teaching rhythm to accommodate students abilities and interests. Creating a classroom museum makes more work for teachers who must secure permission from the school to embark on a project that is not traditionally part of the curriculum. Teachers also need to find a venue for the exhibition, help student s borrow or create objects to include in the exhibition, and acquire supplies to be used in installing the exhibition. However, creating a classroom

PAGE 25

25 museum promises immense learning opportunities for students and that alone should be worth cons idering. How Do People Learn i n Museums? When the classroom museum is opened up to the rest of the school, and even the outside community, then the learning potential extend s beyond the students involved in its creation. For this reason, I deemed it necess ary to discuss how the museum experience results in learning. Regardless of where the museum is housed ( in a building, classroom, park, or even a bus for some mobile museums), certain factors necessary for learning remain the same. From reading various literature related to my research ( learning theories, teaching strategies, adult and children learning, and educational role of museums ), I observed increased interest by researchers in studying how individuals learn in museums ( Falk, & Dierking 2000; Hein, 1998; Hein and Alexander, 1998; Hooper Greenhill, 1992; Lord, 2007). Although great strides have been made in understanding the role and nature of learning in museums, much work is needed before we can begin to unde rstand completely, if that is even possible, how learning occurs in museums. One theoretical framework that aims to map out learning in museums is the Contextual Model of Learning proposed b y Falk and Dierking (2000). Th eir framework suggests that learning is influenced by the interplay of the following three distinct contexts: personal context socio cultural context physical context The personal context ( Falk, & Dierking 2000) characterizes learning as a very personal experience dependent on several fact ors including motivation and

PAGE 26

26 expectations; prior knowledge, interest, and beliefs; and choice and control. Falk and Dierking recognize that learning is prompted by personal motivation and emotional cues but facilitated by personal interests. While the deci sion for students to visit a classroom museum may not be intrinsically motivated, the path s they follow in viewing the exhibition, as well as specific objects they choose to examine are dictated by their personal interests. As in Constructivism, the personal context of the Contextual Model of Learning Since concepts introduced in the exhibitio n are the same concepts the students are learning in class. The potential for learning is increased because about the concept is reinforced by additional information present in the exhibition. A museum visit is a social even t. The socio cultural context ( Falk, & Dierking 2000) positions learning as both an individual and group experience. Both Constructivism and the Con textual Model of Learning ( Falk, & Dierking, 2000) view learning as socially mediated. Individuals do not l earn in isolation. Learning is a shared process between a community of learners where each learner contributes individual knowledge and prior experiences. This also holds true for a classroom museum. Visiting a classroom museum provides students an opportunity to engage in conversation s with other students about the ir experience, especially if the topic of the exhibition is something they are learning together in class. Students can also learn from each other by sharing what they already know about t he to pic. Communication of ideas is also viewed as socio cultural in nature, which explains why individuals have better chances

PAGE 27

27 of remembering information when it is delivered in a story or narrative form (Dierking, 2002) such as a classroom museum exhibition The physical context ( Falk, & Dierking 2000) explains that learning occurs sensations all contribute to the learning experience. Research sugges t s that whe n asked to recall their museum experience, most individuals even after 20 or 30 years, easily remember what they saw, did and felt during their museum visit (Dierking, 2002). Included in the physical context are the objects an individual encounters in a m useum. hand experience with objects stimulate curiosity, exploration, and emotions Creating and visiting a classroom museum is a good way for students to encounter a tangible representation of ab stract concepts they are learning in class. In addition, s tudents visiting a classroom museum are given the opportunity to i nteract with objects, reflect on them and construct personal meanings through them. In Constructivism, emphasis is placed on use of primary sources of data, such as actual objects, and manipulatives to test concept s and ideas. Interacting with actual physical objects, such as those in the classroom museum, provides opportunities for students to conduct their own observation an d test their own theories. Summary The value of creating a classroom museum not only lies in providing students access to a museum but also in developing critical skills that students gain from involvement in c reating the classroom museum can help increase analytical skill creativity, innovation, critical thinking,

PAGE 28

28 problem solving, interpersonal communication, and col laboration skills that they could definitely use in and out of the classroom. One characteristic of a Constructivist teaching approach is the use of questions (Yaeger, 1991). In the class discussion sections throughout the modules, I provid ed questions teachers can use to direct the discussion and encourag e students t o share their thoughts and ideas. The activities were also designed to encourage teachers to engage their students and allow them to make decisions in every step of the classroom museum development process, instead teacher s making all the decisions t hemselves and giving students orders Involving students in decision making gives students a greater sense of control over their learning, another characteristic of the constructivist teaching approach, which leads to more successful learning ( Falk, & Dierking 2000). Finally, since Constructivism views learning as a social activity (Hein, 1992), a number of activities in the require students to work together in small groups. While each student has individual responsibiliti es the success of creating the classroom museum depends In chapter three I discuss details of how I developed the to Creating a Classroom Museum in the Philippines and elabor ate on each of the four modules

PAGE 29

29 CHAPTER 3 DEVELOPING THE TO CREATING A CLASSROOM MUSEUM I N THE PHILIPPINES Overview The impetus to develop a to Creating a Classroom Museum in the Philippines came from m y desire to create educational materials that could help bridge the gap between schools and museums in the Philippines. My first job after completing my undergraduate degree in 1998 was as Continuing Education Assistant at Ayala Museum, an art and history museum located at the h eart of the business d istrict in adults. These programs primarily consisted of visual art workshops and a few exhibition related lectures. From browsing th rough websites of museums outside the Philippines, I realized that there was more to public programs than just workshops. However, it was not until 2001 when I was awarded a grant by the Asian Cultural Council (ACC), an affiliate of the Rockefeller Brother s Foundation, to visit museums in the United States that I became aware of the breadth of education programs offered to the public by museums in the United States The grant from ACC enabled me to visit and observe education programs of over seventy museums in various cities in the United States including New York, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, Louisville, Salem, San Diego, and Washington DC. There were family events, demonstrations, guided tours for various ages ( even as young as toddlers ) performances, activit y sheets, exploration boxes, travelling suitcases, partnerships with schools, and so much more! I was also able to sit down and discuss a few of these programs with education staff from several of the museums I visited. The experience was both overwhelming and inspiring!

PAGE 30

30 After returning to the Philippines from the five month ACC grant, I started exploring and developing a few of the programs I saw during my visit to the United States. Programs that help ed ducational standards were among the kinds of museum education programs that strongly resonated in me. As a result I developed and implemented a new program that focused o n collections to target specific learning objective s under the prescribed Department of Education (DepEd) Revised Basic Education Curriculum (RBEC) 1 The program had three modules, with each module targeting specific grade levels that ranged from pre school to grade six. Each module consisted of a brief lecture, a gallery tour, an educational game and an art activity. I wanted to develop a wider variety of education al program s but I came to realize that what I learned during my observation tour and reading books about museum education and ch decided to pursue a graduate degree in museum education. I knew I needed to learn and understand the theoretical basis for creating effective education programs in a structured learning a specialization in education, at the University of Florida was made possible by a Fulbright Fellowship grant. I knew early on that for my project, I wanted to create resource material elementary school teachers in the Philippines could use in their classrooms Since I wanted to make sure my project would help address a need in the Philippines, I ________________ 1 The R BEC is the prescribed standard that public school students from grades one to six and first to fourth year high school have to learn in school. Public school are required to follow these standards while private school are given the option to develop their own.

PAGE 31

31 conducted a study to find out what types of resources and programs are already being offered to school teachers by Philippine museums Teacher Resources/Programs Offered b y Philippine M useums To get started on my research, I needed a list of museums in the Philippines. I sent a request for information to the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) Philippines through their website. The NCCA is the official government agency mandated to oversee policy making, coordinating, and grants for the preservation, development and promotion of Phili ppine arts and culture. One of the national committees of NCCA, the National Committee on Museums, is responsible for the development of Philippine museums as repositories of national cultural heritage committed to the education and enlightenment of the Fi lipino people. Unfortunately, I did not receive any response. Given that I was doing my research from the United States, I was limited to using the internet to find museums in the Philippines. By using search engines such as Google TM and Yahoo! R I was able to generate a list that consisted of 107 museums. It is important to note that this is most likely not an exhaustive list of museums in the Philippines. However, since I needed a way to contact these museums to ask them to participate in my survey, I deleted from the list any museum without phone n umbers or email addresses This brought down the total to only 29 museums. I then sent messages to museums that had websites and email addresses and solicited assistance from a former colleague based in Manila to call museums that only listed telephone numbers in their contact information. Twenty out of 29 museums (69 %) are located in the NCR. Nine museums (30%) are spread in various regions including regions I, II, III, IV and VII Since the Philippines

PAGE 32

32 has a total of 17 regions, I can deduce that residents from other regions may not have access to a museum. Results from my data analysis indicated that 14 out of 29 museums (48%) offer resources and programs to teachers. However, only five museums provide this information on their website. These resources and programs include lectures and seminars, teacher trainings, teacher tours, lesson plans/curriculum connections and other unspecified programs. Based on the types of programs enumerated by the museums, I surmised that there is a scarcity of resources that teachers can use outside of the museum. With only three museums ( 21 %) offering less on plans/curriculum connections, I came to the conclusion that developing resource materials for school teachers that can be used in their classroom is a worthwhile endeavor for me to pursue. However, I was still left with two issues to resolve. First, I wanted this resource material to be multi disciplinary, meaning teachers could use it regardless of whether they teach science, history, language, art, or mathematics. I needed to find topics that could be applied to lessons across multiple disciplines to attract more teachers to use the resource material in their classroom. Second, I wanted to offer my project as a model th at different types of museums ( science, history, and art) in the Philippines can easily adapt and replicate using their ow n collections. While I thought of developing different sets o f materials that are d iscipline specific ( one each for science, history and art ) in the end, I decided a gainst it since I knew that I d id not have enough time to develop three different sets of materials. Then, I considered focusing on only one type of museum for my project and perhaps develop ing additional sets after I graduate and settle back in the Philippines.

PAGE 33

33 I was still contemplating these questions when I presented results of my research wa s grappling with, and the possibility that numerous school children in the Philippines do not have access to museums Dr. Robin Poynor suggested I create a resource material that focused on teaching Filipino school children about museums. I thought this was a brilliant suggestion as it resolves both issues! Since I wanted to ensure that teachers in the Philippines would be encouraged to use the resource material I will develop, I needed to find out what format teachers would prefer to use. This, t herefore, required a second research study. Resource Materials Preference of School Teachers in the Philippines The research study, which collect ed data specifically from elementary teachers of both public and private schools, had one critical objective: find out the format of resource material school teachers in the Philippines would prefer to use if museums made it available to them. R espondents were given three formats to choose from : 1) online curriculum resource units (lesson plans and material s that can be downloaded from a website) ; 2) traveling museum suitcases (museum objects, information and activit ies sent to schools in a suitcase); and 3) multi media resource loans (video, audio, poster, slides on specific topics). I limited the choices t o these because these are the three formats I felt that I had enough skills to competently develop. Due to limited financial resources, I had to carry out the research while I was in the United States, and therefore had to utilize resources offered by th e internet for my research study. I use d Survey Monkey, a simple and free online survey software tool, to gather data. To reach school teachers, I used various strategies that included sending

PAGE 34

34 an e mail to my personal list of contacts as well yahoogro ups (listserves) of teachers, and art and culture enthusiasts Since not all the people in my contact list are teachers, my cover letter included a request for them to forward my message and the link to the online survey to teachers they know. I also posted the link on various social networking websites, such as Facebook, Multiply, and Friendster, in an attempt to reach more teachers. A copy of the survey is included in the appendix ( Appendix B ). My goal was to collect at least 50 responses. While responses from 50 teachers may not be an accurate representation of possible responses from over 400,000 public and private elementary school teachers in the Philippines, I felt that asking 50 teachers was better than assuming that I kn e w what format they would prefer. Since my study involved human subjects, I submit ted a request for approval to conduct the study Institutional Review Boards (IRB). However, IRB replied that because of the format of my data collecting method (surveys), a permit was not required The survey was launched on March 6 and ended on April 15 A week after I sent out the first wave of emails, I notice d that the number of response s I was getting was quite low. I was worried that I would not reach my target number of respondents, so I asked a few friends and family members to print out the survey and physically distribute these to teachers in schools they have access to and then send me a copy of the completed survey forms. A total of 6 5 school teachers responded to the survey but only 53 responses were valid since 12 skipped some of the questions The number one preference was m ulti media resource loan s chosen by 22 respondents (41.5%) Materials that could be downloaded from the internet were chosen by 16 respondents (30.2%) and m useum

PAGE 35

35 suitcases were chosen by the remaining 15 respondents (28.3%) These results dictated that I develop a ph ysical (meaning not an online version) resource material with accompanying multi media resources. From Learning about Museums to Creating a Classroom Museum The idea of creating lessons to introduce students to the concept of what a museum is, what it do es and its important contribution s to society, evolved into a guide teachers could use to help them create a museum in their classroom. The Guide remained inter disciplinary, which means that students will be required to use, and as a result develop, skills from various academic subjects including science, math, language, history and art, in completing their project. E xhibition s can be developed from a wide spectrum of topics that support DepEd R BEC H ence teachers can u se the regardless of the academic subject they are teaching. While I was looking for resources that could help provide theoretical support for the value of creating classroom museums, I came across a book written by Linda d Learning on display: Student created museums that build understanding Published in 2006, the book walks the reader through an eight step process of developing a classroom muse um project. These steps include 1) introducing the museum project to students; 2) visiting a professional museum; 3) researching the museum topic; 4) designing the exhibits; 5) writing for a museum audience; 6) constructing the exhibition; 7) learning the full exhibition; and 8) opening the museum to the public Al so included in the book are photographs of classroom museums created by students from different schools in the United States, as well as sample activity worksheets and evaluation rubrics.

PAGE 36

36 While s book is similar in content to the I wou ld like to point out several differences. First, in s book one of the steps in developing a classroom museum involved a visit to a museum. I developed the specifically for students who do not have access to museum s and may not have vis ited a museum before. As a substitute for a physical visit, I provided photographs taken inside museums that teachers can show their students. I also included additional online resources that listed museums offering virtual tours and online exhibitions both students and teachers can explore. Sec ond, s book is structured like a textbook, or reference material, providing a wealth of information regarding the process of creating a classroom museum. However, teachers will still need to create their own le sson plans from all the information provided. The is structured like a traditional lesson plan, which contains background information, learning objectives, duration of module, materials needed, guide questions for class discussion, and activities. While I do not undermine the significance of the book as a valuable resource for teachers, I think a simpler structure would be more attractive to teachers because they can just take the and start using it in their classroom s. From conversations with museum education colleagues both in the United States and in the Philippines, I learned that teachers prefer to use museum resource materials structured like traditional lesson plans because such materials require l ess work for them. I have also observed that many big museums around the globe such as The Smithsonian, The Getty, Art Institute of Chicago, Tate Museum, Royal British Columbia Museum, Museum Victoria

PAGE 37

37 (Australia), just to name a few, have lesson plans as p art of their teacher resource offerings. Third, and most importantly, the was specifically designed for teachers teaching Filipino students. I wanted Filipino students to be able to relate to the lessons by providing activities, discussio n questions, and examples that they would be familiar with. For example, in M odule one, after providing information about famous museums abroad, I added information about the National Museum of the Philippi nes. In M odule three the topic of the two example s I provided in fleshing out the exhibition proof that students are truly capable of creating classroom museu ms, that they learned from the creation process, and that they enjoyed participating in the project. I initially wanted to develop the to cater only to grades four to six. However, after reading examples of classroom museums created by students from lower grade levels, I realized that a classroom museum can be created by students who are younger or older. Therefore I decided to remove the target audience in hopes that teachers from lower grade levels as well as teachers at the college level might find the Guide useful. A complete copy of the is include d in the appendix ( Appendix A ). The is divided into four modules with mo dule containing the following sections: Objectives Duration of module Materials needed Background information

PAGE 38

38 Class Discussion Activity Evaluation Reference/s The first three modules will prepare the students in creating their classroom mus eum by teaching skills such as creating catalog entries, writing labels, and thinking of objects and programs for the exhibition. The fourth module focuses on the process of creating the classroom museum. The number of sessions required to complete the fourth module will depend on how much time the class needs to finish creating their classroom museum. The n umber of sessions can vary depending on the topic of the exhibit, the number of students, and the age and skill levels of the students. The class discussion and activities h ave been combined but divided into different steps in creating a classroom museum. Looking back to what I learned about muse ums, putting together exhibitions, and creating education programs, there was much information that I wanted to include in the i s In the end, I realized that I was developing a guide, not a step by step manual, and that I had to leave room for class. Summary T he value of creating a classroom museum is not only in providing school children with a museum experience but also in offering learning opportunities that come from their participation in the process of creation developing a classroom museum will equip them with critical skills ( s uch as analysis content

PAGE 39

39 mastery, critical thinking, problem solving, c ommunica tion, and collaboration ) th ey can use inside and outside the classroom setting.

PAGE 40

40 CHAPTER 4 CONCLUSION The to Creating a Classroom Museum in the Philippines is a culmination of courses throughout my graduate s tudies, previous professional experience working for museums ( and other non museum institutions), internships in various museums, conferences attended, and conversations with colleagues, mentors, and peers. While it would have been ideal for me to have developed the Guide in partnership with a specific museum in the Philippines, obstacles such as geographical distance and limited funding have prevented me from doing so. However, I have come to realize that creating teacher material s not associated with a specific type of museum in the Philippines actually increases the material s potential to be useful for a wider audience. Although the was developed as a multi disciplinary resource, being tied to one specific type of museu m ( a science, history, or art museum) could potentially limit who might be interested in using it. From my experience, most teachers in the Philippines have yet to embrace an inter disciplinary approach to teaching. Hence, history teachers wo uld likely consider only history museums as a possible source of resource materials to help enhance their classroom teaching. They would not think of contacting an art museum for lesson plans that address learning competencies in history using art works A solution I would have explored if I had more time and financial resources, would be to partner with multiple institutions in the Philippines and develop the a s a collaborative project among the various museums involved. To help students visualize how museums look from th e inside, I used existing photographs of museums in the U nited S tates that I hav e taken throughout my travels. I

PAGE 41

41 would have preferred to include photographs and videos fr o m museums in the Philippines U nfortunately, I did not have any on file nor were there any available on the internet It would have be en better if I w ere able to take videos and photographs of Philippine museums I would have reproduced these photographs a s posters or transparencies ( for use with an overhead projector ). Before the is finalized, it should be pilot tested by school teachers. Volunteer teachers could be recruited to try the modules in their classroom to help evaluate its effec tiveness, completeness, and ease of use After using the teachers could be interviewed about specific aspects of the different modules they think worked well or did not work. Their opinion on how activities could be improved if neede d, could also be solicited. They could also be asked if information and resources provided are sufficient or if additional resources are needed to successfully create a classroom museum. Results from this evaluation can be used to revise and improve the Te Just like the teachers, participating students could also be interviewed to find out how they felt about the project. What part of the project did they like most? What would they do to make the lessons more enjoyable ? Would they be intereste d in repeating the experience in other subjects? I think the museum community could creating a classroom museum resulted in making students want to visit museums on their own If results are positive then museums could use information gleaned from the research as leverage in raising funds to support school museum partnerships. Since result s of the survey indicated that teachers prefer physical resource s with accompanyi ng multi media components, this is the format I followed when I developed

PAGE 42

42 the However, I feel that in addition to the printed lesson plans, an electronic version of the should also be uploaded on the internet to reach a wid er audience. While I developed the particularly for teachers in the Philippines, I know that it can also be used by teachers from other countries whose schools have limited physical access to museums By making the Guide available online, t eachers from these countries will also be able to downlo ad and use it their classrooms. However, the teachers will have to add information about their local museums and revise some of the examples in the class discussion to concepts rele vant to their students. Experiences that generate powerful emotions are believed to be more memorable and easier to retrieve (Reisberg & Heuer, 2004). M y hope is that students involved in creating their classroom museums will remember their experience p ositively. I think that this could encourage students to voluntarily seek out museums and therefore could have positive implications for developing future museum visitors, patrons, and advocates.

PAGE 43

43 APPENDIX A THE PHILIPPINES INTRODUCTION interests, or background (Hirzy, 1992). Museums make ideas more accessible, help ty and interests, encourage self confidence and motivate them to pursue future learning. Research studies have supported the fact that people learn in museums. Studies have also shown that school field trips to museums have long term impact on students ( Fa lk, & Dierking 1997) and that these are salient experiences especially to elementary school children ( Falk, & Dierking 1995). Unfortunately, not all schools can send their students to field trips in museums. To help with this problem, I developed this T to Creating a Classroom Museum in the Philippines. If school children cannot go to museums, and museums do not have the means to reach them, then schools should create classroom museums so that students are provided with a museum experience. Aside from the benefits of having classroom museum will be both academically and personally enriching. Using principles of the Constructivist Theory of Learning, I design ed learning modules that will equip students with analytical tools content mastery, critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and collaboration skills. The classroom museum is not only valuable because it will provide school children with a museu m experience but it

PAGE 44

44 will also offer learning opportunities that come from their participation in its creation process. The modules in this are not discipline specific and should apply easily to art, history, math or science. M odules one to three will introduce the students to the concept of a museum, museum collections, and museum exhibitions and education programs. Lessons and a ctivities in these first three modules will prepare students in creating their own classroom museums. The fourth m odule will guide you through the cl assroom museum creation process and will require your students to appl y skills that they will learn in the first three modules.

PAGE 45

45 MODULE ONE: WHAT IS A MUSEUM? Objectives At the end of this module, students will be able to: Define a museum Understand various types of museums Create a concept for their own museum Share with their classmates the museum they created Duration of module One class period Materials needed: Images inside museums ( included in this packet ) Maga zines, postcards, and other sources of images Scissors Glue Markers Blank sheets of paper Background information The International Council of Museums (ICOM) defines a museum as: profit making, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development, and open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education and enjoyment,

PAGE 46

46 A shorter and simpler definition is provided by the American Association of Museums (AAM). According to AAM, a museum is an institution that provides a "unique contribution to the public by collecting, preserving, and interpreting the things of this world." Museums come in various shapes and sizes. The re are very small museums that may only be as big as your classroom. But there are also very large museums, such as the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, that has a total of 365 rooms. Museums in the Philippines have equally diverse structu res. The National Museum of the Philippines, located in Manila, is composed of three buildings. The National Art Gallery is located inside the National Museum Main (formerly the Old Congress Building). The Museum of the Filipino People is housed in the for mer Finance Building, and the future Museum of Natural History will occupy what was formerly the Department of Tourism Building. There are different kinds of museums, and what you can see inside depends on what kind of museum it is. Works of art, such as paintings, sculptures, drawings, photographs, decorative objects, even furniture can be seen inside art museums. History museums houses historic artifacts or objects, memorabilia of famous people, antique objects, photographs, or old clothes and shoes. Din osaur bones, fossils, different types of rocks, preserved animal specimens, scientific apparatuses and instruments, and experiments explaining scientific concepts are just some of the things

PAGE 47

47 especially museums have a combination of art, history and science themes. Class discussion Start the discussion by asking students what they think a museum is. Then ask wh o have been to a museum before. Allow a few students to share their experience by answering the following questions: What is the name of the museum you visited? When did you visit? What did you see inside the museum? What else did you do while at the muse um? Share the definition of museums provided by ICOM and AAM. Then discuss different types of museums. Use the pictures provided in this resource packet to show the students what museums look like inside. Ask the students what other types of museums they can think of. Possible answers include zoos, aquaria, arboretums, anthropology museums, and planetariums. If your classroom has internet access, you can show your class a virtual exhibit or take them on a virtual tour of some museums. A list of websites is included at t he end of this resource packet Activity

PAGE 48

48 The students will now have a chance to create their own museum! Review the different types of museums discussed and what can be seen inside. Ask the students to imagine what kind of museum they wou ld build if they were given the chance to create one. Where will their museum be located? How big will it be? Who do they think will visit their museum? Next, students will cut out pictures from magazines and create a collage of what they want visitors to see inside their museum. Then they have to choose a name for their museum. Provide an opportunity for students to share their museum concepts with their classmates. They can talk about why they decided to create that kind of museum, where they will buil d it and what they think people will like about their museum. Students in higher grade levels can write an essay about their museums. Keep the collages for future modules. These may be used as references in succeeding activities or even displayed as part of the classroom museum. Extension The best culminating activity for this module is to bring your class to a local museum, if there is one in your area. If possible, make arrangements with the museum staff for a behind the scenes tour of the facility. Students will benefit from the opportunity to hear

PAGE 49

4 9 Evaluation Students can be evaluated through their participation in classroom discussion. The collage they made and how they talk (or write for ol der students) about it during the sharing exercise can also be used to evaluate how well students understood and applied what they learned in this module. Additional reference Hirzy, E. (1992). Excellence and equity: Education and the public dimension of museums Washington, D.C.: American Association of Museums.

PAGE 50

50 MODULE TWO: WHAT IS A COLLECTION? Objectives At the end of this module, students will: Research the concept of museum collecting Share with their classmates a sam ple of their collection C reate catalog entries or document object s Duration of module Two class periods Materials needed Catalog template (included in this packet) Ruler/tape measure Pencil or drawing materials A set of objects you personally collect to share and discuss with the class Background information People collect different objects for various reasons. Some people collect for sentimental reasons, to tell stories, as a financial investment, or for learning. Others collect certain things because t hey are really just interested in them. Collections can be as simple as a bag of marbles with varying sizes and colors, or as grand as a collection of houses and airplanes. Naturalist Charles Darwin collected plants and animals, which he studied and use t o help him formulate his Theory of

PAGE 51

51 Evolution. Former Philippine first lady, Imelda Marcos, has a famous collection of shoes that are now at the Marikina Shoe Museum. Some people donate their collections to museums so that others can see, appreciate, and learn from these objects. In 1753, Sir Hans Sloane bequeathed his collection of 71,000 books, antiquities and natural specimens to the UK government; this became the British Museum's founding collection. Solomon R. Guggenheim, an American businessman, dona ted his art collection to the Solomon Guggenheim Foundation, which later established the Guggenheim Museum. When putting together exhibitions, museums sometimes borrow objects from private collectors (people who have collections) to add to objects from the ir collection. Registrar. They make sure that objects in the collection are properly handled, stored, and displayed. They also make sure that the objects are documented properly. Details such as the name and dimension of the object, who made it, when it was made, what it is made of, as well as descriptions and other information about the object are recorded and stored in a database. Pictures or illustration of the object are also a dded for easier identification. irreplaceable. This is one of the many reasons why museums do not allow visitors to touch objects on exhibit. Museums have to take good care of their collection to ensure

PAGE 52

52 that future generations will also have the opportunity to see and learn from these museums, that allow visitors to touch objects on exhibit. These types of museums rely on hands on experience to teach visitors about concepts in the exhibition. Most of the objects in their exhibition are intended to be repaired or replaced when damaged. Class discussion Day One: Review what students learned about mu seums from the previous module Focus the discussion on the objects that can be seen inside museums as segue to discussing the concept of collecting. You can facilitate the discussion by asking students the following questions: What do you collect? Why do you collect those objects? Where did you get those objects? Were they gifts, did you buy, or make them? How many of these objects do you have? How do you take care of your collection? Share your collection with the students. You can also use the questions above to talk about your collection. You can display your collection on a table or shelf so students can examine them. If your objects are not fragile, and you do not mind that they are handled, you can pass them among the students so they have a chance t o closely examine them.

PAGE 53

53 It is important to highlight that while one object may be valuable for someone, it may be considered worthless to another. There are a lot of objects that are collected not for its monetary value but for its historic, scientific, c ultural, or emotional significance. Objects included in the collection could also tell something about the person who collected them. What can the students tell about you from the collection you brought? Let them explain how they came to that conclusion. Ask students to imagine that each of them is preparing a personal time capsule that will be opened 100 years from now. What objects would they put inside the time capsule to let people in the future know about who they are? Why? How about if they are putti ng a time capsule about their class, their school, or even their town? What objects would be useful to include in the time capsule? Draw a large version of the catalog template on the board (or on a big piece of paper) and choose a few objects from your collection to catalog with the class. For the next session, ask students to bring a set of objects they collect. Also make five Day Two: Ask students to share and talk about the collection of objects they brough t. You may choose to divide the class into groups and students discuss their collection within their group. If you have enough space, you can even display all the objects (or choose several students to show theirs) on a table so everyone can have an opport unity to

PAGE 54

54 examine them. Owners of the objects can stand around the table to talk about their collection. Activity Distribute copies of the catalog template to students. They are now going to catalog the objects from their collection. Evaluation Students c an be evaluated through their participation in classroom discussion. Completeness and accuracy of catalogue entries they prepared can also be used to evaluate how well they understood the lesson. A dditional reference Buck, R., Gilmore, J., & American As sociation of Museums. (1998). The new museum registration methods Washington, DC: American Association of Museums.

PAGE 55

55 CATALOG ENTRY TEMPLATE CATALOG ENTRY Accession Number Object Artist/Maker Title Date made Where made Medium/Materials Dime nsions Value Provenance/Owner Date received Description Picture/illustration Catalogued by Date catalogued

PAGE 56

56 MODULE THREE: WHAT IS AN EXHIBITION? Objectives At the end of this module, students will: Articulate the concept of a muse um exhibition E numerate the steps in creating an exhibition W rite object labels Create, as a group, a proposed exhibition complete with title, big idea, objectives, objects and education programs Present their exhibition proposal to class Duration of modu le Two class periods Materials needed Images inside museums (included in this resource packet) Completed catalog entries from module two Sample wall text and labels (included in this resource packet) Background information According to Beverly Serrell (1 given title, containing elements that together make up a coherent entity that is conceptually recognizable as a display of objects, animals, interactive, and

PAGE 57

57 An exhibition is not just a group of random objects put together in a room. These objects, when taken together, should tell a story, introduce ideas, or teach a phenomenon. The person primarily responsible for conceptualizing and putting together an exh ibition is called a curator. In big museums, the curator works with group of people (collectively they are called Curatorial Department) to help his/her in organizing an exhibition. However, in small museums, curators often work alone or with people outsi de of the museum. Below are the steps in creating an exhibition. Please note that there are more steps involved in creating an exhibition depending on its magnitude. Some museums develop a catalog or book, souvenirs (cups, shirts, postcards, etc.) or vide os for the exhibition. Topic the focus of the exhibition. Big Idea a sentence stating what the exhibition is all about. Objective exhibitions are put together with specific objectives in mind. This is what the museum/curator hopes to achieve th rough the exhibition. The exhibition objective could be to teach visitors an idea or concept, a new way of doing things, advocate a cause, or perhaps tell a story about something or someone.

PAGE 58

58 Title name of the exhibition. A good title is concise but cle curiosity about the exhibition. Object list these are the things that will go into the exhibition. The curator works with from private co llectors. Exhibition lay out physical design of the exhibition. Once the objects are identified and collected, the exhibit designer, as the title suggests, designs the space where the exhibition will be installed. Together with the curator, the design er plans the lay out of the exhibition. They decide where each object will be placed, how it will be displayed, and whether it will be clustered with other objects or displayed alone. Labels written words that provide visitors with information about the exhibition. There are different types of labels in an exhibition: Introductory label introduces the visitors to the exhibition and tells them what to expect from it. Introductory labels should not be too long, otherwise visitors may not be interested i n reading them. Serell (1997) recommends introductory labels to have between 20 to 300 words. Some introductory labels could also include pictures. Below is an example of an introductory label created for an exhibition about the American Thanksgiving an a nnual family tradition celebrated by families in the United States :

PAGE 59

59 GIVING THANKS: THE REAL FIRST THANKSGIVING When do you celebrate Thanksgiving? story of the real first thanksgiving celebrated fif ty six years before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock. The exhibition is divided into three aspects that were so integral to this event in St. Augustine: the people, celebrations, and foods. Meet the Spaniards who played crucial roles in the celebrati on of the first Catholic mass as well as the Timucuans who celebrated with them. See accurate representations of Timucuans based on information from historians and archeologists. Compare concepts of giving thanks then and now. Discover the food they s hared during the feast. Share traditions. Section or group labels provides information about a sub topic of your exhibition. It can also be a label explaining why objects are grouped together. Below is a group l abel for the same exhibition above:

PAGE 60

60 Feasts typically followed masses of thanksgiving. This section concentrates on the food shared by Menendez and his men with the Timucuans in St. Augustine. Contrary to the traditional tale, this Catholic ceremony was t he first celebration of Thanksgiving in the New World. Also included are recipes of two contemporary Thanksgiving dishes enjoyed by many American families. Captions are labels for specific objects. C aptions provide basic information about the objects on exhibit such as: name of object/title of artwork; name of artist; date created; place created/origin; medium (what it is made of); dimensions; owner (if borrowed from a private collector or other museums). Captions are placed next to the object but NEVER on the object itself! Example of a simple caption for a painting: Burst of sunshine Felisimo Andres Philippines, 1973 Oil on canvas On loan from the National Museum Example of a simple caption for a capiz shell jewe lry box: Jewelry box Cebu, Philippines Capiz shell Donated by a private collector

PAGE 61

61 Captions that provide more than the basic information about the object are described as interpretative labels/caption. These may be more effective because they make visitors take a closer look at details of the object or share interesting information about the object. Below is an example of an interpretative caption for a painting: Chief Outina Theodore Morris America, date unknown Oil on canvas C ourtesy of artist Timucuans were already occupying the area of what would later be known as St. Augustine when Menendez landed on September 08, 1565. This is a portrait of the chief of the Timucuans, Chief Outina, as rendered by Theodore Morris. The Tatto signify his nobility. His hair is worn at the top of his head in a knot, said to make him appear taller and add to his commanding appearance. He also has long and pointed fingernails, and his ears are adorned with s mall inflated fish bladders. Captions for interactive objects provide directions on how to use them. Below are examples:

PAGE 62

62 Press the button on the left to hear a current version of Te Deum laudamus. Press the button on the right to hear Father Lopez narra te the sequence of events that led up to the mass. Education programs As soon as the exhibition concept is finalized and approved by the Museum Director, the Museum Educator starts to think about programs and activities that will help visitors better und erstand the exhibition and maximize their opportunities fo r learning. If budget permits, e ducators also develop guides and activity sheets for the exhibition. It is the e to the museum get the best possible educational experience from their visit. Education programs for exhibitions can include lectures, informal discussion s demonstrations, arts and craft activities, story telling session s and performances. Some of these programs are held during the exhibition opening r eception. Marketing/Promotion Museums make sure people know about their exhibition through a variety of ways. They send out press releases to TV and radio stations, newspapers and magazines. They also produce banner, posters, fliers, and postcards. Exhib itions are also announced at Exhibit Opening

PAGE 63

63 After exhibition installation is completed, the museum holds an exhibit opening reception. This marks the formal opening of the exhibit to the general public. Class discussion Day One: Show pictures taken from the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and Orlando Science Center to your class Encourage the students to look closely at each of the pictures. Ask the following questions to direct your classroom discussion: What objects do y ou see in this picture? (let them enumerate as many objects they can see) Based on the objects you can see, what do you think this exhibition is all about? What do you think is a good title for this exhibition? Aside from objects what else do you see? Draw their attention to the small pieces of paper next to the objects. These are called captions. How do you think this exhibition was put together? Can you imagine what people at the museum did to put this exhibition together? (possible answers: thought of a good topic, thought of a title, borrowed instruments from musicians, wrote captions, assembled the dinosaur bones, asked old people for pictures, etc.). Write down on the board their answers. Start discussing the steps in creating a museum exhibition. As you discuss the steps, take special notice to student answers that are correct or close to the idea of the steps being discussed. You may choose to discuss the section about labels right before the label writing activity. Practice conceptualizing an exhibi t by going through the exhibit creation process using specific topics. Below are a few examples of exhibition topics

PAGE 64

64 that may help your students understand how to conceptualize an exhibition. Please note that these examples have been simplified. Example #1 Topic: Dengue The Big Idea: Dengue: Cause, symptoms, and prevention Objective: Introduce visitors to the deadly di sease and teach them preventive measures to avoid getting infected Sub topics: (Introduction) What is dengue? (Diagnosis) What are its symptoms? (Aedes mosquito) How does one get infected? (Prevention) How can we avoid getting infected? Objects: Pictures illustrating symptoms of dengue Diagram of how a blood test is conducted Stethoscope, blood pressure apparatus, blood test kit, and other medical t ools Picture of the Aedes mosquito, a diagram of its life cycle, and illustrations of its breeding sites Mosquito net, insect repellents, long sleeved shirts, pants, socks, and other objects that could help keep prevent being bitten by mosquitoes Interactive/multimedia components: V ideos of a children taking about their dengue experience A big jigsaw puzzle of the aedes mosquito Q&A board about symptoms of dengue Posting board where visitors can leave their suggestions in stop ping the spread of dengue in the community

PAGE 65

65 Education programs: Invite a doctor to talk about dengue Design a poster/slogan on dengue prevention Example #2 Topic: Simple Machines Big Idea: Simple machines make our daily lives easier by allowing us to accomplish work with little effort. Objective: Help visitors understand the six different kinds of simple machines, how these work, and where they have been used to make our everyday lives easier. Sub topics: The six types of simple machines Co mpound machines Mechanical innovations that use simple machines Everyday challenges simplified with the help of simple machines The future of simple machines Objects: Simple machines Example of everyday objects that use simple machines (bicycle, sc rews, slides, door stopper, scissors, pliers, hammers, etc.) Illustrations of other simple machines at work (elevator, escalator, ramp, see saw etc.) Inventions, gadgets, tools created by students using simple machines Interactive/multimedia compon ents: Videos of how simple machines work Challenge corner: list a number of common day problems (in school or at home) and ask visitors to design a gadget that uses simple (or compound) machines to solve them

PAGE 66

66 A set of small simple machines that visit ors can explore Education programs: Demonstrations on how simple machines work Inventor challenge (use simple machines to create an invention) Divide the class into small groups. Assign an exhibition topic to each group. You can also assign the s ame topic to all groups to see which group could come up with the most creative ideas. In the following session, each group will present their exhibition concept complete with a title. This activity will help them prepare for the actual creation of their c lassroom museum. Day two: Group presentations. Activity Remind the students again about the captions in the exhibition. Share examples of the labels. It is now their turn to write captions for the objects they brought in during the previous module. Use the information listed in the catalog entry for the objects. Below are a couple of reminders about writing captions: When writing labels, remember to K.I.S.S keep it short & simple. If this object can speak, what would it say to you?

PAGE 67

67 What is the most interesting information about this object: is it the person who made it, how he made it, or where it came from? What is unique about this object? Evaluation Students can be evaluated through their participation in classroom discussion. Captio ns that students write individually should demonstrate how well they the concept of writing labels, particularly captions. Students should also be evaluated based on their contribution to the group presentation. Additional reference Serrell, B. (1996). E xhibit labels: An interpretive approach Walnut Creek: Alta Mira Press.

PAGE 68

68 MODULE FOUR: CREATING YOUR CLASSROOM MUSEUM This final module is the culmination of the first three modules. Skills that your students learned from activities in modules one to three will be applied in this module. Objective At the end of this module, students will: Create their classroom museum Duration of module Number of class periods required to complete the classroom museum Materials needed Images inside museums (included in this resource packet) Catalog template (from module two) Tape measure Art materials Pedestals/tables/boards for mounting exhibit objects Objects for the exhibition List of museums with virtual tours and online exhibitions (included in this packet) Backgr ound information Information needed will d epend on the topic of the exhibition

PAGE 69

69 Class discussion and activities Start by choosing a topic for your classroom museum. Remember that you can create an exhibition about practically any topic in your academ ic curriculum. How about an exhibition on fractions, whole number or even integers? Maybe your class would like to put together an exhibition about verbs, nouns, adjectives. Perhaps even an exhibit on Philippine idiomatic expressions. One of the great thin gs museums are able to do is to help make abstract ideas become more accessible to visitors. How you can achieve that is the challenge to you and your students. Once you have identified your topic, you need to decide on the Big Idea. This statement will h elp your students think about what to include and not include in the exhibition. The se steps should involve your students: A. Brainstorming session to establish objective and sub topics of the exhibition Review group presentations from module three to remind students about the conceptualization process. During this session, you should encourage students to contribute ideas freely Remind them that no idea will be considered silly or ridiculous and the every single idea will be considered. You might be surpris ed with what your students come up with once they become confident about voicing their ideas and thinking out of the box. What story will your classroom museum tell? What new knowledge do you wish to impart on your visitors? When thinking of an objective f or your classroom museum, consider what you want visitors to get out of their classroom museum

PAGE 70

70 experience. Do you want them to view something in a different light? For example, you want students to think that math is fun, or history is exciting, or science is not limited to textbooks, then your class can put together an exhibition that will results in visitors feeling this way. Once the objective has been established start discussing what will be included in the exhibition. Write down all the ideas that stu dents suggest. Cluster together similar ideas and see if a bigger idea emerges from them. Review the list and choose four to five clusters of ideas that support the topic identified. Assign each cluster of ideas to a group. B. Research Each group will have to research their assigned topic. Information from their research will help them decide what objects to include in their exhibition as well as what to write in the exhibition labels. C. Agree on Title As discussed in module three, titles should tell visito rs what the exhibit is about as well as arouse their curiosity about it. D. Generate an object list Students can create objects for the exhibition or borrow them from the school or community. Remind students to think of specific objects that will help tell t he story of their exhibition. Objects can be photographs, illustrations, art works,

PAGE 71

71 videos, artifacts, or costumes. Students can borrow or create these objects themselves. Make sure that a catalog entry is prepared for each object as this will help facilit ate return of objects to their rightful owners. Review how to write catalog entries from module two. E. Layout exhibition Decide how the exhibition will be installed. Students can draw a map of the exhibition space to help them plan where objects will be pla ced and how they will be presented. Unless they are very large, avoid putting objects directly on the floor as it might make it difficult for visitors to see them. Putting objects on the floor could also damage them. Avoid sticking pins or applying glue or adhesive tapes directly to photographs (or objects) and attaching them directly on the walls/exhibition boards as this will make it difficult to remove them later and result in damaging the objects. F. Write text and labels Review guidelines on writing cap tions and labels from module three. E xhibition text should be written in the language that most of your visitors will understand. Some museums provide bi lingual or multi lingual text to accommodate visitors speaking different languages. Consider writing y our text in English and your local language. Labels should be big enough that people can easily read them. Place labels at a height that visitors will easily see. Since your primary target visitors are students, place labels at the eye level of a student w ith an average height.

PAGE 72

72 Again, avoid putting labels directly on the objects. Also make sure that the labels G. Think of programs and activities The type of education programs and activities you can organize de pends on the focus of your classroom museum. Refer to module three to get ideas on types of that can complement an exhibition. Your class can invite an artist to conduct a painting or drawing demonstrations. You can also provide a corner in your classroom museum where visitors can try their hands at painting, drawing, or creating something relevant to your exhibition. Consider inviting an expert to come to your classroom museum and talk about a specific subject within the topic of your exhibition. Explore your community for people who have firsthand experience or interesting stories that relate to your exhibition. For example, your exhibition is about natural calamities. Perhaps one of your students has a parent who is a geologist; your class can invite him or her to come to class to talk about earthquakes. H. Promote the museum Think of creative ways to invite other classes (or grade levels even other schools) to visit your classroom museum. Students can create flyers and posters to promote their exhibition. I. Open museum to the public

PAGE 73

73 Your classroom museum can have an opening reception. You may choose to invite family and friends of your students to visit the classroom museum. This will provide your students with an opportunity to showcase their work and be proud of what they have accomplished. Some students can play the role of a museum guide during the opening to engage visitors, answer questions, conduct demonstrations, and lead activities. Evaluation Students can be evaluated based on their participation and contribution in the classroom museum creation process. For older students, you can ask them to write an essay about their experience, what they liked most about the process of creating their classroom museum and why and what they would change if they had a chance to re do the exhibition. For younger students, ask students to list down what they learned from the experience. Other forms of evaluation could include asking students to maintain an individual journal to record their personal reflections, or a scrap book to document their participation Additional reference Learning on display: Student created museums that build understanding Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

PAGE 74

74 PICTURES OF MUSEUM S Baltimore Museum of Art Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America http://www.artbma.org/ National Museum of American Indian Washington, DC, United States of America http://w ww.nmai.si.edu/ Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America http://countrymusichalloffame.org/ Orlando Science Center Orlando, Florida, United States of America http://www.osc.org/ Strong National Museum of Play Rochester, New York, United States of America http://www.museumofplay.org/

PAGE 75

75 BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART

PAGE 76

76 BALTIMORE MUSE UM OF ART

PAGE 77

77 BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART

PAGE 78

78 NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN

PAGE 79

79 NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN

PAGE 80

80 NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN

PAGE 81

81 COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM

PAGE 82

82 COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM

PAGE 83

83 COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM

PAGE 84

84 COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM

PAGE 85

85 ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER

PAGE 86

86 ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER

PAGE 87

87 ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER

PAGE 88

88 STRONG NATIONAL MUSEUM OF PLAY

PAGE 89

89 STRONG NATIONAL MUSEUM OF PLAY

PAGE 90

90 STRONG NATION AL MUSEUM OF PLAY

PAGE 91

91 ADDITIONAL ONLINE RESOURCES If your school has access to the internet, I recommend that you explore a few of these websites with your students. I have listed two types of museum websites, those that offer virtual tours of their museum and those that have online exhibitions. The virtual tours will provide you and you students with an opportunity to see and explore real museums virtually. You can use websites that have online exhibitions to get inspirations on topic, them e, content, and even activities for your classroom museum. Observe labels and text of the online exhibitions and use these as reference and example in helping your students write their own text and labels for your classroom museum. VIRTUAL TOURS Louvre ( France) http://www.louvre.fr/llv/musee/visite_virtuelle.jsp State Hermitage Museum (Russia) http://www.hermitagemuseum.o rg/html_En/08/hm88_0.html The Monticello Explorer (US) http://explorer.monticello.org/ ONLINE EXHIBITIONS Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (US) This offers an opportunity for users to select obj them, view online, and share with others. They can even create labels and descriptions http://africa.si.edu/collections/createselections.asp Online exhibitions http://americanhistory.si.edu/exhibi tions/category.cfm?category=online Natural History Museum (UK) Online exhibitions http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature online/online exhibitions/index.html

PAGE 92

92 National Gallery of Art (U S) Online exhibitions http://www.nga.gov/onlinetours/index.shtm British Museum (UK) Online exhibitions http://www.britishmuseum.org /explore/online_tours.aspx UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology (US) Online exhibitions www.ucmp.berkeley.edu Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (US) Online exhibitions http://www.mnh.si.edu/exhibits/virtual.html Exploratorium (US) A collection of online exhibitions, hands on activities, articles videos, and more. http://www.explo ratorium.edu/explore/exhibits.html Museum of Science Boston (US) Online exhibitions http://www.mos.org/events_activities/virtual_exhibits Florida Museum of Natural History (US) Online e xhibition http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/staugustine/ The Micropolitan Museum (UK) Online exhibition http://www.microscopy uk.org.uk/micropo litan/index.html The Franklin Institute (US) Online exhibition on the human heart http://www.fi.edu/learn/heart/

PAGE 93

93 REFERENCES Falk, J., & Deirking, L. (1995). Recalling the museum experience. Journal of Museum Education 20 (2), 10 13. Falk, J., & Dierking, L. (1997). School field trips: Assessing their long term impact Curator 40 211 218.

PAGE 94

94 APPENDIX B MUSEUM RESOURCE MATERIALS PREFERENCE OF SCHOOL TEACHERS IN THE PHILIPPINES SURVEY Certificate of Informed Consent My name is Ethel Villafranca and I am a Filipino graduate student pursuing my master's degree in Museum Studies at the University of Florida. I am conducting a thesis project entitled Building Bridges: Museum Outreach Resource Material for School Teachers in the Philippines. My faculty advisor is Dr. Glenn Willumson and he may be contacted at gwillumson@arts.ufl.edu or +1 352 273 3062. Part of the project is a research study to determine what format of museum outreach resource materials (travelling suitcases, online resource materials, or posters and slides) school teachers in the Philippines would use if it were made available to them. Data collected from this study will inform the direction of the resource material that I am developing as my thesis project. The resource material will aim to introduce students to what a museum is, what they do and their important contribution to society. Lessons and activities, which will be aligned with the Philippine Department of asic Education Curriculum, will teach how museums fulfill their educational role through collections and exhibitions. The resource material will be designed for multi disciplinary use and can be applied to lessons in science, history, math or art. As a cul mination, students will collaborate to create their own classroom museum. This is a very short survey composed of only nine questions and should not take you more than ten minutes to complete. If you choose to participate in this study you will

PAGE 95

95 be asked t o indicate the format (travelling suitcase, online resources materials, or posters and slides) of the resource materials that you would be willing to use if museums developed and made these available to you. You will also be asked to provide basic informat ion about yourself, such as location and type (private or public) of the school where you currently teach, the number of years you have been teaching, and the grade level of your students. Your personal details will remain private. There is no compensation for participating, and there are no risks associated with participation in this study. There are no direct benefits to you for participating in the study. Your participation is voluntary and you may withdraw your consent at anytime without consequence. I may be contacted at ethelvillafranca@ufl.edu for any questions about the study and the project. By answering this survey, you agree that you are at least 18 years old and that you read, understand, and accept the above information.

PAGE 96

96 MUSEUM RESOURCE MATER IALS PREFERENCE OF SCHOOL TEACHERS IN THE PHILIPPINES SURVEY 1. Name : _____________________________________________________________ 2. E mail address : ______________________________________________________ 3. Where do you currently teach? (Please indi cate city and region) 4. How many years have you been teaching? less than one year less than three years less than five years 5. What grade level/s do you teach? Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Other: Please specify 6. Have you ever broug ht your students to a museum for a field trip? Please specify name/s of museum. yes no Please list names of museums where you have taken your students: 7. What educator/teacher resources offered by museums have you used to support traditional classr oom teaching techniques? Check all that are applicable. None, I have never used any Pre field trip guidelines/activities Field Trip Worksheet Curriculum Resource Units (Printed lesson plans and materials) Online Curriculum Resource Units (Les son plans and materials that can be downloaded from a website) Traveling Museum Suitcases (Museum objects, information and activities sent to schools in a suitcase) Multi media Resource Loans (Video, Audio, Poster, Slides) Others: Please specify 8 Please provide name of museum/s where you got these resources from. less than ten years more than ten years Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6

PAGE 97

97 9. What type of school teacher resources from museums you would use in your classroom if it was made available to you? (Note: Resources will support DepEd's Revised Basic Education Cu rriculum) Please choose only one. Online Curriculum Resource Units (Lesson plans and materials that can be downloaded from a website) Traveling Museum Suitcases (Museum objects, information and activities sent to schools in a suitcase) Mul ti media Resource Loans (Video, Audio, Poster, Slides on specific topics) 10. Other comments and suggestions.

PAGE 98

98 LIST OF REFERENCES Abdal Haqq. (1998). Constructivism in Teacher Education: Considerations for Those Who Would Link Practice to Theory. ERIC Digest. Washing ton, DC: ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education. Alexander, E., & Alexander, M. (2008). Museums in motion: An introduction to the history and functions of museums (2 nd ed). Lanham, MD: Altamira Press Atherton J. (2010). Lea rning and Teaching: Piaget's developmental theory Retrieved from http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/piaget.htm Atherton J. (2010). Learning and Teaching: Bloom's taxonom y. Retrieved from http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/bloomtax.htm Black, G. (2005). The engaging museum: Developing museums for visitor involvement. New York, NY: Routledg e L. (2006). Learning on display: Student created museums that build understanding Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Department of Education. (2009) Fact Sheet September 2009. Retrieved from http://www.deped.gov.ph/cpanel/uploads/issuanceImg/Factsheet2009%20Sept% 2022.pdf experien ces. In Paris, S. (Ed.), Perspective in object centered learning in museums (pp. 3 18). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. Fairbairn, D. (1987). The art of questioning your students. The Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issu es and Ideas 61 (1) 19 22 Falk, J., & Deirking, L. (1995). Recalling the museum experience. Journal of Museum Education 20 (2), 10 13 Falk, J. H., & Dierking, L. D. (1997). School field trips: Assessing their long term impact Curator 40 211 218 Falk, J., & Dierking, L. (2000). Learning from museums: Visitor experiences and the making of meaning. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira Press Grenon Brooks, J., & Brooks, M. (1993). In search of understanding: The case for the constructivist classrooms. Alexan dria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

PAGE 99

99 Hein, G (1991). The museum and the needs of p eople. CECA (International Committee o f Museum Educators) Conference, Jerusalem Israel, Oct. 15 22, 1991. Retrieved from http://www.exploratorium.edu/ifi/resources/constructivistlearning.html Hein, G. (1998). Learning in the Museum New York, NY: Routledge. Hein, G. E., & Alexander, M. (1998). Museums: Plac es of learning Washington DC: American Association of Museums Education Committee Hirzy, E. (1992). Excellence and equity: Education and the public dimension of museums Washington, D C: American Association of Museums Hirzy, E.(Ed.).(1996). True need s, true partners: Museums and schools transforming education. Washington, DC: Institute of Museum Services. Hooper Greenhill, E. (1992). Museums and the shaping of knowledge London: Routledge. Hooper Greenhill, E., Dodd, J., Gibson, L., Phillips, M., Jones, C., & Sullivan, E. (2006, April). What did you learn at the museum today? Second study Retrieved from http://www.le.ac.uk/ms/research/Reports/Whatdidyoulearn2.pdf Institut e of Museum and Library Services (2009). Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills (IMLS 2009 NAI 01). Washington, D C Latshaw, G. (2009) Cash strapped schools cancel field trips USA Today (29 April, 2009). Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2009 04 29 field trips_N.htm Lord, B. (2007). The manual of museum learning Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield McComas, W. (2006). Science teaching beyond the class room. The Science Teacher 73 (1), 26 30 Montalvan, A. (2010) Mindanao, island of museums. Philippine Daily Inquirer (25 October, 2010). Retrieved from http://lifestyle.inquirer.net/artsandbooks/artsandbooks/view/20101025 299548/Mindanao island -of museums N ational Research Council (U.S.) & Bell, P. (2009). Learning science in informal environments: People, places, and pursuits. Washing ton, DC: National Academies Press. Popescu, R. (200 8). No child outside the classroom. Newsweek 151 (6), 12 12

PAGE 100

100 Reisberg, D., & Heuer, F. (2004). Memory for emotional events. In Reisberg, D., & Hertel, P.(Eds.), Memory and emotion (pp. 3 41). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press Yaeger R (1991). The constructivist learning model: Towards real reform in science education. The Science Teacher, 58 (6), 52 57

PAGE 101

101 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Ethel Villafranca is a Fulbright Scholar from the Philippines pursuing her m ast d egree in m useum s tudies, specializing in education, at the University of Florida. She completed her undergraduate degree in Philippine Arts, major ing in arts management, at th e University of the Philippines in 1998. T he same year she joined the Ayala Museum, an art and history museum located at the heart of the business district of the Philippines. Six years later, she was hired to manage the free access private libraries based inside shopping malls. She has held in ternship po s itions at the Florida Museum of Natural History, Harn Museum of Art, San Diego Museum of Art, and at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. She has received fellowships/scholarships from the Asian Cultural Council (an affiliate of the Rockefeller Brothers Foundation), Association of American Museums, Florida Association of Museums, and the University of Florida. Although she is a museum educator by heart, she is also interested in technology, visitor research, and audience developm ent.


xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'EWPKDB70J_ZWMMEI' PACKAGE 'AA00000312_00001' INGEST_TIME '2011-05-05T17:55:46-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
REQUEST_EVENTS TITLE Disseminate Event
REQUEST_EVENT NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2017-08-02T13:38:11-04:00' NOTE 'request id: 311322; AA00003537_00001' AGENT 'UF61'
finished' '2017-08-02T14:37:58-04:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '180540' DFID 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesAA00000312_00001.xml'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 84cfd3f5694437463a1a28a2e51449cc
'SHA-1' 9dd28ce8bf7d2352a445f74c109e52574198ee50
EVENT '2017-08-02T13:47:25-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2017-08-02T14:20:43-04:00'
xml resolution
'280553' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile1' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_001.jp2'
fac7657ea6371f1747a08f11630dfa60
1f72178f244fed9f2b7504b91d290ffc768fca34
'2017-08-02T13:46:47-04:00'
describe
'1051984' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile10' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_010.jp2'
8e1edff0f37812980b81a04c08036bcd
e6430599ec2af1f3a84b9e6bbd60b767c77bfd82
'2017-08-02T13:46:30-04:00'
describe
'203246' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile100' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_100.jp2'
b4af2380b022ae90e020964da1def748
4d784ffdd9a8ee9f41b7cce2f9d3a0576e4dc797
'2017-08-02T13:45:24-04:00'
describe
'733586' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile101' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_101.jp2'
e780d73b917f239d378847fec69e6b72
2db6402e2535e5a1f6ea402bc2c97df94f3a74bd
'2017-08-02T13:45:13-04:00'
describe
'27407' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile102' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_001.jpg'
28aa98b6462d385816712c06da923d48
369baec06f5d7e092c2035e1be8e3ff71073b1cb
'2017-08-02T13:46:06-04:00'
describe
'8519' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile103' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_001.QC.jpg'
7fb028474ec234fe14df41bf4e97752d
d19dbfcf41448eb485e5f184ec745178493fdb9b
'2017-08-02T13:47:30-04:00'
describe
'3898' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile104' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_002.jpg'
45ec7806302240d551f297536e40904e
4b90a59eacb8a3e217577b4eacd470c1417e0bc8
'2017-08-02T13:45:33-04:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile105' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_002.QC.jpg'
98c11771c2c17c3551ee20036e3d0fdb
4fe69a0b93efba78e94358f37963519bb2b89aa9
'2017-08-02T13:45:31-04:00'
describe
'3548' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile106' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_003.jpg'
6b9f315edf88c3c0995ed2bad02e66ad
349580401ce632e87a135cb9fa8439e4e671c171
'2017-08-02T13:47:11-04:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile107' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_003.QC.jpg'
d9fd60295d0ee0dfc420bd44510a2760
23198cfd90e48a3ff5e4782c67039c76e38769f0
'2017-08-02T13:47:50-04:00'
describe
'93603' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile108' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_004.jpg'
513c89cd0cbb785d5c30feee0d315966
558e8a049cd97c104e8749cd8f38586bc09bf9b2
'2017-08-02T13:47:35-04:00'
describe
'29624' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile109' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_004.QC.jpg'
01699d604c13e6b909d5718107d604a3
03d5cfcb580b71bcd460c1c735ae3dfdcd4be296
'2017-08-02T13:47:09-04:00'
describe
'1051960' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile11' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_011.jp2'
6e09cffd92d4abdea4e2dce98b3f9bd8
a1b78d81f387f346bdbd209fb85ee9038a3d195f
'2017-08-02T13:46:59-04:00'
describe
'22143' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile110' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_005.jpg'
1fbd7f217cda4274189cb9d308e07d34
f2c86ff359eabbe23a14469917353facc7c1d0e2
'2017-08-02T13:46:13-04:00'
describe
'7089' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile111' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_005.QC.jpg'
94af83052e5cbf9bbdec5b39b46d33b6
59f6dc1bf286206f11124abbf5be51ac74bede41
describe
'93004' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile112' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_006.jpg'
701ddbaa592ecfcc50c92dc3e1116784
ea0c3bd5fc0ce7d3194262098fa4041b8bba6370
'2017-08-02T13:45:22-04:00'
describe
'24349' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile113' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_006.QC.jpg'
8729297845ee7e8f837c2c23c9c42e6e
cfe82b48adc67eaea1e0db21a033526a8d1e41b2
'2017-08-02T13:45:09-04:00'
describe
'77858' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile114' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_007.jpg'
aba18ba7e67a736f16a04ee469fa8cfe
eb3bd1dcad48dbe53b890ce2c410442777e907de
'2017-08-02T13:47:38-04:00'
describe
'23692' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile115' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_007.QC.jpg'
517800e5794112b5f09597abe39b76f1
3e5da17f6f75f16b52aec443bdd4514b3db1453a
'2017-08-02T13:47:24-04:00'
describe
'84250' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile116' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_008.jpg'
c6c9c5a16703cb6c5ca96d7f16cdb6cf
f7d6289da1f0788052c15dbe6347a87666075a2d
'2017-08-02T13:47:36-04:00'
describe
'27408' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile117' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_008.QC.jpg'
6bc9be2de26b4cc88c865b74d22152ea
6a16de100ace1dbac352c2c1bee974d71cfac420
'2017-08-02T13:46:22-04:00'
describe
'94464' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile118' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_009.jpg'
6118bc7481fe8909631b30baf6f4a63e
87bfe14704f0f367eaa8ee8d671108d0bb31c449
describe
'29715' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile119' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_009.QC.jpg'
272ebf35235ec3051613072c240701d3
b3687db6932f90dac442b5705ab1b91c1faa773f
'2017-08-02T13:46:21-04:00'
describe
'1051977' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile12' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_012.jp2'
73fae750e8b40ef7c264a158836f0d65
473dfa71cf2738b7a2955c4d7d394117d1984cd3
'2017-08-02T13:47:52-04:00'
describe
'96189' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile120' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_010.jpg'
fab635f7465bd35dcb569542205f1f6f
8ab80e384e9dec816f091e30bea1964d44210538
'2017-08-02T13:47:46-04:00'
describe
'30373' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile121' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_010.QC.jpg'
b66f781504974373f82b1aca755b1031
d744f664934d4e2b092708c2fda582695883f7be
describe
'93520' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile122' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_011.jpg'
4970ed62b81a52adac2564366b29a977
6b5bf1fa0c6df164566412813d2d693f56ef8bf2
'2017-08-02T13:47:22-04:00'
describe
'29588' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile123' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_011.QC.jpg'
6e5f03a0588d545d46ff2b90e0452790
a43292f5f4a888c6662c8805f320e790533b023b
'2017-08-02T13:45:51-04:00'
describe
'98402' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile124' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_012.jpg'
64aa06574d57f778b920edf016490dd1
83a734fc6acbe6a41966d3721ff89d52fb49e319
'2017-08-02T13:46:01-04:00'
describe
'31122' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile125' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_012.QC.jpg'
597814975113c309bd32356c6dcead49
1057ce9c47cb8ecd5f382b8421f0463c4e17e389
'2017-08-02T13:46:00-04:00'
describe
'23801' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile126' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_013.jpg'
e6b7e6f6ade7e071b852ff4d67ae2d3b
25f13d4a8c58a2d96d74847cda364417e6139a46
'2017-08-02T13:45:25-04:00'
describe
'7619' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile127' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_013.QC.jpg'
d66d0d920e055924a25167e412b93897
576c6d46615a131ba79c500bd8d0dcc2ce0f61c9
'2017-08-02T13:45:23-04:00'
describe
'93269' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile128' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_014.jpg'
b54e0bf1c72ea85b5c628facad639c0f
1fb07f3ba116ab738ab47d21f09d7a59fc8d1878
'2017-08-02T13:46:28-04:00'
describe
'29062' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile129' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_014.QC.jpg'
8f6a9ea842679291aaee3a98933ca843
4d511f32b381ebd2aa5b1a4fa3efa65a9c4dbb23
'2017-08-02T13:46:23-04:00'
describe
'260587' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile13' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_013.jp2'
5d9d197cdbe86545befd1bd0912d88a9
3147910837eebb1959ed8aa4e5ef353d64f0f3f9
'2017-08-02T13:46:16-04:00'
describe
'93345' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile130' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_015.jpg'
f526a4b70f1eb2536a0fdad35ac6b04d
3c6dd4d08dddf8b29bf1810de2578e74cecdc004
'2017-08-02T13:47:51-04:00'
describe
'29569' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile131' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_015.QC.jpg'
01f3a99bb2cc870b6704c3841054ff22
2011086fc14a9d1bc8e75a6dcf4d19cb1b88f1c7
describe
'100203' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile132' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_016.jpg'
a6eff98dc6049e3cba3288f3d07f8baa
f8082a91ad735851e8078c0c042d037cc2f6cb1a
describe
'31372' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile133' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_016.QC.jpg'
39a9f64ec9693d9314e5422b5af42c59
ad1c054f1489b669cae42b32c87444e34655b42b
'2017-08-02T13:45:20-04:00'
describe
'97704' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile134' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_017.jpg'
859846c428fd8c8e5f861b51034e9865
90c1fd87317630c2e88af28a8a1e16559e3d75e0
'2017-08-02T13:45:30-04:00'
describe
'30398' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile135' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_017.QC.jpg'
bde0e0a95b4f9e1d553cfa7de440845b
197b7cdd6c3ca812fd11de4a9f87805f8d30290c
describe
'31661' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile136' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_018.jpg'
78405dccf5452b2d3f5f65c68bba2578
e48c3813c8bdd118820199e2ea60ea1c16a1f42e
describe
'10753' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile137' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_018.QC.jpg'
16dda1465f33b1567bcfdda09932b233
c73f095fff45f9a2f7cc2bee4c03e67acea3c705
'2017-08-02T13:46:57-04:00'
describe
'89183' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile138' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_019.jpg'
cbb457b889a4a911a461ea54565e76d6
5a5a533cb883a43838f03827828f13fe4e5f1099
'2017-08-02T13:45:39-04:00'
describe
'26034' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile139' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_019.QC.jpg'
d00e4e31134dec2c899ee0057ae438b2
421860d8106dd5c8494cf8a6b3b27a2fdb8f5881
'2017-08-02T13:46:11-04:00'
describe
'1051965' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile14' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_014.jp2'
c546b3b89f741a7471e748fc04f7a585
391cc515bea32d8c10e90fad65a2668b7c560a22
'2017-08-02T13:45:01-04:00'
describe
'95964' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile140' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_020.jpg'
a9a5280f2d3c36e88e60209757169b4c
0d01239c06474c03a8a3ec9d06a8bf3c74edba92
'2017-08-02T13:47:39-04:00'
describe
'29969' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile141' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_020.QC.jpg'
84723cd7dc06ea3149c7eb7552d6f18f
a24c1583190e08aab8941215d24192eed1428eb3
describe
'94115' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile142' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_021.jpg'
df25e4023bdbcaaae00073f3d7ca4344
c6fe42bda1804fbfaf0f29af8b3424ce9867a85e
describe
'29266' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile143' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_021.QC.jpg'
4a6cd076cd1338d6fe4a2d25cbaba876
041838836a69b54a10e1c45f994f53ff5aee3dda
describe
'95738' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile144' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_022.jpg'
6c63c15346cea4de013cf7a0a771d1b0
9869ff921b0de785ffa9a64a9134221681c22f76
describe
'29726' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile145' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_022.QC.jpg'
7ba4faa256495f1cfc41a01b7f269cd3
199336741165b3f7c4d2362a435601cbe040f4a4
'2017-08-02T13:47:01-04:00'
describe
'86567' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile146' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_023.jpg'
f63801b19252345fe93337155c4eed9a
906362dedab7d51278335dbd476022f84621eff3
'2017-08-02T13:45:12-04:00'
describe
'27557' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile147' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_023.QC.jpg'
61558b6d415cc0b6861612ece726ac57
c383eb035897e9c5fbc9ddb7b92cb1f986d199b5
'2017-08-02T13:45:35-04:00'
describe
'92746' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile148' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_024.jpg'
359b25ad89ec4a77ccb7767a74b28712
0c024e24aa7a218568024d243f571ca0dd6fd8b1
'2017-08-02T13:46:17-04:00'
describe
'27862' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile149' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_024.QC.jpg'
5105d8dbcddc99c69974ca50b7600fcb
5de4f26ff2f2600db32b62e560bf9257e7e4cde0
'2017-08-02T13:46:34-04:00'
describe
'1051939' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile15' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_015.jp2'
db09c52cd688ba9063d5a751241c5b94
fb59bd6f3a3dda8879f7832b1c1d2a4470e121b6
'2017-08-02T13:47:53-04:00'
describe
'85256' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile150' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_025.jpg'
673a53c22eb64a3a0bd7c68b1662e3a5
9afb1c5adb11a7d71c0ec34e0035f70483e78f0a
'2017-08-02T13:46:33-04:00'
describe
'26866' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile151' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_025.QC.jpg'
7d6e4e15455474e4eee7bb854ba12e9b
8bef621bced026a7e7728b6575ea977de1d99f4d
'2017-08-02T13:47:07-04:00'
describe
'95921' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile152' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_026.jpg'
bdd5d3dfe0fecb30e8a9fef9fc1abbdc
755911550f40c331628eca2d1677401dc575d7aa
'2017-08-02T13:47:31-04:00'
describe
'30078' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile153' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_026.QC.jpg'
fd635789822854e827fd458fd2df80ee
b865b78339b991ec09a9813308363857e8e950cc
describe
'90308' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile154' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_027.jpg'
cdd61e8401de33a5c47b70d39938d162
599b7904bf9509f3a209ff11b76f9316bd75f742
'2017-08-02T13:47:14-04:00'
describe
'28012' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile155' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_027.QC.jpg'
84d98277dba6c09afc2b5e76e5d33268
3826947f0b3f3d4d0e0270b4eb91ce652200cebf
describe
'72470' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile156' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_028.jpg'
6584523909dbad41452e15a0d45f15f2
40d0de915a94be2505d845967bbf41ac67412b1b
'2017-08-02T13:45:38-04:00'
describe
'22755' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile157' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_028.QC.jpg'
2c95edcd916b320077ae1b0533a17848
2564b33a384c06697e863bb69c9b48cfcebd798a
'2017-08-02T13:46:19-04:00'
describe
'95054' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile158' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_029.jpg'
bcf861fa68631fd0b39cc9dbfcb1c86d
386771940ebaa936a5f827b497d35a3ab8f59923
'2017-08-02T13:46:35-04:00'
describe
'30030' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile159' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_029.QC.jpg'
00c555de97e20bc85b94d2221f1476c0
a63fec5fd82d2cab9f5a4c86a5a81733cb73bedd
'2017-08-02T13:46:10-04:00'
describe
'1051910' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile16' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_016.jp2'
91109b3d83a601f6ebb1e516ce815ed2
80176b2689651f418e5a2fcf28665fa4db487a99
describe
'96908' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile160' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_030.jpg'
2f59d89597bbab1b4f2765daa45abf1f
9605d8d6c4bd2f670a7b6b04b9ba18ced33b5997
describe
'30533' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile161' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_030.QC.jpg'
37aa66bd85e36bf0fdbbf0f1424a0ba8
681c6b45ff3f4b7911166a2c1280b24e1570409e
describe
'95455' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile162' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_031.jpg'
623fb7dbe09d3a951e526e957a5d9921
ce55106169eab9b1ca8bf0777c2ae611b2cbdb4d
'2017-08-02T13:45:27-04:00'
describe
'30431' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile163' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_031.QC.jpg'
dd74bb9420a9979e9e1ad479d0dc2a03
8b558d46d7d7a1142d3647a9d880c0afe1c9b2d5
'2017-08-02T13:45:17-04:00'
describe
'93650' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile164' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_032.jpg'
df5cde0bfb3772727016e124d5deec9e
4ba7379bc06cfbf94c29d58549c0593ed9a686a3
describe
'29313' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile165' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_032.QC.jpg'
4f3668b7e9ff374f7951780584307318
349a6bae6860bbb1b22ec3a214f07cd58f2f0f6c
'2017-08-02T13:45:15-04:00'
describe
'96116' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile166' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_033.jpg'
dbcf7cbe1a939545e8629251f05304cc
c336aa2ee579d4d245e9520703252018d57197e2
'2017-08-02T13:45:05-04:00'
describe
'30399' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile167' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_033.QC.jpg'
8c568be602b12d224ac49ba04580b9d3
41706193262e7a7e93bff6f2a82bc1a9e2859e74
'2017-08-02T13:47:42-04:00'
describe
'100057' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile168' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_034.jpg'
a757ce84e1820b48cb11a71f9a96e623
4740467372cfeb8bc499eeade40dcfbde2f760ab
'2017-08-02T13:47:41-04:00'
describe
'31265' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile169' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_034.QC.jpg'
24b2524cee739e848f2845601d3fe183
6ec84893cdc0c1c3575c817ce1d138ddd7cc0025
'2017-08-02T13:45:40-04:00'
describe
'1051943' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile17' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_017.jp2'
5edc244ea6a355cb07f3e7aaabd92d88
b7d43014ab1b5de898e81bc66a5358b65e11fbe5
describe
'94347' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile170' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_035.jpg'
10f7f66d107a33477d25579ddef7063a
e614e576033de136305f54639fbd529009f12d08
'2017-08-02T13:45:26-04:00'
describe
'29958' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile171' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_035.QC.jpg'
e7479ba4d37ce751ca36aefcc8e987b5
abbdc861330ac13d6114ca70510b304ad9280519
'2017-08-02T13:45:00-04:00'
describe
'93306' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile172' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_036.jpg'
3b1aa676b70744ef37dede3ef05ec1de
ab5a3762c25fcb64747bca7628f39726f7c6d79a
'2017-08-02T13:46:20-04:00'
describe
'29346' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile173' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_036.QC.jpg'
8418759c922d83b674927bd4d91cedb6
697ccaea8ca50e7a50335d96e4f3af1041448c36
'2017-08-02T13:47:44-04:00'
describe
'86625' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile174' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_037.jpg'
4a3b6310db0d9062dfbec4c807472d3e
c1d8bff21aa4a18c012212426593694271369bd2
describe
'27684' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile175' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_037.QC.jpg'
fd253fb8e080d562a82e0cf152b88df5
a0c775c895c747271c92bd463f48918d7927d955
'2017-08-02T13:47:17-04:00'
describe
'82650' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile176' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_038.jpg'
7d9d30a0045e7cbeec6650134bad44a2
bfc98628068fdbf9cb4a56647f47650791f5634b
describe
'25560' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile177' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_038.QC.jpg'
06ff41fd852bf191966f94b21fcc3740
a6d83dfb2a9abc100f6526b3fc613e6382492644
describe
'10129' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile178' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_039.jpg'
3d01dd0dc7757da36294ceaad0f7b4de
c88167accf033005ab97881b019366be9dd079a2
'2017-08-02T13:47:05-04:00'
describe
'3742' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile179' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_039.QC.jpg'
d193b2c4b431c2453eb86dfc96a6b3c2
8e49f109b7b5b5c0dd0d41701d3dd8f9dcc9255b
'2017-08-02T13:46:44-04:00'
describe
'381740' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile18' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_018.jp2'
d91f11522dd47c15ea94d9da65216a40
37a74a72e1703319008675e33d16cffa359661a9
'2017-08-02T13:47:45-04:00'
describe
'96328' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile180' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_040.jpg'
2d8c9fd911fd69c00cc69f0274db0d45
70d6dfdefb20a6110f5d7011c5094b7ee807e31e
describe
'29990' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile181' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_040.QC.jpg'
a8d8c8dfb358484cf11f3c8e820dc082
5f02ee6f31637a21f5b639838410b13b75b85f3e
describe
'98726' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile182' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_041.jpg'
ca525d8025dc17084ba7e9a872e2890f
37cac4f722bb3f82c651d935ed63b534df471db0
describe
'30866' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile183' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_041.QC.jpg'
79f295a0dcdd8a1400b320aa08a0dba9
2d3cc8cc8ecc1e8003e27fdb1fa6817ff2c1889c
'2017-08-02T13:45:06-04:00'
describe
'60138' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile184' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_042.jpg'
2bc3abf7fa3e3fc431ba9e589cc84cbe
bb2b90787c9c3ef2f571d6a1b8b4ce9f303ede3c
'2017-08-02T13:47:15-04:00'
describe
'19180' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile185' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_042.QC.jpg'
3851c2eeb80971c84a1b74c98c8fcc31
824246425e9a67765f97287489c94566681e85e3
'2017-08-02T13:45:29-04:00'
describe
'85716' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile186' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_043.jpg'
38b33358709ea5497cb5f2eca6ede31a
cc11ddc7df99eb10fa4291cd71ea4f5dc6345997
describe
'27669' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile187' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_043.QC.jpg'
955dc1a96dfa257b1f9600d6575b6e64
11b6be846a9b9403df812fb12e1de9e8bf4494c8
'2017-08-02T13:46:27-04:00'
describe
'35282' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile188' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_044.jpg'
e5b628436263b784f9ce554d6cc1b768
5fd10d42f08bf4071260dd3e5df8b22d9bf8489c
describe
'11067' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile189' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_044.QC.jpg'
1ecf11c01a147dfdfb7dcd65254c4e8e
903360c617d70c798127f3fb77efffe83a45d6a0
'2017-08-02T13:45:07-04:00'
describe
'1051955' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile19' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_019.jp2'
683307459181f6663c8a68ec731dac8a
7c156db0c62cc671465ade352e04feef874f51ad
describe
'45236' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile190' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_045.jpg'
d3151cea962c9c4867b82339c50ecbb5
c64429b57110f75523a796e7144c86ddf13856b1
'2017-08-02T13:47:13-04:00'
describe
'15263' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile191' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_045.QC.jpg'
ba1b26ee9ea39ba5f607611935dae59c
51e435a46f91893fd37af1f550d4dd90732fab5d
'2017-08-02T13:45:34-04:00'
describe
'81109' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile192' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_046.jpg'
835b15ae89fd3193d61f6a89fb51c614
3918e8858005202ef5096cbf454e29784c1c9cb7
describe
'24295' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile193' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_046.QC.jpg'
f3fe5bfd2e34b0951b4bcfa63e798ab1
26530a54a40d35165487564d0d045ed83f34f25e
describe
'61915' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile194' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_047.jpg'
deffdc47edb246474282d801e7760123
0b5ac126b98a73582619517ba45479404c655258
describe
'20290' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile195' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_047.QC.jpg'
98c795b62bab69937c72d46c254618a8
0bd575f1764bbfe2e5fd1a1d7306c038bfa7f7a9
'2017-08-02T13:45:46-04:00'
describe
'68594' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile196' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_048.jpg'
d709ea77485d1bb8493dc5d60ddd0655
b6f0bdbec527c7670bee0bf9ec88d93de5e4561e
describe
'21024' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile197' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_048.QC.jpg'
05d0777dd657d9e6462cd18f3e15f2d1
129b341d0f6eced668915e79c52cceb9f0adf1a2
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile198' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_049.jpg'
0f46a1dd538594bd5b607025e9770f9b
5c7d1e52ecbd759a91cb6bd5c641deb9661b23e4
describe
'8024' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile199' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_049.QC.jpg'
efd72f28c0180729f7dbd6d43e674896
12c2b7070bf4541919ce435ed8f7b8ee421d8362
'2017-08-02T13:46:58-04:00'
describe
'28148' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile2' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_002.jp2'
2c45e28acae282c9f22e6db2ebe75572
1d01a307655db083aba2bc3f36e246ddb4fb77f5
'2017-08-02T13:45:57-04:00'
describe
'1051985' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile20' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_020.jp2'
9bcdfa2eaeff8da3319b642862baca9b
385939d8c024f4b10e8c9dea98e7507a386a174f
describe
'52042' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile200' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_050.jpg'
d4ea1d713a0d4f0631c040b80c8193d1
b1c2af1d8bbb60f2af022fed97daff8592d219f0
'2017-08-02T13:46:56-04:00'
describe
'18010' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile201' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_050.QC.jpg'
ff9fce14a22223fd63a36962eadb7fd6
52f117e59be24d228328c6be6e076658efe59592
describe
'80416' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile202' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_051.jpg'
1546d0ba02e72983c826ed744f3a6100
51234631988f12a9f42c0ae7d0e039ac1e05fcfb
'2017-08-02T13:47:04-04:00'
describe
'25098' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile203' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_051.QC.jpg'
1becc6bda5d697e16d7957e11211bfed
d99996afcbc83b6ba751ba552f876f492a193a62
describe
'69165' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile204' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_052.jpg'
fbc40ba9f853ef4a7c7c1a58d8234e5c
1340a5adaa5dbffb3c489c9dc991834423edd5ad
describe
'22182' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile205' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_052.QC.jpg'
a71a6f5279933a036284370e902df6ca
061ca76e29dcfed9900797855cafe19567ac9e59
'2017-08-02T13:46:32-04:00'
describe
'78555' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile206' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_053.jpg'
6ea5f16da27ffea1473708807db77579
19f5b108c6f926758c98c2940a0504225999bc0e
describe
'24231' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile207' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_053.QC.jpg'
a60b97f52122a083c08ada7106f652f4
e82e00c3692a05cf31dcfaaf0df292153c25aa9a
'2017-08-02T13:47:26-04:00'
describe
'34455' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile208' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_054.jpg'
768a31071ad9c5467dbf0fd2436b1f10
af3dac722305e1606f115f387f1bb5057408ac84
'2017-08-02T13:45:16-04:00'
describe
'11440' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile209' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_054.QC.jpg'
23b36e7f5056cb85269f4aa3f70f8c44
e6b85d0a4a5adfc86681aec09733cad2d0b93975
'2017-08-02T13:46:40-04:00'
describe
'1051959' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile21' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_021.jp2'
68722a5830d365fc2c25cf90a8f69215
fbca7f5d2768c8787ac55b5e30bfd93e7d10e2be
describe
'32420' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile210' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_055.jpg'
e8d9cc5cd8fe7cfe7e150cea59c98334
0119a6b61f7c06e3c5b961c2184e7703be13d140
describe
'12161' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile211' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_055.QC.jpg'
7fedd82c305a428f7e790b5d42a2ca75
b75dce0135454cc54024c0ac3b1e217dc800df2c
'2017-08-02T13:47:43-04:00'
describe
'47990' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile212' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_056.jpg'
381cd6f977ad9a1c03f9a502bbae4296
b4fd5c99dd66a1c2ac89480ecdc18c6e6738d291
describe
'14718' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile213' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_056.QC.jpg'
4ce220f7304770fc5d05b2640e387d41
0b7b70b10973f7bfa0b7bdfe334c5d93670c7d02
describe
'66558' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile214' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_057.jpg'
e2aa534c5252cebedee8a95ae9688706
3de2665e83eca8496cfeda5917a8336190ab65eb
describe
'21275' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile215' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_057.QC.jpg'
7f083b7aaaa7c9b3f8f1d02669a05345
78580f170a9aeccb496119cf6875e9c273c64aa7
describe
'72156' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile216' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_058.jpg'
8c0859c4952198ba8b6455ac3a15eb49
cfda7f3f608945484577c1e781e5cc4d74e5dab7
'2017-08-02T13:46:50-04:00'
describe
'22416' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile217' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_058.QC.jpg'
b68ce05e64e22784415b88a79ef441a3
49bb612592f343dbe5e0ce773a49c7950c789757
'2017-08-02T13:47:27-04:00'
describe
'54516' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile218' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_059.jpg'
e32590a23ebdea3bb829a97fdff7cb5e
91d0d43779300ecce4b93212c07259d3118d479b
describe
'17633' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile219' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_059.QC.jpg'
59083fd15b4cf5b94a1ec76fea00733b
5d4dded81d14c36465c3fa376b4e0ce5a46dfa16
'2017-08-02T13:46:48-04:00'
describe
'1051964' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile22' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_022.jp2'
18ada8d89cf65e5d16632dd0cdfd999b
82e6a5f1455f0ecb1104009bf30fe1808b0d0780
describe
'56744' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile220' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_060.jpg'
d02c7fd218f23213f2ad9c10231d2da4
149d74bd2f31d4074e5665fdf3cf5b625d2a6293
describe
'17662' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile221' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_060.QC.jpg'
1bc6316c900302ff084b554d83961531
6da9c81ac39d5274b2bb1fa5728566693d52339d
'2017-08-02T13:45:14-04:00'
describe
'55999' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile222' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_061.jpg'
d54228e2da1605733e134394928a8580
f46577f9783f10fc3439fc9301ac7b6a0238f986
'2017-08-02T13:47:47-04:00'
describe
'17767' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile223' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_061.QC.jpg'
e1dc89aa37541736e21638e701929f36
7b53a44a295f06df6e091c018f024f8998c5d017
describe
'65290' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile224' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_062.jpg'
80e9a2ad43cc05c9d9fa8053e51653da
83e67c14a42d4ce0d84a78b404bc8d16213fa066
describe
'21420' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile225' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_062.QC.jpg'
e6a9a7139a5c633ad705054c4ac89145
3e80d7fbd130beccc10c382898de4e6a1c32aedb
describe
'82914' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile226' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_063.jpg'
2fc37568d89d9e90b528b65beff19b40
bf4610f1a7e7c2d86ccdcf8ff5fdd9b2d6d61bdb
'2017-08-02T13:46:04-04:00'
describe
'26608' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile227' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_063.QC.jpg'
4c40733c44f5c4ca60904005f0ea0de1
d6a932d8c375360bf65fb8dc7858fcce675f3a30
describe
'64269' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile228' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_064.jpg'
3cba09cccdc933237b99fe27218c0bac
c4c1019eb5d24d4183aecc364ed659d475391303
describe
'19988' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile229' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_064.QC.jpg'
0de88e179759adfc4e20e26b7b933fb0
b1caa30ac1822f8ef0564982f4fc44bfaa712ee0
'2017-08-02T13:47:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile23' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_023.jp2'
7e03fa1676cf7ef2e43ab22b20da509c
201815e965e824f537d96921591f8878630aab4e
describe
'61949' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile230' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_065.jpg'
2acdb0f06b4b6472210cb94ff61e065d
421717b12981e144ee0325b58114046accf66c87
'2017-08-02T13:46:37-04:00'
describe
'19730' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile231' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_065.QC.jpg'
c3683121e53e9132a6817219d2960a8e
a8ea7ff7529f7100fc531ec180c586e116b96767
describe
'55546' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile232' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_066.jpg'
88f24bf564dddf73bed4d0e889c5839d
5a262587fb4fa854d3cacfd0f7c158f22f25b113
describe
'17439' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile233' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_066.QC.jpg'
73989710480839251d4df4044ff8c92e
6bf7c0a2ef1305ca0d0a1d1f8a933d9dd0cb3c83
'2017-08-02T13:45:04-04:00'
describe
'33542' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile234' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_067.jpg'
dce8ce49d382198e0d5ba02e3e7558e0
03d0f15dd945534234a105d2e2a24987e7b8d1a8
describe
'10123' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile235' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_067.QC.jpg'
0a3fb6797ef248a884d7eaf19bc49603
f6806a08b8123d614f2098215a64c5cce7dbd093
'2017-08-02T13:46:29-04:00'
describe
'43866' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile236' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_068.jpg'
e10fd72b0d90111f0d3289caef8cb6ad
06efcd892955f86fe00b212dfccae400c511da18
'2017-08-02T13:46:49-04:00'
describe
'14379' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile237' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_068.QC.jpg'
5b27e54bba4d90bb6b1e7e72a555b12b
4fc6120a489b20c3c4c1bc76cae3be65ff23b36e
describe
'78882' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile238' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_069.jpg'
a52ba091ad1a3fa763d298b83fd5c1b3
80d6a199cd6fdba9e5d049efaac4136d21065815
describe
'26203' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile239' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_069.QC.jpg'
dfc493152ec362933d17c3000131b6d1
29ba261c3b3b50ed3e6291a10f3c220aa5f2f2b2
describe
'1051928' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile24' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_024.jp2'
04899207de5a19485504dc3672702bf8
a18d33ffdecd2004ae1e52ab3959fc282c18a0f6
describe
'64766' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile240' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_070.jpg'
4c884a000dd0b01c6471fd8529c5000c
47c0a1a2d60ef2e5c997ae80a06cddaa2461e338
'2017-08-02T13:46:51-04:00'
describe
'19289' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile241' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_070.QC.jpg'
568e162e562b40f9d6cc9425b698b39b
0855e1d9e08ae5ffa881df331ff2ffd06f91891c
describe
'77157' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile242' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_071.jpg'
0b05d17ee80aa907ef2ddbb40103b5e6
e01415929d69e3a91f36eeb816be50c2d89f7de8
'2017-08-02T13:47:48-04:00'
describe
'23374' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile243' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_071.QC.jpg'
bc00b2c81fe752db7cad1beb57030e41
3535c3462980b68cd7bceb7b5865c9a3741941de
describe
'67546' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile244' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_072.jpg'
412e6d0821a3fb0a8a5c3c8d251334d1
7312869eea14304776c6d80f7866dda152a4dbce
describe
'22446' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile245' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_072.QC.jpg'
426889713b442ff47db0986045b0542e
de0320582ba31c2de9019d48b077a45c17ec44c7
'2017-08-02T13:46:02-04:00'
describe
'66263' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile246' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_073.jpg'
808b09bd5557f3d9c9b695bad845e8cf
807b3c175ebf7891d6f63278931533ede107e35f
describe
'20954' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile247' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_073.QC.jpg'
60fa32fe49e29827d188a01640c3b361
3ecff0d2cce0b5e4c6fcfce4740a567a36c0f034
describe
'34343' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile248' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_074.jpg'
150f019081c9752cfa4176aec0a6a2d4
1abc2dce63302e892ca6d5e51a7e4b771d2af9ad
'2017-08-02T13:45:50-04:00'
describe
'10021' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile249' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_074.QC.jpg'
d93ebfbdc832d31d3228fe317fdbfe8a
71e18338933b2af7eba7126623f410412bb923eb
'2017-08-02T13:45:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile25' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_025.jp2'
af3e0567020812cf3a69bdcb8fb86eeb
5a748eaa71e83610253ac68553cca579efa3f92a
describe
'53414' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile250' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_075.jpg'
05b9bb0f6c7a776f6ddd8524d50abf08
b1314816df3be285af636f3c75de3e6a35e47b4d
describe
'17477' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile251' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_075.QC.jpg'
1028e06b367c5ae4f495dedf64b3e896
d386f66e40da63b54969b2e043d3b30b7f55ce8e
'2017-08-02T13:47:10-04:00'
describe
'48903' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile252' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_076.jpg'
c58f9535528f4b2beb5f93d88d356c24
7a39d8fecc19b78212373c4d664fd10567b274bf
'2017-08-02T13:45:47-04:00'
describe
'16585' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile253' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_076.QC.jpg'
67093d5cedddea881fa045ac970b1eef
6082f4001105f933198d3a42bde0f31297e032ce
describe
'31121' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile254' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_077.jpg'
556fb5924a957dbc38aa9d671444cf66
ba5974f78f57b6638f3ba372eb908b478ac30507
describe
'11077' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile255' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_077.QC.jpg'
9c3282b8eeb4402000f5249322c21fdd
85b788c6650d056fce951d7c622a69fc57efa14f
'2017-08-02T13:45:36-04:00'
describe
'52339' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile256' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_078.jpg'
826d16bda22cbdf72daa9e5e6b4d1341
5b0737c8ceaff8031b530bb7a4b96db7f7977657
'2017-08-02T13:46:46-04:00'
describe
'16879' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile257' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_078.QC.jpg'
e35c43dc75e8bd2c6312fc5f480d1dff
c99f0d7c36fa2a94f0dd82dff6a5b6bd0945ccc9
describe
'43685' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile258' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_079.jpg'
9ecf32c87508e4413dea97e895154116
b2fae21b6ad63d85fb39d0f64f608c524d82bd18
'2017-08-02T13:46:14-04:00'
describe
'14920' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile259' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_079.QC.jpg'
f5bdd85e4f135432fc18f579a1a7bc5c
d1b695f4f17326657ce11e1b942909244addce2e
describe
'1051968' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile26' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_026.jp2'
2641da38b469a6264faeab53a664e061
415662f17a10c3b5284c2451e77ca1d772f8cd7c
'2017-08-02T13:46:38-04:00'
describe
'43467' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile260' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_080.jpg'
133b438852c8f27ea4778bdd85b1cd47
e7650afed762f1846b46cc0d3b32f09014275eb0
describe
'15175' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile261' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_080.QC.jpg'
a0e9f01ebb74c27f1e855af524948351
5f2b9ba0234af9cfc06c2041c516edef6ab8acde
describe
'49371' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile262' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_081.jpg'
a225ec899315d9237520a917b1140cc4
d928bf095bf68ad894445fabe131560de1e194b6
describe
'17258' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile263' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_081.QC.jpg'
d1758dd35512476e43c1069b27f04ae5
bfe8c11da1a60db4c8d928a180b0b61a371f8151
describe
'33788' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile264' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_082.jpg'
bd3bd86ef68a09d5c6369c4e2aa881a5
da5bf4172917f43362b20e3bd690d725d03cf958
describe
'11920' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile265' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_082.QC.jpg'
c31b72f7f7e479bd3c5f4e9e355ed4b8
e0c5ed96b69273a4492ead0ab0a1a4a0909ae0aa
describe
'45574' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile266' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_083.jpg'
6180ce1856b3d2c622072ae979e59f09
26433cb5c5fce71706d89fafa7f99be3bb0b2bd9
'2017-08-02T13:46:18-04:00'
describe
'15693' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile267' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_083.QC.jpg'
240b5101901394d2dca75fb2606235d5
dd17277dbbb1d40e225427be81df9dc62e4dd94c
'2017-08-02T13:45:10-04:00'
describe
'44800' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile268' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_084.jpg'
f85a309f7093719fcc6cbeee1727d59e
defdb3b643a8acf1df4a2b5591743141f7ba5a53
describe
'14861' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile269' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_084.QC.jpg'
3f6c1e28e9d1d26e2bf3463d4b1846b1
4d4fc8fff67cc333fca4bf1d7f19f10134bd5826
'2017-08-02T13:46:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile27' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_027.jp2'
741639795d1429e054d22dc58f01d639
023b6fa906be386d9246e35e592b29093acf434e
'2017-08-02T13:46:39-04:00'
describe
'41703' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile270' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_085.jpg'
2d3d4e5e1375fde2a95d2fcaeb841512
5b09c646daffcfd10d5083b2d3806991a2574adc
'2017-08-02T13:46:15-04:00'
describe
'14436' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile271' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_085.QC.jpg'
fb76db0c325ffd328f80ddce6e2dffd0
0e4b460f657e5f053b3909764b82f067a6d9e49c
describe
'53355' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile272' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_086.jpg'
6e209e3579c9712c2598e2e698ecd548
ccb24c782061a41d960c043e9aacccac9ec8d530
describe
'17344' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile273' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_086.QC.jpg'
43109a34bf63eeaa70a565ac6c02522d
5318f6fe57b233c6ad435e247862933d71e95c9d
describe
'38739' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile274' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_087.jpg'
11ab2ee25bbdd50688d18c4d5f060cac
fdb0dedd6395d85b160845594483229aaf4601c2
'2017-08-02T13:46:52-04:00'
describe
'12704' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile275' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_087.QC.jpg'
1c07a708f350771bad6f670a41dd16dc
1777c6d01e017da7b8a3be5430f5db7dd9d705dd
describe
'54848' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile276' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_088.jpg'
bc779e3ea7ae42db81c9e2378a86ff07
34ef7caa2405ae39405b9ac9816230456e30a65e
'2017-08-02T13:46:05-04:00'
describe
'18446' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile277' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_088.QC.jpg'
11b477d153296c053de1b5d037740133
df594e4600ef4969a49e7fa81a2aaac5bb3c6611
describe
'89165' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile278' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_089.jpg'
06ae0deec2c06659214ccabfea5be006
cf29605345fc349a834edd8d41608acc3ad5383a
describe
'28292' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile279' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_089.QC.jpg'
1095d1959340852e504b09663cf41341
e9417bcd24553faa422ca69fe957a023810e5a60
'2017-08-02T13:47:03-04:00'
describe
'914462' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile28' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_028.jp2'
ef78be2eea139adca6348291fe5e3e11
5120f2e9fd4585b35cb9cf700d67b8a47f07455b
describe
'44301' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile280' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_090.jpg'
103c4f7b5a39d6607eac542605c2977d
12ed859daccbf8e490b32eed3f3a00581b7bfc36
describe
'13930' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile281' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_090.QC.jpg'
74a94e0e99a6a16775b4fcd9e3257702
5ba90243cf1846d70cbf826e99816dcbdca44c39
'2017-08-02T13:46:07-04:00'
describe
'85683' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile282' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_091.jpg'
73defa10b797a77947aafd11dc250988
0b3d997a42f0ed8308cf0d822786e38c47a8e2a3
describe
'24997' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile283' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_091.QC.jpg'
a579ee80142e98ce566314126d4830e1
c2795e23e6fe3423201cfbaa9e1fa63f3960d063
'2017-08-02T13:47:06-04:00'
describe
'56411' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile284' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_092.jpg'
1ea9632ea181481706bc40bf0571ec5d
970515503fd13da8b9004a97f98a0117969d76ad
'2017-08-02T13:47:19-04:00'
describe
'15942' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile285' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_092.QC.jpg'
70c7563cba4a68dea64d557565ae9872
288daacf12ebf8ff2dbea277e85f9d2bdc9f8f87
'2017-08-02T13:45:37-04:00'
describe
'15147' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile286' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_093.jpg'
b38511defbc922f42ac7cdd3407106af
6b4166e821021b92f4dfcc5c6c916a72bd635094
describe
'4986' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile287' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_093.QC.jpg'
0e8c2b34859dc23d9377827fb86da688
7868a5c92a8dd96e4b19de90a5cecac35e11e4ab
describe
'86581' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile288' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_094.jpg'
9cc62492d8c4196ec657f13eb76d56f4
dbd81a847a62673bfabda94e080dbe7dd66f6c8b
describe
'26929' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile289' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_094.QC.jpg'
2a9d26502fc763a82af0b466bed845b1
37453821c96632bd37c0cfbccd16e46ca9e6d757
describe
'1051978' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile29' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_029.jp2'
2fa216f0e145a0e091f5c14b9b595547
428362a00301d3dfe0696fc5720dcf35b17f8bbe
describe
'53054' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile290' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_095.jpg'
aeb54ad095a73b374fa1aa8b39be73cb
64d27a2cd81ff11d52cf7c8434ade8574170b3fa
describe
'16822' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile291' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_095.QC.jpg'
d4dee4e0e8e8b940cede784e7960906c
cc31e7cd612edb29689aaf338d8bcbc0d9112347
'2017-08-02T13:47:18-04:00'
describe
'74434' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile292' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_096.jpg'
731aa46cd00e5fdc866c45187bf0cb73
408c3bd742a2e8b863bf9433915283233289d20f
'2017-08-02T13:46:12-04:00'
describe
'22850' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile293' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_096.QC.jpg'
8eb53e8360596929e529d542b5a25800
680f127a649bd7d4422fa9d7ef1f74b20294bfff
describe
'32082' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile294' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_097.jpg'
d0b317564648ea1965a1f7d3f42c5d42
fddfe2b0018034c54ce56e7ef833661f74ebbd2a
'2017-08-02T13:45:42-04:00'
describe
'9380' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile295' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_097.QC.jpg'
8cc5e0d9205d76820ef64a3e1e2eb545
6e38aa8d3da723d6219034898a845e5a8f46d9a5
describe
'106538' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile296' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_098.jpg'
98b2249673af12859d4c13862d245f11
ccdcc0f0b6c73325c8d772d1548f64698c6dfbef
describe
'29898' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile297' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_098.QC.jpg'
4eb6cf502767af29bd702de1eb4e8cdb
37d7cc9944fd6addc0378e9e7a37f90af6462b9a
describe
'109384' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile298' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_099.jpg'
c743d0a7d5ba7cc53011f8b40b297e38
f1b190d5abb934cc64317bbf2f3e295984d4a716
describe
'30793' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile299' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_099.QC.jpg'
525fca91749e8478785ddb87d83c9917
664caa5f76eef29074da338acacff95586feae26
'2017-08-02T13:47:00-04:00'
describe
'23150' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile3' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_003.jp2'
acd8486e9ee044a6b4d5971a5a40a767
757defa7bd3337e2e6b523b200323f5f8e9b0ad7
'2017-08-02T13:45:32-04:00'
describe
'1051961' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile30' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_030.jp2'
5961ee738ebc20163c231ec045917d81
aebce7a67be5231fae132b20422d01ec14126307
'2017-08-02T13:45:59-04:00'
describe
'19187' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile300' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_100.jpg'
193f5159eef9dafbd1d2dfb404fac71e
6f151979ee07ecdac43fa72f762ab7da54d017bf
'2017-08-02T13:45:21-04:00'
describe
'5600' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile301' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_100.QC.jpg'
61ca4d890e2376715f232e610b723d29
dab34733a713ed3488d6c2be7bbfc1d3ad632cbf
describe
'61580' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile302' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_101.jpg'
a18f3f815241f5816e9454f6f0d822b7
d6c82c0e33ae3d60c57f86be6d530756aea06a2a
'2017-08-02T13:46:03-04:00'
describe
'19261' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile303' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_101.QC.jpg'
22600fa8758a24fc21b536b9bfa88988
75a11515c9c582c818fb5f68221d40d417bb55c7
describe
'2079' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile304' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_001thm.jpg'
2ff0bdd8e7d7e0d5aea91de3dcd27185
b4ee3e1d722636199a4a882a744171c79f0bda31
describe
'569' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile305' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_002thm.jpg'
cd5557887a3789eb20804704629fcf5d
ac81e88f50b71c9e9afd71f56da7a37a26aafd54
describe
'479' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile306' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_003thm.jpg'
6912c9abb57a70549e7c33de6c0c2d09
299f8dcf0e0b1528c4f03f13ac4b9372f442fa98
describe
'7290' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile307' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_004thm.jpg'
8f090d2bf1bd23739ff875161569f0c2
a93e73eb935bb5938c6510f4f70277b98fcc7be1
describe
'1835' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile308' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_005thm.jpg'
4f6d215570271347a48005eb176a704a
946b407f9073d035c901f089ead9150707529563
describe
'5689' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile309' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_006thm.jpg'
37e3ca52e92908f2c459b67d226baa76
cd86182ac4ca0a1b7e840cfbf5581506b96d5239
describe
'1051966' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile31' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_031.jp2'
01bea825dc8f61f44d9952e6eda6157a
bbeb701c75fb6377617beca240c8ccf4d798ccab
'2017-08-02T13:46:42-04:00'
describe
'5687' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile310' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_007thm.jpg'
00cfc49bc91a5e70636859847430e8e0
73dac4155c6e763c528cda36cc27b75a5d1e03c8
describe
'6522' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile311' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_008thm.jpg'
81602044efc5202386e0b8ef4c48835b
d8060c3fe14932d6b418f3cb8b241864afd79d2b
describe
'7183' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile312' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_009thm.jpg'
724679d11146150033334b525f4a529c
7462dafe366f4b29a19ad0cc79a92451b89d3db9
describe
'7396' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile313' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_010thm.jpg'
ca0dea4fb6271533fdc32c211ab1c67a
dd911974993771c7e1906d88c3fe53dbe24c9a3d
'2017-08-02T13:45:18-04:00'
describe
'6993' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile314' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_011thm.jpg'
32745493744ae2c74e8707cdf586e957
f30bf7fb37e1c291cab33fac03641df19f6fea10
'2017-08-02T13:45:02-04:00'
describe
'7503' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile315' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_012thm.jpg'
76c4e512221564f3661c01640be63c14
b15fe260b327782b9e58437386ad4845c539296b
describe
'1886' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile316' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_013thm.jpg'
6813f578aae93ff043b3b34e0c68d7a9
fa2accb5428b00bb97c4a2f12a9928ec7d5b82d2
'2017-08-02T13:47:54-04:00'
describe
'7464' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile317' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_014thm.jpg'
3f2eb6f4ee565e6738d4b28f418f949d
55445200e4b5376f9eaf2a137590566bfd0696a0
describe
'7041' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile318' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_015thm.jpg'
19aeb75cfa36f13087dd9e99e4a003e2
584d6494ba8b493d1bed42f8f19e723e4f9d0de8
describe
'7544' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile319' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_016thm.jpg'
d28a4edc7721361c72274f129e7a790c
12e489f98efe6a28a52c4c1ca80219026153a754
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile32' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_032.jp2'
8037220f72b050d2306e16fd3eccbe26
81d99d9e84ab792280bc4b86bfd4444eff9c56a8
describe
'7429' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile320' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_017thm.jpg'
a9f3dd2113a4df1e3e4582ecb9639367
2354b884bd568148cdc46da06aafd8238dfaf428
describe
'2541' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile321' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_018thm.jpg'
5fa08a22699c953010aef52239b46bf3
c50c15654675cd5e86ccb0b66112023f7c6e145b
describe
'6365' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile322' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_019thm.jpg'
51b51fc7db7d11663e911fd08844a391
83c15b686d734af6367815b59780abd9e531d6cc
'2017-08-02T13:47:37-04:00'
describe
'7484' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile323' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_020thm.jpg'
95f02e566ae6c2de045c4569c3ef64ba
cb0c4a5594a55f6d7909ed1619d4aa4264a482f6
'2017-08-02T13:45:53-04:00'
describe
'7156' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile324' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_021thm.jpg'
f380e1062082e6e2814613b231038960
fdc9062ea106c3bf871facc2f1c43dfa9744d98d
describe
'7164' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile325' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_022thm.jpg'
485b7bff6ae4f0cbebe3b30982be57c0
a3c70fb611257751dcaa2ea97a5198c341953aba
'2017-08-02T13:47:20-04:00'
describe
'6681' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile326' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_023thm.jpg'
baa75456f8988d1fc3da478ed609180e
9b83ea2d2c295b7bbcce651353f9fb44e202c5c6
describe
'6857' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile327' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_024thm.jpg'
7166e7b5c8c5ae880d29c507ffa0427b
ca99867a81cffeb14b8918bba060f5ac72fc0da3
describe
'6603' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile328' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_025thm.jpg'
05d4a6696da87de792610f512cc3b67e
9771f58796789ef642ceb5bbca54a30b9c14a60f
describe
'7202' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile329' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_026thm.jpg'
fcab6bec854c6c02327b450ff6e21844
6846a08c0a52114a2c2a0143d1f523f646c7f000
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile33' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_033.jp2'
e88ed05b874c95463cdf9dde984bfe38
b681805ca974ce1adad044f962c5adbe8de99ce1
'2017-08-02T13:46:08-04:00'
describe
'6950' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile330' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_027thm.jpg'
7afe50ecc299f8327d4c3d6daee1d095
298d42bb5cf328a25fa4ba085a5c129ebee393c5
describe
'5589' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile331' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_028thm.jpg'
61da93048f607fbab73ac0f7b70dd1e5
6cadea690f28bcb3b758901d592521eb8a3ef7cf
describe
'7305' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile332' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_029thm.jpg'
a33ba34801cf2d0bdb4829b144151d94
82b21916919bb192c53a5ef05edbb0b7caf3b2dd
describe
'7368' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile333' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_030thm.jpg'
403c0b6e3d6686304e70fa5a49351bd9
c0900c375cd96344e8ceb1b78102a218010ea528
describe
'7321' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile334' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_031thm.jpg'
ec8c518c9f8db6c782753cccd2982ad3
db6168ac671373b11b55aa9f331afde8c0167051
describe
'7302' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile335' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_032thm.jpg'
01e85b4b8accd9ef4f28e5f78aed72b3
00a7b7555afa1162e21156ebcd8147d6d8daa0b7
describe
'7482' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile336' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_033thm.jpg'
4085c6be83474b802e12d5fb4a395e6c
d82fe51ed2f294ba2ee9fae1cbbf0017fa2b15df
describe
'7694' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile337' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_034thm.jpg'
20333dec0639aa1d2657b9b53977689e
5c8041ac44df992679e0c95146786691561961df
describe
'7256' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile338' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_035thm.jpg'
cedac963c4bada3b866a096df74f4637
039b66c4773b5056327217839c15477f01a327c2
describe
'7024' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile339' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_036thm.jpg'
9c5d641dcccca998c517715c7f513b7a
16aa97222e98cf7cc66fa17b1530a2b65b752890
describe
'1051981' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile34' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_034.jp2'
c309a11dc3c112ed5a2c322d3b211cae
784b5bd21885b241976b9c3434e4f569283a114d
'2017-08-02T13:47:32-04:00'
describe
'6826' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile340' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_037thm.jpg'
d736978a596a75ea986cad1bb7435f9f
250dd43551b635686f7a1fce7e3b32d1cffaf606
describe
'6400' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile341' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_038thm.jpg'
cf37460e14750409c3ad255f0b5ce3ed
df3725610a85ca8e82d50ed0a0a918c2e533accb
'2017-08-02T13:45:56-04:00'
describe
'979' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile342' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_039thm.jpg'
3bc5541be0796fcb8feae9800b7fa27c
624e7e23d1e937b154c8b41f4a45303906145ac4
describe
'7168' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile343' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_040thm.jpg'
1b56ad3aa8128c8ecf0f67c41df7e48d
7e3710ccc7bfc3ac0fb3072e637c9882e04b9e95
describe
'7469' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile344' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_041thm.jpg'
63e1e08f0281c2805d41b34688641b45
979667d3870209c1328e1decb642cc3ff4857ff6
'2017-08-02T13:47:12-04:00'
describe
'4722' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile345' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_042thm.jpg'
238b29f26f914415f7ecc20d08511770
67dfd02b1efdcec2b67e18c2ebc15084b8e3e34f
describe
'6612' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile346' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_043thm.jpg'
0a45233e226794a25c9e537e546de270
0bddfc3a79210b9f17e07f64e5bd696220eef430
describe
'2944' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile347' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_044thm.jpg'
99fcbafa4cec9cb49986c4e5c78062ee
b22c6c521549e8ac9f848d11767be06558c49eff
describe
'3922' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile348' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_045thm.jpg'
80d40e8ac88f47f5d7635b8785368339
4d626cbd365b1c2fb6e5dfea9d798882b0552cff
describe
'6526' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile349' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_046thm.jpg'
463c0c392f235300489ad63401be4428
2c3d8e6384f9b63c59f3fc0bfdfb39928d3863f4
describe
'1051974' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile35' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_035.jp2'
5f41ae5aa08292bc7f9f2c51205f2442
db9dfba7b5eaf1b6a4400c96217a7173bf6a190e
describe
'5340' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile350' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_047thm.jpg'
1a5f3922abbee8af853cb0585d487da2
3ca475ddb44266db44147e31f9656ddd4f37ceea
'2017-08-02T13:45:19-04:00'
describe
'5921' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile351' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_048thm.jpg'
93d6c40eee5dc1d0c4f2257b5258ba71
8250de88ebf574fbd0c59eb4c836820d5abaa0c1
describe
'2225' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile352' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_049thm.jpg'
34cdedbd91333bc03b94cf419cbf10b2
352fa5c853c1c40c046fd53d3d5a986e0f09f336
describe
'4400' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile353' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_050thm.jpg'
9dcfc86667523dcb61c0056e4ad3c692
08ec3ce6adb58c32191bebc683216e18fdca7bd9
describe
'6380' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile354' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_051thm.jpg'
caa70bb7ce4b3d5de57d2d26e08a3ee3
e87017a5e1a811ba166975d62daa4d6897ab6173
describe
'5389' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile355' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_052thm.jpg'
1a42fad78bd626e9072caddba9439b0f
282ea1fc7596ce34440e3a3e95327fc9ebd6c240
describe
'6296' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile356' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_053thm.jpg'
fe1b616d9e04d829303ba3293209200b
96ce780b0ffe162cecb6fa4130eb03a1b3d958e1
describe
'2904' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile357' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_054thm.jpg'
c26e1040a47b2d024a410420deee811f
44649ec5bafc242d23b585528fde57a802be6419
describe
'3489' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile358' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_055thm.jpg'
07ad79ff6ded9e9cbc62074f3f768242
8effd5bbe6ac32b717a943e3a6c55518eb8bf96a
describe
'4195' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile359' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_056thm.jpg'
a7a77fa11246a1f8860c004518ebbe6e
e7dcd37744862c453ea03e1a690c15338f278aea
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile36' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_036.jp2'
bb038d63c5a346023242dd98629803aa
5cf1ebeaad29dbbae270c37108b572ff509c27f0
describe
'5726' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile360' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_057thm.jpg'
9526107a5338208475b6b24a88830552
7e4899e9b5c341e2fd595c7bd9256a8e3f691fcf
describe
'5904' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile361' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_058thm.jpg'
5f8f3b328aed2f26c364aafab1eedf72
3e39b787e0d66420b780d6c7bd76e750e890d90a
describe
'4492' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile362' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_059thm.jpg'
3cee61b678479a1336d3069da62d8e57
eea238098f58ec3ade90d803d8495b7522cfe170
describe
'4685' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile363' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_060thm.jpg'
4d779f725d18a71c586ea00b5bca1ea7
8a11f9a8a70930a487019a2713d15374a6f54046
describe
'4511' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile364' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_061thm.jpg'
d7a9f58ed2fc50832ad95c77e8b705fd
790b074f9aa05fbc9c3d313ce6250b6162ac244e
describe
'5150' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile365' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_062thm.jpg'
55da80e08d9becb3403d4226356009dc
1662c3af4cfa73eef818429f5b9fd5b3c5d21478
describe
'6209' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile366' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_063thm.jpg'
728defad6dfd0c205933f28b6aa6aacc
7d56ce63576c46c3c93972e9f9e9cc5754705e2a
describe
'5006' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile367' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_064thm.jpg'
5c365e240ccaa2feae2cb1b81f92dee3
08d85294ccd710a6fce48748fe4620b553c88c52
describe
'4785' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile368' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_065thm.jpg'
a7d759a19ad29c14376a20377f53f2a2
025d46e24ede5cb213d959b2cbdba9d2c30f5904
'2017-08-02T13:46:41-04:00'
describe
'4665' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile369' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_066thm.jpg'
315694c27d30722155c3113d99828b65
5dd30bc8edb37ea10f2c30a10d1ea24fa07d9940
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile37' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_037.jp2'
e6eed5f3e379956e886b92f8fca97300
f35e63fd2ccfdddfde64668b550227e264d125fb
describe
'2809' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile370' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_067thm.jpg'
039ad9ba5329c4afd6cb51a30f8bab7e
dd1f62511413c8d8a3d026070a03a12958a07aad
describe
'3873' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile371' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_068thm.jpg'
81192ce3cb659dbeeb8f6779ee20cb6a
3b94117e3d1de980d5dda57cd60821842c3d3fa4
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile372' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_069thm.jpg'
21673d77c4b2cb843277f403979b340c
bc7fe6f933da37bfcddf757b6eaf094e79a5b7c8
'2017-08-02T13:47:08-04:00'
describe
'5582' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile373' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_070thm.jpg'
139d4333ec0fd907dd7f74d6b54ddb4f
5fdadd8e5be507daeba9c366f2e802665e66df54
describe
'6136' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile374' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_071thm.jpg'
d15d5be02e8f90f79cab79a3a54e7ce3
44eda51e113f40d771d2ff416fd060893413a6e2
describe
'5690' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile375' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_072thm.jpg'
9b707a04c3aca3d83fd03f9f2a273767
afbd80231b4125c9e8ed5b6ec21795cc563ad9e7
describe
'4763' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile376' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_073thm.jpg'
93ac31eae6243b639dedf96e5fc4e865
7d4094e1ffaf7c790cfed60a5e76b56e0576224e
describe
'2797' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile377' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_074thm.jpg'
dec4bd0e80835c9a9fdba138cae6ef5e
92eb2ea685b15db2b284999a2e1e026877dd1b3c
describe
'5732' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile378' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_075thm.jpg'
6fd1a67c2ea01ddea52b00ea8d790a54
8d507f779147988a30fa576647f10a89f1c4ea3c
describe
'5567' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile379' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_076thm.jpg'
d6f749f53492963ed24e01ff917bd837
e4176247bb4000b47ac2e72dc1fd437c8f99a093
describe
'1036042' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile38' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_038.jp2'
1a43d37dd53f73eea441f2740ab26bd8
d763da328e2644ff3366d13de325fbb4cc9c828a
describe
'3863' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile380' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_077thm.jpg'
757ab76c4474d305188ed2c11797efb6
4a9d3cf1e84b5104786b5931e732e78398b4457a
describe
'5002' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile381' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_078thm.jpg'
891d9271e5f9b3eb6b3fabaa61b8bfb2
9ba09299ffe656d064948c64f145b2f29f4575a1
describe
'4897' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile382' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_079thm.jpg'
8b14df2e90b702a4ea85b16c0c5e85e6
c91f7ee2d9ed0870c2eb8b669e4c0c9ec92e10ac
'2017-08-02T13:46:36-04:00'
describe
'4799' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile383' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_080thm.jpg'
e821422321377c4e6c041d7818ac4fbf
5af0d4f571642d68476a1bcab850dba4aa1c12e9
describe
'5345' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile384' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_081thm.jpg'
f851715f4f4c4af3edd5dbc0aec7829a
22a177089cbfda05c23279f627e1e9c338315f09
describe
'3827' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile385' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_082thm.jpg'
11e5aa9b9d2ed93c05501fb321665521
2c563fc282c1955c42f36c48750f65b654e85965
describe
'4944' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile386' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_083thm.jpg'
3b358584a8f61905d9978d212b5cc397
cca2ba29b6a057ed59cdf4993bd75e49cc84de5f
describe
'4508' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile387' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_084thm.jpg'
b7caa462e512f7f4e24fc335a29e1699
b218e8ec351b28a16903b8b50df6ee4b492adfb2
describe
'4574' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile388' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_085thm.jpg'
4d0327e5c7b1d67f1bafcd8496ce6cf6
6951ed4f35975a4cdcb196a90f555c6770768132
describe
'5123' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile389' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_086thm.jpg'
05e8677a6d3509df440f877ecb4f1450
6a519d670dbac36d2a2030e9a6097a1956c7a412
describe
'97731' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile39' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_039.jp2'
8c7215c4d975b5059b0ce3706b6b02b4
485ddb12df7ff5443fd2cb236e5a4543160c7b98
describe
'4262' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile390' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_087thm.jpg'
25e8939650975fdbb2614435350b211f
9ce2af792547b9ae38102d5c24d2d390635c1837
describe
'5677' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile391' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_088thm.jpg'
97cde4da8f19722c63b1191e89eb1e8e
e6ddec183ec7c851a02431d3f6e983717f99f14e
describe
'8342' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile392' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_089thm.jpg'
9135b97822f57f89859368a5fdab8dac
f751d5efd923cbf6f0f67dccd31960aabfb5d2ad
'2017-08-02T13:47:28-04:00'
describe
'4387' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile393' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_090thm.jpg'
be4018b754f1395a621cb5bbfecde6dc
8b1b4c28dcf4dbfba489004173d6537ef889b2e9
describe
'6258' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile394' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_091thm.jpg'
24fbd870083a12e1d0c7a9c4937d6bb5
abe1f2c49571349ac9fd9a5e248dd89bf452965c
describe
'4091' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile395' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_092thm.jpg'
df9d0537c6361028bf4751827ccc192a
6c595cb18aa753475831fb434929647bd50fc025
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile396' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_093thm.jpg'
806ce3745c971458cca0950759d0c2ef
042006fd6ed722db1798c2dc8bd72ddf1b412b39
describe
'6671' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile397' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_094thm.jpg'
3672b2d4f7a0cd39db7ed059c191cb68
e4549ede9b1b3fa5362393397d2fe71a4a1a8cb5
describe
'4395' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile398' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_095thm.jpg'
c56e62fd467483d3eee56dd80fef41f3
a3ab1eb121525d03051811d586d8a9cfbd832727
describe
'5810' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile399' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_096thm.jpg'
00756769546473dc1b1588974fe604ac
393496dd24ba42945c293062810fc34b86c5c9e9
describe
'1051972' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile4' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_004.jp2'
f2b46e83bdeafbba8844e778ce1f05a3
f0f33798719cde06477fb2f44f381ef8015b54c8
describe
'1051929' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile40' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_040.jp2'
11263e5229bc117652fd761e7e79d227
195383dc272bc605c8b2c6d92be315cc5aeba6d1
describe
'2289' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile400' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_097thm.jpg'
e9c32eae85bcd3c1051b9f226149144e
8fd35dac056181f680754d8f7b03e9edbebcf2c2
describe
'7427' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile401' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_098thm.jpg'
5d5a32cb89be8039d97d52f2a74476e2
2882383dc7a90080fff6d1c155da5635c13dff99
'2017-08-02T13:46:26-04:00'
describe
'7511' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile402' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_099thm.jpg'
a72f08d50f7dc39fc7aa418073bfe650
5e82bff3bd80de442c98f9bc711f8d94a6e598e3
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile403' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_100thm.jpg'
c5ae5725689364afb0afeab404a57cb3
e72653e489b1b48efaaa0d0984c6c4c6ad88b558
describe
'4644' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile404' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_101thm.jpg'
a13e4d85247acac3c8b0e4ef16ae7c53
6a22cb291cbfc3c0e8b8d89ed3942f47de169db3
describe
'10866' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile405' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_001.pro'
ada6cda72750e60b2c10fc6f22fc8144
ad06d56a4aa4468e81a103d4fb95c55e2a2fffcc
'2017-08-02T13:47:40-04:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile406' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_002.pro'
863e693cc25a00231c516499899f5d05
4493a550e6326c7ca3cede33649773782c767c45
describe
'790' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile407' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_003.pro'
604f7e6f4b7d54276d50b46ec6cd7b0b
abaa7948179607cefcdb94394865a1d548e55185
'2017-08-02T13:45:43-04:00'
describe
'51120' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile408' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_004.pro'
1bd2946151b7fcb1906979522fb5b1ca
2d6d7c6b98965911ba611e9530ec4b36cebe847e
describe
'10894' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile409' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_005.pro'
38b3018bffbd9d143b90af41c4c22164
9797ee7da07dd4108e16ebfe2c3443acfd47bc40
describe
'1051957' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile41' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_041.jp2'
d6ae4ab24b1fcf576fee8ebd0e008312
bae5454494d7d9aff57312672fd53831621d7e05
describe
'62876' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile410' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_006.pro'
4182cd4d7562fe53cc5ebccba508d99c
efaf7939fb3093bdae6b806eac0b0175acf3f7dc
describe
'42424' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile411' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_007.pro'
9bc1a093d2667e8ba74f5f41662440d9
dfceaba599b9cd68abd0be27a8c7ea427fce53f0
describe
'45980' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile412' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_008.pro'
680bc98ff3fe4b90f709b77c654d0eb6
7acc74002682c4de28146c525000a524931dc888
describe
'51855' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile413' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_009.pro'
c4371ec30faa2795555cb49bee20e5cb
1ee7b950526b7432f92c11989b1128d0dfd707e6
'2017-08-02T13:47:16-04:00'
describe
'52850' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile414' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_010.pro'
a36e626b825d87034f1ada0cbfa316ef
f3d24e053f5c382e25b3ea048742a08ce50f8fb7
describe
'51611' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile415' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_011.pro'
e7a229c21293558374bd357aaf46d02c
c9a06a1eafad1dfe7a66bda7f0720bd06a1cc0d3
describe
'52707' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile416' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_012.pro'
0b2be3dae3639716cf58976cf3ccb67b
15cb16260dbc4517ee0bc35876f118bf11c59300
describe
'11256' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile417' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_013.pro'
ab6adf08f34885672e4c21d96e9e74f6
71486bf8c2182532db893b7851dd43d100a316ff
describe
'48563' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile418' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_014.pro'
b38e908bcd2a47639c47ee9c8f4352d6
ce768cfb9066b2e8a31c3b666e88a38b53389356
describe
'52024' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile419' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_015.pro'
9c4d549bc9ae6b1a61d0427c3f842ac8
90a934878aa388b54ae8666a36937d5046dd41d0
describe
'742355' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile42' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_042.jp2'
e8dbe5496202fe71f68754a79fd4b41f
b9d67324a1bd60ee43b8e870baa5a0ed4232b3c4
describe
'56131' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile420' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_016.pro'
7c7327558203fb63274a5d3291cb0dba
60729b39609fda558f1e859c3be33060f3728249
'2017-08-02T13:45:45-04:00'
describe
'54821' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile421' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_017.pro'
2f2b814777322d8c20589b935683433d
b9d20c8bf8f60ce60ce99fe3e2418388034a0379
describe
'16546' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile422' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_018.pro'
63cde454de82233005c9f614abeecc21
27ae64485970958801503fe1349db51a9f2f27f4
describe
'45974' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile423' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_019.pro'
7f1bb7573e45252ac9409e84bc37b19b
7dc897634210464d74e4efff534a3074735ef47b
describe
'53709' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile424' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_020.pro'
340e8bc80bf66ef0e02fde946e48efd5
6b28edfc048504c8b40fc25017fefdff1a8b0539
describe
'52242' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile425' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_021.pro'
e5addde9cb46f9b20f90b71bc7fc5c2a
6f888693f6d42a6cd27f52422a69377d29aa5728
describe
'53381' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile426' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_022.pro'
73139d6a2d9af06ae629ee0b34c377b5
c84030d6c0c5d15a41f77f9528a4f8bc405902a9
describe
'47800' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile427' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_023.pro'
fd67219da342da136d0db439d274a96f
2f25a03a735fa839a61fa66c89118b3f9437b3ed
describe
'52413' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile428' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_024.pro'
56ceb7683183d30e2ba7dcd5e2653e36
daed1432c0bcabae3f958574e2c9182b69038c33
describe
'46387' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile429' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_025.pro'
c7cf49f39c295eebf0f9fb967e0990ca
aee2a61688014604d215f111940210809eebef02
describe
'1051919' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile43' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_043.jp2'
87e4ebc4e1f1da1ddba770ff1b7bfe9a
4ea8d5dfb42bafaf2abf50ce5050833aefb468fd
describe
'53402' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile430' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_026.pro'
b0f5f3e7acae5cb1c08ef3a1aaa395d0
d12e23c6135584ea22a543066d5250ce2ccbfdb3
describe
'50468' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile431' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_027.pro'
0ebaadc05aff8e1666516feae19b5af6
39de6cb3c860da6e17908914e95184bcb636abef
describe
'39504' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile432' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_028.pro'
ff2c0ad4503c0a41d48524d524ec0c4b
ae5b3af88065c6d9a5717dde2bcbba703b8c21d9
describe
'50417' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile433' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_029.pro'
dcf25cdf876d5ce1443c4de3a00f1106
4b361b9d076b733183cdcdec319456a7e939415e
describe
'55620' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile434' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_030.pro'
8192aa6a1c1196e56cbc8cebbc5e9393
6a4eb1d5fc5a100004a5674cde343733bda98364
describe
'52332' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile435' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_031.pro'
c621dea700f509ed0567301417a84c10
3712461379c6eb5e59b5b2f0ff17a7defdb66f8c
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile436' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_032.pro'
41ee5c22f296678af6b824a183dc69dd
33cf628dfd8947685f459c30bf50cf268212abf5
describe
'53933' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile437' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_033.pro'
e45bb3ea6df5b0c65b965543bab7c1ea
bd0516769adf7fa5e369e8fd8cc0451c167d3087
describe
'53909' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile438' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_034.pro'
cc87959a64a88f666a1b0dec384b8c35
1b1f5d169053dfc832771c0765f1a9e4a4398e9e
describe
'51441' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile439' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_035.pro'
3864a00d6babab9999ac7c81dd1d8dad
95866aafb18ee6bd0e8ebde1513b78d3d274a159
describe
'422495' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile44' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_044.jp2'
8c6279ef1372f6cd7194b0f96bbbc4fc
6fbf8f1ba58bacafab91ac860ffe9509d3c51874
'2017-08-02T13:46:24-04:00'
describe
'51443' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile440' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_036.pro'
bc6d2c10cddbe8244a3f608eebfd7877
88baf112323788224e9b4e6a22ad28cb3a62be87
describe
'46471' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile441' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_037.pro'
662392c5565dc0643b8d71fd7de99b85
f9add39652429e2dae25078bdab5e59330211b60
describe
'46510' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile442' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_038.pro'
641a922f9d0f1e095eafaf3ef92fe4cf
b9ebc017eb53b52c70213e16efcf92623390768e
describe
'4023' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile443' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_039.pro'
07ae8b5d709980496946b3d14f23a5d6
bd6fe0adeb2a648e23a0dd1363043a97981e167b
describe
'52815' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile444' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_040.pro'
d2cd551729afd10757674515d36df3a1
1a0db1e980211ed19e777b01dffb8fd65c1ef261
describe
'54692' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile445' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_041.pro'
05fc4a09e4f3b0f2a879803b05a5d03c
1e7796d08fc481b8d3ad1e48bcc114110cfe1ec6
describe
'32193' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile446' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_042.pro'
a018a293b51d03503db1c18cf5453023
de808d359c9134cdc561f0c57b618c21d0fe2324
describe
'46322' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile447' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_043.pro'
5defeff57dcdcec7921dc764f829688e
64c04c78a970aaf07e77e8ef28fd32900173b188
describe
'18702' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile448' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_044.pro'
e6e8a91b52151ead06c679f4f10d32f3
a91b653a74285718c682500c891ffb72009157ef
describe
'24193' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile449' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_045.pro'
4a0c4527f15f613fed4bd3e2b8d496c9
f170a56a4ad9409e2510831a70a84a033a1718df
describe
'560227' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile45' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_045.jp2'
fe3dcf3f0c42f9473bec86714aaea8bb
65bdbd0f5f641b37cad419259aaf9b881fd32da8
describe
'43628' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile450' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_046.pro'
8ba078b32d98850a2ef4628af310335c
b7b34b55abe99a4d80f1770d50d07c595d201a5f
describe
'33043' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile451' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_047.pro'
b5d51fbafb2b63a85d58ba9b78f4df0c
89819903aa63d3ae2b0006326fad1613c735d7bf
describe
'38101' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile452' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_048.pro'
c592b14538fa1f54c4c80f5b4949583b
7d4a93e8a5d070757631d7683351ee38b6797283
describe
'13255' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile453' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_049.pro'
8415d9332c3c9d31b71c9df1c8247bf4
1a3c9de9845c03d092c2f9182c4d875369d04f4b
'2017-08-02T13:45:08-04:00'
describe
'28290' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile454' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_050.pro'
b6b7c2d26f15282ddfbf4ec94a068fdf
9b6d1ec1ea754e6d48728d8e675c0fc2d0ab148f
describe
'43711' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile455' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_051.pro'
b2800ba8b7363e455cd4ef4b950f3c88
38cc9160c711745caf6d53f24b3fef0f26ec2398
describe
'36658' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile456' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_052.pro'
da8df6a9ee60a24103b81377643a72e4
ee57e881798042ae7c0bf61e936f22a441cd3152
describe
'43588' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile457' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_053.pro'
c799e7f30b8518213483b41a6faad01c
a2635cc8fc40dfabb10a179cd0e80daebf314055
describe
'17594' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile458' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_054.pro'
9892ce0b037384f41dfe5a3e25d3ec88
784a72b7ef055bb0a2a7ff3aa59050a166b0fdb4
describe
'7129' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile459' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_055.pro'
747da8dd5e8bc882c1cba92d32e583b7
d78acc9d08da443ec3e1d008455fdb170f3b6a20
describe
'989688' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile46' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_046.jp2'
1d2c3fdbf0d6e3f7d0def38d27b83f87
69c11ec11869f1d162e07ae7bd80218a71d4cf8d
describe
'24993' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile460' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_056.pro'
b3013b3eb8b07b9d113dc68f99443336
c0a8950209d173d2d7b417c06d08bed560cf4135
describe
'35802' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile461' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_057.pro'
2ee24a3dec8c3c763d57e8241a3e153c
25a57f852ff73c4dec138d7d0d0fe7ec225b6d58
describe
'40304' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile462' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_058.pro'
55c7ff869b866282372360bf814e402b
1c09c09715eb545a66e00525373c3ae89ca718e5
describe
'28362' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile463' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_059.pro'
8020346fdfbee06ae2f9e533d603206b
fe1fa287a0a9ff5ee2651acd791b081524fa2e95
describe
'29870' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile464' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_060.pro'
9d48eb194b6cdb77eef4ad51893478c7
498c298f186a46ad52481f1238accc5770b8ee83
describe
'29909' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile465' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_061.pro'
a76444579a5e94638246fba1c75648a6
a1bdf62812b1a220abe9f42139a9d915ef98471e
describe
'34902' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile466' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_062.pro'
1b36dcf01c872c40bbbf1761dbae4a9e
4c47e79022cd99269775d34e15d785acf0fe7adc
describe
'45764' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile467' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_063.pro'
8961848fba4c3365a13ce850ac609fb9
4d50de1202c8504b3fc3179b3434f52c16823c70
describe
'34141' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile468' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_064.pro'
73d9fe5ec24e62e529b783542b9ba5c9
2bf674573f7729620a2047134c23bef10b93f2d3
describe
'33689' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile469' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_065.pro'
5d309c3c4261a1230f43e277156c4e4c
e79f9e03808c2efa2ed5bd35436933be9034f838
describe
'760747' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile47' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_047.jp2'
2f08a5beda51ebce27113102676c06d2
2481525114338b18b9dd1a769e3b6e01aa4dc2d9
describe
'29991' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile470' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_066.pro'
c4b6458694a7d7321f74ad6249d5d357
e47514d21d98aec2c36af05e84d6720b26c6fbab
describe
'16975' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile471' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_067.pro'
c33c2166987c391cec1ddfafcf6727f2
129ca3400856cac8bb8fda681919c817fa2d69ee
describe
'22175' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile472' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_068.pro'
3a1d66788fbf38f07f9a21f8873399f0
1f2eea185eaad30a72474ccf5e8699236bce6031
describe
'44409' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile473' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_069.pro'
978952bd9df9db2a80a2644325852d55
931fb0c0685c3152625a14fe8559bb0c2c47a2c9
'2017-08-02T13:46:53-04:00'
describe
'36651' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile474' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_070.pro'
e90cc0d955dfd18e155d070ad90607f2
f5f4d181c051daf32bc1b30675b78c314c8fe242
describe
'42528' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile475' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_071.pro'
e031288e76732dde9d4634179f67281e
ad3bd271e8312cb6d6ea2124ad3ebc4e2a464db4
describe
'36812' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile476' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_072.pro'
54077bb5028fe2e42be1e8cd6f47f270
28f8452f59d49476ab186f71a4e5dd280bcb2575
describe
'34879' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile477' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_073.pro'
eb1a841bc6fbf45ea00bd3b318c5d3b6
e1c4eccb506a70b95cd31e0ab9449a3d36d3b038
describe
'15491' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile478' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_074.pro'
ea072689d754a3d892d3f41d3f60f93e
aa307cf4857f6b395bdf2bd3fcc2aa870bb9fbf5
describe
'3452' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile479' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_075.pro'
9ac6d3fdf79b021572685cb2bf0060c1
80993c5fcfebc96a8635f9371eedcdc18345b13b
describe
'856060' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile48' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_048.jp2'
a064946aca50954eff6504d097c30d96
eea42bbfd4f7f3a44542a6a97a5a6341b9cbb19a
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile480' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_076.pro'
de413e33adc13374df6b162d10ec9319
6533cb7a3abfd755cc5d238f4a8b38b7ee78b36c
describe
'930' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile481' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_077.pro'
01613df55a5ee7e6f65a988cb3b3d009
a9d9772d7a539767a6b871be31ab5d87da171d2c
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile482' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_078.pro'
6902425f80d7b3c2138e24aa35e3f83d
82e715ba840f6c2761efd7598fc3217883908e32
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile483' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_079.pro'
6e527c43d4d3ccdc67e5d90e439b6c4e
9feff31f901ad788313b4f39d07a117d2fd8e058
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile484' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_080.pro'
44094b06c38cd394a0fee624d4d5eb41
288f16467852b2f62390f695a9fcb590532ebcca
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile485' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_081.pro'
962e6938e94538789b0d0d873bbaf82e
49c39108d8b4b005624f45e5781a9e47ae058872
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile486' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_082.pro'
76e40cb7bc4761f877f241c7e7429245
2c61d2668b51124032990def897f86a4af448304
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile487' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_083.pro'
dc4674ef995bd526ce29d7a5ea6cc6d1
c2111a1207b9b2b7d7bdac2ccfc71b2de875bd1d
describe
'1977' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile488' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_084.pro'
a30b35060c5bce0b92e256799b066aad
5e2eb99f503acc68a0b1ee00aeed818418f0627d
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile489' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_085.pro'
adcc491eb595b7f59d1cf9321091eff5
e82daadc105076b1a30f70ca9d4be4178c5acf57
describe
'319991' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile49' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_049.jp2'
fe0947a007cd4f25ef1457c480088111
c35d963aa30d9a7f97c075f199dec36943776e60
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile490' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_086.pro'
3ca9ef5aa13f381a91531ed364fd6795
93df41e320245a2bd0c2a3bd79d8f1af039c0f0e
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile491' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_087.pro'
86a65520c120f6fb032dbea6f7ff6381
58b8c54d117caab71e73fdb39b1b3ad30dd7855a
describe
'1822' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile492' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_088.pro'
7ffdbf9e194491ea7f921d59b7b9a11b
500faac3adc1c8a2b64efbb93b55525bfe36f1ee
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile493' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_089.pro'
681a6918b3fbb86c75ce15835eb9d7a1
8303803a3865840068b676153c37ceedec62c454
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile494' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_090.pro'
927534cf8da3bdd6bfa4a81ba68555de
64bb6a3bcbd6f87cf8d691c7a95faef35d5ccde3
describe
'44761' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile495' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_091.pro'
bc1e29ad2e255e4d6bf8f682aa49f6e7
69c0375c4861425ad4ef4e99f9239b0da9d5e3d6
describe
'26681' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile496' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_092.pro'
9229f95be923566988b637f43496170f
2f60bd1abc6135f93c352b563d17f46e9a3df5eb
describe
'6783' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile497' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_093.pro'
4b474979e3858a4c2b5e395e2278f5d9
52188c2dfe98d4ac9ee94d67aa0f427ffa5fd3b1
'2017-08-02T13:45:44-04:00'
describe
'46690' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile498' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_094.pro'
889fbc47cce706f6ad3f1b877c80658f
32273c43fb342dfe6b915f9007f0ff9038e60ddb
describe
'28708' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile499' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_095.pro'
9c0fa34f9445dab9a26ea984d68e6385
2ec7b2e36705a93729b7d82f5d45a5e7cf7c403d
describe
'250501' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile5' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_005.jp2'
877eee117f01d451476e369978bdd85d
46b9a293a817060d073e6b6f88774c14f83fe0ae
describe
'647155' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile50' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_050.jp2'
fb2312d24f28345c72cdaf18796f4149
e90f67d81a2288df6d7a1981b0ae5645498f4a90
describe
'38463' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile500' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_096.pro'
6a1d7482993606159b5682455477ed60
d3087fc9491b2588d6cb9e862e6d7206a639480c
describe
'15544' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile501' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_097.pro'
684941a1c16047edca9c57f278e943d8
3120a4ab9f9667ce977595eda8ecd4d2e746c353
describe
'57376' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile502' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_098.pro'
7ccd476e778ff1b0b12bef5a4cc1b33f
9e38872218a1e65c458a8d58980fa204d3708c9c
describe
'56418' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile503' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_099.pro'
7630a06899d9fad970fb9bd6c54d451d
219c5e63b4f455d2f7cf3aa0eaff06a8dc01f370
describe
'8880' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile504' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_100.pro'
114d9916e8ea20dbd696a49ec6edd8a7
335d24e83af0ec07c007f88516b050ae937e082a
describe
'32077' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile505' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_101.pro'
547ca361d60af558e32b33b0eadd0c93
471e3f10f41f162c65a7caf01928a15726d293c1
describe
'25271604' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile506' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_001.tif'
dd8e4c94f13ae3f75801ed116f82719f
db2250854307cf41214f811063d4fcac9678fe82
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile507' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_002.tif'
4aad4fc61f84e5c03f20085d43d99b1f
236d83533c470ab0a1e3471b440186c74142c34e
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile508' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_003.tif'
01cfbc6fc8069e7410be2caadeecc8d3
65e39eacf68fc3118e924391d8d2c377e6d74a44
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile509' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_004.tif'
7653c809b5e511d1241dcedaf2b4e082
49cbac34a234a4f5f34e6127465c375753a09389
'2017-08-02T13:47:21-04:00'
describe
'999236' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile51' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_051.jp2'
4ba6409bfc997bada6974007700b1f20
8299816436e44e1889dfe5a1a4c74e0324ee3105
'2017-08-02T13:45:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile510' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_005.tif'
3f9f6adc2f81310705f7be7d9298270a
9a108ddf8374f30832f1880c5792851e62f1f8b8
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile511' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_006.tif'
3c3e021ae85442fb4ad779bd710f6083
9aa1f91bc7921b3a81db05de117ba3aa636ecae2
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile512' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_007.tif'
64f9ba135f9227caec45a6f51d123789
1bae54321afefca7313c9788e02aa2ed3a942a6e
'2017-08-02T13:45:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile513' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_008.tif'
cad294e967e3528c429c8c13ae36126a
8b38a824276516ae2ec4c975460d31a47d2e7fd2
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile514' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_009.tif'
bf5ecc00103b87c80ee93b079267a911
be63fee18fe7224cad741870960806c63300ef23
'2017-08-02T13:45:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile515' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_010.tif'
c3e3d3420e96188a09da798f33c9e4c1
39677179079053fe68c2d63fd87ee4cb1faa4b35
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile516' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_011.tif'
7195b30a0ee4177911f2afb38d60724d
4cad1abf4d923cca8877f8aeef7109b56263b815
'2017-08-02T13:45:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile517' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_012.tif'
ae26dd82310cb0b639686d85eab3badf
24eb6cf14784778aa99468f2a5cb412387d76e34
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile518' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_013.tif'
8b3915f3267e0bff2ee53f43667a23e0
957d14d0b95f7c68d700dd1f9bc0bb1d9b3e20b3
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile519' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_014.tif'
9e8b2eac75b0c25d0030e6851e237616
f75677b876ab385b09bcba1efdf62faa1738c317
describe
'842657' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile52' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_052.jp2'
1879a019e8f1e873820ee7cb7643e5b8
88ba3617c3ae6685c772c42e53acb83e1dffc3c7
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile520' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_015.tif'
6447f09fbb612b7ffeadcb40af7e7edf
5d569d7dacb2a5964630e11fbb8ef6b9ce36082f
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile521' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_016.tif'
5fc75bdf5e792635329613698428919e
fc382bc3816d6cb4b5517b78b46896ca425542c4
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile522' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_017.tif'
e1ab015b1f021aaac73322177d3aa7df
ef4e3276782af1f267fbb88a577a0aaa5529ff19
'2017-08-02T13:46:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile523' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_018.tif'
24dbf0dd2026a3175628ea7379471768
d3c0e86ed5e106429aee32d2a8b0666a358d7562
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile524' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_019.tif'
1bb66746e7a7364350fe3b6bc3645f2c
ee4a3481639f24412b68a96555f982afed314d7e
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile525' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_020.tif'
8715f9bdb82ba9a2957ed27828586e96
c0d39c77f2489bb586ebd8e4b954252de1649cbd
'2017-08-02T13:47:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile526' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_021.tif'
8ff6d81f11c7f02980531cf32933c015
fed007618bf848e6fcf68ae687f70c4ace49be9c
'2017-08-02T13:45:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile527' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_022.tif'
f25808a6ce3d0300251db3bccad2bf3c
76352687c25810ac828e0c76055053d8872d523a
'2017-08-02T13:47:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile528' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_023.tif'
1ddc5764c6a64a9290d1acc1d5288e5b
ad0c0e7e04a92491a35073b1e1776f7c0cd76fc8
'2017-08-02T13:45:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile529' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_024.tif'
02031e1edabfb622fcb3682e0710f90a
5f249cbcd41fb337a6d8023c1bf465b9701ab586
describe
'970507' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile53' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_053.jp2'
432934850a90d2855f4cd6b7653f88a8
af9c8b40a9345d03625fa106e07961818551e2f4
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile530' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_025.tif'
4c48ea97be5feca161375810e616a3f3
39c5a7de8e99344995cfb3069a57e1843570f9c1
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile531' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_026.tif'
6e1c270b3e1b81f4970dcbc37d0b370e
e235339e7d31765c32a7d15fb5fe78ecd2471495
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile532' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_027.tif'
ee4684d6bd3aa57123052331af1ffc5e
91675b070ac4de50008af04f0a916e176e737703
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile533' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_028.tif'
57d7df107a74a70219aaa99e2e5d2c4e
02be6b1bbcf72cb2b261909d63fa587d77d69e52
'2017-08-02T13:45:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile534' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_029.tif'
35cf36de5e0e6e367ba1230fe5e18149
6cf305b28a0758f437c7646174b4764d1d844d3a
'2017-08-02T13:45:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile535' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_030.tif'
8df8f13460a01903a1e701e9b6d92de2
2f30cc3ed9705c250663e69d93ee3738c4b6c20a
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile536' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_031.tif'
ca8ba06b8faca6940efbd85f7b6b3140
0ae121f98153f1598593ce4b2592b17b6abe4025
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile537' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_032.tif'
2360f91d23002c0e209a698b989a95c8
1d2da56351d99716bd2fc7955f34aa8981204473
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile538' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_033.tif'
e18b643197a5f34bfd6325293500faae
c22d6a3fefecbf10a62521c9cfee774f63151b21
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile539' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_034.tif'
1926b5facd3558bd2d64cbf864b48d7a
5e5ff88c2fc447d6e3e9b8965226c22348e56b74
describe
'423627' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile54' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_054.jp2'
c9f8efaaec849f5dbb12b289d2da2f4c
3a2a6e9d679158cb3f5401e2f2156cc9a693875f
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile540' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_035.tif'
fe2e1963d7f4e232e0cb13b292a7f653
6b0eb63e5dec9f28ae776ecd1497eb1610c23db6
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile541' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_036.tif'
9a38bf8ab8f32ae16f2bb931665e761e
17d1ffb44681577f3df5810d29922b6ec4614c01
'2017-08-02T13:46:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile542' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_037.tif'
a6c56cefc7116245e001897029b7aafc
e2e5991ba5b24da73b27f5b7fee90d05d7cc76ca
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile543' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_038.tif'
da21d93d6a736787d59b557f77de2e9b
5a111e2b53117b0259aca1563aa57da80191245c
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile544' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_039.tif'
fcfa2742c630ae2b2014f7f1a8822fb4
7047ca10a570573fe49b6b0da989600a12b28512
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile545' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_040.tif'
c92cca3098ca5ea0a9e33e93914aaa0a
1fcf55b2809c9c6ad9d63ab2c4c68627153f6f54
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile546' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_041.tif'
b4fb6eb1594b4120d6e9e03017df8d51
728d08983b4d8713bf92798506129337f5917c51
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile547' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_042.tif'
bd2611fca16e6fab5e2a2e2646e9f769
0188e26fdf29a1ca377e20d92f8cb70aaf6d25b8
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile548' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_043.tif'
18a3abf8cbe9cadd58a5a1d93ed90379
cdb1320f4e1e5ed0ae0d1ec290e19b10d4fd0f7b
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile549' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_044.tif'
25012a595b033ea64ad074fbdbc0fc3c
e424a7a78f731413df210a1c515c872cf4ab7d2b
describe
'273795' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile55' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_055.jp2'
259dbf030e0b7528d462ee6f933c91cf
f39408c12f2f0b762a3e24142a0bf2acc6ca6bb2
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile550' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_045.tif'
3bc59f79c1e0bec8ad0f0265be730d37
333ea6cb382920a1b2937dca8bf07f767a2f4027
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile551' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_046.tif'
fc896eb80bcbe8a39bb2b2111f197dc3
2711bf6d7dcdd4e71d7096c2c17d7ca9e791b6eb
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile552' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_047.tif'
be378d5377dc8e09130c2d9a367ade0f
9fffe01b846f45119530b77068764b9d324a3362
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile553' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_048.tif'
5e2653d481ab7747b3e51a9985b90cfb
cb01e9a167217617aed875853b51408e264580cb
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile554' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_049.tif'
46e6397276ed69efbcb72146ce7b4567
94e7f6b2309af0c8399c599cd94990dff449b16a
'2017-08-02T13:46:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile555' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_050.tif'
5b4ac1cbb79339f349a40e5403d4da4a
c4225c271b1ccdffa6dd0c19933e7b1b2be857fc
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile556' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_051.tif'
d1b9714d8017a071ba6e0ed5be5f86c6
383100df761b8936485a34cc7daae4ab04e882e3
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile557' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_052.tif'
dfc29ec33d1cc515f19b9431ad5b2095
a4634d1e3440c27290c615da469220b525783378
'2017-08-02T13:46:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile558' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_053.tif'
ce2f7f5dad687f165a5a4bc4817e4e65
d299d1f5857e8952dec2fa61bf578b82e37ff0f5
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile559' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_054.tif'
7f1c31678dedf2daf4d4653dafac9f5f
1073ca84e26ce207b4a74560d92e065938e03ee6
describe
'577068' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile56' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_056.jp2'
2bf81a7bbd61de2f268fac8a91e7c86a
2bb8913add6d6346b06a02317c6b68ac691eb316
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile560' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_055.tif'
c945cf2b79c1590add684fa80e696905
b2a191d1cd25d60aa01433086126364e5f73f6ef
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile561' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_056.tif'
3b1963bf3381552beade6e60c833e09f
9e9f77fc57d34b2f77bcf0ee14b0892eb0c23e6f
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile562' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_057.tif'
6552156aef14c4fc3936da85af1d606b
e165654da864a7b615ea2a7400eed61e7fe45acf
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile563' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_058.tif'
a13826e45a052d606fd043178a79ce53
da7bcdaeaddbc47185f07a9225c252b3e21a92c0
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile564' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_059.tif'
e1dbba68dae2ea7ef52bfc462422be7a
3c22766e69e23f22c42aef412c983506fa992703
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile565' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_060.tif'
894a30c1131b5406815135e1838cbfcc
674e98c659b70c980ebc2c3b900e43f7eed0e737
'2017-08-02T13:46:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile566' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_061.tif'
7d5a1a8792f116966f7cca7344469478
701ccb82768408aa5c5faad4eed9a6fda56a92a9
'2017-08-02T13:46:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile567' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_062.tif'
64c4bac9a702a859e6ea8c4008939aba
9c2a4d38cb0731d83d24bda576696f3e9c2543af
'2017-08-02T13:45:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile568' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_063.tif'
c48347d91613033d1d0af18e8e29928f
c2e8d85b1b1d1af509a52e8c303349adc2cede2e
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile569' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_064.tif'
ae524f5919f8be6bd0ae9fb2a240b359
6fa2c36ec46f1b6bdaa6cf183f495113df97ab34
describe
'802622' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile57' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_057.jp2'
0b9cd64c17b9da2f17a5faafe7ba3c76
57d92fdb64a62b235d9f701971328da5fe4ae377
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile570' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_065.tif'
5f4356817db32d8987da87f78c6e7ccc
8b3677a93d84a1826588eac07e5708662c2720d7
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile571' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_066.tif'
1bc96901a92214b2b11e79b2b8b426d4
b6f62be7460549c5ab1b70c21e8ae06933103c10
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile572' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_067.tif'
53b28e91b336312faf79442e629837db
d7ba9c3b0f290d6bb0845bccc4f81e6488d62579
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile573' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_068.tif'
a96e8b8ca676ade5bb9c82534b2612e4
225a8933e96886d25985b9e07af5e310660bbbb4
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile574' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_069.tif'
a63fcca29028da827db0d139830a9c7a
7220e0b51f719d599f5bfc5ea6c133c323704079
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile575' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_070.tif'
a6d9c357f15cb20c65adb9f176686eff
641b47b111764d9179c67759b5627a19dc7aa343
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile576' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_071.tif'
0e3ba1f6009e90fff1b7b6f65208ab91
fd4b54c1999e25c178c822c0e6d9e32501ce2f06
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile577' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_072.tif'
9a420eb742cd570082b5417f8a972c81
df76ea4f96049346ac98a4015e0f405bc5c0983f
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile578' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_073.tif'
52776ecc6493f1633803fd05497756c2
6644207de0d8d8418da5c5b84eab78e48bcdebd7
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile579' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_074.tif'
f3c2d63b31d99e205332a1cbfad76672
1bedb8295dc7c955ee70ed04ed5e456084a7986a
describe
'889630' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile58' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_058.jp2'
700264d790dabfb0bd36c0f9d41f1e9d
5be9bf782703e2cd98c5943b01b6e10aeb5f7960
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile580' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_075.tif'
6468c40856723a0ff32295d1bf7cee88
60c9c1c399ebe6e21b10ddc45b5e3aad8d958fa4
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile581' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_076.tif'
24f6e66f871902268ccbf52a986d9933
b7eec7fd7f8cbed594aa14d3d27968d2f8e89eb3
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile582' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_077.tif'
34406d0653c3200624c30971f9205cbd
232c79a1165e733642a3edca803ea3c18c17eb71
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile583' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_078.tif'
d5f919e744ce1bf07a59b1762825e108
c35d2c99a78edec439039bc1ecd039fcb58fe55b
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile584' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_079.tif'
00f9155f4900a333dabc538e48d0fa06
a2daa85029eb659df013466cbc9feadc4cc1f772
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile585' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_080.tif'
5e713c7e28d780a62680e1c37f8fd7e2
b0c0ba20780750bfca9e89e17f67a5bbfdaaf445
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile586' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_081.tif'
2ed4e860d7b05c016d085b0341b8dd7a
a7d6b4190c78d69b76936a7a2523ac62e1d1cb31
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile587' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_082.tif'
2e62b1e01b4695a163c0191461a36886
5965f1d467ad02d243fcc2fcdaffe058bb28aa04
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile588' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_083.tif'
9857c18612c2ac9b7d4ade12fa63bd39
476e52edd427288b52570142f51ad64339f2925e
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile589' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_084.tif'
36d7e13033f34551ea830b039fee4364
c7c83e0d5fbcd18450c3e442fcbd2840dad77163
describe
'652392' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile59' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_059.jp2'
b6c2b2a0657212813002d2341d87cca9
dc18587958b3a9c77db4c93e61c2df624531e15e
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile590' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_085.tif'
60e1a69c5b6a8215f033ff3899bd429f
ec5dd554ec3bbc33049dd43d03e4edcf0348a855
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile591' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_086.tif'
f8f442acd27dc752e7e88f74c2324bc3
352a04acacfef4d83103c68172ef7215dc319041
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile592' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_087.tif'
3d977ed5a0b8e1d056a5591b701b1253
20965fd1641a6f424e822c9d0a030e48426b79c2
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile593' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_088.tif'
0f22bcae6a11c45dcf73a2a2d0a64265
14bbb47625b1456f7614aadd67ce0fa169db6bfc
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile594' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_089.tif'
703e688911d7aec965196acea48a385e
f8208215381077e2dbd2013b595652c8b1484aae
'2017-08-02T13:47:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile595' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_090.tif'
15c44c773ddd9e7b10158f6554c16afd
3bba2a48752caf87f8505c0f5f13f199fcc71f35
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile596' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_091.tif'
a4453ac6e174a3818c27220cb2b17046
98627eac69fee03b1f4ab3e608a5582f9bca39b7
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile597' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_092.tif'
70a6d9d018f391fd2ed3da601b3e230a
878b3073b7ac29da9f68c9175a5ed53fb1813779
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile598' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_093.tif'
e07576e1fb362a205998e12f2dd23019
e64698b4a9d5f7f34a9b208b338a90eb451178cf
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile599' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_094.tif'
07a4e501e4e7225db72bab56fba59c41
f5a0277974ba4abd79844ae3fb8388789546afb9
'2017-08-02T13:47:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile6' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_006.jp2'
c2b375e34b40aa39838670e8e198e3d7
74789f74fdf20d012c61a4a47a711efec0fe9203
describe
'686074' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile60' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_060.jp2'
52a6251f9bb0afc07a1b9cfe8fd24042
509fae9db40910621ab396743aa738882ffd2d76
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile600' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_095.tif'
2071850cc77b37c3f097181f49de272f
efd0bed4a47b4821a2a8dd9ef1ac2d8859c6c2b2
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile601' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_096.tif'
2feefa1b25e00a733b985ff4876acfb6
9616c0ed4a3eab57839fd49908fa5b05864962d3
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile602' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_097.tif'
76f83beffc5f8bc0bf69e4ebfcb00979
5c7161bae28186f7adaa3195bc6b27f250ba9f13
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile603' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_098.tif'
e65bf5854d0229b0ba23f0ea8ad6482b
90c5468cc7c5994c64e3d496fdd11f6cf78cf3b0
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile604' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_099.tif'
bd1699c2c5f25eb1c3068c4121d267fa
303bf3cef5facaab82a0f98a35138067a8622b08
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile605' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_100.tif'
7d0b619e07f990ac9b45077db99021a4
204cb41f927a0ee16d66ef8a95071a0e0a179612
'2017-08-02T13:47:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile606' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_101.tif'
0265ae0376497480ce4276a140512f12
d49556ffce836106b595ef7e8d78464a6afa8a24
describe
'607' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile607' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_001.txt'
5673d4384025b2399db414032582439f
64ce2cef57734db47be09780a34f6b35cbbeb919
describe
'94' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile608' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_002.txt'
eba4c931a1cd94a5da1003356d859730
59d53ba3d046a273298f71419b9e8a1a2f0c307f
describe
Invalid character
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
Invalid character
'71' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile609' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_003.txt'
ebfdd7990907bf3fd0bf6b1704f63075
135b49865607a2acd6144927210cc325cef0e822
describe
'683171' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile61' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_061.jp2'
a2c33ef79e7839df07df4b0632f928d9
14f5e93a11877021ba28be539d0e871143fae7a2
describe
'1912' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile610' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_004.txt'
6e7fa4b87a0502214d84bb1630a748fd
75e68825b00f93c73c8ba72e4664c297f8c86e8f
describe
'416' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile611' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_005.txt'
81abd43b65d64822aabb82b451fe2bd4
ff859ad63c35c66353b83dcf56fc455b1e4d2da5
describe
'2506' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile612' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_006.txt'
bc16356b9f8dea5da6dfeaa1093b51df
fa455252831d5e375e72d98931d29ea4c666d975
describe
'1798' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile613' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_007.txt'
9de01628f9c12ef7d39658268c064ed8
ea1f6339b382581cf7df6af5187e83d77ec1650c
describe
'1701' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile614' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_008.txt'
f5514beb7468dd7a57affacca048e4f2
7f53b1853affec72343b5c0083169fb37fc9e103
describe
'1972' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile615' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_009.txt'
f2ccb20aa2f52567cb5100192a4840c1
233d6cf31884ecd452023d6c5a4dee80f9d5d77a
describe
'1939' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile616' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_010.txt'
b367e284d3fb640ee3cdca412b1420d8
bc7fc07ec445f0d12c7b8fda24d9f93e81d62f03
describe
'1897' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile617' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_011.txt'
57777907af243b90554e9066ca67db20
ced99f51f7c967a71179a0bea7ab41df20b727b8
describe
'1941' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile618' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_012.txt'
51b028027edd440397a4fe4646cac2d3
aab3404699c050743c610087443b9551f682277a
describe
'419' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile619' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_013.txt'
6fe1f7190a2a11f424dc5f0c956d0a21
19ccc2a472f445ff9c61379b581e0ef28b1baf91
describe
'801795' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile62' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_062.jp2'
7b0ee8d5504226f2a7630c65560abb2d
c6caabb26a2db92cef5e3a82a443c248cf4becc1
describe
'1859' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile620' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_014.txt'
fff5426c99fdad4f9779d68c8f4ee39d
d0c59fddac62276da212f48fbd0d6d734311f9d7
describe
'1937' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile621' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_015.txt'
914b94dd3052babc4062709198664a04
2eb45071446e4d81c5094b09637e7f46031369ee
describe
'2057' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile622' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_016.txt'
b9d7a2fb0390e7cd92950450ed6e1ca3
3c25ee7bd59d8f0ab055ead3a22893063ac2fc33
describe
'2010' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile623' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_017.txt'
f97ad9e1c2ff0571824f7a53c1e01cfb
76c29cbfd273e3440c7c0eb47328512fdfe8c22b
describe
'613' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile624' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_018.txt'
ee2e7cb83df595f333954dde8bc22add
a51bf037be8297e810f7d176f19c7a0f989c5447
describe
'1944' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile625' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_019.txt'
9f06d44c34e5ba5938478ebe9b203e63
577e8d99ad7091c441e4eef6bd9bce5d58f9597c
describe
'2023' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile626' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_020.txt'
8b8a55fadb12a8b2bbfa9760754b636d
4c0711c0416906241a7bb23fef6a07ca7f12239f
describe
'1923' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile627' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_021.txt'
cda59dff63bb774ee0ade8bf98ce3d18
5589e306c85ddb380a71af323bca0dc8b6248628
describe
'1956' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile628' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_022.txt'
5a7c5d6a58e26188603d4c7c2caffba7
f95cab3291560592ebf5d4a16abb863dfa6e160d
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile629' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_023.txt'
68e2ee105333cd6c71fb63911351b9ba
bb48d1b14fd757719262432378469760e243d676
describe
'1033234' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile63' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_063.jp2'
5c260161961706d0876bb8f7d259a749
683bd09583faabf3e717ef5aa0ff8d11d359c180
describe
'1981' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile630' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_024.txt'
6853d340a0e1052bd168f5ffee07f973
76179c7313fd58fed33ee0b8986ef4341c85ea28
describe
'1768' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile631' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_025.txt'
4a65772295bfba902dcfc3c0b595f7b2
d0bd53ef42930e6e4d639513dced98210249a58f
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile632' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_026.txt'
bb69a0828527dbd31b467203ea25b0a4
dd064b39d45a315636bde91e4e4290675490d5ed
describe
'1891' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile633' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_027.txt'
c0e2f621165779cecc195c3a13e7f062
8b7e072f8ec4abb40495ea41e2332c01290690e1
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile634' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_028.txt'
3b5dc6ac7e393e99f80239db11901fb3
2e3d7c568ff6de4eebc0c2748d6364a5870b1740
describe
'1947' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile635' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_029.txt'
905e4c968367ef4474a55a4952fa87d5
bbbb4ac9eaea5004dcbaa74760b92766058e764d
describe
'2043' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile636' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_030.txt'
31c57c2747d0f5d6fa3a8335f4b29d4c
11fd83629f0599634693a4f47fea5387540ffff3
describe
'1924' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile637' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_031.txt'
6306939479ee5bcb1c4f8505dd241403
7125f79317ce0c18e1f19ae72094614090f41e37
describe
'1922' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile638' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_032.txt'
fa2cc3e6888dfb6ce6005821d42fe401
4c649d05b3b905a05b5e8c82d703e31298df29e3
describe
'1985' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile639' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_033.txt'
2852736526e4413222315a2cb497da34
fd9ef1d04c1152f69636709cc01304f1e2e0d126
describe
'792928' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile64' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_064.jp2'
2c2e65b6b54f63b36cdf09d148ee8da9
ce6ef5805da1a96c1491f9040d8d501503380006
describe
'1984' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile640' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_034.txt'
6822b7b80f95b11ef0a5159a9e487b1b
6be14bba3e4a2307ee3ef3bd7e8dd4eaad623ac8
describe
'1901' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile641' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_035.txt'
517cccc19e035b38f02fb96b58f03b63
5da0a0eef37b96c2df4cad84898dc97da70c8375
describe
'1894' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile642' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_036.txt'
52d1bd12897a8b7b0b067bcb97838d53
10339763ce894923647b8cf0a663383825aaa9ca
describe
'1752' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile643' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_037.txt'
5ae73de0c83a7a2e5bbd23602385578e
5f2cdcd07e492b1460738f8f5441dde31849a714
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile644' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_038.txt'
2ae7af39bd9cae52a8548c06da348c75
3719e5bebab4c95d846f7c74f2ab5079b61b93fc
describe
'153' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile645' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_039.txt'
552fe15ec74c6b7a8d8212a771c3f044
c75bc42a10ba15c1ff6f6f9185bad0d218ae408a
describe
'2009' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile646' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_040.txt'
380bbade4f73cb94403529b59321ae28
8b877481355a99809afdaca180cd100d880d671a
describe
'2007' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile647' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_041.txt'
0244c741ec1e40219121beaa62331f1e
c066a4573221f35a6b62a62b35cbbdb7d53cb8cd
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile648' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_042.txt'
024aca6bd4c97a5be3eaab58e1a81adb
4366ed4817f526b706119f798d42cd5527e2d771
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile649' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_043.txt'
c9878ffc9922d39d2d1e0c88fe4c78f7
6e70165780ec2e702cddc66e5222152d448754c3
describe
'774646' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile65' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_065.jp2'
1540c5eb3d106807d58a3d8165b0b3a8
daf3a471a23fee328e86a4ab595daf95b22e6e95
describe
'702' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile650' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_044.txt'
908c4791157a18d88360525d2d5e8375
e29c553bacfa68c8eec0da562bd6a1365eca0183
describe
'991' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile651' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_045.txt'
83790ee4304795bd4a87dbfbeaf3a07c
be70f1fc280383e939de5fc12bd86b5fba03868d
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile652' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_046.txt'
df76906added814cac63a4a677429af2
0a8fd0c3c05d2b85101c2baf9f21dbc41967d3ec
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile653' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_047.txt'
f4e6632e273895c1a421a1ee27617e41
f67fcb02a314ce64ea43a925a15e3184146e6136
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile654' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_048.txt'
fb828fbc25f73d09eec4a3b678a30ee3
3127e422d7dc8ce46d09fc3425951b7064b303af
describe
'504' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile655' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_049.txt'
361c3973667263d29ce9868a1f2a5e03
7f4862bd90855114d8e0f2a613b0d51eded49fb4
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile656' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_050.txt'
baca6a865b83265d311c3bbe0c12c44b
4d044e4859f5474f91bf5e55f78d29537cb0da11
describe
'1610' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile657' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_051.txt'
5ad6bb25332a0560ea5086a401954980
a714db4783c860351570f1bf487a521f3c2b1045
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile658' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_052.txt'
86415ca41c225a00f210756b4f583f3e
4d98f03b841456828eaeefd0a03ae1b3fe3d971a
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile659' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_053.txt'
50d075ee43bb8356be3daddb4052e1c4
f4bb7d981fbfa3d2585f49876a13eab76d0f9797
describe
'671113' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile66' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_066.jp2'
cba02f10c1c86105ecfe17609d113d25
6e626c08e5189aab19d19c21edc16e95f6d86b81
describe
'677' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile660' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_054.txt'
2934c11c44fc1722f874d006f7379fa1
0a7e1b24bf364726495476f5e9e783c43e2e6037
describe
'353' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile661' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_055.txt'
8b69a41ff163d8982f00b453b1c26521
c4c1d147332734197e5ea859d6f933628efa4aeb
describe
'961' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile662' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_056.txt'
b3273b8ceaba0a82a2c88ffd5e23cee8
9480f555945c4ee314ec9d5932edcaa179497547
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile663' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_057.txt'
704d5e1d9244cd5aa0ee091cc47e0dcc
e9008094ec998ede0a1c99cecf17de96639a6e9e
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile664' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_058.txt'
f2dde92935d6984d6f69d1016a8ddec7
511eb289b950f2d978916653a03cf1547e373e5c
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile665' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_059.txt'
6e8697fdce8d309c8316ce424b913a37
d26496dbf4a5c8c72e9922463173eb05c1c9d334
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile666' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_060.txt'
543a25d9c7dc858dacf9f12f5f8b8735
88e91ce4c3528edf84dd01cb8f151769cdecb2fb
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile667' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_061.txt'
01ca642c835b76a83953f7e4409a62fa
67b3cd72e652b70b83e8cf1f837f105cf81101d2
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile668' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_062.txt'
91f5b637986c0ca87b6cd6e1236c036e
a4f6c427ea4309299ed0b44fd206dbbf01209f63
describe
'1718' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile669' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_063.txt'
069c0184d563898a92bb17356d8bc8d7
2d141dad950ccfc415d90d643d2e4b70f1addd32
describe
'392755' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile67' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_067.jp2'
534822fcf27fd71c1a1e4df13b57eb46
ea0afa93e534c612826254cf9ed5be10fea8bebd
describe
'1648' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile670' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_064.txt'
8bfa99f16af9daa9e4e0f87cf1477ab7
c9c3eece26c8e6401c5195fdf72a65db5b9e026a
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile671' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_065.txt'
cbbb47266ebe3983bbd5c782b31fccab
8dabc0f7fcceccdda354fba18622f4292f8b2e85
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile672' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_066.txt'
53e5e63ac88559a9cf42e23d0b1981bd
f726a9af564a8344f41e10759c18b696b80fea1c
describe
'668' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile673' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_067.txt'
7c2ebd10c31c672d083b5cabf3a1df12
2890078bbe9373fcceb02ad1f5ba33ede3aafa99
describe
'867' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile674' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_068.txt'
50c91c13d2aa0e1f28f35313f3f6b2c4
cbd58ec9c0a5c0f62737d5d0ce116fc3cf78b1d3
describe
'1691' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile675' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_069.txt'
fae555e86537daf38480eb57b3043645
e32599b274d0f83dd1604acaa6ae4a01a9e08e41
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile676' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_070.txt'
28044c6bb6e591724a90fb504a368452
75b132e26547bf14c595225b4a928cadea1d632b
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile677' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_071.txt'
2d067b2be0e87e4efb02694a2575652a
0ffa87753454414ac905639f055bbb793905f0b4
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile678' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_072.txt'
f53f17eb0633e22fe32fc140511325c8
8bd544f6f58be87edf2b1dca4e5584df9a35740b
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile679' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_073.txt'
a64a3f1a57da786f39373d1a002df7e1
1ff8690dabe71b4a673529a95635a68c01e041d4
describe
'529008' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile68' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_068.jp2'
3e5113098260f70bc25b77ba5d9d12aa
cde98d2d6fa4b43e8a7a683619e0601da2f03535
describe
'608' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile680' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_074.txt'
0df5d7b55af3142cdd77b899f21f4890
442503515108507b820a13d8613c1842eddb6a1c
describe
'219' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile681' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_075.txt'
ea51c295cf5aa674e609100b45841896
e04b711d69c699ac36464436d6f88d8199f7a1e4
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'56' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile682' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_076.txt'
b3f8905910ef4b0256a3877a69b30bc5
3de58adc9ed3d34a171c0a902edab5b46005ae9f
describe
'42' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile683' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_077.txt'
05c5fc348e2a04d2538a37d2408674a9
d9797dc794e6dedd7a1038b359a4adeef934c72d
describe
'174' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile684' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_078.txt'
69e61cde4f6c1a34dd63de0102e25e3e
cd0f26c20a78b427430b74febc85dd5829460f3a
describe
'193' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile685' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_079.txt'
70a3895bf91762d596526824dd36bbec
6d2b818346f8d376ee67515a33b424e85b446ac4
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile686' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_080.txt'
c88753f0dde3b40d629439a63ecea8fd
4ca1d9b3ea6c2a89aad6b6a3bfee9f749d18ae42
describe
'170' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile687' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_081.txt'
a2320695776de295ca318f6d76c509e8
e34ed015a40fe828d890e784c35c9ae17e2e852c
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile688' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_082.txt'
52ae2f689027e076bb73702c5dce9fa3
1c9492e849f4e10531ac309ee77c0a8d1714298d
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile689' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_083.txt'
3791e2651de44f4f5c2fed5b01bff6b8
914023fc357404792f7501ff461e937d7b2bd3ea
describe
'1008798' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile69' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_069.jp2'
92b2315553aef5b0310967e822249fff
5b7f01bdbc3d148704772bbf8aaf4d526c050164
describe
'245' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile690' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_084.txt'
e7d9219074c48772dc8a950142a4dbb7
b2f12203b2fa3e20761e325897913740dd478189
describe
'151' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile691' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_085.txt'
9a40ed51c33a016f51d7982146c88389
75c26a149750c7aac8b1d6caedeb918fb6e623d2
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile692' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_086.txt'
e08f73bba692bc335bce5943200a32fa
1357895522689721a32d02f5dc2f6e04472209a8
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile693' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_087.txt'
a4da45121ad0f58b6af7baafdb90b8a6
0b101161a85c2fd25586cd4b6d357444807626cb
describe
'251' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile694' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_088.txt'
a108cc6707856d2f08b126a4d2344499
99679d58125562a7c9f11c513b4ef982693f60cc
describe
Invalid character
Invalid character
Invalid character
'82' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile695' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_089.txt'
bd40ca64a1fb85ba05e7a956a2f6ae51
39bc7efe8d429da490ba1373c999dceaa1ddd6f6
describe
'160' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile696' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_090.txt'
84ce7981a142b50df33fef62ce4b5968
632211129c95e43e85393bdeb502f60623859fe5
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile697' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_091.txt'
25597b0d3802d7dffd47432d901b22c3
eb0f90faf37447b34d21502906e476cab61ff840
describe
'992' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile698' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_092.txt'
ea30298445a5e41339d9c4904957ea79
0adabd1c7cd4ef46981c8be42a3b8619c44e40bd
describe
'267' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile699' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_093.txt'
f6d72901ffe18ff98b8b30b478d273c4
3b0c47fbde16f574ab3a462ebc0d084e31e70c8f
describe
'949927' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile7' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_007.jp2'
2b7aa49c24f8e937c2694633fc1aea34
f1ddde332955cc3e5fe5db703483f9a947e1aa84
describe
'801354' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile70' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_070.jp2'
abbd2f43f2fd3c343e6a3894155b03ef
f8aa98794f8c91e4239367ed7700a6beccaf0ce4
describe
'1820' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile700' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_094.txt'
a82a68087c49241b672e3d3d1dab4c82
6062e0cfb075e0c4b87a5633f90ab992a245d207
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile701' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_095.txt'
6eb5d737821f2d8dc98c698ae459cbd1
84149c2f724b464a9784a2aa77e21d4996c4eb43
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile702' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_096.txt'
cd203a4b1c0276df3cd508bc524937c0
e6167f1b59fbae74ae11aec6b2dbb6a2dbf5ddaa
describe
'581' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile703' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_097.txt'
05c9c3ef6512eecf1ebd57048fe693a3
28f7936832d5492f7a871a312437bd21083901c3
describe
'2184' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile704' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_098.txt'
a68f475f62b5fe64821ac525166b9059
d2ab5d8efe0f3c113e476fa58ba2dff7b2eaa38e
describe
'2154' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile705' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_099.txt'
aff99f87c025882a766cc340e9cbb979
e36a1f590b44f1f6ba9fdc7548344831eea2bca6
describe
'348' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile706' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_100.txt'
cacb61f478cfd1d031a1a7ae7d5d62e8
0657b5a9b00676210878a43fc7f17663350a3189
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile707' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_101.txt'
dd579f0c0a5884c5879ecd3d6abbfb3b
242eddb0f0dc22d54463f2ed2fc30de623c94b07
describe
'91738' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile708' 'sip-filesAA00000312_00001.mets'
551bdfc20e18984ee03f7c908d91e45e
27619ec1a592b4796400558e18c0459a88617baa
describe
xml resolution
'943107' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile71' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_071.jp2'
8c649e9b0df64cbd3384ba7d530ffeb4
53c368e7081b0a00c33f9a74cfbc1750b17f530d
describe
'829053' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile72' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_072.jp2'
9ee01c182201c7bdb37aac46d45abc10
c576c0fa521a907a6f5b8c9da299b0e23ea8caf9
describe
'814226' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile73' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_073.jp2'
e1119ae8c6ba3e89e1aa52f05b317547
9f497cfcbb863b1bf4595320aee440b98b643c11
describe
'488374' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile74' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_074.jp2'
34a890dea530d99f96d484efea5e39a7
7fe1edaf46106c2c40de80139e1ccfd8183539ec
describe
'1051976' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile75' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_075.jp2'
4fba6c9fac3b9bd711427774851b148a
5fa5cb57627eada76c3182afc3605db3fbbf7a1d
describe
'1051853' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile76' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_076.jp2'
25ed4cea3d3dd030397a8225abd5fda2
e94475230a4f5f6a3601fd599fa5156004706869
describe
'594196' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile77' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_077.jp2'
b179862046182c9e7979b667c54202a1
bcb91334a8e26d1532508064db9fb72bb909ed9e
describe
'1051958' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile78' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_078.jp2'
90150bc56cac18222197e88551cad32c
3f0673ffa2c283a90dec98d537447c11b31835d0
describe
'967725' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile79' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_079.jp2'
0eaa437a00b03752fa8f5fbd18f7c2a2
f8fbd1de94e88340cd3bfc5dfc9f167e85b80105
describe
'1051967' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile8' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_008.jp2'
6d9d2ba1cb6decb5ceaa00f50decf77e
282d2877e5afd64f66f573964757bd3d3ffb5f68
describe
'960818' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile80' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_080.jp2'
91471addc51174af30c2cb2166fa568a
61b255f995545ecd43abca147397b25ae2b168c3
describe
'855788' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile81' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_081.jp2'
7843f719509c0041d4a65ddbab54ef4d
4992a6ef09a552c8e3a12f874bb43eaa3969b35c
describe
'613261' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile82' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_082.jp2'
9c9afe8806b718f582ec124a8be22145
b6b553cec27b5d31c63d4c462acf80eb90898360
describe
'817493' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile83' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_083.jp2'
3be20a1dcd9a48b3d2379ba311dcb4c5
9183c9ecaaf991bd216dde2dc7be2ef8b086f015
describe
'868788' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile84' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_084.jp2'
dfb22af800674e551d0a6fdc912a9d50
290721145b6c06ad508a1b00ff1f5efcff09eed2
describe
'818848' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile85' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_085.jp2'
e650a6fe3cc79c5c17f1b7acbd1e4734
f566daf06c01cb23bb33a73c7e65197bbd4733f4
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile86' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_086.jp2'
a74cb1310b1ef0a36e729dff656c1631
5a85a3c81fdda3a5914bc2da147708628ed3b247
describe
'913679' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile87' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_087.jp2'
0e5d2d2e0b39a119bc9413ff59a42b76
a19be5f9b4b24907a157fe252b64856f2c1b2811
describe
'1051956' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile88' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_088.jp2'
adb6a8cf26f5ee0f49c88e67b6b84acf
cd384fa03f45858ce27a92f46774cd747fd4ba70
describe
'1051979' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile89' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_089.jp2'
5d04f5b70c9f56cb02620ed3052cebbd
b32a2269b6d57d2be19aa7c858f02793b4a70047
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile9' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_009.jp2'
bde70207d9ea39fc03c3ec108707f454
bf0ec882769367fe0d34a08dda931d92b575a64a
describe
'1051953' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile90' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_090.jp2'
5b5b11127ec251e46f72f9c51debc44e
7affef5dfdcb8515e10d9156f61daa2486f882b3
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile91' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_091.jp2'
92a55ea259376f50aa5c7df88193fdb0
f4eb61dd8f780f7587b8b165baf2b554e387a827
describe
'968668' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile92' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_092.jp2'
72afa851ebc6e8abadcc3e4fb533eab6
89ef19cf0db0d0d1a4c9d9067385f8f9d0699ac4
describe
'161615' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile93' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_093.jp2'
0999ab964660c740df4149045aca350e
a14d46540c7c14ac15512cd38ae06862836b6aba
describe
'1051948' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile94' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_094.jp2'
4279532be4e2e5fbac1a95760fd0ee17
578e54cedad0a94ffad1353bed64100e631c2f7c
describe
'653826' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile95' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_095.jp2'
f99b3e66e27514fa60d1225c3a661e59
7099b3c0ad33e565a2631654e8fe54bfcf1305a5
describe
'900338' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile96' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_096.jp2'
5e9b80d9ba6d3e1386b0dce1db5c4167
f969580507ba3e34f5ec9240cdeb41c6a477f75d
describe
'371902' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile97' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_097.jp2'
c7bacf520e9a22e34c8262394115900c
f987671508021359b3b7195a8f15a105a0ac90d9
describe
'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile98' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_098.jp2'
8b77bd897ddbe3de3024a324205986e2
26dbf06586cb4b5b1a07aff3fadd97847416f97a
describe
'1051986' 'info:fdaEWPKDB70J_ZWMMEIfile99' 'sip-filesvillafranca_Page_099.jp2'
05db49d59dd6e3469a9790f911c9e63f
6467d8d4f7db5129191ccc5b0f447d0bc396de0a
describe