The university news ( October 19, 1906 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The university news
Uniform Title:
university news
University news (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 55 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Creation Date:
October 19, 1906
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semimonthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua Countty (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 19, 1906)-
General Note:
Editor: A. Clyde Evans, 1906; Sam A. Sanborn, <1907>.
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: PJ-50006-05

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 01390155
lccn - sn 96027438
System ID:
UF00075916:00001

Full Text


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PLORMA,?W


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5~iU~f U-F ~ -AIL


U!VE[SI!!.


AMM With Eaborate Program and


SMcMmh Ceremony.


,,to nwii's rfste Sea---am f se. N. P. rya a.W ,
ste wt4th emd Peflt. its eApduced for the
Semset i ear Mde.

Thutuday of last week was one in the minds of his audience. Pre-s


that will remain green in the mem-
ory of Gaiesville people ior a long
S tUa to come. It was the day set
apart ar the public celebration of
the palP -g of the University of
the State cf Florida in its new lo-
ca e ms o the beautiful site one
fIde wet of the Court House, and
jaut over the city limits of Gaines-
ve. Per sever days the citizens
wese engaged i preparing for the
event, the loa outside and in
we decoratd profusely with the
cahla of the University and ap-
prepriete toes were in frequent
eideAce. A large number of sta-
dents bad already reported and
Switch their friends and rela-
ia d considerably to the
Coa mpoa the streets. The
Oiitee of Arrangements had
an attractive. Igr-at
of emeeiaes, secured a dne band
and the ladie-a is always the
CAe-were active in promoting the
aos of the day, by arranging a
-weplima with refreshments to be
a" Ar the speaking. Short-
ly ar m6 d o every e began
u-es their way toward th Un-
tiwnety grloada, and by three
S- I-.- *lk* s ^nn.


ident A. A. Murphree of the Flori-
da Female College was the ntx'
speaker on thb program, and
delighted every one with his orator-
cial display in handling the subject
"The Unity of the State School
System. Hon. N. P. Bryan,
Chairman of the Board of Control
had for his theme "The University
of the State of Florida," and we
were fortunate enough to secure a
greater part of his remarks, which
we present to our readers. Mr
Bryan said:
"Florida, as a State, is sixty-one years.
old. The act of Congress which admit-
ted her ito the Union, recognizing the
value of education, made provision for
two seminaries of learning, one east and
one west of the Suwannee River. The
one east was located at Gainesville; the
one west, at Tallahasee. The state then
proceeded to wander and roam in the
educational field for sixty years, having
established in that period of time, in ad-
dition to these seminaries, institutions of
learning, for the education of the white
children of the state, at Lake City, De-
Puniak Springs, Bartow and St. Peters-
burt, and made appropriation for at least
one other. Then came the Legislature
of 1905.
Long before, it had become apparent
that so many institutions of simhnilar aim,
purposesacope wereot only unneces'


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6tui d R ofdthe Linlawuly of Ilaria.


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telligent wills, trained minds, edac*ted
intellects. What power can be more
couceracd in the existence ad m at*
teanece of this condittlo than the gerw
ernment itself- the State?
The state recognizes private sad eme.
tartan colleges and university a vaet.
able Wlaborers in this great work,. a,


I '-


in t brfa ofthe pMst. v baafigh th wft-Aw f Jiimiisl to
af thn UsmVelty Is to ad turned minds anm wth lately tidaeas by a lpat iae, ay i
tf M YOlum daa o t sate sad met t aW] the sttan Aprth gape at of taht aeoasil mah tat
Ibl development. wmah ofthemermlyrich. Yeoa uanat so~to eHmia. a laa *.
i aded that the itrac tin lek tato th bright face of a Fkpia a.la .l.. ud ely t.amp s aof
sal he equal to the best baWy, poor and umseeath though ha of a sbaae -t e
We hm a lgal haerw*wt Ia*, struggaIg to pay for his g hMesf
eIMisls a he sabjae thoaNiteminaaod-etodetor die, sawpop F tito--te init It
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aur*easm anywhere. It has not been
the pmrpaeof t boards I charge to
aMt shawy, espeOaiv buildag, but we
beiNlms we have speat the State's momey
wisy is plain, comfortabe, substantial.
puoNasat Msrcture. The Iamps is
leaid M ith the idesofpermanocy. We
me a*ple grounds for all present and
liom Irpoms. Other departments
will be aed as needed.
The is a public iastitutio for the ben.
at of all the people. It makes no dif-
Isam how poor you are or bow rich you
are, M so ye are a gentlems and are
wlling to work.
I a boygoesout ofPlorkda to get sa
emmaloa now, it is becaur h.- wants to,
amd motbeeame be has to or ought to do
It.
The advantagesto a cities of this
Steteof aen eatmon obtained iton it over
en edaest'-n btaimed out of it are evi.
4dea Wh,. be gets through, be doem't
feel ke "* tstrangeri i a strange land "
Be han a St ite aeqasistance with ame
whe will be his aslectes, ftor Ife. He
fbi NUbe heisat somme and has an ia-
tin hbs native State, her tnMaittso
and her people.
Thla. In bris., i what the Sate thmghk
her Universiy Oera herM young men.
Aand in wtr sasheexpecta themm to tw
mtful, upright dien. She cannot ask
m They eant aeed to beto lea.
It may e ggested that all this costs
mey. O comm it dnve, bt t It
Weith L. L eatmnt is cheap at amy
pa m. mnce ism toc sw tly, the ea-
Pasdhee tg. It as always ad every
whi tn that th people whe spend
am. 4a aedetine a the ricast., not
pomirflw and mast pnoprwsv people;
wbe the vicis a nd c rismmal ciss
emealmost erlMusively iroam tle igno
som people. I wamce begets ecrse.
Isg aimery wlu sbe r by the tapsy
me Os y inar fe pea came ao am atcr-
nae Ia the twi o Miies of o Dnval ad
U lp e s W then udb he spent
by tOm emaye to suppo t wtah Waeivar
N ay a a t0he hIrtydz~sa

AaseerlmenM: aea t0e p a ofSM
m aGs ald msi e at
Uio" tms has spudw edy mene
myOura sr s d..smmte ofte1Mv hepa
o ib ae mumpoem of thesens
N ahptidy m on I o tlI e a ir
in a&s UCaemet wr -eo a bl11
we and goL ft wE he d y appmea-
Wk emme we we .mme sAter r b a g
i woo S &mowp a" PONS by.of, we
1e ame imass o as ohm in s 6W
to am oe beean.
Ih tin -Iimens as aIe *mm .


ture, will refae to foster, support and
maintain their public institutions. You,
sir, (turning to the Governor) are not the
Governor of a miserly, niggardly people,
bat of a people who have ever been con-
trolled in such matters more by patriot-
imm than by selfishness: more by great-
hearted liberality than by calculating,
closs-fied minguea.
I believe the next Leghlatnre will
want to be satisAed that the appropria-
tion asked will be necessary for the pro-
per equipment anl nialatenanee of the
insitutMons temporarily under our care;
but I do not believe that we will be
placed In the attitude of begging for the
young Iien and young women of the
State.
Two years ago only one out of several
proposed constitutional amendments
was adopted by the people, but that one
carried by a tremendousmajority; and it
was to tax themselves, to raise the con-
stitutional village to aid in the case of
public education.


then great :iches; that "smaensmu into
the bask of gorIJ cittaemMp *that"
liberty bath so abiding place ase in the
iatelligeme of the people."
"By their fruits ye shall jdgea them."
The hope and pride of thi Univermity
will center in the young men who new
sad from time to time hereafter, avail
themselves of the privileges hen so
freely tendered.
May they repreeat ber with cadit
while here, mad when they leMe, to o-m
turn in the capacity of stadratis a mee,
may they go forth, with hebr ertMatel
that they are worthy, well equipped to
take their place as lekers **Is te
several persits and proeslous of e
May it soon he the proud priilV aof
this University. though the -tre-msal
ity and by the ightby power of Mhi
great Mteat, volcin the will ofthe pmols,
to make it emidly poasile for ery
worthy young man within her haIW to
secure a Arm f ^i NfO-I ian


GrowumIF. P. b I" ed, do Mswmbg ..


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mthe ar 0n and was acked to warfae. Our position was unique, in higher, collegiate ami t alvarety
a-y Iein unable anpreedented, anoutelous. Without education.
B A1CM uAA. After a beedic- eanaing, or assuming to say, tlhat these This is the age of the specialist. The
t"sa6y the Rev. T. P Ilay of the stitutions were of ao bene6t, but frak- so-called learned proftIasft ea
Pd-abyteria dchrch, th,. lion. W. ly conceding that much good was accom- longer hmonopolive the teekhical imatre.
W. limpaS., win' iatr[uooed and polished, I do asert that this benefit was tion of our colleges and -anretla, th
at 'east sectional, if not local, in charac- provision must also be made for the ex.
O ea e Of the finet welcoming t pert in other calling., such as teach g,.
Mila ~ evr listened to by the Then came the Buckman Bill, drastic engineering, pharmacy and agricltam.
.paple o Florida. It is to be re- in its provisions, seemingly cruel in its The time is past when "a soft ba d ia a
g%-ald that it IS impt.sible to pub- abolition features; but I verily believe kid glove" is the badge of a gentleusa
S MS s emarks in full, for they wise i theory and statesman-like in It is no longer undignfied to labor.
Smmeting these conditions which had We, as a people, are peculiarly depend-
W m aske edlent, reading and grown up among us. Its great central ent upon skilled labor i almost eey
a owg reference for rising orators, idea is concentration. calling of life.
Mr. Hampton closed the day as And so we have coe back to Gaines From Pensacola on the west, in whom
a "ad letter" one in the history of ville and Tallahassee for locations, splendid harbor can float the navies of
O vlle nd expressed his Gainesville, beautiful in her (urround- the world, on down through the-s yet
angs, patriotic. enthusiastic, bighearted -undrained Everglades, and beyond to
piaMf a tohaving the duty thrust Gaineeville opens wide her doors and Key West, the new gate-way to the
upes haf of welcoming the dis- bids the boys of the State welcome countries socth of us, Dame Natue has
ting- dhetd getleImen present, as Likewise Tallahassee, the favored bestowed her rhoMeest mlsings. No
wel as the students. He then re- child of the state, rich in history anw land possessed of superior astIral or
adto rth of the Buck ha tradition, culture and refined, presses sources is to be found on the face of th
to bher boeon the girls of the State, and habitable globe. It wod be aier *o
IM, and the indignation of the ,,ts them welcome, mention the few we do not than toeena-
p Ite at the tboughts of losing We have now a complete Mist(m of rate the many we do enjoy. Her
the tie honored East Florida I education, beginning in the priwiary de golden fruit and her fleecy staple, grat-
Saeamary with its many loving and partment of the grammar school. pro min each other on their way to tae
ST gT~ing through the high scht'l and< markets of the world; her clmaft, ea,
c a neopleh enL ing in the Plorida Felimal College for coast, cotumerce, forests, p.eophat,
ever accepting the inevitable then t girls and the iverit) of the State vegetabes, fruits and agricultural em
het their energies, inder the ,f l-lorida for the boys. pasture lands, proclaim as a hBap .
management ol Mayor W. R. Where there have heretofore been a pnoperous and conateatd people.
Taneas, W. N. Wilaso and other few localities and sect oms vying with With all these resources, Florida has
we to sec ... et each other for advantage and preferment. only begun to be the greet stat she i
telet all localities and all section work to- destineorl to become. Tbe. aamsmB
cweld aprime of the new Universi- gather in barinnny for the ifv-nerntrrit illt he developed by edlucatd people
ty. We WlOR a glWrious viCtOry, of all the institutions of higher eliscatHit by our own educated people if we me
as is witemed today by these supported by the State. Where their, wise. 1,y educated people from e lwebe
mqleaiiraMt bmldings, and for have ber totwe en t,,teai.w aa14 li- .f we are not wse. Will ear pep
thi "curved for eternity." e cord: let there be romcslihaton at. Uke avantage of these elppatmMal sl
d toa ity. Let's have peace. or will they be content to be sareawi
1WbuM ef to declare ear fraternal .**Nt,'" you aw,. **why not leave tht and dependents of others? Will they r
dau atiu of the noble work came of higher education to Stetome and leaders, or will they be esawl de y
des by the BDad of Control. oalius, and the otbes coU-eges and ui tabsees? They will be eIneir, aId 1
Mr. aampam extended hearty nitis of this sad lotmer stsat You will tell y~e why. The peple of tal
S. to the s body and say it s burden enoeth to pav the run state are .nferior to nb people i m ai
emiHft 0 e the b -y of ning expeases of the state, withaiw bsing and moanl enuowwme t-. Ibey ag
i ity d upon art required to elucatet here ah-n this ~state was a asddw m
the ma"g Ber hemM an d eiNde' otber peoples chWdrv-. Why tax for They had thee plck to mess, with a.
and hapd that wbhe they left tbe this purpose Why have a fSate tni- com.pliailag. sptledld patince, asge
UR aiy th wsaldl crry with I vwerty t aLl why anau determaonas the AnUessem fis
d wW Gii Th is as old qiekuie. bt t.e answer dl 1 which wept away in a iglei
taiB a mied- Gn aPto it is very plain a d siuhI. 1he uig t the ac.eluimams of a Nd-ia of
Sher pe .e duty ress upon the state to W' hard,, pe, err work, and i1 a sha d
MB isacaliaecy, ov. N. B. pae the eaduation 4 er ftree coti. catet havr made the achaie of the
atfd awl ind an anid~ atdrIs ato begin it: end the ree Min haith preusnt rvl te glorns of a e
S"*Im tin and elBimash i" ca@s is that an eilucatet man axake a wibcu i tafsag up *a oave t no m
o w ... .be.t r ct tmha an unwe'ratrd or themr akri-g adtr.
... I M ig one -ITme mnTO, r ale w eea to k a tha r
am c m ui- a "AlB political pow ef aer .t-1,-t the cbuit'-a aw quipptd ato be Pa t ia n*a
od o ieav r. and bremght a pey r t.'" TsliC*tkry % ,,.'. b, io.. f pftsw I Tme. T ien r
IND y gy. MWUattes o I*the tha well of the peroie. u.m ii s* to-o -I-"I!hr whm is- the V &a a e ea if -
O Wimf tm" dbew bowe good governamit we irmt have t- ae es. as ihek aiebesbe esm


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mbtu4 em-.memthy (m Friay
GAINESVILLE, FTPIlnA
A. CLYDE VANS EDIT
SAM A. SANBORN AS6OCIA
U Bs vw is adM


OR
TE


In thus coming before the public
we have no apologies to offer, for
nome are necessary. But we have
many than to give to the good
people of Gainesville for their
hearty and loyal support of this
enterprise which they have deemed
worthy of their assistance. We
were commended in our undertak-
ing by Dr. Sledd, president of the
University, and we have been en-
couraged by all patriotic college
men. In return we shall offer the
best we have in each issue and
hope in the course of a few mouths,
when we are in better running
order, to publish a paper unexcelled
by any school. The students are
the contributors, and frou. the


students come


almost our enti


support in this line. Anon, tb
will appear articles gracious
given by the faculty or others i
terested, but as a rule this pap
will be by the students, of the st
dents, and for the students.


ire.
en
sly
in-
er
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Students, you are earnestly re-
quested to write something for
your school paper. Who knows
whether you are a genius or not?
Nobody. the thing to do is to
got down to it and write a story,
an article, a poem, something
Sfuey, interesting, who cares so it
i of interest to the general public?
Don't my that you desire no fame.
Grapes are not always sour that
S -require a little working to obtain
them. Just do your best. Angels
could do Ir. t is your duty
to try. YWMutyto owurollege
which waters you, your parents
who look for the best that is in
you, and to your dod from whom
come your talents.
A school isn't worth much with-
cot lege spirit. A college news-
S paper is the best medium in the
wrld to gender this spirit, as
wl eN for advertising the school.
,by the pub.
They reali the pow" of the
printars.k. They e that they

beat etorts to make a good show-
ing before the public. It causes
breed rivalry, and makes better
students.


The Florida College for women
advert as embracing many
things but we note with regret
that University Students are not
aMOg the things so fortunate.
Is thee any chance, Dr. Murphree?
When youget up in the morn.
g and start to "come ocean" for
the day, repeat this with a sancti.
momioas coatortion of your physi-
S"Wa kld d a elao would iM ihh one be
I rf M o lt io a w )*o Iem like m.e
.- --'--,--t-- Ewa*ydo you and your school
rome gaod.

A Uiversity aeeds a publication
about as bdasthe Devil needs a
mncience. It can afford to do
without it well as a fiddler can
do wkMbot his resi. We have
the f dle: help us supply the
esi, aud we will have some
music.


All the students seem "tickled
to death" with GaOaesville, sad
the good people here are very em.
thaestic over the University.
We cam oly hope for such hbar.
m iom ac ed forever, and we are
MR that such will be the cam.
This6 as ideal Aege tow,. aad
we opc the school will stay right
heft always. The Board ofl Ze
ral 4tee0d very wisely indeed.

Sme ew i squirminq umder
the atbrt Mihaary dacipie which
is tikeg admiitmed a the achol
in egultr doae. habt thee awe
mae wh fail to realize hew me-h
of a msIt mbeIsofa ffle.mw and
he mw k bemth e ti to h e h ader
mo re M an oer maeat .a.m
Wewe g.ad mseethat if thee is
to be anyMimaryat AL, is the
gh ibad adso ay. I


To him that hath shall be given;
if not, he'll take it.

Mr. Day of Jacksonville com-
plains that his dog has been killed.
Rvidejy he believes that every
dog shookd have his day and every
Day his dog.

This school never has had a
newspaper; it may be a question
whether or not it has one now.


1 41


This being our first issue, we
have no exchanges to clip from;
but in the hereafter we hope to be
in position to give you the cream
of other college publications.


Our sisters at Tallahassee "beat
us to it" in the college publication

line by starting up last year; but
we'll catch up with them by June
by printing curs bi-weekly while
they have theirs monthly.
We wish to call the attention of
all of our readers to the excellent
speech of Hon. N. P. Bryan,
Chairman of the Board of Control,
oa the first page of this issue. In
college slang, he made a ten pin
strike.


This journal will seldom dabble
in politics, as we owe our existence
to those dangerous things, and a
turn of the mighty crank or cranks
may mean the death of all of us.

We 6olidt and are very glad in
deed to have all poems, articles,
emays or stories written by the
students, faculty, or alumni of the
U78A,,, ---T- %,*t -w%. J,, &%, -*ma &%;
spousible for what is mid thru
tthee columns as we do not endorse
all the ideas and opinions that have
beet or will be expressed.
We are always open to sug-
gestion or criticism.


We are in for, and shall always
endorse athletics in any way we
can. We are great believers in
good, clean athletic sports, anid are
glad to give space in our columns
to any matter which will advance
the cause. We call especial atten
tion to the article by Athletic Di-
rector, Forsythe, in this issue, and
beartly endorse all that he says.
Truly, a college is widely known
thru the men who represent hei on
the field or in the parlor. a


"Man can not live on bread
alone," nor can a newspaper de-
pend on subscriptions alone, but
we dodepend a good amount on
them, as we are judged almost al-
together by our circulation. A
dollar means little to you, but
several of them come iu handy in
running a newspaper. Show the
proper spirit by sending us your
one dollar for a year's subscription
Talk up the University News
You can help us by talking good
things about us. Only one dollar
per year for a good, dean. spicy,
newsy, college publication. Sent
to any addre upon receipt of
price. Every student ta the school
onglt to take this paper, as well
a all the patrons Help us out,
we can't run a paper on sympathy.
It tat money, and a plenty of it.


We understand that a moment
is on foe to Mim a Dramati Cltub.
anda Gee Club. Don't let them
drop th. fe0ows! They are
othims which every school
dshmid bare. There is exellent
material in the school for bath. aad
we sMdkMoe ae to put ou the
sage veral plays. ^ smire, etc..
befethel yar is ver. It is an-
ateMr asm et adrtising ya
ce Sm mit ma eace.


Mrs Nicholas Longworth better known
as the Presidents daughter is getting the
Canincus as bad as the other members
of the smart set. Ju| now according to,
press des patches the Longworths are very
much disturbed over the fact that their
pet poodle, Manchu, is losing his hair.
A very eminent physician has been called
to attend "doggie" and strenuous efforts
are being made to save the hair. As
Nicholas Longworth is very bald himself
he can probably sympathige with the
dog.


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Say. old college
chum, don't cuss if
you break your shoe
strings: just come in
and we will give you
a new pair chazitg
it up to friendship.


HYDE:&TE:NCHLo,


W. o. Buie
Cold Drinks Confectionery,
Cigars and Tobacco.

W. M. JOHNSON
LEADING PHARMACIST,
AND DEALERS IN
haM W&M b hnuo "
Fey aI Toir A ts.
nft.sals fu f U s ft Ikwa l

Aops for Ibh rs Cine.


lOftSSIONAL


CAR


&u NaBUMER


ATTORNEYS AT LAW.


TO OUR ADVERTISERS
We believe that it pays to ad
vertise; we are glad to Iee other
people that do. We after grateful
to all who have placed their cards
in our paper, and we are sure that
they will come out winners a
hundred fold. We urge all stu-
dents and those interested in this
journal to do their trading with
those who have patronized us.
They have helped you, students, by
helping your paper; now show'
your proper spirit by helping them.'
Some firms of every kind of busi-
ness have given us support. Now1
help them by giving your trade
over into their hands. Several
whom we have broached on this
subject have arrived at the conclu-
sion that they are going to get all
the college trade anyhow, so let
them labor under this impression
until you have undeceived them by
trading elsewhere. Look over
your paper before buying or come
to us and we will direct you aright.
That will be showing the proper
college spirit. That will be show-
ing those people that they can't
expect everything from you and
give you nothing. Cut the proper
caper and let your money go to
those who tike an interest in
you more than to get what you
have. All contributions, sugges-
tions, subscriptions, advertisements
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DENTIST


We are all sometimes filled with
the best spirits one way or the
other. The most desirable kind at
this time, however, is good old
college spirit.

The Female College, at the last
hearing, had enrolled 136 of Flori-
da's fair damsels, representing
more than thirty counties. Now
those Tallahassee Beau Brummels
will purchase Haylers, Nunnallys.
etc., in a very strenuous manner,
we guess.


77--


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Drngs Soqps, rashes. comx4 hasel b esks ad o a@s.e Seow eI



Drq-ornd Book Store
Corner Eacst iale tl Stresta. GAINESVILLA PFLORIDA

UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA.
6AMCS*lA FLOMA.
A High Grade Institutiotn for Young Men.
Literary, Scientific and Engineering.
Strict Military Discipline.

For Catalogue and information address
ANDREW SLEDD PRESIDENTs


I


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CA-ZL 4omqv-1124o 3011cxr1clet,


Abb







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J mH WfWT4ML


NRN ta ewT mm mem o Q1d
&.I.y day, th e writer of tis r-
sdle o ed in the ind sand at



what itadl met-what t twenty-
two sttt yot !o", repe-
aemtiqa s.- aamd the University
of Sam dl& a, were trying to
domtby stood about in the mud,
taggig and struggling for the pas-
sftdmiow what appeared to be a
huge, wed mad ball. This was the
fint g m of lter-collegite foot
al that the writer nad witnemsed-
i fc ae of the first played South
of the North Carolina line.
The game enMi by the score of
ten to five in Clemson's favor, and
thone of us who knew a little of
wse ball and nothing of foot ball.
felt that our Champions had done
gloCi Ily. We had already yelled
emeles hboarse at we knew not
hatbat not contented with this,
at the termination of the game,
meniser of the faculty and the
students alike, plunged out into
the gidiros, ankle deep in Carotna
mad am slash,m d anboe othe be-
decked victors as if they had been
closed nif u rug beres. It made
so di w wh at or not the
gme d its merits were under-
steod; it was enough to know that
wr CAlebge had been victorious
Ths gaKme was te fiM of those
"PFir Week Cotests" in Columbia
wkh kattU t thomead of citizens
d dramw to the city thousands of
visits from all over the South.
The gWowth and popularity of the
gme has indeed been phenomenal.
The writer left the field of the


alot adIN[f you my it
Ieeamlemaditno s man's tudying
0 $*w the*dolege ooMto eb-
Wuk dssAbs awlgm
aq toboll pla0 s
team th e thosf -who s o6
ot play- ubeM than thbk, L asrt
that oa the basis of percent, there
are a large wuuubcr of leading col-
lege ioen, leading students, princi-
pal officers, on the college foot ball
team than in the rest of the school.
I claim WLK submit to the records,
that the men who play foot ball
make, as a whole, better grades
during foot bill months tham dur-
ing the months of the session, due
to the regular habits required by
the training Code, and the activity
of mind that accompanies activity
of body.
I have no patience with the "arm
chair" foot ball critic-a self-ap-
pointed here, who, with dogmatic
self conceit, abuses a sport which
be has not had the opportunity or
perhaps the inclination to investi-
gate. How often do we hear the
adjectives "brutal"-"degrad-
ing"-"'dangerous" applied to foot
ball by persons who have never
even seen a foot ball or a gridiron,
or know absolutely nothing of how
the game is played.
How otten this year have we
seen in our newspapers, luid ap-
peals to the legislature and college
authorities to stop a sport, that to
note their tone, you would imagine
was as dangerous as a Boer regi-
ment or Japanese Squadron.
Legislation! what has a Legislature
to do with a college boy's sport?
It might as well arrogate to itself
to the right to stop bicycling, row
ilg, base ball or any other sport
which does not imperil the public
morals. The College authorities are


fiat of tI tsts convinced tjic proper ones *, decide whether
that thiIs gase offoot ball had douc ,.r n,.t partici>ationas in th,. ,. -


ot only aM inpuoast but a legiti-
mate p-e-ery doA .4
Snot wee& aJ
ptay Fuerthe tdest, .n tamia
14the ussual aeseary lot of mant in-
structors. I d noat mea to be
understood as ying that athletic
sports should it in any way later-
fere with the proper eomot f cl-
lege work and study, but I would
be understood to my I do not be-
lieve that these skuM in ter fere
with a certain amount of athletic
sports. They should go hand in
hand-both important and neces
sary, although by no maeans equally
so, both occupying a legitimate
place in the day, and In the
thoughts and hearts of thestudents.
The experiment of abolishing out
door athletics has been tried by
some few colleges, but let us re-
joice in that the light has again
dawned on most of them.
The game of foot ball trains the
mind and muscles together. The
movements of the game are as com-
plicated as any on the chess board,
which latter requires only the men-
tal efforts to be executed: a man
engaged in a game of foot ball is
taught the importance of perfect
obedience, and of combined and inl
stantaneous action. It is not a
game where brute streught alone
avails: a keen intelligence and an
indomitable courage must charac-
terize a successful foot ball player,
just as it must a successful general.
Foot ball is no game for a fool! To
the initiate the struggling maas of
men on the gridiron may appear
senseless-a man exhibitions of
brute force, but a slight knowledge
of the game reveals intricate com-
binations for offence and defense,
quick moving and shifting like the
colors in a kaleidoscope. The man
with the ball goes down, and a
mass of humanity are piled on top
-f him-that is all the casual looks


Mwe to ay the Clemson sts dent interferes with the work of a Ion see., ar'd :r!" such on lookers
dy; ae to M10 e college spirit student. and tht act -n of eWery w hear that %ot ba .i i nge
=aW l e gee pride, than all the at"- cllegkg o aowt and stan','i i not i ,: a t stop a moment
W tec eyt in Clbam's history .nly allowing but n c t, C *.i ugh ut not
-p tSen er. He fiet thaO the the game, leads tr '.. ,,..:. It :. '~ sat ish
ame had come to stay and to be sioa that its beneficial effects as,. e charm to ,oung
dmWedly the most important of duly appreciated by those in a posi- America, and a good many older
her athletic $ta. t be had twou to know what is best for the Americans too. The heavy iOe.
Ia a Adtd rtaotIN e agag adi that the faunmings of 0 .ilin. a oneM a to


dthe ; he kifelt that, willing to
dbs bura*l and financial sup-
pMt,%e weUld rather amoe one
i m eAd doe tub vlaiog for him.


e^ijant aumd Ialconte*ts have
no foundation in fact. It has been
my good fortune to see foot ball in-
troduced into two colleges-I have
noted in both instance- an increasmed


other, -while they might dIamgeI
you don't hurt these young lellows
who are trained and hardened tO,
But you say: "Some students up
N^r.th e*- killed while lavlal thl


lie Wted to think of the many ad- interest in college life, an awaken- game." Did you notice in the
aefmis eoered by chase ball, in ing of college spirit, the greater paper also that a sailing party was"
Vhch he was then deeply interest- pride taken by students and gradu- drowned near Mobile: that Lieu.
d; S greater appar.nt gentility, ates in their Afma Mater. These tenant Dano Greene and his wie
ts maptie lack of daa~t all two colleges have become known skated into an air hole and wer
In a, it see med a much uicer game in other states and to other colleges. drowned; that Dr. John Hopk*imoS.
S sr a young gentleman to engage The students of different institu the renowned physicist, was killed
IB. tions have been brought together by a fall from the Alpin slope: that
ABt 6tInuarly our opnioNe are in a friendly combat, and an honor in Chicago a couple of bicycliets
aI Iethe laws of the Medes and ably, hard fought game creates a collided and one was fatally injured,
Ste- -a new session of base wholesome respect between the and to cap all, an old gentle--'
bll six months in the distance, a different bodies of students which engaged in the proper and dignified
gSet college outbort of foot ball could be brought about in no other game ot croquet, stepped on a ball.
ealtham and a year from the way. To a young an:d growing and injured his spine. You did
time, the writer lad stood on the University like this, nothing could not notice these: or, if you did. are
grasd stemd, and witnessed the be or is of more value as an ad- accidents in these sports so common
first cotest for foot hall supremacy, vertising, agency than its foot ball as compared to those in the much-
nd mhhi there again in a capacity, teams-an advertisement in its best abused foot ball as to pas nacom-
ow~ier, that did not pitm of a sense- wherever her foot ball teams mented upon even by you?
Sso the grmandtand. have played, they l ave left the Inl- I need not carry the argument
Sle then I have been found iiin pr&asion that Florida men are gen. further. Accidents-even deaths-
tue ranks of ball enthusiasts read' tlemen. It has been stated that occur almost daily in almost every
to bemlv anything good that is the attendance at Vale and Prince- department of sport or pleure;
said of the game. and to recent any ltoe is always affected by the results but if we should summarize all the
impntation on its character. of their great foot ball game-. I accidents that occur m foot ball,
It has been my good fortune to' heard some say, when this argu- compare them with equally serious
erve for nearly te years in thb. aent was made in a college paper, accidents in other sports. I believe
capacity of foot ball payer, man- that students drawn in this way the percent would be greater in
nr, aid coach-to view the foot were not worth having, I must con favor of the former. I admit that
hall question from the standpoint fes I do not shbr, this \i-x: hic.. or au outsider without pvreios
of the Slet and the instructor, a student meets a younng man de~sir. training preparation to step into
to teach the same me on the grid- ous of entering college. and is en-, the gridiron and engage with men
is and is the class room: and I deavoring to persuade hum to enter. who have had the necessary pre-
mse'sitatifgly make the statement Alma Mater, what does he dwell paration of, my a meth of traia-
baed a these eanptial appor- most poe? The ex exlece of his ing experience, would go er hard
SUr he a lg bot the gond teachers, the advantages of the with him, but what you see the
ad the a of the game, that I courses offered? I t h i n k n o t i average foot ball man eaders, has
believe foot hall s ds today as Would he not more likely speak to through a process of hard g be-.
the greamte stm -akg ie on hi of those things outside of the come entirely normal. Such physi
the AmericasCm timat View it regular routine of work. that gouto cal hardness lasts a a th
f m any standpoit you please- make college 1:fe attractive to the life. The art of falling without is-
the phyifgl, the -metal. the moal, average youngg man- nfthepretige during. the ability to swMtly cNi.
I am pmpmd to way ad attempt of theJuat ball and hbae hel team, I bine thought and actism; thes
to prove that cies them a of the socqss of their orators. of facities acquired drwlng a l et b
If you my tht f ball is com- their Conlle Glee Caub-ave not eason never entirely dert theidd
atively danu prt. I chial- these the mast hkel) tbhms uUpo pplaye.s Thnea m ethedof Ift
Is-e you to show that t is asfatal which the average students w*xt.d is lke a dip etothefaMIedf
* Myding. sowing, shalag, or dwells Njr does the fa. t that such of eternal yoth.
h-gak ridng- -if you msy it is arguments drdtc the dtha'sinc'an Some of my readers -ay s-
bhe Ti W brtalnag. I say you didate, make the Imes ai- I, dr sad acew me t bag a sat ba
hbew i Mt of the ey der- able ascollege materiss enthmia. 8o l nsas thee me
al7ip a of the game which believe that athletp.rtsluvlf faelbtiut heip to M W Ar


amp~ 01-


. its, an


. hb ml, pcurmme Laeu-,-0e

-ftnt -e y downed by oblades
wr ppmitio; who cotol their
ImesI ad restrain their appetites,
'w- -an deal hmormle with a an-
!'I'Aadvrary, and cane take
vicpry moderately and defeat with-
out bitteress; so log as I believe
that the game of foot ball does help
to makethiskind ofa man will I
feel toPored by the title of a "foot
bael ethosiast. And as long as
foot ball properly controlled and
re ated elps the student in his
college duties, instead of hindering
hi: gives zest and pleasure to
college life, make name and fame
for the college on account of vic-
toreswon. not only by skill and
prowe of the team on the gridiron,
but by their gentlemanly conduct
in the streets of the town where
they play, in the hotel where they
quarter, and on the trains; so ]Zng
salit helps to bring about a closer
boilA ofsympathy between students
and members of the faculty by
creating an interest from the routine
dutda--so long as in all these ways
the best interest of this and other
schools are advanced, and the cause
of education aided in its highest
mimion, which is to make the best
mee out of the material at hand; so
long will I say for the game of foot
ball, long may it live and prosper.
mWEM Of VERSITY


Frem first Arge
At the closing of the exercises,
Preddent of the University, Dr.
Andrew Sledd made the auuouuce-
meet that the State Board of
Education had established a free
scholarship to be known as "The
Trustee scholarship." that the
facIlty had established another to
be known as "The Faculty scholar-
ship," and that the Gainesville
RBoId of Trade still another to be
known as "The Gainesville schol-
arship." ELach of these scholar-
ships has a fact .-,Alut uios /100.
Hle lso stated that the h -ad ot
Cp !t l had named fte :.o build. -
al4eady compiled Tu-n-s
Itckman Hall" In
Ihumor thetwo genilemem of
-hase umms. In the evening the
yrg people of the city enjoyed
thsinelvs by having a grand ball
in the Opera House.
ItNXR ITANC&
L*.wbatmI? A patch athim.
am b and ae d of iw fln ug by,
dPua'ms -smeo will mam wit,
Isaasdy's aiMits and hise air,
Dinimad e Mamcesce. ifath Oce fair
tim, the0 mothb. had tot It;
Mv ps-p dfather's thia a" me.
T~~y- ly~~ gt-.--rotf -m re
A i Y- U. om remote-Who

Ia ad,-'* sty.., body' aft,.
AMateawidy' wbt atid wai.
Wft eb OIT &br, thIt ones trait,
CW tao amtmer'a lack of taste;
~ls I umr ebae to 14l,
A va" in whkih I adMl so yoke,
u eW I wImuIWM emal
c- se, itbt sa ch1oi ,;
he onefahwr r that
UglhMli) Iontted o my ill,
With olbe, Msme Oam elm bUgt
And m'e the matter wow stil,
They ehma. three mn aa myfate.
To themseve 'me. ,
amiIlthethUthiU I hpa. .
U #Wo what albietb mhe.
do eeshesob at tir bee,.
Oth at d i tw N. do tetr ase.
h. me.,v mighty si.,
IMRhal m I aB my @ald own?
Ay, burned buik. ha baut, ad
bwd,
I m yawL and ye a nmma mdI
anl ay Gad khuwu-what am I.
[adum Gaoy Chaus"l -

am P. JI of CaitcMUWr, G(.
p-ONOr, h101"r sad m a26 d mvget-
t, d" iidemly MoNday rautae

Lfth am*, AA N-our the amIe l m
faimatdm a pephecy ot he. W ea
ad sonom s big m "um t b e

s"amu i ayer t obb m as a-
- -A& U-mar.- am esmM ga-m






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An up to-date clean and moral pleasure resort.


Proprietor.


BROWN HOUSE CORNER.

---------------a eae~aeeeeeeeeeeee


The S. J. THOMAS co.

WOLESALE AND RETAIL
HEard are

ore, Tuppeqtine upplie.

The S. Jo or SO oo
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SFLORIDA FEMALE COLLEGE!*

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Ideal location. College of Liter'al Arts.
Excellent equipment. School for Teachers.
Standard curriculum. School of Music, vocal and
Well selected faculty. instrumental, including
Spacious gymniaium. pipe organ, new instru-
Heated swimming pool ment.
Twenty acre campus. School oft Industrial Arts,
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Admirable college spirit. ence and Art.
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Young ladies cotemplating entenng the Collele this Pall should
write at once for dormitory room. Session begins Wenesday. September
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Por catalogue and detailed information write to
A. A. MURPHREE, President.
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***s n**'i sak you I the*sawt Ufbe am
Tm, w6ueeb skdeol It's you fr tew ptams
His plabrk readily to hodM youea the tam


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am up ode. wA bewy. and
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amie a Om a hr a ml m. ad a
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Ube 3mv Sms 3mas g
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ad aftit an aw m'Smtsmw

Uft be wss bemiy ad plill. P
ped smIAm he $mPa t
bn a %I*s amlpfy to pabmy be
mb Me to bowNo V do bsy.

Ua"* ages


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.t...lh.a de, I... ..ayl, wi .m



so b e meInad m ang o r two.
an& rb yw e hageot the football





hM W.L. .has i
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m.iL, bIm, ft Mois e. tae hmis


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..... ..i. ... Mr. K at. a-

irddsBy- *MW in Pwmh >lm me
Mm mg loh, Ml ". b ei B n dt m s.








-aue s wI a aai nietas <
md g m n dd Ma m M-

tnmteMb r ob t e y bm n hiy-
hra. ho d, ad a nd many m ys
magand Wd13ty.
Wi. OUmM Mm as I= tddd
_law_ a" rm fe i d the idtr o:m
tof the m a nd

16.5 m Oat the U at .



a"=as. wey mmthiss

"0% $no"ay, mn me 4ntoam
iaft mer ambon m* 00 m m d.
- jabya 1, el 1
ubk k, vof. m. K"jba.-

ad ft saw. &r o l m..'s

Ib. j K -n

Mr.bit al has barn oen driving
b wS a lawe wslaofheow ink s@axe
w .. for e..1.ia.g in


I oto haftet.

ro Int! mrubai int!
46-2 for yo twice.
All rit. lady
Hal HM Dae good joke; whi
you gotli?
It ail't bad.
Gee, talt thi a good old town?
cmt tn till you try.
Cme cen.


re did


AU e-nd of the of a.dr ledin* to
Wa o widea.ed s psf..tian -,
er oadM mae tammeluva to be the top
imat ad twInetey e reached,.
waopepo- al the glory t ts had clut r
d aa them diHmedA by theM
aps h whend X i yet atalnd
m.it manm Ie sMIn t he osc tr,
w to the view" of the IVsk-
moa ti. (as Ithaoght)so nfor abowe
ma. At lt when tmhat lg hoped for
h did oIcomemydlas we ende,.
! m a glrim o," Maon,w I
1%0htt. Alms. my Iappmlm m nouly
* be fr a week. but for tht e wek
wI vs =s Ndo asWatk anmd as w eucoa
s ay Im alhe.
0 bamed days! why we they eletisd
end mt! why coMldt that self-
aWPIJ bspy m .es end a elm^s, m
tsp higher, wv duy and plumte i
tas a be f Im me nd my clm tat
v -u SkmeP.. that -cob- .me

ba hw p esw ma the e-p-rN tia
ma uasio sb aunminGal, such awful
.as." sine wit .soec ma nsg.
saod j awmWIIn ad alt teeqww
mNtO of Amusong a Fe Iit. I it
so m b eme ataind the bght of a
boem dse that emem 'ade the ome.n


bo w peN n im t a year e-.
lowso- bim he m quadw w to
ow sod it dues
As punho Ow pwrp ofCoftell
bma,. itto a*&kwe on thenaaSub-
ri oa mb ;ad mely it
he p LotsSm mm aof
It at e ow uere e lats .Smb m
seo1s sl pmpfth bmegn am'e
absubb t 4 and=& tson
Teo A3Mi Psnftmea amngns t*h
sheatems of Seea
3m itow to save em r ohmbmana
U. A. F.
Tome a emps ammd at ye
"we mawe emdbe ad to ymanoum
- bb m -g -y mam a -per
of emaf easd audg dwms L

The Aum anw an.".. adver-
tn~ ad baby

a -m-w .-


Last year the University had two liter
ary socRiees. Both were mallU ad .-
astuactry. The sdests mealesg
this, mcae together om the Lrat
day ilght of this school y a ea-m.
"Wed the --di e i to em -r
ai adw e the Ddae Uswy
puovNdlug hr two fai to he knb wn
as te Ddpbm sad the sdemaan
The two factions ae to delam agalat1
each other at mglar Intervals d
-piru I oratorual coatastI are e-n-pat.d

Carmbene was elted. The dertis
of sther iC aM deferred nAtUl the
nest regular lar mag, as well oa the



Freterialls.
adopiM of the -ttn awl bya
Thi paper wil cotia kep im
Wach with the work along this Him


The University of the Stte of Florida
bas the following three frtnutasls,
in S.arishing ood condition sad pmw.
ag s great beanet to the school: Alpha
TMa Omeas, Kappa Alpha ad PI pKamp
Alpha. They all have eeallst must.
ag roams down Sown, and faeer,-y
spiit rn hih during thias the spring
mon.
i* hr aw lvBrety StUdusts.
The University of the w e of lorda
hnems Floridas atuensts tm-as -a,
ma fmihlm bead sad lodging at
adaal c. This b ig nthe eo of as.
ad.1ug theinesitt iths teah of
To p-vde a way, however, for very
podr students to mor te Uasteksil
P esMadAt SStM Ihas appolated a *.
mie. em 1 Self Hdp The duties of
ts conmitgd awe to mg e, am hrWan

-edy stdam A edly wmmk beAM m
found for several youag m"e. Fw m-W
stace aem has bern placed in -Aqe of
then elacric ligts a4d wiring. another Is
employed to attend to smelapl aawa
jOIet two me aang as jabMled
svewssimrne as wes isa be thes hea.
The work ino allowed to beemder wit
teir school ndesla The pay vwlsm


0menct lheahd of peptm.t, Smbu
is every e01j m -sedm msem a ear
*mpemlsteu. Amy esw~Mug o u
ply hor mbta peMim, shad4 tho
-Dr. DaLan, u.m3smm o tMh
is additeis t o the psdmet be
I3ym mebddpa mm hmbed d t i.


bmemb to mmu -"nel yand
iYmun gNN Wem 4d d3m
glmas by am of Toweataof I
of a a .mah byi ~ d o
sl of th ammlesy, ad Easa"
bydith em aiy. Any ime w t o
Inda fpprll ar a tal
*mo i wubi toar-ADmw shdk Fm
.m of aev ounim. so ob
mas weab.od* mamyammnb w
of m damhty aime elog doaltee
de,41 MIOR

"m of .-..., 3mno w.so. a
vmg em-1ammdnb
ad d"Itft


On Wednsday maimn the good peow
pie of the Bptist Chuck gave an In-
feemal emptis1 to the utasanta of the
Ushiesalty at the baamtful hme of Mrs.
L Wihma nm Bmt iberty sueet. Many
o te studeud="w premset wel sm
he morlity of the famealty, ad every-
body met evrybody, amd enjoyed the
ivMt tothe smNit.
M sic wa redeued by several of the
rough tai aad a qutette of young
- named the IdI* wi- sofn-
r. Clam Camoa mag "Dearie," mch
* the delight ofht aimm.
Wh all we npmiet,ice m sand
bm m we sved be the spaims dining
*Ol by the yo ledlem of the town,
md the quaateme a cod not strainln a
am of "Hame a tt awthia Hke
k"*1* After I ue mesa sad scial
de a mw of UnelMad gss foand
heir way to the emer table ad off
In em eto mbst ft. --
At atoIt tr Vty the wceptim wa
=Ar, ad after e pI trag thir thuaks
or an evensing o pleastly spet to
Mr. Wieso and the eaivngoammitt.e,
he staet hbaa d' mat teir
wwy, My hepig th auch good times


an bn = bb n ofn
sow40ambwb ad soow21o
ft~M IA -' -600LFfik=
NOM66 WOS ftNW 0866
of dw I


- ALAL -Aa+A
AFIVVN,"g


Th e me rou .
slow ISOWS

I e-P dide like tim al
game what them boy dom up bemt
he* Psidi. I c-me ber with T top
him iechule, a' be tol' mea he
their w Ste'tobeasgme of fethu
o I Cme down with him to me em
-e I in't mwe m mn wbIem
IWal. .ir; The fut thia I I m
soe fMer wil BOwn read Om thu. 8B


molddrwit ve The-allthe dle m
together sad jumspad m the feller wha
canghti t-cesm they didn't wat
to ve t-but e wantedit, *o he -m
and was almost getting away whI
somemody made a jump and gaIbbd
hia by the as sad they ll dowa, and
a the other piled olike they mIted
to make sur e o t bn. Tbm sommebody
blowed a whistleand they got up lN
they we sorter i tafied with the
ro sad before, you could my seet,
they were al butting each other lie my
old rams. One felltter mid *smtiing
'bout 7 come 11 sad that tN bimem
Ted always saying, an d mfeller
grabbed the Il uader Ises a sadM tied
to rum away down the Aeld to beak up
the game, but another plcky little devil
grabbed him before he had got far and
throwed i down aad lofd then piad
oa qamn-guem that feller dida't mat
to rnmm ore. All the fell om the
outsdwe nr drunk and hollering and
the policeman mmust of had ame too.
But the feller that was down bhleed
"dam, dam," sad thme they all got up
egia. Ovm they didt Hlikeprofadity.
Ewry time ome little feler nwoMld
boller 7-11 i t, anll o em woldM sme
Wh it was all over, I looked or Ted.
and he was over with a crowd hovering
bout Bum licker anad all that stL.
somebody had my hat and cane, but I
dn'dat ce. I was so glad somebody bwt.
'll sure me every football ame I ea.
Yours truly.
SILas HoWI.
P.S. IMd beinaotemandwrhe yoe
sme memme. e shore and ased y paper
to me, al believe i colleges and their
papen,.
S. H.


- ~ ~-- . .. .. -- w -- --- -w w -

GAINESVILLE STEAM LAUNDRY


pEjlJL ATTElTIOI TO 0TUETS




University Agent, T. Z. Cason


wggg;:gguasug::w:::guugg


"6PAY


DIRT


You Can Strike it l


E The Man who buys Lots 50o by ioo today
and hangs on to them will leave his family
f well provided for when the time comes for
him to occupy a plot 2 by 6.

BUY PROPERTY NOW.

No one is too poor to be interested is a
real Pstate proposition if the property can be
bought on the Easy Payment Plan.


The W. R. o Real s Co.





Wilson's


SWY MASTS ANDlMSTY N'S.
Wat oar th- i F__ Fisedsw are b-

Cleveland, 0., Oct. 10.-Heavy,
wet snow, driven by a high wind,.
fU here today. The storm is the
o st severe since that of October 5,
I12 and is general along the lake

Birmingham, Ala., October 10.-
A light frot fell throughout north-
era Alabama thin morning. Ten-
der vegetation in many places was
nipped by the frost.
Louisvil e, Ky., October 10-
There has been a light fall of snow
here today, and through the moun-
tain region of Kentucky. This
breaks the record for early snow

"'- is. Tenn., October 10.-A
llt froit fell in the vicinity
alM phh this morning. It ia
5blleved that the cotton is in-
i b t t ftbe of froetL
utha, Ky., October 10,- The
lit now of the season fell here
t0 Morning.
NaWhille, Tenn.. October 10 -
A killing front fell throughout this
action this morning.
Yellw fever in Cabe.
Cienfuegos, Oct, 10.-Col. Bar-
iett has ordered the immediate re.
moal of the American marines
free the city on account of the
*ppa ance here of yellow fever.
The marines were taken on board
the ships. A yellow fever patient
amae here from Cruces, where two
their ase are report.
mIdM for Crmind Ca sL
Jacksmville, Oct. 9-At a pre-
teary trial beld in the nunici.
pal Cort of this city yesterday,
Alfred St. Chir Abrams of the
"Tavares Herald and A. K Taylor.
(Caetoosit, were held in $400
Semch for trial In the Criminal
Cwrt. This is the case brought
by Ex-Govermor Jenings against
the defendants for libel, owing to a
cartoon and article published in
the Tavares Herald accusing Jen
eig of cadalous conduct while
GOwernr. The case is exciting
general laterea.
ram immlem lmeM,

Havaa, Oct. s-The govern
of all povis, excepting Sta
ra. report that the dia mnt
iof bo vel ars and immtrgets
iampkae and Sata Clara reports
d ppgo Thbe reprt wre
sa e by mages to marine

Tmum.r RaIdd today tase





Rme. Italy. Oct. *.-The

et -I Itabe i dimd t

r,, p m mai a. le.
sesmeeses gas enbse at Lbe


1M; ;J Tinlic w"#, z op


THAN AT THiM JTORE


MRS. R.


WILSON


Next Door to h E-. IN
A PLACE TO EAT SOMETHING


f1mmCAW gey OPO..an*lo


- 4-.


One Price

Dry Goods Store


lot is"


MABUSY CONR 111111


Headquarters for Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery and Underwear

Ladies Ready-to-Wear Goods-Cloaks, Skts, Waists-Fine Milli-.

nery, Men's Furnishings, Trunks, Suit Cases.


Rugs, Curtains, Linoleums and Oil Cloths.


Stocks Larger, Values Better and Assortment more varied.

We are going to be "The Pride of Gainesville."

Wastob .S GVQoTw.

Make Our Store Your Headquarters



EAST LORIDA TH W HY E XC e -O


41i i H1 i 111 1111 b I I 11 | i > 11 II -O l 14


I.


opm Xat a Af


With Mercrin om................ M!....
RollinUt W ter Prk,......Nov. 10
assyll ....... **


Lust rida.y adtn.OR e.e ee
aec..ed fe.m the k f .otbal d .d the
Oinesille Iow elevem. Oa the gridirm
at dtho seban par. The vieory mwa
emy for the Uaiveasity, a fr the
jump they kept the ban goa their way.
thwo ta.doa manse sd in. the sa
- was.kice.. ..our P.Iuh downs
ae. aned.. ae J as the e w. o Sam
INAd up, aid the eqnd ehd bern caned
for the bem topo the deIalred 'ywd to
sia.' the haf back fumbed and the
banll fell oun the gml. In a twiakllag
Of the eye Clark, rht half for the town
Im. ad the ballnand wa gsog down
the iL-Id. O-blaadng hit pursues
he places the ball at the other end, sad
seemed a touch-down. Then a goal left
the same 164 for the University.

feplsa auahw ar u um


1 I


^y


of* 164N ""04/


-ooI:1"099oo."


_ Jal 1L


laf /1019/ 0





V


.4 ... -


News


OPMG IN Of U*NV!


*.b


AMnde With Elaborate Program and


Much Ceremony.


gpmk-Usby Amelia's FaMis ~eSON-Tha~t Of Men. N. P. Orvam 3.1mg
~emipI p .4t %am sou fim s Uewproi-c Fme orthe
Beneit ofnour seadems


* Tlhrsday of last week was one
tlot will remain green in the mem-
ory of Gainesville people for a long
time to come. It was the day set
apart for the public celebration of
the opening of the University of
the State cf Florida in its new lo-
cation on the beautiful site one
mile west of the Court House, and
jut over the city limits of Gaines-
vile. For several days the citizens
were engaged in preparing for the
event, the stores outside and in
were decorated profusely with the
colors of the University and ap-
propriate mottoes were in frequent
evidence. A large number of stu-
dents had already reported and
these with their friends and rela-
p added considerably to the
crowds upon (&e streets. The
conittee of 'Arrangements had
fi-mulated an attractive program
of exercises, secured a fine band
and the ladies-as is always the
case-were active in promoting the
mucess of the day, by arranging a
reception with refreshments to be
enjoyed after the speaking. Short-
ly after dinner everyone began
wending their way toward tbh Un-
iverity grounds, and by three
*C -- *S* M ft n.ru.


E'3.


-i






ft


*1


* ?*


LRKE


d
E~J


in the minds of his audience. Pre-s
ident A. A. Mnrphree of the mori- -
da Female College was the nt x'
speaker on the program, and
delighted every one with his orator-
cial display in handling the subject "
"The Unity of the State School
System. Hon. N. P. Bryan,
Chairman of the Board of Control
had for his theme "The University
of the State of Florida," and we 7
were fortunate enough to secure a
greater part of his remarks, which
we present to our readLrs. Mr
Bryan said: E i
"Florida, as a State, is sixty-one vears I
old. The act of Congress which alndmit-
ted her into the Union, recognizing thle
value of education, inade provision for
two seminaries of learning, one east and .....
one west of the Suwannec River. The
one east was located at Gainesville; the
one west, at Tallahassee. The state then
proceeded to wander and roam in the
educational field for sixty years, having
established in that period of time, in ad- 6id PI- of the I
edition to these seminaries, institutions of
learning, for the education of the white --7
children of the state, at Lake City, De- telligent wills, trained minds, educated ieadoet in the Florida of the past.
Funiak Springs, Bartow and St. Peters- intellects. What power can be more pTrpose of this University is to
burg, and made appropriation for at least concerned in the existence and main. ednAM tie youm m of the state and
one other. Then cane the Legislature tenance of this condition than the gov. to in this development.
of 1905. ermnent itself- the State? A Ut is intended that the instruction
Long before, it had become apparent The state recognizes private and sec- shall be equal to the best
that so many institutions of similar aim, tarian colleges and universities as valun- an. We have a loyal hardwork-
purpose and scope were not only unnecesL able Wlaborers in this great work,. ana4.igjlty, specialists in the subjects


3~I
U..

U
C.


-* .


ffL.


1%


I
I
S


University of Florida.


YoAl men of high character, with skill-
ed hands and trained minds are worth
more to the State than all the piled-up
wealth of the merely rich. You cannot
look into the bright face of a Florida
boy, poor and uncouth though he may
be, struggling to pay for his own educa-
tion, determined to door die, an? prop-
-A *.- --


------~~zi---
Why. the people of Jacksonville, be
lately stricken by a great fire, only last
April gave out of their necessities about
$15,000,00 to relieve suffering in far-away
California. Surely the people of Florida
out of the abundance with which the
Lord has blessed them, will gladly con-
tribute to supply the necessities of their


Sthe occasio and was packed to
over a flWg, many being unable
to mecare seats. After a benedic-
tion by the Rev. T. P Hay of the
Presbyterian church!, thv Hlon. W.
W. Rampton, was iutrt uced and
S made one of the finest welcoming
addremes ever listened to by the
people of Florida. It is to be re-
gretted that it is impi-ssible to pub-
lish his remarks in full, for they
would make excellent, reading and
a good reference for rising orators.
Mr. Hampton classed the day as
a "red letter" one in the history of
Gainesville and expressed his
pleasure in having the duty thrust
upon himfof welcoming the dis-
tinguished gentlemen present, as
well as the students. He then re-
ferred to the birth of the Buckhamu
bill, and the indignation of the


their warfa-e. Our position was unique,
unpritedented, anomalous. Without
theanir.g, or assuming to say, tldat these
institutions were of no benefit, but fraunk-
ly conceding that much good was accom-
plished, I do assert that this benefit was
at 'east sectional, if not local, in charac-
ter.
Then came the Buckman :;ill, drastic
in its provisions, seemingly cruel in its
abolition features; but I verily believe
wise in theory and statesman-like in
meeting these conditions which had
grown up among us. Its great central
idea is concentration.
And so we have come back to Gaines
ville and Tallahassee for locations.
Gainesville, beautiful in her surround-
ings, patriotic, enthusiastic, big-hearted
Gainesville opens wide her doors and
bids the boys of the State welcome.
Likewise Tallahassee, the favored
child of the state, rich in history and
tradition, cultured and refined, presses
to her bosom the girls of the State, and
isls them welcome.


people at the thoughts of losing i We have now a complete system of
the time honored East Florida I education, beginning in the primary de
Seminary with its many loving and Prtment of the granmar school, pro
sacred memories. The people how gre-ing through the high school, and
acred emories.eing in the Florida Female College for
ever accepting the inevitable then: the girls and the University of the State
bent their energies, under the of Florida for the boys.
management ot Mayor W. R. Where there have heretofore been st
Thomas, W. N. Wilson and other few localities and sect ons vying w ith
progrsve men, to secre the each other for advantage and preferment.
proressiveer let all localities and all sections work to-
coveted prize of the new Universi- gether in harmony for the sdvaincenwert
ty. We won a glorious victory, of all the institutions of higher education
as is witnessed today by these supported by the State. Where therm
magnificent buildings, and for have het-rofore twen hitter-.s ansd d these "carved for eternity" lie cord; let there le- reconciliation ant;
unity. Let's have peace.
was bidden to declare our fraternal l..ut," you ask, "why not leave th<
appreciation of the noble work I cause of higher education to Stetson and
done by the Boatd of Control. Rollins, and the othei colleges and unii


Mr. Hampton extended hearty
greetings to the student body and
extended them the hospitality of,
the town, our homes and firesides,
and hoped that when they left the
University they would carry with
them a tender spot for Gainesville
sad her people.
His RxIll'nv, tGov. N. RB


versities of this and other states?" You
say it is Ihurden enough to pay the run-
ning expenses of the state, without b-intg
called upon ard required to educate
other peoples' chilre,,. Why tax for
this purpose? Why have a State Uni-
versity at all? Why?
This is an old question. but t.'.e answer
to it is very plain aid simuipl-. 'Ihe
same duty rests up'ion the tilte to c. mn
.1.. t.h. ....,.-atin o. f her future cit.e1ie


in higher, collegiate and university
education.
Th's is the age of the specialist. The
so-called learned professions can no
longer monopolize the technical instruc-
tion of our colleges and universities, but
provision must also be made for the ex-
pert in other callings, such as teaching,
engineering, pharmacy and agriculture.
The time is past when "a soft hand in a
kid glove" is the badge of a gentleman.
It is no longer undignified to labor.
We, as a people, are peculiarly depend-
ent upon skilled labor in almost every
calling of life.
From Pensacola on the west, in whose
splendid harbor can float the navies of
the world, on down through the-as yet
-undrained Everglades, and beyond to
Key West, the new gate-way to the
countries sorth of us, Dame Nature has
bestowed her choicest blessings. No
land possessed of superior natural re-
sources is to be found on the face of the
habitable globe. It would be easier Wo
mention the few we do not than to enum-
erate the many we do enjoy. Her
golden fruit and her fleecy staple, greet-
ing each other on their way to the
markets of the world; her climate, sea
coast, commerce, forests, phosphate,
vegetables, fruits and agricultural and
pasture lands, proclaim us a happy,
prosperous and contented people.
With all these resources, Florida has
only begun to be the great state she is
desitied to become. These resources
..ill e d-eveloped by educated people;
t)y our own educated people if we are
wist; by educated people from elsewhere
If we are not wise. Will our people
take advantage of these opportunities,
or will they be content to be servants
and dependents of others? Will they Ir-
leaders, or will they be unskilled day
laborers? They will be lealerb, and I
will tell you why. The people of this
state are inferiorr to nto people in mental
and moral endowumeit-. '1 hey were
here whl-n this State was a wilderness.
They had the pluck to meet, with un-
cou.plaining, splendid patience, courage
and determination, the disastrous freeze
of t93., which swept away in a single
night the accatnulations of a life-time of
haul, li.ineer work, and in a short de
ca, de have made the achievements of the


not be found anywhere. It has not been
the purpose of the boards in charge to
erect showy, expensive buildings, but we
believe we have spent the State's money
wisely in plain, comfortable, substantial,
permanent structures. The campus is
laid off with the idea of permanancy. We
have ample grounds for all present and
future purposes. Other departments
will be added as needed.
This is a public institution for the ben.
efit of all the people. It makes no dif-
ference how poor you are or how rich you
are, just so you are a gentleman and are
willing to work.
Ifa boy goes out of Florida to get an
education now, it is becauw h.* wants to,
and not because he has to or ought to do
it.
The advantages to a citizen of this
State of an education obtained in it over
an education obtained d out of it are evi-
dent. WVh. it he gets through, he doesn't
feel like "'. stranger in a strange land "
He has a St tde acquaintance with men
who will be his associates, for life. lie
feels like he is at home and has an in-
terest in his native State, her institutions
and her people.
This, in briel, is what the State through
her University offers her young men.
And in return she expects them to he
useful, upright citizens. She cannot ask
more. They cannot afford to be less.
It may be suggested that all this costs
money. Of course it does, but it is
worth it. Education is cheap at any
price. lgnorance is the costly, the ex-
pensive thing. It is always and every
where true that the people who spend
most on education are the richest, most
powerful and most progressive people;
while the vicious and criminal classes
come almost exclusively from the igno-
rant people. I <,rance begets crime.
More money will be spent by the taxpay
ers this year in the prosecution of crimi-
nals in the two counties of Duval and
Hlilaborough alone, then will be spent
by the taxpayers to support this Univers-
ity serving all the forty-six counties of
the State.
Another thing: Since tie passage of
the Buckman Bill the Government of the
United states has spent vastly more
money tor the education of Florida boys
than have the taxenvers of the State.


ture, will refuse to foster, support and
maintain their public institutions. You,
sir, (turning to the Governor) are not the
Governor of a miserly, niggardly people,
but of a people who have ever been con-
trolled in such matters more by patriot-
ism than by selfishness: more by great-
hearted liberality than by calculating,
closs-fisted stinginess.
I believe the next Legislature will
want to be satisfied that the appropria-
tion asked will be necessary for the pro-
per equipment and maintenance of the
institutions temporarily under our care;
but I do not believe that we will be
placed in the attitude of begging for the
young men and young women of the
State.
Two years ago only one out of several
proposed constitutional amendments
was adopted by the people, but that one
carried by a tremendous majority; and it
was to tax themselves, to raise the con-
stitutional millage to aid in the cause of
public education.


I






7


then great riches; that "sound morals is
the basis of good citizenship; "that"
liberty hath no abiding place save in the
intelligence of the people."
"By their fruits ye shall judge them."
The hope and pride of this University
will center in the young men who now
and from time to time hereafter, avail
themselves of the privileges here so
freely tendered.
May they represent her with credit
while here, and when they leave, to re-
turn in the capacity of students no more,
may they go forth, with her certificate
that they are worthy, well equipped to
take their places as leaders "in the
several pursnits and professions of life "
May it soon he the proud privilege of
this University, though the instrumental-
ity and by the mighty power of this
great State, voicing the will of the people,
to make it easily possible for every
worthy young man within her borders to
secure a first-class University education.
Continued on Third Page


*iI


VOLUME I.


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a


THE UNIV


~'w. a atmau10 is"Mii


urnD w w %F-m ww w in


Ek INVERSiTY NEWS
Pa l semoetly (em FrMay)
GAkmSVILLER, Fl)OU IMA
A. CLYDEB VAN8 EDITOR
SAM A. SANBORN ASSOCIATE
Seagptlm St.M ar la se ces
Ia thus coming before the public
we have no apologies to offer, for
noe are cessary. But we have
many than to give to the good
people of Gainesville for their
hearty and loyal support of this
enterprise which they have deemed
worthy of their assistance. We
were mwmmen4ed in our undertak-
ing by Dr. Sledd, president of the
University, and we have been en-
couraged by all patriotic college
men. In return we shall offer the
best we have in each issue and
hope in the course of a few months,"
when we are in better running
order, to publish a paper unexcelled
by any school. The students are
the contributors, and from the
students come almost our entire.
support in this line. Anon, then
will appear articles graciously
given by the faculty or others in-
terested, but as a rule this paper
will be by the students, of the stu-
dents, and for the students.
Students, you are earnestly re-
quested to write something for
your school paper. Who knows
whether you are a genius or not?
Nobody. The thing to do is to
get down to it and write a story,
an article, a poem, something
funny, interesting, who cares so it
is of interest to the general public?
Don't say that you desire no fame.
Grapes are not always sour that
require a little working to obtain
them. Just do your best. Angels
could do Imie. It is your duty
to try. YVo uty to your college
which fosters you, your parents
who look for the best that is in
you, and to your God from whom
come your talents.
A school isn't worth much with-
out college spirit. A college news-
paper is the best medium in the
world to engender this spirit, as
well as for advertising the school.
Students try to do things that they
night oe recognized by the" public.
They realize the power of the
printer's ink. They see that they
mGt put forth their highest and
best efforts to make a good show-
ing before the public. It causes
broad rivalry, and makes better
students.
The Florida College for women
advertises as embracing many
things, but we notice with regret
that University Students are not
among the things so fortunate.
Is there any chance, Dr. Murphree?
When you get up in the morn-
ing and start to "come clean" for
the day, repeat this with a sancti.-
monious contortion of your physi-
ognomy.
"Wht kind If every felo- in iIt were just like me:"


It may do you and your school
some good.

A University needs a publication
about as bad as the Devil needs a
conscience. It can afford to do
without it as well as a fiddler can
do without his resin. We have
the fiddle; help us supply the
resin, and we will have some
music.

All the students seem "tickled
to death" with Gainesville, and
the good people here are very en-
thusiastic over the University.
We can only hope for such har-
monious accord forever, and we are
sure that such will be the case.
This is an ideal college town, and
we hope the school will stay right
here always. The Board of Zon-
rol selected very wisely indeed.
Some few are squirming under
the strict Military discipline which
is being administered at the school
in regular doses; but there are
none who fail to realize hnw ..,n-h


To him that bath shall be given;
if not, he'll take it.

Mr. Day of Jacksonville com-
plains that his dog has been killed.
EvidelUy he believes that every
dog should have his day and every
Day his dog.

This school never has had a
newspaper; it may be a question
whether or not it has one now.
We are all sometimes filled with
the best spirits one way or the
other. The most desirable kind at
this time, however, is good old
college spirit.

The Female College, at the last
hearing, had enrolled 136 of Flori-
da's fair damsels, representing
more than thirty counties. Now
those Tallahassee Beau Brummels
will purchase Huylers, Nunnallys,
etc., in a very strenuous manner,
we guess.
This being our first issue, we
have no exchanges to clip from;
but in the hereafter we hope to be
in position to give you the cream
of other college publications.
Our sisters at Tallahassee "beat
us to it" in the college publication
line by starting up last year; but
we'll catch up with them by June
by printing curs bi-weekly while
they have theirs monthly.
We wish to call the attention of
all of our readers to the excellent
speech of Hon. N. P. Bryan,
Chairman of the Board of Control,
on the first page of this issue. In
college slang, he made a ten pin
strike.

This journal will seldom dabble
in politics, as we owe our existence
to those dangerous things, and a
turn of the mighty crank or cranks
may mean the death of all of us.
We solicit and are very glad in
deed to have all poems, articles,
essays or stories written by the
students, faculty, or alumni of the
sponsible for what is said thru
these columns as we do not endorse
all the ideas and opinions that have
been or will be expressed.
We are always open to sug-
gestion or criticism.

We are in for, and shall always
endorse athletics in any way we
can. We are great believers in
good, clean athletic sports, and are
glad to give space in our columns
to any matter which will advance
the cause. We call especial atten
tion to the article by Athletic Di-
rector, Forsythe, in this issue, and
heartly endorse all that he says.
Truly, a college is widely known
thru the men who represent her on
the field or in the parlor.


"Man can not live on bread
alone," nor can a newspaper de-
pend on subscriptions alone, but
we do depend a good amount on
them, as we are judged almost al-
together by our circulation. A
dollar means little to you, but
several of them come in handy in
running a newspaper. Show the
proper spirit by sending us your
one dollar for a year's subscription.
Talk up the University News
You can help us by talking good
things abont us. Only one dollar
per year for a good, clean, spicy,
newsy, college publication. Sent
to any address upon receipt of
price. Every student in the school
ought to take this pa; er, as well
as all the patrons. Help us out,
we can't run a paper on sympathy.
It takes money, and a plenty of it.

We understand that a movement
is on foot to form a Dramatic Club,
and a Glee Club. Don't let them
drop thru, fellows! They are
something which every school
should have. There is excellent


TO OUR ADVERTISERS
We believe that it pays to ad-.
vertise; we are glad to see other
people that do. We are grateful
to all who have placed their cards
in our paper, and we are sure that
they will come out winners a
hundred fold. We urge all stu-
dents and those interested in this
journal to do their trading with
those who have patronized us.
They have helped you, students, by
helping your paper; now show-
your proper spirit by helping them.
Some firms of every kind of busi-
ness have given us support. Now4,
help them by giving your trade
over into their hands. Several
whom we have broached on this
subject have arrived at the conclu-
sion that they are going to get all
the college trade anyhow, so let
them labor under this impression
until you have undeceived them by
trading elsewhere. Look over
your paper before buying or come
to us and we will direct you aright.
That will be showing the proper-
college spirit. That will be show-
ing those people that they can't
expect everything from you and
give you nothing. Cut the proper
caper and let your money go to.
those who tike an interest in
you more than to get what you
have. All contributions, sugges-
tions, subscriptions, advertisements
or other matter nrW be handed to
the editor on the street, mailed to,
him, left at "The Oaks," or drop-
ped in The Elevator office, and all
will be gratfully received.
For Love of Poodle.
Mrs Nicholas Longworth better known
as the Presidents daughter is getting the
Canincus as bad as the other members
of the smart set. Just now according tor
press des patches the Long worths are very
much disturbed over the fact that their
pet poodle, Manchu, is losing his hair.
A very eminent physician has been called
to attend "doggie" and strenuous efforts
are being made to save the hair. As
Nicholas Longworth is very bald himself


he can
dog.



S

H,

0

E

s


probably sympathige with the


HO0E
Say, old college
chum. don't cuss if
you break your shoe
strings; just come in
and we will give you
a new pair charging
it up to friendship.
HYDE -TENCH


H[OE


0

E

S


W. C. Buie
Cold Drinks Confectionery,
Cigars and Tobacco.


W. M. JOHNSON
LEADING PHARMACIST,
AND DEALERS IN
Patent Medicines. Druggsts' Sundries,
fancy and Toilet Articles.
Prescriptions fled By Us COatai Odl The
Purest hlrediMts.
Agency for uyler's Candies.
-------------


We Furnish


The Home


Complete


Our Rug Department is brim
full of the latest creation in
floor covering.
Get our Prices.


I


G. K. BROOAI

Dry Goods, Shoes, etc.

Gainesville, Florida.


NEW YORK RACKET
Cheapest Store os Earth
We (arry Everything usually
t'arried in a first-elass IDepart-
Sto-e. Your' trude solicited.

FHIFEmR DROJ.
PWlER B6OCK.
South-east Cur. Square

L. J. Burkhim,

MEN'S
FURNISHINGS
stabledd MI 18M7.
J]qCS 1=. SMITH
MAKER OF


F


INE
ADELESS
OTOGRAFS


From Locket to Life Size
Special Rates and Mounts for Students
of the University.
115 East Union St.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA.

L. E. DEAN
TONSORIAL ARTIST
Only White Barber in Town.
POST OFFICE BLOCK.


J. W. MCOUIt & CO..
DRUGGISTS
FANCY GOODS,
TOILET ARTICLES,
PERFUMES, ETC.

SOUVENIR POST CARDS,
Agents Nunnallys' Fine Candies.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA.

J. S. BODIFORD & CO.
Wi@IESAL 414 *II411
arTb~so-m ro2 4ql


_Dne* Smm **mbw Wb.* Sd Books amd School So

VIDAL'S

Dru-Nd Book Store
Corner East Main sl rt Streets. GAINSVILLE, P FLORIDA


miiimm-i


hOfESSIONAL CARDS

BMER, MB Im SN i BAXTER.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA.

DR. J. H. ALDERMAN,
DENTIST.

,Over i)utton & Co's Bank.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA,

C. C. THOMAS
ATTORNEY AT LAW
GAINESVILLE, FLA.
Practice in both Federal and
State Court.

DR. DEVERE B. MORRISS
DENTIST
Office over Marcus Endels.


CARTER AND LAYTON

LAWYERS


WM. ANDERSON,

"BIYCMES AND RLECTRIAL GOODS.
All repairing done prompt-
ly. Electrical work of
all kinds.
I 13 West Union St.


ESTABLISHED 18*9.


N. F. DUTTON & CO.



I)o a general banking business, buy and sell Foreign and Do-
mestic Exchange. The accounts of banks, banks, corpor-
ations, farmers, merchants and others received on favorable
terms. Special facilities for making collections on all accessi-
points in the United States.




VIDAL'S

UplIVEFITY HEADQUAkTER

Books, Stationery Novelties,
Souvenirs, Cigars, Tobacco,
Candies, Cold Drinkso


Open 3 to 5:30 and 7:30 to 10 P. M.
SKATES 15c, ADMISSION 10. Old SMimay BMilg.

ELDORADO CAFE.

Nothing But the Best

Oysters Steaks Chops


BOWLING


ALLEY


OPEN ALL THE TIME


Ducks, Ten Pins and other Ganies


Amlusemlent IHall.


D. G. EDWARDS,

Livery, Sale and Feed Stables
Special Attention to University Men.


.. 1). Matheson
Si OF .AN1D I.:ATIII.R SToio.
Foi E' s, Durability and :;tyle
W\car the
KING QUALITY SHOE
For Men and Boys. Shoes of all'
Grades at Right Prices.

Saunders & Earle

WIIOL.ESALE AND RETAIL
IEAFERS IN

Fancy and taplu I0oc1tig
Queensware and Glassware i

Agents For Leading Bicycles.


W. $. 0o eg C 0o.
LVLRYTIIU IN GhRORmIS
Lowney's Fine Candies
National Biscuit Co's Fine Cake-
and Crackers.

CIAS. V. WDIVAL

BOOT and SIHOE MAKER


A. R. Harper,


Pianos


andl
U
dfl(1


Organs


UNIVERSITY of FORIDA
GAImSVwLL. oFlom@
A High Grade Institution for Young Men.
Literary, Scientific and Engineering.
Strict Military Discipline.

For Catalogue and information address
:NDRE]WL SLEDD PRESIDENT



Novelties, Books, Stationery
Souvenirs, Sheet Pictures,
and Picture Frames .


F', 1ICUrida.


k


CwAfL33L4e'VfLI14e





a
C. ~,waJrw-'.,.' -~


IMP UN! LVISITY IN31WB NU3SMAY.. am'nkftim to 1


SE W FIWT4SML
lam Jin ,

Nearly ten yeas ago o a cold,
iMaly day, the writer of this ar-
tkie sand la the grand stand at
thePar In Columbia* and with
aboutlw4en-t tof the lew hun-
dred 'al tatos present wondered
what itall meat-what the tw.aty-
two talwart young fellows, repre-
eati g eammon and the University
of South orolina, were trying to
do as they stood about in the mud,
tagging and struggling for the pos-
emion of what appeared to be a
huge, red mud ball. This was the
first game of inter-collegiate foot
ball that the writer had witnessed-
in fact one of the first played South
of the North Carolina line.
The game ended by the score of
ten to five in Clemson's favor, and
those of as who knew a little of
ase ball and nothing of foot ball.
felt that our Champions had done
gloriously. We had already yelled
ourselves hoarse at we knew not
what, but not contented with this,
at the termination of the game,
members of the faculty and the
students alike, plunged out into
the gridiron, ankle deep in Carolina
mud and slush, and bore off the be-
decked victors as if they had been
indeed conquering heroes. It made
no difference whether or not the
game and its merits were under-
stood; it was enough to know that
mew College had been victorious
This game was the first of those
"'Fair Week Contests" in Columbia
which attract thousand of citizens
and draw to the city thousands of
visitors from all over the South.
The growth and popularity of the
game has indeed been phenomenal.
The writer left the field of the
first of these contests convikiedi
that this game of foot ball had .i'i,.
more to unify the Clemson st, [ at
body; more to arouse college spirit
and college pride, than all the at'
letic events in Clemson's history
put together. He felt that the
game had come to stay and to be
deservedly the most important of
her athletic sports. But he had
ama-how a Igdf-qogratqlatory
feeling that he did not belong to
the team; he felt that, willing to
lend his moral and financial sup-
port, he would rather some one
else would do the playing for him.
He tried to think of the many ad
vantages offered Iby base ball, in
which he was thent deeply interest-
ed; its greater appar nt gentility,
its comparative lack of dau-r;, all
in all, it seemed a much nicer gamn
for a young gentleman to engage
in.


But fortunately our opinions are
not like the laws of the Medes and
Persians-a new session of base
hall six months in the distance, a
great college outburst of foot ball
entliusiam; and a year from the
time, the writer had stood on the
grand stand, and witnessed the
first contest for foot ball supremacy,
found him there again in a capacity,
however, that did not permit of a
seat on the grand stand.
Since then I have been found in
tne ranks of ball enthusiasts ready
to believe anything go x that is
said of the game, and to recent any
imputation on its character.
It has been my good fortune to
serve for nearly ten years in th;.
capacity of foot ball player, mana-
ger, and coach-to view the foot
ball question from the standpoint
of the student and the instructor,
to teach the same men on the grid-
iron and in the class room; and I
unhesitatingly make the statement
based on these exceptional oppor-
tunities for learning both the good
and the evil of the game, that I
believe foot ball stands to-day as
the greatest man-making game on
the American Continent. View it
f om any standpoint you please-
the physical, the mental, the moral,
I am prepared to say and attempt
to prove that it excites them all.
If you say that foot ball is com-
2-st.w .. Am1....... ...,..,4 T .!T


I


inculcate control of temper, and
restrain of passion--if you say it
is detrimenental to a man's studying
A a student, I challenge you to ex-
ami and.comnpare the average
record of the foot ball players
with the average of those who do
not play-iore than this, I assert
that on the basis of percent, there
are a large number of leading col-
lege ietn, leading students, princi-
pal officers, on the college foot ball
team than in the rest of the school.
I claim dW submit to the records,
that the men who play foot ball
make, as a whole, better grades
during foot ball months than dur-
ing the months of the session, due
to the regular habits required by
the training Code, and the activity
of mind that accompanies activity
of body.
I have no patience with the "arm
chair" foot ball critic-a self-ap-
pointed here, who, with dogmatic
self conceit, abuses a sport which
he has not had the opportunity or
perhaps the inc-!::ittion to investi-
gate. How often do we hear the
adjectives "brutal"--"degrad-
ing"-"dangerous" applied to foot
ball by persons who have never
even seen a foot ball or a gridiron,
or know absolutely nothing of how
the game is played.
How otten this year have we
seen in our newspapers, luid ap-
peals to the legislature and college
authorities to stop a sport, that to
note their tone, you would imagine
was as dangerous as a Boer regi-
ment or Japanese Squadron.
Legislation! what has a Legislature
to do with a college boy's sport?
It might as well arrogate to itself
to the right to stop bicycling, row
ing, base ball or any other sport
which does not impei il the public
morals. The Col,/g authorities are
ti. p orop ner Ones "* decide whether
1 t. p:t rtlciapathn;is inl I '
'interfer.- with the work of a
!student, ano tr. Scll .t i .i 't .. JI s in ,, l"-'' i- nout
tnly allwxig ret < ,tc
the game, leads ti
cn that.-- A-1 tc |, ., a lfX4o t> v u.,tc


onUU irLat it Lsthuu en.it o- a eec aa %. augil m L. "
duly appreciated by those ii a posi- America, and a good many ol"i'
tion to know what is best ior the Americans too, The heavy falls,
students. and that the fumings of the piling up one on top of the
the ignorant ana malcontents have other, while they might damage
no foundation in fact. It has been you don't hurt these young fellows
my good fortune to see foot ball in- who are trained and hardened to it,
produced into two colleges-I have But you say: "Some students up
noted in both instances an increased North were killed while playing the
interest in college life, an awaken- game." Did you notice in the
ing of college spirit, the greater paper also that a sailing party was
pride taken by students and gradu- drowned near Mobile: that Lieu-
ates in their Alma Mater. These tenant Dano Greene and his wife
two colleges have become known skated into an air hole and were
in other states and to other colleges. drowned: that Dr. John Hopkinson.
The students of different institu the renowned physicist, was killed
tions have been brought together by a fall from the Alpin slope: that
in a friendly combat, and an honor ,in Chicago a couple of bicyclists
ably, hard fought game creates a collided and one was fatally injured,
wholesome respect between the and to c;ip all, an old gentleman
different bodies of students which engaged in the proper and dignified
could be brought about in no other game ot croquet, stepped on a ball.
way. To a young and growing and injured his spine. You did
University like this, nothing could not notice these: or, if you did, are
be or is of more value as an ad- accidents in these sports so common
vertising a-.ency than its foot ball as compared to those in the much-
teams-an advertismeut in its cstl abused foot ball as to pass uncom-
sense- wherever her foot ball teams rented upon even by you?
have played, they have lett the im- I need not carry the argument
rression that Florida men arc gen- further. Accidents-even deaths-
;tlemen. It has leoin stated that occur almost daily in almost every
the attendance at Yaie and Prince- department of sport or pleasure;
ton is always affected by the i-sults but if we should summarize all the
of their great foot hall game-. I accidents that occur in foot ball,
heard some say, when this argu- compare them with equally serious
anent was made in a college paper, accidents in other sports, I believe
d-i td vii 41 had b mp in


tallat sl entsrl t l in i 11s way the percent wouiU ie greater lu
were not worth having. I must con favor of the former. I admit that
fess I du not sLrL tlhis vi -v: u --. "or au outsider without previous
a student meets a young nian desir- training preparation to step into
ous of entering college, andl is en- the gridiron and engage with men
deavoring to perbuad: himi to enter who have had the necessary pre-
Alma Mater, what does he dwell paration of, say a month of train-
most upon? The excellence of his ing experience, would go er> hard
teachers, the advantages of the with him, but what you see the
courses offered? I t hi nk not average foot ball man endure, has
Would he not more likely speak to through a process of hardening be-
him of those things outside of the come entirely normal. Such physi-
regular routine of woik. that go to cal hardness lasts a man through
make college l.fe .tt:active to the life. The art of falling without in-
average young nian ofthepre.-tige during, the ability to swiftly com-
ot the foot ball atnd base hall teanims bine thought and action; these
of the success of th,_ir orators, of facilities acquired during a foot ball
their College Glee Cub-are not season never entirely desert the old
- .-. tI... .... 1.1-. 0. 1, ....... .. ...... T'Pho- o ann. th ,f( fnL h* ael


not only an important but a legiti-
mate place inevery college coae.
I do not believein all work and no
play for the student, even if that is
the usual necessary lot of most in-
structors. I do not mean to be
understood as saying that athletic
sports should it in any way inter-
fere with the proper amount of col-
lege work and study, but I would
be understood to say I do not be-
lieve that these should in ter fe re
with a certain amount of athletic
sports. They should go hand in
hand-both important and neces.
sary, although by no means equally
so, both occupying a legitimate
place in the day, and in the
thoughts and hearts of the students.
The experiment of abolishing out
door athletics has been tried by
some few colleges, but let us re-
joice in that the light has again
dawned on most of them.
The game of foot ball trains the
mind and muscles together. The
movements of the game are as com-
plicated as any on the chess board,
which latter requires only the men-
tal efforts to be executed: a man
engaged in a game of foot ball is
taught the importance of perfect
obedience, and of combined and in
stantaneous action. It is not a
game where brute strenght alone
avails: a keen intelligence and an
indomitable courage must charac-
terize a successful foot ball player.
just as it must a successful general.
Foot ball is no game for a fool! To
the initiate the struggling mass of
men on the gridiron may appear
senseless-a man exhibitions of
brute force, but a slight knowledge
of the game reveals intricate com-
binations for offence and defense,
quick moving and shifting like the
colors in a kaleidoscope. The man
with the ball goes down, and a
mass of humanity are piled on top
'f him-that is all the casual looks
Son see., i;', :. such on lookers
Sw,- hear that foot ,ksn ,. ''Inge-


CRAWFORD& DAYIS,


man out of our students, stronger
in body, more accurate in mind-
men full of energy, euthuslam, and
an indomitable personal courage;
men not easily downed by obstacles
or opposition; who control their
tempers and restrain their appetites,
who can deal honorable with a van-
quisbed advermry, and can take
victory moderately and defeat with-
out bitterness; so long as I believe
that the game of foot ball does help
to make this kind of a man will I
feel honored by the title of a "foot
ball enthusiast." And as long as
foot ball properly controlled and
regulated helps the student in his
college duties, instead of hindering
him: gives zest and pleasure to
college life, make name and fame
lor the college on account of vic-
tories'won, not only by skill and
prowess of the team on the gridiron,
but by their gentlemanly conduct
in the streets of the town where
they play, in the hotel where they
quarter, and on the trains; so long
as it helps to bring about a closer
bond of sympathy between students
and members of the faculty by
creating an interest from the routine
dutlem-so long as in all these ways
the best interest of this and other
schools are advanced, and the cause
of education aided in its highest
mission, which is to make the best
men out of the material at hand, so
long will I say for the game of foot
ball, long may it live and prosper.
OtNM (Of NWRVERSITY
From First Page
At the closing of the exercises,
President of the University, Dr.
Andrew Sledd made the announce-
meat that the State Board of
Education had established a free
scholarship to be known as "The
Trustee scholarship." that the
faculty had established another to
be known as "The Faculty scholar-
ship," and that the Gainesville
Board of Trade still another to be


*OO*O-B-*-*- - -


4 1>****4*4


FLORIDA FEMALE COLLEGE!
TALLAAHA JES *
IT POSSESSES IT EM 1 \ i -
Ideal location. College; of i.l:.i al Arts.
Excellent equipment. School for Teachers.
Standard curriculum. School of Music, vocal and
Well selected faculty. instrumental, including
Spacious gymna sium. pipe organ, new instru-
Heated swimming pool ment.
Twenty acre campus. School ot Industrial Arts,
High moral environment. including Domestic Sci-
Admirable college spirit. ence and Art.
Steam heat, electric light. School of Expression.
Young ladies contemplating entering the College this Fall should
write at once for dormitory room. Session begins Wednesday, September
26, and continues eight months.
For catalogue and detailed information write to
A. A. MURPHREE, President.


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An up to-date clean and moral pleasure resort.


E. W. Waters,


Proprietor.


BROWN HOUSE CORNER.


The S. J. THOMAS CO.


WHOLESALE AND RETAIL


E LrINrdw :r0P

Furniture, Turpeqtine 0uppliez


knwnu as "The Gainesville schol-
arship." .ach tle .o.J.THOM ASr- CO.
ships has a tacL u,,,. j1j0. L J* 1 UJLAC .
lie '. stated that the )lA,' ot I -
C. -ro! had named the build. j ---*****-*'-< ^
ings al. completed A
Ha' and **' t Hall" in lss- "-g0a****
honor of the two gentleman of A LANTIC CC 'IN
those names. In the evening the A C
young people of the city enjoyed
themselves by having a graud ball Florida, e gia, AlabaFa, Virginm
in the Opera House. ,
INRITANCE North And $uth aaiina.
Lo, what am I? A patch of things,
Mere odds and end of liesflung by, The Great Highway of Travel From
From age-long rag- gatherings .
I wo n-outwilltdwit Florida-East, est North, o()t


Somebody's habits and his hair,
Discarded conscience, faith once fair
Ere time, the moth, had eaten it;
My great-grandfather's chin and nose,
The eyes my great-grandmother wore,
And hands from some remote-who
knows?-
Perchance, prehensile ancestor;
Somebody's style, somebody's gait,
Another body's wrist and waist,
With this one's temper, that one's trait,
One's tastes, another's lack (of taste;
Feelings I never chose to feel,
A voice in which I had no voice,
Revealing where I would conceal
Rude impulses without a choice;
Faults v 'ich this forefather or that
Unkind,) fostered, to my ill,
With tothets home one else begat
And na.'le the matter worser stail,
They chose, these masters of my fate,
To please themselves, bequeathing uie
Base pleasure in the things I hate,
Liking for what misliketh me.
Out of the ashes of their fires,
Out of the fashion of their bone,
They fashioned me, my mighty sires.
And shall I call my soul my own?
Ay, borrowed husk, head, heart, and
hand,
Slave on and serve me till we die!
I am your Lord and your c.,mmand!
But only God knows--what am I.
[Grace Ellery Channing.
Death of Evagelist Sam Joes.


Sam P. Jones of Cartersville, Ga.,
preacher, lecturer and noted Evangel-
ist, died suddenly Monday morning
-Ahile on a train of the Oklahoma, Choc-
taw and Gulf Railroad traveling to
Little Rock, Arkansas, near the small
town of Perry. His death was an exact
fulfillment of a prophecy of his, as he
had often said in his sermons that he
would die either while in a pulpit or on
a train. As a newspaper writer his repu-
tation was second only to his renown as
an evangelist Mr. Jones was filling an
engagement with a lyceum bureau at the
time of his death and this would have
brought him to Florida during the win-
ter. Mrs. Jones and daughters were
with him at the tame.
a ^ _


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TO THE EAST, THE FAMOUS

Florida and West Indiian Limited

and New York Express.
.. TO THE WEST

Montgomery Route and
"Dixie Flyer" via Atlanta.
PULLMAN Cars and Through Coaches on ALL TRAINS
Atlanti Coast Line mileage books, good to ,ill aints,. via all
trains as far East as Washington, and as far West as St. .oui,mi,
Cincinnati and New Orleans; rates ,'$2-* 11
CONSULT THE PURPLE FOLDER
For detailed and full information regarding rates, P'illinan rs--r
nations, schedules. Call on your nearest ticket a:g' t or write
FRANK C. IBOYLSTON, I)ist. Pass. Agt. W. 1). STARK. Try'. .as \gt.
Jacksonville, Florida.
W J. CRAIG, Pass Traf. M'g'r. T. C. W IITE'. Tr.v. 'a Pam..\gent
General Offices, Wilnminigton, N. C.
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'Better watch out, here comes the News Man"
He's gem' to soak you in the slate if he can
Them, wheroof skidool it's you for the pines
His pitchfork is ready to hold you on the tines


A M cI enjoyed a loage drag
rie adtmany w Ih.
A -m is mM t ateall jtbefore the

aoUhg seaen in oeo, ad everybody
-ema to be having a good time.
Mr. Rmel Uidell, of Dalt, Ga. is
cs-ladn at the Beown Hne. He uwn
at the University st yer. and is think-
g fmenIu- rg in afew days.
soMe wd and pump mSeds will
nt be ta in ech age for The New.
Ifttae $$$foram
The Dixie Debating Society will meet
every edasday evening at 7T0 in the
Chapela I
Cach orsythe ha got the football
ud looking "mighty fne I tell youe
ow, and by the date of the fit game
they'll show somebody a thing or two.
The acuIty will have a bicycle club
ptty soo. All of them will wheel
their way to the schooL
Mr. Wa. Wheekr has been sporting
si nd tas emamobile for the last few
days.
Harvey McComick, a great favorite
ammo the boys left Mowday to take his
mo-im as midshipman on the Ten-

T sflat Shoes. At L J. Barkhim's.
Get the habit.
Mr. Bert Dyl hams bought a new horse
end beoy ,with which to enjoy the
eChad yer.
The folowing from the Florida State
i ae here: Herbert Felkel, Rex
nualek, Roy Douels, FPrak Hart eld,
Gesg Amas, Sam Sanburn, A. Clyde
MwUs, tnley Grabling, Earnest Han-
cock, Thea. Hanwock, Howell Sheats,
med Kut -Jd*mt.
Mewryhodya somto be buying tcy-
etoamveaueewalkof amile and a
quantr. It's a eighty fe hard reed
Ir a webl, tho', and a good many more
we mdasft already.
Mr. D.ldM Mamm ha decide d to
Ister ad coSme of of the water aad

r Five clothing ad uruishing at
I. J. Bdnkhim'. Get the Habit.
Memrs. Bert Dyal and Rusell King
have decided to remain o longer in the
Univerty, much to the regret of their

Your.g ma. were you Mprimed this
minag when you woke and found you
we a howear late? This need not occur
a", just call and get one of our alarm
clack. we ha .hemso cheap that they
may be had by all. L. C. Smith.
The many friends of Mr. Kent John-
san iegst very much that be has return-
ed to ASetao. Our low is Steatoo's

Mr. John King reigned last week
from the University. He will enter

Mr. gert Dyal has been seen driving
by thin knowledge factory quite often of
late with a tasty selection of the fair sex,
They found room for ex.tiu wanting in
their gamnsomimcl regions with persim-
-orn and grapes picked up in the woods.
Together with mixing fun and instruc-
tion Liybody had an enjoyable time,
and more Geological surve) s will happen
ia the near future.
Mr. Donald Marcus. of Tallahassee,
left asuddenly and silently last Wednes-
day night between ten thirty and day
light. No under hand work at all,
merely the best way to pass a guard and
change hi diet.
The following party made a Geologi-
cal expedation to Alhchua Sink on last
Wednesday: Dr. E. H. Sellarda, Marcus,
Moeman, Gunter, Carter, Hancock,
Felkel, Sanborn, Kirk, Rader, and
Earman. They visited the city watel
plant and made other investigations at
the lime snk.


students of the University of Florida,
we welcome you, we wanted you, an
glad to have you and want to make
your stay with us as pleasant and inex
pensive as possible. Call and see oni
ine of shoes and hosiery, the best anc
most up to date found in the city, and
at prices more reasonable than our largI
cities L. C. Smith.
lops are becoming a frequent thing ii
Gainesville. They have averaged ahoui
two a week for a mouth now, and a
swell ome as coming of tonight. Whet
the uniforms come there will be a Mili
tarv Hop once a mouth at the Universitq
for the students only, the best feature
dofwhich will be that there are to be n<
stao
Attention University Full line o
gloves at L. J. Burkhim. Get the habit
Don't ask Fatty Whidden if he ha
read the Prisoner of Chillon or of Zenda


-ost k --A- -u- A
With Mercer in Macon...............t.
Rollins Winter Park...... Nov. 10
Ga ville...... "


Last Friday -*twer- eleven men
selected from the football quad, met the
GaineMvile towm eleven on the gridiron
at them bae ball park. The victory was
easy for the University, as from the
jump they kept the ball going their way.
Two touch-dowas were scored in the first
half, and one in the second. Only one
goal was kicked. Four touch downs
I were earned, but just as the two teams
lined up, and the squad had been called
for the ball to go the desired 'yard to
gain,' the half back fumbled and the
ball fell on the ground. In a twinkling
of the eye Clark, right half for the town
team, had the ball and was going down
the field. Outdistancing his pursuers
he planted the ball at the other end, and
scored a touch-down. Then a goal left
the game 16-6 for the University.

RocapuPm to Umarn-ity M".
On Wednesday evening the good peo.
pie of the Baptist Chuach gave an in-
formal reception to the students of the
University at the beautiful home of Mrs.
R. Wilson on uast Liberty street. Many
of the students were present as well as
the majority of the faculty, and every-
body met everybody, and enjoyed the
evening to the limit.
Music was rendered by several of the
young ladies, and a quartette of young
men taved the gathering with songs
Mr. Carlo. Canova sang "Dearie," much
to the delight of his bearers.
When all wee present, ice creams and
cakes were served in the spacious dining
halls by the young ladies of the town,
and the quartette could not restrain a
stanza of "Home ain't nothing like
this." After refreshments and social
chats, a box of Universidad cigars found
their way to the center table and off
again one to each student.
At about ten thirty the reception was
over, and after expressing their thanks
for an evening so pleasantly spent to
Mr. Wilson and the r..aivinngcowlaittee,
the students 'barracksward' went their
way, only hoping that such good times a
were every day oc.urenrs.

CaeiMge Slug the Week.
I don't hate it.
Tip the Blarney some.
A dollar fifteen in nickels-IS.
I'm ruint! ruint! ruint!
46-23 for you twice.
All right, lady!
Ha! Hal Darn good joke; where did
you get it?
It ain't bad.
Gee, ain't this a good old town?
Can't tell till you try.
Come clean.


WhbN I Was a Freammb n
All rounds of the ladder leading to
what our ideas hold as perfection seem,
or should seem themselves to be the top
most rounds, till once they are reached,
whereupon all the glory that had cluster-
ed around them is dimmed by those
stages higher and not yet attained.
Thus it was when I toiled in the obscure
ranks of the "prep" that "distance lent
euchintweot to the view" of the Freah.
man, then, (as I thought) so far above
me. At last when that long hoped for
day did come, my struggles were ended,
I was a glorious College Man, so I
thought. Alas, my happiness was only
to be for a week, but for that one week
I was as good, as great, and as educated
as any man alive.
0 blessed days! why were they destined
to end so soon! why coukl not that self-
exalted opinion have lasted always!
Simply because there existed a class, one
step higher, whose duty and pleasure it
was to take from me and my class that
self confidence, that unadultrated con-
ceit which (had not the Sophomore come
to my rescue), might have "ruint me."
But how painful was the operation that
was used! Such unmerciful, such awful
"ratting," mixed with speech making,
forced joke telling, and all the require-
ments of hazeiuy a Freshman. It is
not until one has attained the height of a
Sophomore that one can "see the sence"
in what happened to him the year be.
fore. But there can be no question as to
the good it does.
As you know, the purpose of College
hazeing is to take out the natural con-
ceit of every Preshmac; and surely it
serves its purpose. Let's have more of
It at our University! Let's have no
more of these Freshmen hanging on the
shoulders of Seniors.
Tn shav is tn save nr Fre&shman'e


Tat G m ri'ey.
tore News.
Deer Sar,
I shore did like that air
same what them boys done up brown
In' Friday. I come her with Ted to pt
him ina chule, a' be tol' se a- ow
thar wnz ln' to be g e of football,
so I come down with him to see one
cause I ain't never mee no mbefe.
Wasa, sir; The fust thing I knowed
some feller with more pads on than Sal
and looking as how he wa mad at
something, ran straight at a line of fel-
lers andkicked the ball as hard he
could drive it. Then all the fellers ran
together and jumped on the feller what


caught it-guem they didn't want him
to have it-but he wanted tt, so be ran
and was almost getting away when
somebody made a jump and grabbed
him by the legs and they fell down, and
all the others piled on like they wanted
to make sure of him. Then somebody
blowed a whistle, and they got up like
they were sorter satisfied with that
round, and before you could my scat,
they were all butting each other like my
old rams. One feller mid something
'bout 7 come 11 and that U business
Ted is always saying, and one feller
grabbed the ball under his arm and tied
to run away down the field to break up
the game, but another plucky little devil
grabbed him before he had got far and
throwed him down and all of them piled
on again-guess that feller didn't want
to run no more. All the fellers on the
outside were drunk and hollering and
the policeman must of had some too.
But the feller that was down hollered
"'dam, dam," and then they all got up
again. Guess they didn't like profanity.
Every time one little feller woukl
holler 7-11 fite, all of em would sure go
together.
When it was all over, I looked for Ted,
and he was over with a crowd hollering
about Bum licker and all that stuff.
Somebody had my hat and cane, but I
didn't care. I was so glad somebody best.
I'll sure see every football game I can.
Your truly,
SILuA HONK.
P. S. I %ill be in often and write you
some more. Be shore and send my paper
to me, as I believe in colleges and their
papers.
S. H.


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De Debti Society.
last yer the University had two liter
ary societies. Both were small and un-
satisfactory. The students realizing
this, came together on the first Wednes-
day night of this school year, and com-
bined the two societies into one under
the name of the Dixie Literary Society,
providing for two factions to be known
as the Delphian and the Jacksonian.
The two factions are to debate against
each other at regular intervals, and some
spirited oratorncal contests are expected.
For president Mr. Samuel Sanborn, of
Carrabelle, was elected. The election
of other officers was deferred until the
next regular meeting, as well as the
adoption of the constitution and bylaws.
This paper will continually keep in
touch with the work along this line.
Freternities.
The University of the State of Florida
has the following three fraternities, all
in flourishing good condition and prov.
ing a great benefit to the school: Alpha
Tan Omega, Kappa Alpha and Pi Kappa
Alpha. They all have excellent meet-
ing rooms down town, and fraternity
spirit runs high during this the spiking
se p fosoierty Stn.
Help 1r UiveSIty Studets.


bgL- or *.a a- m~* ~ ~ -- -


One Pris and
that the lowest


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Headquarters for Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery and Underwear

Ladies Ready-to-Wear Goods-Cloaks, Skiats, Waists-Fine Milli-


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Rugs, Curtains, Linoleums and Oil Cloths.



Stocks Larger, Values Better and Assortment more varied.

We are going to be "The Pride of Gainesville."

"aw tohi U7s Q3ro w.


Store


Your Headquarters


EAST FLORIDA CITY PHONE
I 5 MM M D O 2 10


-WTTTTTT* 'W FTTWT-F-IF-T.


SMNWY BASTS AND FROSTY NFS.
What er Nrtherm Friseds are Be.
i.mnmfto xpeiefnce.
Cleveland, 0., Oct. 10.-Heavy,
wet snow, driven by a high wind,
fell here today. The storm is the
most severe since that of October 5,
1892 and is general along the lake
front.
Birmingham, Ala., October 10.-
A light frost fell throughout north-
ern Alabama this morning. Ten-
der vegetation in many places was
nipped by the frost.
Louisville, Ky., October 10-
There has been a light fall of snow
here today, and through the moun-
tain region of Kentucky. This
breaks the record ior early snow
falls.
Memphis. Tenn., October 10.-A
light frost fell in the vicinity
of Memphis this morning. It is
not believed that the cotton is in-
jured by the fall of frost.
cynthia, Ky., October 10,- The
first snow of the season fell here
this morning.
Nashville, Tenn., October 10 -
A killing frost fell throughout this
section this morning.
Yeew fever iM Cuba.
Cienfuegos, Oct. 10.-Col. Bar-
nett has ordered the immediate re-
moval of the American marines
from the city on account of the
appearance here of yellow fever.
The marines were taken on board
the ships. A yellow fever patient
came here from Cruces, where two
other cases are reported.
Meld for Crimil Court.
Jacksonville, Oct. 9-At a pre-
liminary trial held in the Munici-
*%-I n -..6* -C -:&. .


The University of the State of Florida PIl Court of this city yesterday,
charges Florida students no tuition fees, Alfred St. Clair Abrams of the
and furnishes board and lodging at Tavares Herald and A. K Taylor,
actual cost. This brings the cost of at- the Cartoonist, were held in $400
tending the institution within reach of bail each for trial in the Criminal
almost every young man in the state.
To provide a way, however, for very Court. This is the case brought
poor students to enter the University, by Ex-Governor Jennings against
President Sledd has appointed a corn. the defendants for libel, owing to a
mittee on "Self Help." The duties of
this committee are to secure, as far asartoon and article published in
possible, remunerative employment for the Tavares Herald accusing Jen-
needy students. Already work has been nings of scandalous conduct whilt
found for several young nmen. For in- Governor. The case is exciting
stance one has been placed in charge of general interest.
the electric lights and wiring, another is
employed to attend to small carpentering Cb In surgets Disbandia.
jobs, two are acting as janitors, and Havana, Oct. 8-The governor
several serve as waiters in the mess hal. of all provinces, excepting Santa
The work is not allowed to interfere with
their school duties. The pay varies ac- Clara, report that the disbandment
cording to the kind of employment, but of both volunteers and insurgents
in every case the student receives a fair is complete, and Santa Clara reports
compensation. Any one wishing to ap- good progress. These reports are
ply for such a position, should write to ofir by ssags to arin
Dr. J. R. Benton, chairman of this com- confirmed by messages to marine
mittee. headquarters.
In addition to this the president has Treasurer Roloff today began
three scholarships of one hundred dol- counting the contents of the treas
lars each to bestow upon needy and ury which amounts to $12,000,000,
meritorious young men. One of these is mostly in American gold.
given by the Board of Trade of the city
of Gainesville, another by the Board of steri the Actress Dead.
Control of the University, and the third
by the faculty. Any one wishing to Rome, Italy, Oct. 9.-The
make annliention for a whAlar.hin Marchioness del Grillo. better


GAINESVILLE STEAM LAUNDRY


$pECIAL ATTE TION TO STUDENTSS


University Agent,


T. Z. Cason


Z1:1---------0-- -11b0,l*- -- ------- -


"PAY DIRT"



You Can Strike it Rich!


The Man who buys Lots 50 by 100oo today
and hangs on to them will leave his family
well provided for when the time comes for


him to occupy a plot 2 by 6.


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BUY PROPERTY


No one is too poor to be


in


real estate proposition if the pr(
bought on the Easy Payment I


The W. R. Thomas Real I
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T NOW.

terested in a
operty can be
?lan.


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One Price

Dry Goods Store



DfTeo q ods, Tiimnjingi Notiorn, ug, ,;bhade$ e pAotie


1%To c better C-CCIMoods

NTo LO er ve Prioes

THAl /IAT THIJ JTORE


MRS. R.


m T IE UVMITY RMWS TRUESOAT. OCTOBER 19, 1Ms


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Go" on"Go

Gas e t~oSo eli.


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Make Our


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