Title: 1995 NWSI Annual Report
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 Material Information
Title: 1995 NWSI Annual Report
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Language: English
Publisher: Resource Projects Department of the Southwest Florida Water Management District
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - 1995 NWSI Annual Report
General Note: Box 28, Folder 15 ( 1995 Annual Report of the New Water Sources Initiative - January 1996 ), Item 5
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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3.0 STATUS OF CURRENTLY FUNDED NWSI PROJECTS

As of 1995, there were 16 projects partially funded by the New Water Sources Initiative Program
(Table 3-1). The approximate location of each project is shown on Figure 3-1. Budgeted District
expenditures for the 16 projects total $107 million. Table 3-2 lists the Governing Board and Basin
Board funding contributions. With the exception of the Lake Jackson/Josephine Watershed Project,
which was canceled, the projects are in various stages of implementation. This chapter presents a
detailed description of the scope, budget, schedule, and status of each project as of December 1995.


Table 3-1.


New Water Sources Initiative Proiects


Total District Water
Project Local Cooperator Cost Contribution Provided
(S) (S) (mgd)
Agricultural Water Use Efficiency None $375,000 $262,500 TBD
Central Hillsborough Reuse Hillsborough County $7,000,000 $3,500,000 4
Central Sarasota Reuse Sarasota County $4,263,440 $2,068,220 2.8
Lk. Jackson/Josephine Watershed Canceled -
Manatee Agric. Reuse Supply Manatee County $14,024,724 $4,668,470 16.3
Manatee Reuse ASR Manatee County $800,000 $325,000 up to 3.6
N.W. Hills. County Reuse Hillsborough County $11,100,000 $5,550,000 13.2
Pasco Rainbow Pasco County $50,000,000 $25,000,000 up to 30
Peace Creek Canal Polk County $75,000 $37,500 TDB
Peace River Option* PR/MRWSA $43,981,193 $17,974,000 6
Plant City Reuse Plant City $7,705,000 $3,852,500 4
Punta Gorda/Shell Creek ASR Punta Gorda $700,000 $350,000 4
Section 21 Wellfield Pilot* Hillsborough County $841,000 $420,500 up to 4
St. Pete, WCRWSA
Tampa/N.W. Hills. Interconnect WCRWSA $3,400,000 $1,700,000 12
Tampa Northwest ASR City of Tampa $700,000 $350,000 up to 10
Tampa Water Resource City of Tampa $100,337,500 $40,966,496 50
Recovery*
TOTAL $245,302,856 $107,025,186 up to 160
* Indicates project has received federal funding.
TBD = to be determined WCRWSA = West Coast Regional Water Supply Authority

Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-1


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996











1995 NWSI Annual Report


Figure 3-1.


10 0 10 20
scale in miles


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-2


New Water Source

Initiative Projects
Location Map


Tampa Water Resource Recovery O

Section 21 Rehydration -

Pasco Rainbow 0

Agricultural Water Use Efficiency O

Peace River Option -

Manatee Agricultural Reuse Supply 0
Manatee Reclaimed Water Aquifer
Storage and Recovery
Plant City Reuse 0
Tampa Northwest Aquifer O
Storage and Recovery 0
Central Hillsborough County Reuse 0

Jackson/Josephine Watershed

Peace Creek Canal
Northwest Hillsborough/Tampa
Interconnect
Northwest Hillsborough
County Reuse W
Central Sarasota Reuse
Punta Gorda Aquifer Storage
and Recovery






1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Tahle 3-2.


Total District Gocvernina Board and Basin Board Funding Contributions for NWSI Projects


Project Total Project Governing Alafla Hillsborough N.W. Coastal Pinellas- Withla- Peace Manasota
Cost (S) Board Hillsborough Anclote coochee

Agriculture Efficiency $375,000 $131,250 $32,812 $32,812 $32,812 $32,812

Central Hills. Reuse $7,000,000 $1,750,000 $875,000 $875,000 -

Central Sarasota Reuse $4,263,440 $1,034,110--- -- $1,034,110

Lk Jackson/Josephine canceled canceled -

Manatee Reuse ASR $800,000 $162,500 -- $162,500

Manatee Ag. Reuse* $14,024,724 $2,334,235 $2,334,235

NW Hills. Co. Reuse $11,100,000 $2,775,000 $2,775,000 -
Pasco Rainbow $50,000,000 $12,500,000 $3,822,150 $1,421,450 $1,152,250 $6,104,150- -

Peace Creek $75,000 $18,750 $18,750 -

Peace River Option* $43,981,193 $8,987,000 $2,268,149 $6,718,851

Plant City Reuse $7,705,000 $1,926,250 $1,926,250-- --

Punta Gorda ASR $700,000 $175,000 $175,000
Section 21 Pilot* $841,000 $210,250 $105,125 $105,125- --

Tampa/NW Interconnect $3,400,000 $850,000 $283,334 $283,334 $283,334

TampaN.W. ASR $700,000 $175,000 $87,500 $87,500 -

Tampa Water Resource $100,337,500 $20,652,000 $1,442,325 $5,809,946 $2,072,080 $1,645,475 $9,344,670
Recovery*____ I

TOTAL $245,302,857 $53,681,345 $2,350,137 $12,836,992 $6,744,489 $2,797,725 $15,838,279 $0 $2,494,711 $10,282,508
* Indicates projects receiving federal funding.


Southwest Florida Water Management District


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1995NWSIAnnul ReortJanuarv 1996


3.1 Agricultural Irrigation Efficiency Evaluation

Cooperator(s): United States Department of Agriculture
Natural Resources Conservation Service

Contacts: Natural Resources Conservation Service SWFWMD
Dino Ricciardi You-Jen Tsai
David Sleeper

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Peace River Basin Board
Hillsborough River Basin Board Alafia River Basin Board
Manasota Basin Board

Project Rationale:

Agricultural production accounted for almost 40 percent of the 1994 water use in the SWFWMD.
In the southern portion of the District, large ground-water withdrawals and low rainfall have
contributed to concerns regarding saltwater intrusion and lake level declines. As a result, the
SWFWMD Governing Board declared the southern portion of the District as the Southern Water Use
Caution Area (SWUCA). A management plan, developed to address water resource issues in the
SWUCA, calls for the development of alternative water sources, caps the quantity of water available
for withdrawal from affected aquifers and contains requirements for increased water conservation
efforts.

Increasing irrigation efficiency is a water conservation strategy for agricultural water use. As part
of this NWSI project, the SWFWMD will expand the scope of the Mobile Irrigation Lab. The
program will target high-end water users and those exceeding permitted quantities. District staff
will provide on-site water audits and expert advise to assist users in understanding efficient water
use through changes to their irrigation systems and management practices.

Project Background and Description:

The District each year will provide free services of NRCS for non-compliance (over-pumping)
permittees, high-end water users, and other voluntary cooperators. The NRCS will evaluate up to
seventy-five (75) sites each year. It is anticipated they will include fifty-five (55) micro-sprayer and
overhead sprinkler systems, fifteen (15) drip irrigation systems, and five (5) subirrigation systems;
or an equivalent combination as approved by the District.

The NRCS will arrange for the facilities, equipment, materials, and the technically trained personnel
necessary to evaluate the designated cooperators' irrigation systems. The NRCS will contact and
coordinate site evaluations with the cooperators. Scheduling of these activities is the NRCS's
responsibility, with priority scheduling being directed by the District.


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1995 NWSI Annual Report


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eJanuar 1996


When the evaluation is completed, the NRCS will formulate the results with recommendations into
a standard report. The report will be provided to the District and to the cooperators. For each
system evaluation, NRCS will recommend and present/instruct an individual irrigation system
improvement plan to the cooperator. Proper irrigation management tools will be introduced and
distributed to the cooperators. Follow-up site visits by either NRCS or District staff will be
conducted to monitor improvement of irrigation management practices, as needed. District staff will
assess the findings of the NRCS, and report the resultant water savings and other elements of the
program each year.

The NRCS will transfer the evaluation technique to the District by means of field instructions, so
that the District will be able to perform the evaluations in the future.

Project Benefits:

* Reduce the amount of water used for agricultural irrigation, especially in the Southern Water
Use Caution Area

* Stabilize ground-water withdrawals to sustain the safe yield in the Southern West-Central
Florida Ground-Water Basin

* Maintain and promote District support of agriculture growth within its jurisdictional
boundary

* Reduce the time and expenditures required in enforcement of District regulations.

* Provide direct assistance to agriculture in meeting the efficiencies required under revised
Water Use Permit rules.

Project Costs:

The total cost of the 75 evaluations is estimated to be $75,000 annually. Each year, the District will
fund up to 70 percent of the eligible project costs up to a maximum of $52,500. Funding for the
project is being provided by the Governing Board ($26,250 or 50 percent of District's share) and
four Basin Boards ($6,562.50 per Basin Board) for each fiscal year. The project is expected to be
funded over five fiscal years from FY 95 to FY 99 (Table 3-3).

Project Schedule:

The project will span a five-year time period. Scheduling of site evaluations is dependent upon the
crop growing season and the cooperation of the irrigators.


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-5


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1995 NWSI Annual Report


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Project Status:

Negotiating and processing the agreement with the NRCS delayed the implementation of the FY 95
project until May 1995. As of January 1996, 16 sites have been evaluated. The cooperative
agreement for FY 96 has also been executed.


Table 3-3.


Funding Plan for the Amicultural Water Use Efficiency Project


Funding Total FY 95 FY 96 FY 97 FY 98 FY 99
Participant Funding
Contribution
(%)

Governing Board $131,250 $26,250 $26,250 $26,250 $26,250 $26,250
(35%)
Peace River $32,812.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5
Basin Board (8.75%)

Alafia River $32,812.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5
Basin Board (8.75%)

Manasota $32,812.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5
Basin Board (8.75%)

Hillsborough $32,812.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5 $6,562.5
River Basin Board (8.75%)

District Subtotal $262,500 $52,500 $52,500 $52,500 $52,500 $52,500
(70%)

NRCS $112,500 $22,500 $22,500 $22,500 $22,500 $22,500
(30%)

TOTAL $375,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000
(100%)


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-6


I









3.2 Central Hillsborough County Reuse

Cooperator(s): Hillsborough County

Contacts: Hillsborough County SWFWMD
Carole Awad (Planning Stages) William C. Miller
Thomas Tucker (Development)

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Alafia River Basin Board
Hillsborough River Basin Board

Project Rationale:

The Central Hillsborough Service area is located in both the Northern Tampa Bay Water Use
Caution Area (NTBWUCA) and the SWUCA. Ground-water resources are stressed in these areas
and the project will offset a significant amount of existing ground-water withdrawals, up to 14.25
mgd. The project will maximize the use of treated effluent by allowing the reclaimed water to be
delivered where there is the greatest need.

Project Background and Description:

Reclaimed water is produced at two advanced wastewater treatment (AWT) plants in the central
Hillsborough County service area: Falkenburg AWT and Valrico AWT. The two plants currently
produce about 6 mgd of reclaimed water and are projected to produce 14.25 mgd in year 2010. The
Central Hillsborough Reuse System currently utilizes 1.75 mgd of reclaimed water: 1.1 mgd for golf
course irrigation, 0.6 mgd for process water at the resource recovery plant and 0.5 mgd for
commercial landscape irrigation. Two projects under construction will increase reuse to 2.85 mgd.

In FY 94, the Alafia River Basin Board approved funding for the Cargill Reuse Feasibility Study.
The objective of the study was to determine the most feasible method to deliver reclaimed water to
Cargill Industries and other industrial users. The use of reclaimed water for industrial processes will
offset both ground and surface water withdrawals. Potential reclaimed water demands were
identified for Cargill (5 mgd), IMC Agrico (3 mgd), and Nitram (0.4 mgd). Other reuse options
identified in the service area include the replacement of ground water with reclaimed water for
agriculture irrigation, including strawberries, nurseries and citrus groves.

This project will interconnect the Falkenburg and Valrico AWT plants via an eight mile transmission
main to enable flows at Falkenburg to be transferred to meet the higher reuse demand in the Valrico
area (Figure 3-2). In addition, reclaimed water will be transferred through the Valrico transmission
system to offset 5 mgd of existing withdrawals from Lithia Springs. At build-out, reclaimed water
provided by the Central Hillsborough Reuse System will offset 14.25 mgd of high-quality ground
and surface water withdrawals.


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-7


1995 NWSI Annual ReDort


January 1996










1995 NWSI Annual Report
Figure 3-2. Central Hillsborough County Reuse Project

HillsboroughCounty A New Water Sources Initiative


Local Cooperator: Hillsborough County


Southwest Florida Water Management District


-- -- -- ;;-;----1-----;---~ r ------. --~----c---- ----










Project Benefits:

* Optimize/regionalize the system through interconnection of the treatment plants

* Offset 14.25 mgd of water withdrawals for residential, nursery, golf course, and agricultural
irrigation and industrial process water

* Help relieve the stress on NTBWUCA and SWUCA ground-water resources

* Help relieve stress on Lithia Springs, potentially making surface water available for potable
uses

Project Costs:

Total project costs are estimated at $7,000,000. The District will fund up to fifty percent of eligible
project costs up to a maximum of $3,500,000. A funding plan for the project is shown in Table 3-4.

Project Schedule:


Engineering Design Consultant Selection:
Project Design:
Advertise, Bid, and Award Construction:
Construction:


March 1995 -July 1995
August 1995 July 1996
August 1996 January 1997
February 1997 January 1998


Project Status:

Black & Veatch has been selected as the design consultant. Design has begun and is anticipated to
be complete in July 1996.


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-9


Oh-


1995 NWSI Annual Report


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Table 3-4. Funding Plan for Central Hillsborough Reuse Pro ect

Funding Total Funding FY 95 FY 96 FY 97 FY 98
Participant Contribution
(%)

Governing Board $1,750,000 $800,000 $316,666 $316,667 $316,667
(25%)
Alafia River $875,000 $218,750 $218,750 $218,750 $218,750
Basin Board (12.5%)
Hillsborough $875,000 $218,750 $218,750 $218,750 $218,750
River (12.5%)
Basin Board

District $3,500,000 $1,237,500 $754,166 $754,167 $754,167
Subtotal (50%)

Hillsborough $3,500,000 $875,000 $875,000 $875,000 $875,000
County (50%)

TOTAL $7,000,000 $2,112,500 $1,629,166 $1,629,166 $1,629,166
(100%)


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-10


1995 NWSI Annual ReDort


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Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-10








1995 NWSI Annual Report January 1996


3.3 Central Sarasota County Regional Reuse Project

Cooperator(s): Atlantic Utilities
Central County Utilities
Sarasota County

Contacts: Atlantic Utilities Central County Utilities Sarasota County
J. Peter Martin Thomas W. Goodell Robert D. Obering

SWFWMD
Scott McGookey

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Manasota Basin Board

Project Rationale:

The service areas of Atlantic Utilities, Central County Utilities, and Sarasota County are located in
the Southern Water Use Caution Area. The interconnection and regionalization of the three reuse
systems will enable ground-water withdrawals to be offset, reducing stress on the aquifer system.
An additional 2.8 mgd of reclaimed water will be immediately provided by the project, with the
ability to increase to 10 mgd based on projected future flows within the Sarasota County system.
In addition, the project will provide water quality and flood control benefits.

Project Background and Description:

Atlantic Utilities currently uses deep well injection to dispose of approximately 1.0 mgd of
reclaimed water, which results in the loss of a valuable resource. To beneficially reuse the reclaimed
water, Atlantic Utilities proposed constructing transmission mains to provide reclaimed water to
customers of the Sarasota County reuse system.

At the same time, Sarasota County proposed constructing two new reuse lines. The proposed lines
are part of Sarasota County's Reuse Master Plan. The North Reuse Line would connect additional
golf course customers to the reuse system. The South Reuse Line would connect additional
agricultural users and provide an interconnect to the Central County Utilities reuse system. The
reclaimed water provided through the Atlantic Utilities interconnection would help to supply newly
connected customers.

Central County Utilities (CCU) currently has reuse but must dispose of large quantities of reclaimed
water during the wet season when demands are low. As a result, CCU proposed the construction
of a reclaimed water storage impoundment. CCU also proposed constructing a transmission line to
connect to the Sarasota County South Reuse line.


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-11


Southwest Florida Water Management District


1995 NWSI Annual Report


3-11


January 1996










The District worked with the three entities to develop a regionalized reuse system, including
reclaimed water storage, that increases the reclaimed water use efficiency and maximizes the use
of the resource (Figure 3-3). The project will offset ground-water withdrawals in the Southern
Water Use Caution Area. The project will also reduce nutrient loading to Sarasota Bay (a
recommendation from the Sarasota Bay National Estuary Program) and provide improved flood
control. The project was awarded New Water Sources Initiative funding beginning in fiscal year
1996. Each of the three cooperators will have a contract with the District for its share of the project.
The responsibilities of each cooperator are as follows:

Atlantic Utilities Design and construction of a booster pump station and 18,000 linear feet of
transmission main from their wastewater treatment plant to the Sarasota County system.

Central County Utilities Design and construction of a 52 million gallon reclaimed water storage
facility and 54,800 feet of transmission main connecting to the Sarasota County reuse system.

Sarasota County Design and construction of 14,800 feet of transmission line to distribute reclaimed
water to agricultural and golf course users and to connect to Atlantic Utilities and Central County
Utilities.

Project Benefits:

* Increase reuse by 2.8 mgd

* Offset existing ground-water withdrawals

* Decrease the amount of wastewater disposed of via deep well injection

* Decrease nutrient loading to Sarasota Bay (from reduced CCU discharge)

* Improve flood control in vicinity of Sarasota Bay

* Provide a link between two private utilities and the county.

Project Costs:

Total project costs are estimated at $4,263,440. The District will fund up to fifty percent of eligible
project costs up to a maximum of $2,068,220. Funding for the project is being provided by the
District's Governing Board ($1,034,110) and Manasota Basin Board ($1,034,110) over FY 96 and
FY 97. Three local cooperators are also providing funding: Atlantic Utilities ($480,250); Central
County Utilities ($1,196,470), and Sarasota County ($518,500). Table 3-5 shows the funding
contributions provided by the District and each of the three local cooperators. If the private utilities
are sold to Sarasota County, the District's contribution will be reduced from the sale price.


Southwest Florida Water Management Disirict 3-12


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-12







1995 NWSI Annual Report


Figure 3-3.


Central Sarasota County Regional Reuse Project
A New Water Sources Initiative


Local Cooperators: Sarasota County, Central County Utilities, Atlantic Utilities
Southwest Florida Water Management District


~-p-r~l~-~-rrC---.~P-i1I;T1?_~i










Table 3-5. Funding Plan for Central Sarasota Regional Reuse Project

Funding Total Funding FY 96 FY 97
Participant Contribution
(%)
Governing Board $1,034,110 $517,055 $517,055
(24%)
Manasota $1,034,110 $517,055 $517,055
Basin Board (24%)
District Subtotal $2,068,220 $1,034,110 $1,034,110
___(49%)
Atlantic Utilities $480,250 $240,125 $240,125
(11%)
Central County Utilities $1,196,470 $598,235 $598,235
(28%)
Sarasota County $518,500 $259,250 $259,250
(12%)

TOTAL $4,263,440 $2,131,720 $2,131,720
(100%) (50%) (50%)


Project Schedule:

Based on schedules provided by individual cooperators, the project schedule is as follows:


Transmission Main Design
Transmission Main Construction
Storage Facility Design
Contractor Selection for Storage Facility
Storage Facility Construction
Storage Facility Start-up


January 1996 August 1996
January 1996 January 1997
January 1996 June 1996
July 1996 August 1996
September 1996- February 1997
March 1997


* The schedule assumes a January 1996 start date following contract execution.

Project Status:

The contract between the District and Central County Utilities contract has been executed. The
agreement with Sarasota County is anticipated to executed by January 1996 and the contract with
Atlantic Utilities should be executed by March 1996. During the next year the transmission and
storage system design should be completed.


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District


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199 W- Annual R or _. _.~-January 1996


3.4 Lake Jackson/Josephine Watershed (Canceled)

Cooperator(s): Highlands County

Contacts: SWFWMD
Dave G. Arnold

Project Background and Description:

The objective of the project was to reduce the amount of water discharging from Lake Jackson via
the drainage canal by holding back ground water which is currently seeping out and around existing
upstream structures. To achieve this objective, the construction of a water-table gradient control
structure within the Josephine Creek system leading from Lake Jackson was proposed (Figure 3-4).
The control structure was intended to conserve water in Lake Jackson, thereby raising water levels
in the lake and increasing aquifer recharge.

Project Status:

Upon further investigation, the initially proposed control structure was determined to be ineffective
in substantially increasing water levels in Lake Jackson. Alternative structures which might be more
effective are cost-prohibitive. Consequently, the proposed project has been canceled. Funds
originally budgeted for this project have been reallocated to other NWSI projects.


3-15


Southwest Florida Water Management District


1995 NWSI Annual Report


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1995 NWSI Annual Report
Figure 3-4.


Lake Jackson/Josephine
Watershed Project
A New Water Sources Initiative


Local Cooperator: Highlands County


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-16








1995 NWSI Annual Report January 1996


3.5 Manatee Agricultural Reuse Supply (MARS) Project

Cooperator(s): Manatee County

Contacts: Manatee County Public Service Department SWFWMD
John A. Zimmerman Scott D. McGookey
Edmund McAdam, P.E.

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Manasota Basin Board

Project Rationale:

Manatee County is located in the Eastern Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Area. The Manatee
Agricultural Reuse Supply (MARS) Project has been designed specifically to demonstrate the
effectiveness of the alternative sources recommendations in the District's "Draft Southern Water Use
Caution Area Management Plan" (SWFWMD, 1993). The MARS project will interconnect Manatee
County's three Wastewater Treatment Plants and construct the Frog Creek Stormwater Reuse
Facility. The project will produce an efficient regional reuse system and offset existing ground-
water withdrawals, primarily for agricultural users, and reduce stress on the aquifer system.

Project Background and Description:

Manatee County Public Service Department (MCPSD) operates three regional treatment plants
providing reclaimed water to large agricultural and recreational water users. Historically, these
users fully consumed the available supply. In the late 1980s, a reclaimed water surplus developed
in the Southwest Service Area due to diminishing agricultural use and a growing urban base. This
surplus is disposed of via deep well injection. In 1990, MCPSD and the District completed the
"Effluent Reuse Feasibility Study and Master Plan for Urban Reuse". The plan provided the
blueprint for an urban reuse system in the Southwest Service Area. The urban reuse system is under
construction. The master plan also recognized the ability of the North and Southeast Regional
Wastewater Treatment Plants to supply reclaimed water for agricultural use.

In 1994, the MCPSD proposed the Manatee Agricultural Reuse Supply Project. The MARS project
will interconnect the three regional treatment plants, construct a stormwater reuse facility, and
provide 16.25 mgd of reclaimed water for agricultural use. To significantly reduce ground-water
withdrawals, it was determined that additional water is needed to supplement flows from the North
and Southeast treatment plants. Potential sources that were considered include: the City of
Bradenton WWTP, the City of Palmetto WWTP, Florida Power & Light Lake Parrish Reservoir, the
MCPSD Southwest WWTP, and the proposed Frog Creek Stormwater Reuse Facility.

The City of Bradenton, which discharged approximately 4.8 mgd of reclaimed water to the Manatee
River in 1994 has, to date, declined to participate in the project and is reviewing its option to either


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-17


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996










continue with urban reuse or connect to the County system. The City of Palmetto, which discharged
approximately 0.6 mgd to Terra Ceia Bay in 1994, plans to connect to the MARS system.

The MARS project has been divided into three phases to allow for better administrative control of
design and construction (Figure 3-5). Phase 1 is subdivided into two parts. Part 1 of Phase I is the
design and construction of the Frog Creek Stormwater Reuse Facility. The facility will have
800 acre-feet of storage with a reuse yield of 1.6 mgd. The project will include a diversion structure,
high service pumps, filters, chlorination, and a 16-inch transmission connection to the North
Wastewater Facility. The site is located at a previous borrow pit, east of US 41 at the intersection
with 1-275. Part 2 of Phase 1 is the construction of a 24-inch reuse transmission line from an
existing line at McClure Farms along Moccasin Wallow Road east through Parrish and along SR 62
to farms approximately 1.5 miles east of Saffold Road. The extension is approximately 12.15 miles
in length and traverses an agricultural area. In Phase II, a 24-inch transmission line will be
constructed to interconnect the North and Southeast Reuse Systems. The transmission line is
approximately 9.8 miles in length and will enable transfer of flows between the two systems. In
Phase III, a 24-inch transmission line will be constructed to interconnect the Southeast and
Southwest Reuse Systems. The transmission line is approximately 6.8 miles in length. The contract
agreement requires MCPSD to offset existing or proposed surface or ground-water withdrawals with
a minimum of 75 percent of the reclaimed water.

Project Benefits:

* Reduce existing ground-water withdrawals by 16.25 mgd upon project completion

* Eliminate wastewater disposal by deep well injection

* Increase available supply of reclaimed water by interconnecting WWTPs

* Decrease nutrient loading to Terra Ceia Bay (City of Palmetto discharge)

* Provide improved flood control in the Buffalo Canal Drainage Basin

Project Costs:

Total project costs are estimated at $14,024,724. The project received a Federal Grant from the
Environmental Protection Agency for $4,145,000. The District will fund up to fifty percent of the
remaining eligible cost up to a maximum of $4,668,470. Funding for this project is being provided
over FY 95 through FY 98. Manatee County will provide the remaining project costs of $5,211,254.
Table 3-6 shows the funding contributions for the MARS project.


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1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-18







1995 NWSI Annual Report

Figure 3-5.
Figure 3-5. Manatee Agricultural Reuse Supply Project

A New Water Sources Initiative

Florida Power & Light Plant
HILLSBOROUGH CO.


aj uI* 1PhaseLake Parrish

irr
II ..... Phase 1I


MANATEE CO.






Phase III

SARASOTA CO.

N Wastewater Treatment Plants
North, Southeast, Southwest -
A Frog Creek Impoundment
III, Proposed Pipeline '0
-- Existing Pipeline


Local Cooperator: Manatee County
Southwest Florida Water Management District









Table 3-6. Funding Plan for Manatee Agricultural Reuse Supply Project
Funding Total Funding FY 95 FY 96 FY 97 FY 98
Participant Contribution
(%)

Governing Board $2,334,235 $1,000,000 $708,212 $626,023 $0
(17%) (7%) (5%) (5%)
Manasota $2,334,235 $670,395 $554,613 $554,613 $554,614
Basin Board (17%) (5%) (4%) (4%) (4%)

District Subtotal $4,668,470 $1,670,395 $1,262,825 $1,180,636 $554,614
(34%) (12%) (9%) (9%) (4%)

Federal Grant $4,145,000 $4,145,000 $0 $0 $0
(29%) (29%)

Manatee County $5,211,254 $2,196,752 $1,607,801 $1,406,701 $0
(37%) (16%) (11%) (10%)

TOTAL $14,024,724 $8,012,147 $2,870,626 $2,587,337 $554,614
S(100%) (57%) (20%) (19%) (4%)


Project Schedule:


Phase I, Part 2 design
Phase II design
Phase Il design
Phase I, Part 1 design
Bid Phase I, Part 2
Bid Phase II
Bid Phase III
Bid Phase I, Part 1
Construction of Phase I, Part 2
Construction of Phase II
Construction of Phase II
Construction of Phase I, Part 1


April 1995 March 1996
April 1995 March 1996
August 1995 April 1996
December 1995 June 1996
March 1996- April 1996
March 1996 April 1996
May 1996 August 1996
June 1996 July 1996
May 1996 July 1997
May 1996 July 1997
September 1996 November 1997
August 1996 December 1997


Project Status:

All phases are under design. Preparations are under way to apply for a permit from the District and
FDEP for the Frog Creek Stormwater Reuse Facility. Potential agricultural customers are being
contacted and agreements are being worked out to receive reuse water. Discussions are ongoing
with Florida Power & Light for possible supply of reclaimed water at the Parrish Facility.


January 1996


1995 NWSI Annual ReDort


3-20


Southwest Florida Water Management District







1995 NWSI Annual Report


3.6 Manatee County Reclaimed Water Aquifer Storage and Recovery Project

Cooperator(s): Manatee County

Contacts: Manatee County Public Services Department SWFWMD
Tom Zinc Donald L. Ellison

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Manasota Basin Board

Project Rationale:

Overpumping in the SWUCA has lowered the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer system
to the point where salt water from the gulf is intruding into the aquifer. Reductions in ground-water
pumpage and the development of conservation programs and alternative water sources are needed
to protect water resources and meet current and future demands. The development of reclaimed
water for irrigation and other uses is a primary element of the alternative source development.

Manatee County, located in the Most Impacted Area (MIA) of the SWUCA, has developed a reuse
system which currently supplies approximately 8.4 mgd but has the capacity to supply 12 mgd when
wastewater is available. At Manatee County's Southwest Regional Wastewater Facility,
approximately 330 million gallons of storage is needed to fully utilize the future plant flow of
18 mgd. Current storage at the site is limited to approximately 170 million gallons. Failure to
develop a cost-effective means to temporarily store reclaimed water will mean a continued
dependence on the wasteful practice of deepwell injection of reclaimed water during the wet season.

Manatee County has proposed the development of a reclaimed water aquifer and storage (RASR)
system. The RASR system would tie into the MARS project (see Section 3.6). Success of the
project would make an additional 3.6 mgd of reclaimed water available annually by reducing the use
of deep well injection and increasing wet weather storage capacity. Currently there are no permitted
reclaimed ASR systems in the state of Florida, as such, the Manatee County project would be in
the forefront of the effort to develop this type of system.

Project Description:

The project consists of permitting, design, construction and cycle testing of a reclaimed water
Aquifer Storage and Recovery (RASR) well and associated monitor wells at the Manatee County
Southwest Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility (Figure 3-6). This project is intended to answer
the question of whether RASR can be employed in this area of Manatee County.

The first work element of the project will be a feasibility study to evaluate several issues pertaining
to RASR. The feasibility study will evaluate permitting requirements that must be considered in
storing and recovering reclaimed water in subsurface aquifers of various water qualities. Some or


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-21


January 1996








1995 NWSI Annual Report


Figure 3-6.


Manatee County


Manatee Reclaimed Water
Aquifer Storage and Recovery Project
A New Water Sources Initiative


Cortez Road


SOUTWS


SOUTHWEST
WWTP




N


Local Cooperator Manatee County


3-22


Southwest Florida Water Management District







January 1996


all of the following permits will need to be obtained: a Class V Injection Well Construction Permit,
Manatee County Environmental Action Commission Well Construction Permit, FDEP Water Quality
Criteria Exemption, FDEP Class V injection Well Operation Permit, and SWFWMD Water Use
Permit Modification. The study will also address potential Aquifer Exemptions or Water Quality
Exemptions that may be required for the RASR system. The feasibility study report will be used
to support permitting and subsequent design and construction tasks.

Geophysical logging, specific capacity tests, and visual inspection of drilling cuttings will be used
to determine a favorable storage zone at the site. Once the storage zone has been determined and
the necessary wells have been installed, a series of cycle tests will be performed to assess the storage
zone's capacity to store reclaimed water. The purpose of these tests is to determine what percentage
of the stored water can be recovered before either water quality deteriorates or aquifer drawdowns
become great enough to require shutting down the recovery system. An additional purpose of the
testing is to ensure that the stored water doesn't migrate an appreciable distances prior to recovery.
More than one cycle test is generally necessary to determine if the percentage of recovered water
increases as residual water from previous cycles accumulates.

Details of the well drilling and cycle testing program have not been finalized at this time. Final
plans will be contingent on FDEP requirements. However, it is anticipated that at a minimum of one
monitoring well in the storage zone, one in the aquifer below the confining unit of the storage zone,
and one in the aquifer above the confining unit of the storage zone will be necessary. The scope of
work includes the design and construction of the necessary piping, recovery pumps, electrical
systems, and wellhead valve assemblies. A 30-inch reclaimed water supply main is located nearby
and will be utilized to supply the necessary water for injection.

Project Benefits:

* Demonstrate the feasibility of reclaimed water ASR in the state of Florida

* Provide the means to fully utilize reclaimed water throughout the year

* Allow storage of excess wet season reclaimed water for use during the dry season

* Increase utilization of reclaimed water from an annual rate of 8.4 mgd to 12 mgd

Project Costs:

Manatee County estimates that the design, permitting, construction and testing phase for this
feasibility study will cost approximately $800,000. Prior to the District entering into agreement with
Manatee County, $150,000 was obtained from federal funding sources. The contract between
Manatee County and the District is for the remaining $650,000. The District will fund
approximately 50 percent of the eligible costs up to a maximum of $325,000. Funding of the project
is provided during FY 95 (Table 3-7).


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-23


1995 NWSI Annual Report









SJanuary 1996


Project Schedule:


Feasibility Report
Permitting
Design Services
Construction Services
Drilling and Testing Reports
ASR Cycle Testing
Final Report


Table 3-7.


January 1996 April 1996
January 1996 December 1996
October 1996 February 1997
February 1997 November 1997
August 1997 September 1997
May 1997 September 1998
September 1998 December 1998


Funding Plan for the Manatee County Reclaimed
Water Aauifer Storage and Recovery Project


Project Status:

The selection process for the engineering and design consultant has been completed. The primary
consultant on the project is Montgomery Watson who is teamed up with CH2M Hill. The feasibility
study will begin in January 1996.


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-24


Funding Total Funding FY 95
Participant Contribution
(%)
Governing Board $162,500 $162,500
(20%)
Manasota $162,500 $165,500
Basin Board (20%)

District Subtotal $325,000 $325,000
(41%)
Manatee County $325,000 $325,000
(41%)

Federal Grant $150,000 $150,000
(18%)

TOTAL $800,000 $800,000
(100%)


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-24


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996









3.7 Northwest Hillsborough County Reuse System

Cooperator(s): Hillsborough County Public Utilities Department

Contacts: Hillsborough County SWFWMD
Carole Awad (Planning stages) Kathleen Coates
Tom Tucker (Development)

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Northwest Hillsborough Basin Board

Project Rationale:

The project is located in the Northern Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Area which has experienced
declines in wetland, lake, and aquifer levels due in part to large ground-water withdrawals. The
interconnection and regionalization of reuse systems will enable water managers to offset existing
and future ground-water withdrawals by increasing the use of reclaimed water.

Project Background and Description

The Northwest Hillsborough Reuse System Project was initially proposed by Hillsborough County
as part of the Western Hillsborough County Conceptual Reuse Plan. The project consists of two
phases. Phase 1 will interconnect the Northwest Regional, Dale Mabry, River Oaks, and Van Dyke
wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and expand the reuse transmission system in northwest
Hillsborough County. Reclaimed water will also be available for wetland augmentation. Phase 1
includes fourteen construction projects (Table 3-8 and Figure 3-7). In Phase 2, Hillsborough County
proposes to construct additional storage and transmission facilities. Phase 2 consists of seven
construction projects. The interconnection of the wastewater facilities will enable large quantities
of available reclaimed water at the River Oaks plant to be transferred to high demand areas located
near the Dale Mabry and Northwest Regional wastewater plants.

The interconnected reuse system (Phases 1 and 2 combined) is projected to provide an additional
17.1 mgd of reclaimed water by year 2015. The system will serve residential, commercial, and
institutional water users. It is estimated that the two-phase project will offset 5.1 mgd of existing
water withdrawals and 4.4 mgd of future withdrawals, for a total water savings of 9.5 mgd. In
addition, the project will reduce wastewater discharge to Channel A and provide 5.0 mgd of
reclaimed water for wetland augmentation and/or wellfield rehydration.

Project Benefits:

* Increase reclaimed water use by 17.1 mgd by year 2015

* Offset existing ground-water withdrawals by 5.1 mgd


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-25








1995 NWSI Annual
Figure 3-7.


Report


Northwest Hillsborough County Reuse System
A New Water Sources Initiative


Local Cooperator Hillsborough County


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-26


3-26


Southwest Florida Water Management District









* Offset future ground-water withdrawals by 4.4 mgd

* Reduce wastewater discharge to Channel A which discharges to Old Tampa Bay

* Provide up to 5.0 mgd of reclaimed water for wetland augmentation and/or wellfield
rehydration during wet weather conditions


Table 3-8. Construction Projects Contained in Phases 1 and 2
Phase 1 Projects Phase 2 Projects Project Type
(Map Number) (Map Number)
1,5,6,10,12 13, 14,15,17,19,20 Transmission Main Expansion
2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 11, 16 -Transmission Main to Interconnect
WWTPs
3 High Service Pumps
18 -Wetland Augmentation
21 Reclaimed Water Storage Facilities
Map numbers correspond to Figure 3-7.
WWTP = wastewater treatment plant


Project Costs:

Hillsborough County estimated the cost of Phase 1 at $11,100,000. The District will fund up to 50
percent of the eligible project costs up to a maximum of $5,550,000 over FY 96, FY 97, and FY 98.
The funding plan for Phase 1 is shown in Table 3-9. Phase 2 funding is contingent upon District
approval and budgeting in future funding years.


Project Schedule:
Engineering design consultant selection
Engineering design (9 months)
Construction contract and contractor selection
Construction (12 months)


March 1996- July 1996
August 1996- April 1997
May 1997 September 1997
October 1997 September 1998


Project Status:

It is anticipated that the contract will be executed in January 1996 and that a design consultant will
be selected by early summer of 1996.


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-27


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


3-27


Southwest Florida Water Management District










Table 3-9. Funding Plan for the Northwest Hillsborough County Reuse Project: Phase 1

Funding Total Funding
Participant Contribution
(%) FY 96 FY 97 FY 98

Governing Board $2,775,000 $1,387,500 $1,387,500 $0
(25%)
Northwest $2,775,000 $1,317,300 $ 728,850 $ 728,850
Hillsborough (25%)
Raqin Rnard IIII

District Subtotal $5,550,000 $2,704,800 $2,116,350 $ 728,850
(50%)

Hillsborough $5,550,000 $1,850,000 $1,850,000 $1,850,000
County (50%)

TOTAL $11,100,000 (100%) $4,554,800 $3,966,350 $2,578,850


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-28


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-28









3.8 Pasco Rainbow

Cooperator(s): WCRWSA and Pasco County

Contacts: WCRWSA Pasco County Utilities SWFWMD
Russ Bowman Douglas S. Bramlett You-Jen Tsai

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Coastal Rivers Basin Board
Hillsborough River Basin Board Northwest Hillsborough Basin Board
Pinellas-Anclote River Basin Board

Project Rationale:

The project is located in the area designated by the District as the Northern Tampa Bay Water Use
Caution Area. Ground-water resources in the Northern Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Area are
stressed, primarily due to large ground-water withdrawals at regional wellfields. Wetland, lake, and
aquifer water levels have declined in the region.

The purpose of the project is to investigate the feasibility of applying reclaimed water at the
wellfield properties to augment the aquifer and offset withdrawal impacts. Reclaimed water is
currently used for aquifer recharge in the San Gabriel Basin in California and in the Hueco Bolson
aquifer in El Paso, Texas. In these two states, aquifer recharge with reclaimed water has been
proven effective and is publicly supported (Murphy, 1994).

Project Background and Description:

The Pasco Rainbow is a multi-phase project. In Phase I, a literature review will be conducted to
determine if major obstacles exist to project implementation, specifically those which may pose a
significant risk to public health and safety. Next, a feasibility study will be performed to investigate
wellfield recharge with reclaimed water (Phase II). If determined feasible, Phase Ill will develop
a pilot project at the Starkey wellfield. If the pilot project is successful, Phase IV will construct a
transmission network to supply reclaimed water to the Starkey, Cross Bar, and Cypress Creek
wellfields, which are located in Pasco County. A schematic of the proposed "Rainbow"
transmission system is shown on Figure 3-8. Up to 30 mgd of reclaimed water supplies may be
provided for the project. Up to 15 mgd of reclaimed water is anticipated to be supplied by Pasco
County. Hillsborough and Pinellas counties have the potential to provide the additional 15 mgd of
reclaimed water supplies, but as of yet are uncommitted.

A number of issues will need to be resolved to gain acceptance for aquifer recharge using reclaimed
water in the Tampa Bay area. These issues, which will be addressed in the feasibility study, include
regulatory permittability, health concerns, the quantity and quality of available reclaimed water, and
the method of reclaimed water application.


3-29


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District









1995 NWSI Annual Report
Figure 3-8. .
Pasco Rainbow Project
A New Water Sources Initiative

Proposed Reclaimed Water Transmission System
0 0 Under Design
S0* Future Design
[ Public Supply Wellfields. .
I f






.. ,
NORTH S CYPRESS
PASCO ..-- CREEK
EXTENSION D' J'

i.r *
STARKEY *


SSOTH CYP RE GE S
k600K7]PA0CPASCO
ELDRIDGE -WILDE .....

Local Cooperators: Pasco County and WCRWSA
Southwest Florida Water Management District
Southwest Florida Water Management District









Project Benefits:

* Offset ground-water pumpage through ground-water recharge

* Increase wetland, lake, and aquifer water levels

* Enhance wildlife habitat

* Beneficially reuse up to 30 mgd of reclaimed water

* Reduce wastewater discharge to streams, rivers, coastal estuaries and Tampa Bay

Project Costs:

Pasco County has estimated the total project cost at $50,000,000. The entire cost is eligible for
District funding under the New Water Sources Initiative. The project is to be funded jointly by the
District and West Coast Regional Water Supply Authority. However, WCRWSA has yet to commit
funding beyond an initial $20,000 for the literature review. Proposed funding contributions are
shown in the Table 3-10.

Project Schedule:

Phase I Literature Review 1995
Phase II Feasibility Study 1995-1996
Phase III Pilot Project 1997-2001
Phase IV Transmission Network Completion 2001-2004

Project Status:

The project has been delayed pending the outcome of a risk assessment literature review.
WCRWSA would not commit to funding the project as originally submitted by Pasco County. A
compromise was reached where a literature review would be conducted and a recommendation
would be made based on those findings. The literature review, funded totally by WCRWSA, is
complete as of December 1995 and a recommendation regarding WCRWSA's participation is to be
made in January 1996. The project will not proceed without WCRWSA funding. The
recommendation may be to proceed as presented herein, to reduce the scope to just the Starkey
wellfield, or to cancel the project. In any case, the delay and probable changes to the project scope
will necessitate that District staff revise the current multi-year funding plan for contributing Basin
Boards and Governing Board as we develop the FY 97 budget.


Southwest Florida Water Management District


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


3-31








January 1996


Table 3-10. Funding Plan for Pasco Rainbow Project

Funding Total Funding FY 95 FY 96 FY 97 FY 98 FY 99 FY00
Participant Contribution
(%)

Governing Board $12,500,000 $125,000 $870,375 $2,876,156 $2,876,156 $2,876,156 $2,876,157
(25%)
Hillsborough River $3,822,150 $31,250 $62,500 $932,100 $932,100 $932,100 $932,100
Basin Board (8%)
Pinellas-Anclote $6,104,150 $31,250 $62,500 $1,502,600 $1,502,600 $1,502,600 $1,502,600
Basin Board (12%)
Coastal Rivers Basin $1,152,250 $31,250 $62,500 $264,625 $264,625 $264,625 $264,625
Board (2%)
NW Hillsborough $1,421,450 $31,250 $62,500 $331,925 $331,925 $331,925 $331,925
Basin Board (3%)

District Subtotal $25,000,000 $250,000 $1,120,375 $5,907,406 $5,907,406 $5,907,406 $5,907,407
(50%)

WCRWSA $25,000,000 $20,000 $0 $6,245,000 $6,245,000 $6,245,000 $6,245,000
(50%)

TOTAL $50,000,000 $270,000 $1,120,375 $12,152,406 $12,152,406 $12,152,406 $12,152,406
L _(100%)


Southwest Florida Water Management District


1995 NWSI Annual Report


3-32







January 1996


3.9 Peace Creek Canal Stormwater Management Plan

Cooperator: Polk County

Contacts: Polk County Water Resources Division SWFWMD
Jeffrey F. Spence Lisa A. Henningsen
G.D. "Willie" Nabong
Gaye Sharpe
Hinh V. Nguyen

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Peace Basin Board

Project Rationale:

Agricultural interests prompted the construction of the Peace Creek Canal to relieve flooding
problems and expand agricultural operations. However, the drainage capacity of the canal was, and
is today limited. Despite the canal's limited flood relief capabilities, the drainage functions of the
Peace Creek Canal have nonetheless had a major impact on the surrounding region. Conveyance
of surface waters through the canal has extensively drained adjacent lands. Drainage of natural
lands, including wetlands, resulted in habitat alterations which have adversely affected wildlife.
Drainage has also led to the expansion of agricultural lands into historically wet areas.

Chronic, seasonal flooding still remains the major problem for some residents along the Peace Creek
Canal. This coupled with regionally extensive impacts to plant communities, wildlife and water
quality, have focused attention on restoring the Peace Creek Canal region and determining if surface
water from the region can be used to restore lake and aquifer levels in the Highlands Ridge area.

Project Background and Description:

The Peace Creek Canal has a drainage basin of 224 square miles comprising the eastern-most
headwaters of the Peace River. For the most part, the creek is a channelized ditch which was created
strictly as a drainage project in the early 1900s. In 1983, the SWFWMD determined that the creek
could adequately convey only the flow from the expected yearly rainfall. In the past years,
landowners along the Peace Creek Canal corridor have complained about flooding.

Reduced rainfall during the past few decades, increased ground-water withdrawals and over drainage
have lead to serious water resources concerns in central Florida including the Highlands Ridge.
Ground-water withdrawal management is now in place through the WUCA regulations and over-
drainage is now preventable through the District's regulations regarding the management and storage
of surface waters. But over the past few decades, rainfall decline has left lakes in the Highlands
Ridge area below the Extreme Low-Minimum Water Level. This study will determine the feasibility
of flood alleviation/management, increasing wildlife habitat through wetland creation/restoration,


1995 NWSI Annual Report


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-33








January 1996


water quality improvement, and transferring surface water to the Highlands Ridge area to restore
lake and aquifer levels.

The Polk County Water Resources Division submitted a project proposal under the District's New
Water Source Initiative (NWSI) program to develop and implement a stormwater management
master plan and flood control project for the Peace Creek Canal area in Polk County. The proposed
project involves a one year feasibility study to be conducted by District and Polk County staff to
evaluate various conceptual restoration designs to increase wildlife habitat (through wetland
creation/restoration), improve surface water quality, alleviate/manage flooding, and evaluate
transferring surface waters to the Highlands Ridge for restoration of lake and aquifer levels
(Figure 3-9). The final report will include recommended alternatives to be evaluated for
implementation, at which time Polk County will seek the District's cooperative funding assistance
in their implementation. The project will be complemented by and coordinated with the District's
hydrologic study of the Peace Creek Canal watershed. Concurrently, lands in the Peace Creek Canal
area are also undergoing evaluation for potential acquisition under the Save Our Rivers/Preservation
2000 (SOR/P2000) programs.

Project Benefits:

The study will determine the feasibility of:

* flood alleviation/management
* increasing wetland wildlife habitat through wetland creation/restoration
* water quality improvement
* restoration of lake and aquifer levels on the Highlands Ridge

Project Costs:

The estimated project cost is $75,000. The entire cost is eligible for NWSI funding. The project is
being jointly funded by the District and Polk County. The proposed funding plan for the project is
shown in Table 3-11.

Project Schedule:

Complete Feasibility Study December 1995
Draft Report March 1996
Final Report July 1996

Project Status:

Staff from the District's Engineering Section developed a surface water model of the Peace Creek
Canal watershed which was used to evaluate the feasibility of alleviating/managing flooding,
restoring/recreating historic wetlands, improving water quality and transferring surface water to the


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-34


1995 NWSI Annual Report









1995 NWSI Annual Report


Figure 3-9.


Peace Creek Canal Drainage Project
A New Water Sources Initiative


("T Polk County


Peace Creek Canal Drainage Area

Local Cooperator: Polk County
sotws Flrd Wate Manaemen Ditrc 3-3


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-35







1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Highlands Ridge area to restore lake and aquifer levels. A draft report detailing the results,
conclusions, and recommendations is currently being written by District and Polk County staff.


Table 3-11. Funding Plan for Peace Creek Canal Project

Funding Total Funding FY 95
Participant Contribution

Governing Board $18,750 $18,750
(25%)
Peace River $18,750 $18,750
RBasin Roard (25 %/)A
District Subtotal $37,500 $37,500
(50%)

Polk County $37,500 $37,500
(50%)

TOTAL $75,000 $75,000
(100%)


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-36



I







January 1996


3.10 Peace River Option

Cooperator(s): Peace River/Manasota Regional Water Supply Authority (PR/MRWSA)

Contacts: PR/MRWSA SWFWMD
Emilio D. "Sonny" Vergara Jeffrey G. Vomacka
Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Peace River Basin Board
Manasota Basin Board

Project Rationale:

In response to concerns regarding saltwater intrusion and lake level declines resulting from aquifer
over-pumping, the District designated the southern portion of the District as the Southern Water Use
Caution Area (SWUCA). The SWUCA includes all of De Soto, Hardee, Manatee, and Sarasota
counties, and parts of Charlotte, Highlands, Hillsborough, and Polk counties. The SWUCA
designation limits the development of future ground-water supplies and may reduce permitted
ground-water allocations.

Anticipating reductions in allowable ground-water withdrawals, the Peace River/Manasota Regional
Water Supply Authority (PR/MRWSA) developed the Peace River Option. The project provides
for the expansion of the existing treatment, storage, and transmission facilities necessary to meet the
water supply needs in the four-county region of the PR/MRWSA. The major justification for the
Peace River Option is maximization of surface water in the SWUCA for use as public supply,
reserving ground water for other users.

Project Background and Description:

The Peace River Regional Water Supply Facility, owned and operated by the PR/MRWSA, provides
potable water to consumers in Charlotte, De Soto and Sarasota counties. The facility can treat
12 mgd of surface water and operates in conjunction with an existing Aquifer Storage and Recovery
(ASR) system consisting of 9 ASR wells and an 84-acre off-line reservoir. The water use permit
allows an average annual withdrawal of 10.7 mgd (16.6 cfs). By permit condition, withdrawals
cannot exceed 10 percent of stream flow on any day as measured at the Arcadia gage, located
seventeen miles upstream from the Peace River facility. Withdrawals from the river must cease
when flow at Arcadia goes below the regulatory minimum established at 130 cfs. This condition
also determines whether or not the full 10 percent can be withdrawn.

The Peace River Option will expand the treatment capacity of the Peace River facility from 12 mgd
to 18 mgd, construct 14 additional ASR wells, and construct transmission lines to interconnect the
major public water utilities in Charlotte, De Soto, and Sarasota counties. The expansion of the
treatment capacity and additional ASR wells are intended to meet projected future demands of De
Soto County, the City of North Port, and other areas of Sarasota County served by Sarasota County


1995 NWSI Annual Report


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-37









1995 NWSI Annual Report January 1996


Utilities. The treatment expansion includes raw water pumps, reactor/clarifies, filters, chemical feed
systems, above-ground storage tank, high service pumps, improvements to the instrumentation and
control system, and other components that will be incorporated into the existing system. Addition
of 14 new ASR wells includes well construction, installation of pumps and motors, transmission
piping, and incorporation of electronic remote control capability into the existing SCADA control
system.

The construction of a regional transmission system will allow water from the Peace River to be
transported to a larger base of consumers throughout the PR/MRWSA region, and will significantly
improve the ability to move water for emergency purposes from one major system to another
(Figure 3-10). The transmission system extension is divided into three segments:

Segment 1: A 36-inch or larger pipe, approximately seven miles long, paralleling the PR/MRWSA's
existing 36-inch transmission pipeline serving Charlotte County. The transmission pipeline route
is owned by the PR/MRWSA.

Segment 2: A 48-inch pipe, approximately nine and a half miles long, paralleling an existing 12-inch
transmission line owned by the City of North Port. The route parallels Hillsborough Avenue with
placement in public rights-of-way or easements. The pipe provides for the future demands of North
Port and serves as the first leg in transporting water to Sarasota County.

Segment 3: Connecting to the 36-inch pipeline, a 30-inch or larger pipe, approximately 13 miles
long, from North Port to the Sarasota County water treatment plant at the Mabry T. Carlton Reserve.
The pipeline route is in easements provided by Sarasota County.

The contract agreement requires the PR/MRWSA to obtain the necessary water use permits prior
to the disbursement of any funds by the District. The contract also includes a provision for a
Conservation Reinvestment Fund equal to the amount contributed by the District. Funds collected
must be used by the PR/MRWSA to finance future water conservation programs of benefit to the
basins and counties that contributed to the project.

This project does not authorize the withdrawal of water from the Peace River. All water use
related issues are handled under the Water Use Permit No. 2010420.20.

Project Benefits:

* Provide a regional surface water supply source as an alternative to further development of
limited ground-water resources by public suppliers within the SWUCA

* Reduce competition between public supply and other uses such as agricultural irrigation
within the SWUCA

* Provide a link between major public systems throughout a four-county region within the
SWUCA that will allow transfer of emergency supplies on a temporary basis

Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-38


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996







1995 NWSI Annual Report
Figure 3-10. The Peace River Option

A New Water Sources Initiative


Local Cooperator: Peace River/Manasota Regional Water Supply Authority


Southwest Florida Water Management District


'5lpn~pgnn~R~l~pym~ I II I










Project Costs:

The total project cost is anticipated to be $43,981,193. The District originally committed
$21,000,000 to the project, however, a federal grant in the amount of $6,052,000 has reduced the
District contribution by $3,026,000. Funding for the project is being provided over FY 95 through
FY 97, contingent upon District approval and inclusion in the budgets (Table 3-12).


Project Schedule:
Treatment/ASR Consultant Selection
Treatment/ASR Design/Permitting
Treatment/ASR Construction
Pipeline Right-Of-Way Acquisition
Pipeline Design/Permitting
Pipeline Construction
Start-up/ASR Recharge
Begin Delivery


November 1995 March 1996
March 1996 July 1997
July 1997- April 1999
July 1996 January 1997
March 1996 September 1997
September 1997 September 1999
April 1999 September 1999
January 2000


Project Status: Water supply contract is signed. Charlotte County is not participating in the
contract. Consultant selection is anticipated to be complete in early 1996. An Administrative
Hearing for the proposed Water Use Permit is scheduled for March of 1996..


Table 3-12. Funding Plan for Peace River Option

Funding Total Funding FY 95 FY 96 FY 97
Participant Contribution
(%)
Governing Board $8,987,000 $8,000,000 $987,000 $0
Peace River $2,268,149 $883,333 $692,407 $692,409
Basin Board
Manasota Basin Board $6,718,851 $2,548,871 $2,084,990 $2,084,990

District Subtotal $17,974,000 $11,432,204 $3,764,397 $2,777399
(40%)

PR/MRWSA' $19,955,193 $0 $0 $19,955,193
(47%)
Federal Grant $6,052,000 $6,052,000 $0 $0
(13%)

TOTAL $43,981,193 $17,484,204 $3,764,397 $22,732,592
(100%)
Funding source is a bond that is scheduled to be issued in 1997.


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-40







January 1996


3.11 Plant City Reuse

Cooperator: City of Plant City

Contacts: City of Plant City SWFWMD
Robert E. Bedell Lou Kavouras

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Hillsborough River Basin Board

Project Rationale:

Reuse is an important alternative water source which has the potential to conserve ground- and
surface-water sources by offsetting the demand for these resources. It is estimated that nearly 4 mgd
of treated wastewater will be produced by the City of Plant City's Water Pollution Control Facility
by the year 1997. Currently, treated wastewater is being disposed of into Lake Thonotosassa,
instead of being used beneficially to protect the resource. By helping to fund this project, Plant City
and the District will be assured that reclaimed water will be used to its greatest advantage.

Background and Description:

The City of Plant City Water Pollution Control Facility (WPCF) discharges reclaimed wastewater
to the Westside Canal, a small stream in the Hillsborough River drainage basin located
approximately 14 miles upstream of Lake Thonotosassa. The lake has been identified as highly
eutrophic, due to the historical discharge of nutrients from point and non-point pollution sources.
As a result, the City of Plant City has entered into an agreement with the Environmental Protection
Commission to institute a reclaimed water reuse program and eliminate discharge to Lake
Thonotosassa by January 1, 1997.

The City of Plant City's Reuse Feasibility Study, completed in October 1993, examined potential
reuse alternatives including residential irrigation, industrial applications, and spray irrigation of ball
fields and golf courses. The study identified numerous reuse opportunities north of the city,
including use at C.F. Industries (CFI), as being the most economical and beneficial use of the
reclaimed water. It was determined that, to serve CFI, the city would have to supply public access
quality reclaimed water complying with Part III of Chapter 62-610. Although this requirement
imposes unexpected costs in treatment plant upgrades for the city, the higher water quality opens
up increased opportunities for future users.

The current utilization of ground water at CFI accomplishes two purposes: it provides for plant
processes (such as cooling tower make-up water); and it maintains a "cone of depression" in the
potentiometric surface beneath the facility site. The cone of depression prevents pollutants which
leach beneath the site from migrating downgradient to create a ground-water contamination plume.
The ground-water withdrawal is a permitted condition of operation and alterations require regulatory


1995 NWSI Annual Report


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-41










approval. A study prepared by Ardaman & Associates, Inc. (1995) demonstrates that a 2.0 mgd
reduction in withdrawal will not endanger the ground-water protection plan currently in place.
FDEP approval is a pre-condition of reclaimed water service to this site.

The Plant City Reuse Project will fund the design and construction of 11 miles of reclaimed water
transmission line, pump stations and telemetry, extending from the City of Plant City WPCF, north
to the vicinity of CFI and Two Rivers Ranch (Figure 3-11). Once constructed, the project will
immediately offset approximately 2 mgd of ground water being withdrawn by CFI. The agreement
between the District and the City of Plant City requires Plant City to enter into an agreement with
C.F. Industries to accept at least 2 mgd of reclaimed water when it becomes available. Other users,
such as citrus groves and nursery operations, have been identified and will be connected to the
system. The reuse system will have a capacity of 8 mgd. As flows increase from 3.4 mgd (1993)
to the projected future flow of 8.0 mgd, additional users will be connected to the system.

Hillsborough County owns an extensive parcel of land known as Cone Ranch which is located south
of CFI and east of SR 39. It is designated for eventual development as a wellfield by the West Coast
Regional Water Supply Authority (WCRWSA). WCRWSA has indicated that development is not
expected for the next five years. The area is characterized by pasture and forest lands with many
isolated wetlands. Because of the proximity of the proposed reclaimed water pipeline to the Cone
Ranch property, opportunities may also exist for future wetland enhancement or wellfield mitigation.

As part of the project, the City of Plant City will upgrade their wastewater treatment plant facilities
to AWT standards. The upgrade includes addition of filtration and high-level disinfection. The
improvements will be the financial responsibility of the City of Plant City, because current District
policy does not consider plant improvement to be grant eligible.

Project Benefits:

* Improve the water quality of Lake Thonotosassa

* Offset 2 mgd ground water currently being withdrawn by C.F. Industries

* Potentially augment or restore areas within the watershed

Project Costs:

Plant City's estimate of total program capital costs for the project over the next 15 years is nearly
$25,000,000. The portion of the project eligible for funding under the New Water Sources Initiative
is $7,705,000. The District will fund up to 50 percent of the eligible project costs up to a maximum
of $3,852,500. Funding for the project is being provided over FY 95, FY 96, and FY 97, contingent
upon District approval and inclusion in the annual budgets (Table 3-13).


Southwest Florida Water Management District


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


3-42









1995 NWSI Annual Report
Figure 3-11.


Plant City Reuse Project
A New Water Sources Initiative


Local Cooperator City of Plant City


Southwest Florida Water Management District


J-4t3








January 1996


Table 3-13. Funding Plan for Plant City Reuse Project

Funding Total Funding FY 95 FY 96 FY 97
Participant Contribution
(%)
Governing Board $1,926,250 $963,125 $963,125 $0
(25%)
Hillsborough $1,926,250 $642,083 $642,083 $642,084
River Basin (25%)
Board ___
District Subtotal $3,852,500 $1,605,208 $1,605,208 $642,084
(50%)
Plant City $3,852,500 $1,284,167 $1,284,167 $1,284,166

TOTAL $7,705,000 $2,889,375 $2,889,375 $1,926,250
(100%)


Project Schedule:


Preliminary Engineering Report
Negotiate Reclaimed Water Supply Contracts
Complete Survey & Geotechnical Work
Develop Scope for Final Design
Issue Notice to Proceed for Final Design
Prepare Construction Plans and Specifications
Issue Notice to Proceed for Construction
Construction
Phase-in System Operation


January 1994 April 1994
May 1994 February 1995
January 1995 February 1995
January 1995 February 1995
April 1995 May 1995
May 1995 October 1995
December 1995
December 1995 December 1996
December 1996 March 1997


Project Status:

The City of Plant City entered into a reclaimed water supply contract with C.F. Industries on
November 18, 1994. The contract between the District and Plant City was finalized, approved by
the Governing Board, and signed into effect on January 31, 1995. The Preliminary Engineering Plan
funded under the Cooperative Funding Program is complete, and the design consultant has
completed the bid documents and construction specifications for the project. The construction
contractor has been selected, and notice-to-proceed has been given.


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-44


1995 NWSI Annual Report


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-44










3.12 Punta Gorda/Shell Creek ASR

Cooperator(s): City of Punta Gorda

Contacts: The City of Punta Gorda SWFWMD
Bill Harper Bart Weiss

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Peace River Basin Board

Project Rationale:

Due to the increasing demands on the water resource in the District and in particular, in the
SWUCA, alternative sources will play an important part in meeting our future needs. The quality
of the ground-water resource in the vicinity of Punta Gorda is relatively mineralized compared to
the District as a whole. Thus, the use of ground water can only be accomplished through advanced
treatment methods such as reverse osmosis. To avoid using ground water, which not only would
be costly but would also continue the degradation of ground-water quality, local alternative sources
are needed.

The City of Punta Gorda studied Shell Creek's feasibility and sustainability to produce needed
amounts of potable water. The feasibility study found that increasing demands can be met by Shell
Creek if additional storage is created. The proposed project will design an Aquifer Storage and
Recovery (ASR) system to store water from Shell Creek for use in drier periods when needs increase
and the available water in Shell Creek decreases. The stored volumes are normally lost in the
system during periods of increased rainfall and runoff. Creating additional storage will allow the
city to continue to use Shell Creek at normal capacities and store excess water for later use.

Project Background and Description:

The City of Punta Gorda is currently permitted to withdraw an average of 4.2 mgd from Shell Creek,
with a maximum day withdrawal of 8.1 mgd (Water Use Permit # 000871). In 1992, metered daily
withdrawals averaged about 3.4 mgd. Demands are projected to reach 5.6 mgd and 6.8 mgd in 2010
and 2020, respectively (Needs and Sources, 1995 Draft). It is estimated that the population will
grow from 19,549 in 1992 to 32,824, and to 39,776 in 2010 and 2020, respectively; thus driving up
the potable water demand (Needs and Sources, 1995 Draft).

Due to the local water quality and availability, the City of Punta Gorda is looking toward alternative
sources to achieve their future potable water needs. The future water needs exceed the existing
permitted withdrawals for Shell Creek and could not be achieved without permit modifications.
However, the 1992 Needs and Sources document cited that dependable yields of 11.8 mgd to 18.3
mgd can be realized for Shell Creek with off-stream storage. Therefore, a study was funded to rank


January 1996


1995 NW~T Annual Reoort


3-45


Southwest Florida Water Management District










the feasibility of storage options. The conclusion of the study ranked ASR as the most feasible
option.

In this project, the City of Punta Gorda proposes to drill a 12-inch Class V injection well into the
Suwannee Formation of the Floridan Aquifer for future ASR use. This well will be drilled at a site
adjacent to Shell Creek, north of the Punta Gorda water treatment facility (Figure 3-12). The ASR
well could store excess surface water from Shell Creek obtained during periods of high flow, not to
exceed 10 percent of stream flow. Approximately 60 percent of the water withdrawn will be equal
in quality to the water injected and subsequent withdrawals (up to 100 percent) will need minimal
treatment.

Project Benefits:

* Aid in meeting future water supply demands

* Reduce the need for costly treatment of mineralized water

* Reduce the production and disposal problems associated with brackish water treatment
facilities.

Project Costs:

The City of Punta Gorda estimates the project costs to be $700,000. The portion of the project
eligible for District funding under the New Water Sources Initiative is $700,000. The District will
fund 50 percent of the eligible costs up to a maximum of $350,000. The project is funded entirely
in FY 96 (Table 3-14).

Project Schedule:

Based on an anticipated start date of June 1, 1996:

Task 1 Test Site Design June 1996 September 1996
Task 2 Permitting July 1996 January 1997
Task 3 Construction December 1996 February 1998
Task 4 Interim Report July 1997 September 1997
Task 5 ASR Cycle Testing June 1997 May 1998
Task 6 Final Report February 1998 June 1998

Project Status:

The initial study has been completed. The project, as of 1/1/96, is in the initial contract stages. A
scope of work has been completed and the anticipated tasks and dates of completion can be seen
above. The City of Punta Gorda has hired Montgomery Watson Americas, Inc. as project consultant
and is awaiting the District Governing Board approval to begin this project.

Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-46


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996






1995 NWSI Annual Report
Figure 3-12.












I


==4





AL
l7


Punta Gorda Aquifer Storage and Recovery Project
A New Water Sources Initiative


Local Cooperator: City of Punta Gorda


Southwest Florida Water Management District


_n_~







1995 NWSI Annual Report


Table 3-14.


Funding Plan for the Punta Gorda Aquifer Storage
and Recovery Proiect


Funding Total Funding FY 96
Participant Contribution
(%)

Peace River $175,000 $175,000
Basin Board (25%)

District Governing $175,000 $175,000
Board (25%)

District $350,000 $350,000
Subtotal (50%)

City of Punta Gorda $350,000 $350,000
(50%)

TOTAL $700,000 $700,000
(100%)


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-48

V


January 1996







1995 NWSI Annual Report January 1996

3.13 Section 21 Wellfield Rehydration Pilot Project

CooDerator(s): West Coast Regional Water Supply Authority
City of St. Petersburg
United States Environmental Protection Agency

Contacts: WCRWSA SWFWMD
Russ Bowman Kathleen Coates

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Pinellas-Anclote Basin Board
Northwest Hillsborough Basin Board

Project Rationale:

The City of St. Petersburg owns and operates the Section 21 Wellfield, which is located on 583 acres
at the southwest comer of Dale Mabry Highway and Van Dyke Road in northwest Hillsborough
County (Figure 3-13). The wellfield has been in operation since 1963 and has a currently permitted
average day withdrawal of 13 mgd and maximum day withdrawal of 22 mgd. The wellfield includes
10 wells, six of which are permitted as production wells. These wells are approximately 400 to
600 feet deep and withdraw water from the Upper Floridan aquifer.

Wetland and lakes comprise a little over one-half of the land within the wellfield. The wetlands are
experiencing diminished hydroperiod and the lakes are at or near historical lows. These stressed
conditions have affected the ecological function and aesthetics of the region. Several factors have
contributed to these stressed conditions including wellfield pumping, lower than usual rainfall, and
land use changes.

The City recommended using the Section 21 wellfield as the site for a pilot project to test the
effectiveness ofrehydrating stressed lakes and wetlands within and adjacent to the wellfields with
stormwater and/or reclaimed water. The Section 21 wellfield was chosen due to the extremely
stressed conditions of its lakes and wetlands, and its location near a major drainage canal and
reclaimed water storage source.

Project Background and Description:

The objective of the Section 21 Rehydration Project is to determine the recharge effects of
augmenting wetlands and lakes at the Section 21 wellfield, using surface water and reclaimed water.
The project will help determine the recharge effects of rehydrating the surficial aquifer system,
quantify the demand and response of the surrounding ecological systems, and determine the viability
of the surface water diversion and reclaimed water as augmentation sources. The project will also
determine the impacts of rehydration on water quality in lakes, wetlands, the surficial aquifer, and



Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-49








1995 NWSI Annual Report
Figure 3-13.


Local Cooperators: City of St. Petersburg and WCRWSA


Southwest Florida Water Management District


Section 21 Wellfield Rehydration Pilot Project
A New Water Sources Initiative









Floridan aquifer. The project will provide valuable information regarding rehydration that can be
applied to other wellfields in the region.

The project will be accomplished in phases:

* Public health and safety risk assessment

* Permitting for stormwater diversion from Brushy Creek Interceptor Canal

* Construction of water budget and biological monitoring stations

* Construction of stormwater diversion

* Permitting for reclaimed water application to Section 21 lakes and wetlands

* Construction of reclaimed water interconnect

* Monitoring of water budget and biological effects of rehydration

* Determination of project feasibility

Project Benefits:

If determined feasible, a distribution system will be designed and constructed to apply stormwater
and reclaimed water to the Section 21 wellfield. Benefits which may be realized from the successful
implementation of the project include:

* Improve wetland, lake, and aquifer water levels

* Enhance fish and wildlife habitat

* Improve aesthetics and recreation opportunities for the public

* Offset existing ground-water withdrawals

Project Costs:

The final project costs have not been determined. Originally $840,000 was budgeted for the project
in FY 94. This was to be split 50 percent WCRWSA, 25 percent Governing Board, and 25 percent
Basin Boards (Table 3-14). Later, Federal funding was obtained that could be used up to a limit of
55 percent of the project costs. Finally, the project scope of work was modified to include a
substantial risk assessment. The District's contract with WCRWSA will be amended to incorporate
these changes to the funding split.


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-51









1995 NWSI Annual Report January 1996


Table 3-15. Funding Plan for Section 21 Wellfield
Rehydration Pilot Project

Funding Total Funding FY 94
Participant Contribution
(%)
Governing Board $210,250 $210,250
(25%)
Northwest $105,125 $105,125
Hillsborough (12.5%)
Basin Board
Pinellas Anclote $105,125 $105,125
Basin Board (12.5%

District Subtotal $420,500 $420,500
(50%)

WCRWSA $420,500 $420,500
(50%)

Federal Grant () ()

TOTAL $841,000 $841,000
(100%)
(1) Federal funding can be used for up to 55 percent of the total project
cost. The funding split will be determined following the revision of
scope and budget to include the risk assessment.


Project Schedule:

The project was initiated in September 1994 with the selection of the firm of HDR Engineering, Inc.
The contract required that WCRWSA complete the project within 18 months.

Project Status:

The scope of work for the project has been revised to include an expanded public health and safety
risk assessment. Although the WCRWSA Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) approved the
original project scope of work, an expanded risk assessment was necessary to address concerns of
the TAC. The added Risk Assessment will significantly increase the cost of the project and will
result in the project being delayed. When the revised scope of work, cost estimate, and project time
line are complete, the District will renegotiate our agreement with WCRWSA and if we can come
to terms, will amend the project contract.


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-52


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-52







1995 NWSI Annual Report January 1996

3.14 Tampa Aquifer Storage and Recovery Project

Cooperator(s): City of Tampa

Contacts: City of Tampa Water Department SWFWMD
Marjorie Guillory Donald L. Ellison

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Hillsborough River Basin Board
Northwest Hillsborough Basin Board

Project Rationale:

This project is located in the northwest portion of the Tampa Water Department service area
(Figure 3-14) which is within the Northern Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Area (NTBWUCA).
Within the NTBWUCA, wetlands and lakes have been impacted by ground-water withdrawals. The
need has resulted to develop alternative sources of water that minimize environmental impacts. In
an effort to develop a new water supply that would exert the least amount of stress on the
environment, the City of Tampa is investigating the use of Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR).

Project Background and Description:

The Tampa Water Department (TWD) obtains water from two sources; the Hillsborough River
Reservoir System (HRRS) and the Morris Bridge Wellfield. The HRRS primarily utilizes surface
water from the Hillsborough River, however, during periods of low flow, Harney Canal and Sulphur
Springs are used to augment the Reservoir. Seasonal variations in the HRRS range from no flow
over the Hillsborough River Dam to discharge of over 900 mgd. During the dry season when the
HRRS lacks the ability to meet the water demands, the Morris Bridge Wellfield is utilized as a
peaking facility to satisfy the remaining need.

In 1993, the average daily flow (ADF) and maximum daily flow were 68.2 mgd and 71.6 mgd,
respectively. An ADF of 81.3 mgd is projected to occur in the year 2020. An evaluation of the safe
yield for the TWD with and without the use of Sulphur Springs indicated that the 90-day ADF will
exceed the safe yield by 2005 if Sulphur Springs is taken out of service. Since Sulphur Springs may
not be able to provide a reliable supply to meet the dry season demands during a one-in-twenty year
drought, an additional water supply is required.

A seasonal storage of approximately 10 mgd would provide the additional supply required to meet
water supply deficits anticipated to occur in a one-in-twenty year drought. Aquifer Storage and
Recovery could provide the TWD with the necessary water if feasibility can be demonstrated. By
capturing approximately 2 to 3 percent of the total flow during peak flow periods, treating the water
and storing it in a suitable aquifer for later withdrawal, the TWD would have an additional dry
season supply of 10 mgd. The Tampa water supply system is scheduled to be interconnected to the


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-53










1995 NWSI Annual Report


Figure 3-14.


Tampa Northwest Aquifer Storage and Recovery Project
A New Water Sources Initiative


Local Cooperator: City of Tampa


Southwest Florida Water Management District


_ _~___


---s~---~*U*YII~CI~X*-*IPY-*Lr*Llm-~ ~~*~211_.1UiYIII--111._.- ..rWtiir










WCRWSA loop system via the Morris Bridge Wellfield. This interconnect will allow the sharing
of water between the TWD and members of the WCRWSA; thus, any development of additional
storage capabilities could also benefit the regional system.

The Northwest Tampa ASR Project consists of the construction and cycle testing of an ASR well
and associated monitor wells at the Rome Avenue Park located at the comer of Sligh and Rome
Avenues. This area of Tampa is located in the Northwest Service Area (NWSA) of the Tampa
Water Department.

The first well installed at the site will be a pilot well. The pilot well will be drilled to approximately
450 feet and be carefully monitored and tested to assess the geologic conditions at the site.
Geophysical logging, specific capacity tests, and visual inspection of drilling cuttings will be used
to determine a favorable storage zone at the site. Once the storage zone has been selected, a 12-inch
ASR production well and two surficial aquifer monitoring wells will be installed. Once the wells
have been installed, a series of cycle tests will be performed to assess the storage zone's capacity to
store the treated drinking water. Each cycle test will consist of an injection period, followed by a
rest period, and finally, a recovery period. The purpose of the tests is to determine what percentage
of the stored water can be recovered before either water quality deteriorates or aquifer drawdowns
become great enough to require shutting down the system. A 30-inch supply main is located on
Sligh Avenue and will be utilized to supply the necessary water for injection.

Project Benefits:

* Demonstrate the feasibility of ASR in the City of Tampa's NWSA

* Offset development of a new ground-water source to supply the future need of an additional
10 mgd

Allow storage of wet season flows in the Hillsborough River for use during the dry season

Increase utilization of the Hillsborough River flows for water supply

Demonstrate the feasibility of ASR in the NTBWUCA

Increase the period that discharge occurs over the Hillsborough River dam by making
available a 10 mgd supply to the City of Tampa during the 90-day dry season

Project Costs:

The City of Tampa estimates that the design, permitting, construction and testing for this feasibility
study will cost approximately $700,000. The District will fund 50 percent of the costs up to a
maximum of $350,000. Funding for the project is provided in FY 95 (Table 3-16).


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-55


1995 NWSI Annual ReDort


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-55








1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Table 3-16.


Funding Plan for Northwest Tampa ASR Project


Drilling Contract Document Preparation
SWFWMD/FDEP Permitting
Drilling Contract Bid and Award
Construction of ASR Test Well
Well Construction Report Preparation
Wellhead/Piping Construction
ASR Cycle Testing
Final Report Preparation


October 1994 November 1994
October 1994 February 1995
November 1994 January 1995
February 1995 August 1995
October 1995 December 1995
September 1995 December 95
January 1996 July 1996
June 1996 August 1996


Project Status:

The project has received the permits necessary to start drilling and testing. The pilot hole and the
associated monitoring wells are complete. Drilling and testing of the ASR well started in August
1995 and was completed in October 1995. Arrangements are being made to connect the ASR well
to the 30-inch supply line running along Sligh Avenue. A well completion report has been
submitted to the FDEP for review and approval of the ASR cycle testing plan. Arrangements to start
the test phase of the well will begin as soon as the wet season begins providing the necessary water
for injection. Cycle testing is tentatively scheduled to begin in February 1996.


Funding Total Funding FY 95
Participant Contribution
(%)

Governing Board $175,000 $175,000
(25%)
Hillsborough River $87,500 $87,500
Basin Board (12.5%)
Northwest Hillsborough $87,500 $87,500
Basin Board (12.5%)

District $350,000 $350,000
Subtotal (50%)_

City of $350,000 $350,000
Tampa (50%)

TOTAL $700,000 $700,000
(100%)


Project Schedule:


3-56


Southwest Florida Water Management District









3.15 Tampa Water Resource Recovery Project

Cooperator(s): City of Tampa

Contacts: City of Tampa SWFWMD
Brad Baird Jeffrey Cunningham

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Alafia River Basin Board
Hillsborough River Basin Board Pinellas-Anclote River Basin Board
Coastal Rivers Basin Board Northwest Hillsborough Basin Board

Project Rationale:

The project is located in the Northern Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Area (NTBWUCA).
Ground-water withdrawals for public water supply use in the area have contributed to lowered lake,
wetland, and aquifer levels. To protect the water resource and meet future demands, alternative
water sources are needed. Recovered water represents an important alternative source which has
the potential to offset ground- and surface-water withdrawals. A supplemental treatment facility at
the Howard F. Curren AWT Plant could provide between 35 mgd and 50 mgd of recovered potable
water. This project will tie the City of Tampa's water supply system to the West Coast Regional
Water Supply Authority regional system. Local and regional participation in this project will help
ensure that the recovered water will benefit the entire Tampa Bay region.

Project Background and Description:

The City of Tampa's Howard F. Curren Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant discharges high
quality effluent into McKay Bay. During the mid-1980s, water use projections for the City indicated
that the demand would exceed current supply between 1995 and 2010. In response to these
projections, the City of Tampa commissioned a series of studies to examine the feasibility of various
alternative water sources and, in particular, to determine whether water from the Curren AWT Plant
could be treated to drinking water quality.

The City of Tampa began a Pilot Plant Project in 1985 that focused on testing the effluent from
several different pilot plant designs. Testing included monitoring of physical, chemical and
microbiological parameters, as well as toxicological testing for health effects. Results from the Pilot
Plant Project indicated that supplemental treatment of the Curren AWT effluent could produce
recovered water of quality equal to or superior to the City's raw water supply from the Hillsborough
River. Only for nitrates did water from the supplemental treatment plant have higher concentrations
than the Hillsborough River.

Originally, the City envisioned using recovered water to meet only its own future water supply
needs. Initial projections considered supplying between 20 and 35 mgd, perhaps only seasonally.


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-57


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996










However, the use of the water for only the City of Tampa for 90 days per year is economically
infeasible. In addition, it has become evident since completion of the Pilot Plant Project that the
entire Tampa Bay region faces potential future shortfalls in water supply. The District is working
with the City of Tampa to integrate part of its recovered water supply into the WCRWSA regional
water supply system. It is anticipated that a portion of the recovered water may be used to offset
existing ground-water pumpage with the rest of the recovered water being used to meet new demand.

The Implementation Program, Phase I of the Tampa Water Resource Recovery Project, involves
numerous preparatory tasks to the actual design and construction of a recovered water facility
(Figure 3-15). One of the issues the Implementation Program will address is the environmental and
permitting issues associated with development of recovered water. These issues include water
quality concerns regarding impacts to Hillsborough Bay resulting from reducing the discharge of
effluent, impacts from the recovered water to the Tampa Bypass Canal and Hillsborough River, and
potential wetland impacts due to the siting of the facility and transmission lines.

Cost concerns will also be addressed in the Implementation Program. While preliminary estimates
place the cost of the project at approximately $100 million, more refined cost estimates are needed
to determine the cost of recovered water to member governments of the WCRWSA. This
information is needed so that governments receiving water from the regional supply can compare
recovered water to other alternative sources.

From a regional perspective, how and where the City of Tampa's system will connect with the
regional system is also a question that the Implementation Program will address. Alternatives
include treating the recovered water at the City's existing water treatment plant, then piping it to the
regional system via a pipeline between the two systems. Another option involves construction of
a linear wellfield and a treatment plant at the Tampa Bypass Canal, with a pipeline tying into the
regional system at the Morris Bridge Wellfield.

One of the most important elements of this project is the public acceptance. A natural resistance
exists toward the concept of recovered water. In order to educate the public concerning the safety
and reliability of recovered water, the District, WCRWSA, and the City recognized the need to
conduct a public education/acceptance program as part of the Implementation Program. It was also
recognized that a key aspect of the public acceptance program will involve gaining support for the
project from elected officials of the member governments in the WCRWSA.

In the agreement between the City and the District, the City will engage the services of a consultant
to perform the Implementation study. Further District involvement will depend upon District review
of the conclusions of the report. The Implementation Program will begin in September 1995 and
will be completed within 18 months of a notice to proceed from the City.

Project Benefits:

* Provide new water source of up to 50 mgd


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


3-58


Southwest Florida Water Management District









1995 NWSI Annual Report


Figure 3-15.


Tampa Water Resource Recovery Project
A New Water Sources Initiative


Tampa's
Water
Treatment
Plant


Hillsborough
ReservoIr


Regional
Distribution
System


P St
Pump Station


New Water
Treatment Plant


illsborough giver


Howard F. Current
(HFC) Advanced
Wastewater Treatment
Facility
,11111 W I


Tampa c Linear
o Wellfield
Bypass o W
Canal o
Central c
Pool c ,


West Coast Regional
Water Supply Authority
Distribution System


HFC Supplemental
Treatment
Plant


Hillsborough County


HIIShO~reU~h
layP


, Ypaa


Local Cooperator: City of Tampa


Southwest Florida Water Management District


II










* Reduce ground-water withdrawals in the NTBWUCA

* Stand as example for other indirect potable reuse projects

Project Costs:

The estimated total project capital costs over the next 10 years are $100 million. The federal
government has committed $18,712,000 to this project, with the possibility of more funding in the
future. Although the District has committed funding only for the Implementation Program
($250,000), funding contributions listed below are based on the assumption of District participation
in funding of the design and construction of the project. District contribution to design and
construction will be based on 50 percent of the total project cost minus total federal funding.
Funding for the project is being provided over FY 95 through FY 01, contingent upon District
approval and inclusion in the annual budgets. The funding plan for the Tampa Water Resource
Recovery Project is shown as Table 3-17.

Project Schedule:

Implementation Program Report February 1997

Project Status:

With a signed agreement on May 21, 1995, the City of Tampa and the District entered into the
consultant selection process on June 2, 1995. The City also signed an agreement with the
WCRWSA. WCRWSA was also involved in consultant selection. The selected consultant is
Montgomery-Watson. The City, the District and WCRWSA will enter into contract negotiations
with the consultant. A notice to proceed will be given upon signing of the contract by all parties.


Southwest Florida Water Management District 3-60


January 1996


1995 NWSI Annual ReDort


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-60






1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Table 3-17.


Fi~nninp Plan for Tamna Water Resource Recovery Project


Funding Total Funding FY 95 FY 96 FY 97 FY 98 FY 99 FY 00 FY 01
Participant Contribution
(%)

Governing Board $20,652,000 $8,000,000 $1,560,400 $2,522,900 $2,522,900 $2,522,900 $2,522,900 $1,000,000
(25%)
Alafia River $1,442,325 $ 252,143 $ 198,364 $ 198,364 $ 198,364 $ 198,364 $ 198,364 $ 198,364
Basin Board (1.8%)
Coastal Rivers $1,645,475 $ 290,000 $ 225,912 $ 225,912 $ 225,912 $ 225,912 $ 225,912 $ 225,912
Basin Board (2.0%)
Hillsborough River $ 5,809,946 $1,020,714 $ 514,872 $ 854,872 $ 854,872 $ 854,872 $ 854,872 $ 854,872
Basin Board (7.2%)
Northwest $2,072,080 $ 363,214 $ 284,811 $ 284,811 $ 284,811 $ 284,811 $ 284,811 $ 284,811
Hillsborough (2.5%)
Basin Board
Pinellas-Anclote $ 9,344,670 $1,645,357 $1,283,219 $1,283,219 $1,283,219 $1,283,219 $1,283,219 $1,283,219
River (11.5%)
Basin Board _

District $40,966,496 $11,571,428 $4,067,578 $5,370,078 $5,370,078 $5,370,078 $5,370,078 $3,847,178
Subtotal (0%)

City of Tampa $40,629,000 --
(0%)

Federal Grant 18,742,000 18,742,000

TOTAL $100,337,500 -- -..


Aulti-year funding p 1.


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-61










3.16 Tampa/Northwest Hillsborough County Rotational Interconnect

Cooperator(s): West Coast Regional Water Supply Authority

Contacts: West Coast Regional Water Supply Authority SWFWMD
John Kennedy Jeffrey Cunningham

Participating
Boards: SWFWMD Governing Board Pinellas-Anclote River Basin Board
Hillsborough River Basin Board Northwest Hillsborough Basin Board

Project Rationale:

The project is located in the Northern Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Area, which is an area where
ground-water resources are stressed. The development of alternative water sources, such as
additional surface water, can relieve stress on ground-water systems. The interconnect constructed
in this project will enable up to 12 mgd of surface water to offset ground-water withdrawals.

Project Background and Description:

The West Coast Regional Water Supply Authority is working to interconnect the regional system
and to develop "rotational capacity" which would enable wellfields to be periodically rested. As
part of the water supply planning process, the WCRWSA and the City of Tampa examined the
potential to increase withdrawals from the Hillsborough River during periods of high flow in the
river. Currently, there is no connection between the City of Tampa water supply system and the
WCRWSA water supply system which would allow river flows to be transferred from one system
to the other. The construction of an interconnect between the City of Tampa and WCRWSA systems
will enable water from the Hillsborough River to be transferred to the regional system. The river
water can be used as "rotational capacity," allowing wellfields to be rested during periods of high
flow in the river.

The interconnect will provide excess water from the City of Tampa's Hillsborough River Reservoir
to the Northwest Hillsborough Supply System (Figure 3-16). Up to 12 mgd of water would be
available from this source during periods of high flow on the Hillsborough River. The project will
include modifying Hillsborough County's water treatment plants in the Northwest Hillsborough area
in order to make the chlorination system compatible with the City's system.

Project Benefits:

* Offset up to 12 mgd of ground-water withdrawals in the regional system

* Increase wetland, lake, and aquifer water levels


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-62








1995 NWSI Annual Report
Figure 3-16. Tampa/Northwest Hillsborough County

Interconnect Project
A New Water Sources Initiative


Local Cooperator: West Coast Regional Water Supply Authority


. -uhws Florid Wate Maaemn Ditit3


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-63










Project Costs:

The WCRWSA has estimated the total project cost as $3,400,000. The portion of the project eligible
for funding under the New Water Sources Initiative is $3,400,000. The District will fund up to 50
percent of eligible project costs up to a maximum of $1,700,000. District funding for the project is
being provided during FY 96. Funding contributions are shown in Table 3-18.

Project Schedule:

To be completed.

Project Status:

As of August 1995, project funding had been approved by the District Basin Boards and Governing
Board. A draft contract has been developed and is being reviewed by the cooperator. Construction
is anticipated to begin early in 1996 and be completed by the end of the year.


Table 3-18.


Funding Plan for the Tampa/ Northwest Hillsborough
County Rotational Interconnect


Southwest Florida Water Management Disirict 3-64


Funding Total Funding FY 96
Participant Contribution
(%)

Governing Board $850,000 $850,000
Pinellas-Anclote River Basin $283,334 $283,334
Board
Hillsborough River $283,334 $283,334
Basin Board
Northwest Hillsborough $283,334 $283,334
Basin Board

District Subtotal $1,700,000 $1,700,000
(50%)

WCRWSA $1,700,000 $1,700,000
(50%)

TOTAL $3,400,000 $3,400,000
(100%)


Southwest Florida Water Management District


3-64


1995 NWSI Annual Report


January 1996




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