Title: Fla. Dept. of Environmental Protection Annual Report on the Status of Regional Water Supply Planning
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00004698/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fla. Dept. of Environmental Protection Annual Report on the Status of Regional Water Supply Planning
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - Fla. Dept. of Environmental Protection Annual Report on the Status of Regional Water Supply Planning
General Note: Box 28, Folder 4 ( Fla. Dept. of Environmental Protection Annual Report on the Status of Regional Water Supply Planning - Nov. 15, 1997 ), Item 1
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00004698
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text




,.1


iorida Department of environmental Protecti'h


ANNUAL
REP ORT



-on the status of

SUPPLY PLANNING
November 15, 1997


F






Department of
al FLO fA ,
FOID Environmental Protection

Marjory Stoneman Douglas Building
Lawton Chiles 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard Virginia B. Wetherell
Governor Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000 Secretary


November 14, 1997



The Honorable Lawton Chiles gaO i
Governor ofFlorida ste HeC "'
The Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0001

Dear Governor:

The 1997 Legislative session enacted some of the most significant revisions to
Florida water law since passage of the Water Resources Act of 1972. The amendments
(Chapter 97-160, Laws of Florida) included most of the provisions of Executive Order 96-
297, and clarified agency responsibilities related to regional water supply planning. They
directed Florida's five regional water management districts to conduct districtwide water
supply assessments and, where required, to develop regional water supply plans. The new
legislation also directed the Department of Environmental Protection to submit an annual
report to the Governor and Legislature on the status of regional water supply planning.

I am pleased to report that the department and the water management districts
have made significant progress toward implementing the requirements of the new
legislation. Details are provided in the enclosed report. If you have any questions
regarding the report, please contact Ms. Janet Llewellyn, Director of our Office of Water
Policy, at (850) 488-0784.

Sincerely,


Virginia B. Wetherell
Secretary

VBW/lb
Enclosure
cc: Lieutenant Governor Buddy MacKay





"Protect, Conserve and Manage Florida's Environment and Natural Resources"
Printed on recycled paper.










F~-..
I













i-;


I-
i;-


~






.I


I


I .'


-V.


. '(''


-


9`-


;


-z
-.



:






,.


-i-~
~~


~ I ~ _


Acknowledgments





The assistance of the water management districts and the Department of Community


Affairs in producing this report is greatly appreciated.


'i


' '


-- 1
<"l -> '""'*


ro *


S-$


s
j


''


-,

~


"'




~-


~- r:.

:r 'se


' ''


.r
j


--
I


,* *J'


.- ~

~

''
j' -.r











Contents



Executive Summary
I. Background 5
II. Water Supply Planning Regions and Districtwide Water Supply Assessments 10
III. Regional Water Supply Plans 15
IV. Projects and Funding 24
IV.a. FY 1997-98 Related District Expenditures: NWFWMD 26
IV.b. FY 1997-98 Related District Expenditures: SRWMD 30
IV.c. FY 1997-98 Related District Expenditures: SJRWMD 32
IV d. FY 1997-98 Related District Expenditures: SFWMD 35
IV.e. FY 1998 Related District Expenditures: SWFWMD 38
V. Coordination of Land Use Planning with Water Supply Planning 40
VI. Meeting Florida's Water Challenge 46


Appendix A: Executive Order 96-297
Appendix B: Key Water Supply Planning Provisions in Chapter 373, F.S.
Appendix C: Water Planning Timelines









Executive Summary


In response to recurring water supply problems in some areas of the state, the 1997 Legislature
amended Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, to clarify agency responsibilities for water supply
planning. The amendments (Chapter 97-160, Laws of Florida) direct the five regional water
management districts (WMDs) to establish water supply planning regions, conduct districtwide
assessments of the adequacy of existing and reasonably anticipated water supply sources, and
to initiate regional water supply planning for those planning regions where existing or
reasonably anticipated water supply sources are determined inadequate to meet 20-year
projected needs. The amendments also assigned the primary responsibility for water resource
development to the WMDs, while primary responsibility for water supply development was
assigned to local governments, regional water supply authorities and private utilities. The
amendments also require the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to submit an
annual report to the Governor and Legislature on the status of regional water supply planning.
This document is the first annual report submitted pursuant to these requirements.

Pursuant to earlier legislative and executive directives, the WMDs have completed substantial
work regarding needs and sources assessments (section 373.0394 F.S.); groundwater basin
resource availability inventories (section 373.0395, F.S.); and establishment of minimum flows
and levels (section 373.0391, F.S. and Executive Order 96-297). These previous efforts
strongly support current objectives for providing adequate, dependable water supplies while
protecting natural systems and sustaining water resources.

Districtwide water supply assessments are underway or have been completed by each WMD,
and a total of 17 water supply planning regions have been established statewide. A planning
horizon of 2020 was chosen for both regional water supply assessments and water supply
plans. Three regional water supply plans are currently under development in SWFWMD, with
their completion expected in 1998. In SFWMD, a water supply plan has been completed for
the Lower West Coast Planning Region, and draft plans have been completed for the Lower
East Coast and Upper East Coast Planning Regions. As soon as practicable, all regional water
supply plans initiated or completed prior to July 1, 1997 will be revised to conform to require-
ments of the 1997 amendments.

Summary of Legislative Requirements and Progress to Date

Planning Regions Assessments in
WMD Established Progress Plans Initiated

NWFWMD 7 7
SRWMD 1 1
SJRWMD 1 1
SWFWMD 4 4 3
SFWMD 4 4 3










Currently, the water management districts' budgets are not structured to easily separate out the
costs specifically for "water resource" and "water supply" development projects as required by
the 1997 amendments. During the development of regional water supply plans, and in working
with the Governor's Office to formulate a comprehensive budget review process, the Districts
will develop the capability to separate out the costs for these two activities as required by
statute. The total estimated funds budgeted for WMD activities related to water resource
development and water supply development during Fiscal Year 1997-98 are approximately
$241 million.











I. Background


In Florida, with a current population of 14.2 million and rapidly growing, water is an increas-
ingly scarce resource which must be protected, restored, and managed in order to sustain the
state's economy, quality of life and natural systems. Demands for cheap, dependable, high
quality water for agriculture, industry and a burgeoning population are beginning to cause
serious shortages in some areas of the state.

Florida law requires that water be managed as a resource of the state. The 1997 Legislature
clarified water supply responsibilities by directing the five water management districts (WMDs)
to initiate regional water supply planning in areas where existing or reasonably anticipated
water supply sources are inadequate to meet projected needs. WMDs were also assigned the
primary responsibility for conducting water resource development, while primary responsibility
for water supply development was assigned to local governments, regional water supply
authorities and private utilities. The new legislation (section 373.0361(5), Florida Statutes)
also requires the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to submit an annual report to
the Governor and Legislature on the status of regional water supply planning:

(5) By November 15, 1997, and annually thereafter, the department shall submit to
the Governor and the Legislature a report on the status of regional water supply
planning in each district. The report shall include:
(a) A compilation of the estimated costs of and potential sources of funding for
water resource development and water supply development projects, as identified in
the district's water supply plans.
(b) A description of each district's progress toward achieving its water resource
development objectives, as directed by s. 373.0831(3), including the district's
implementation of its 5-year water resource development work program.

This report is intended to meet the above requirement.

Water Use in Florida
No state east of the Mississippi River consumes more fresh water than Florida'. As indicated
in Figure 1, Floridians withdrew about 7.1 billion gallons of fresh water per day in 1995,
slightly more than double the amount withdrawn in 1950, when records of statewide water use
began. Over the last two decades, it appears that Florida's total fresh water withdrawals have
increased less than the rate of population growth. However, there is little evidence to suggest



1 Solley, Wayne B., Robert B. Pierce, and Howard Perlman, "Estimated Water Use in the United
States in 1990, U. S. Geological Survey Paper 1081, 1993.









that this trend will continue. The state's population is projected to steadily increase to about
20.26 million by the year 2020, placing further demands on water resources that are already
stressed in certain areas.


Figure 1. Total Fresh Water Withdrawals and Population


.. -20


1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020

S I Groundwater I Surface water Population


The largest single use of fresh water is agriculture, followed by public supply, ther-
moelectric power plants, self-supplied commercial-industrial uses, and self-supplied domestic
uses2. As indicated in Figure 2, agricultural irrigation accounted for about 45 percent of the


2 Water use data from: Marella, Richard L., "Water Use Data by Category, County, and Water
Management District in Florida, 1950-1990," USGS, Open-File Report 94-251, 1995, and
preliminary 1995 data. Population data from: Smith, Stanley K. and June Nogle, "Projections of
Florida Populations by County, 1996-2020, Florida Population Studies, Volume 30, Number 2,
February, 1997.


16

O

12 m
12



80




4



0









total 1995 fresh water use, compared to about 29 percent for public water supplies. About
sixty-one percent of total fresh water used in 1995 was from ground water sources. About
13.2 million (over 90%) of Florida's 14.2 million residents rely on ground water for drinking
water (11.2 million for public supply systems and 2 million from self-supply).


Figure 2. Fresh Water Withdrawals
1995






45%









Commercial-
Industrial Self-supplied
10% domestic
4%


by Category:



Thermo-
electric
10%


Recreational
Irrigation
4%




Public Supply
29%


Water use varies widely around the state. As indicated by Figure 3, greatest with-
drawals occur in the South Florida Water Management District, while the lowest withdrawals
occur in the Suwannee River Water Management District. These trends reflect geographic
differences in population and economic activities.









Figure 3. Total Fresh Water Withdrawals
by Water Management District
(1975-1995)

4


*3


= 11975
0

N 1990
0




NWFWMD SJRWMD SFWMD SWFWMD SRWMD


The Need for Regional Water Supply Planning

As Florida's population increases, competition for water is a growing source of conflict
between agricultural, industrial, and urban interests, and the needs of natural systems. Water
supply-related problems exist to varying degrees in all five water management districts. If
Florida's population growth and economic development continue at current rates, additional
areas of the state can expect shortages in the next decades. For some areas, the prospects for
cheap, easily developed, clean new sources of water no longer exist. Adequate sources can be
developed, but usually at higher costs than in the past. These increasing water scarcity
problems are compounded by the continuing risk that existing and potential new supplies may
experience contamination from a variety of sources such as septic tanks, municipal landfills,
industrial wastes, and agricultural practices.

Previous Efforts

Even before the 1997 amendments, the Water Resources Act (Chapter 373, F.S.) contained
important requirements related to water planning. Many of these requirements have already
been substantially addressed, including:

Florida Water Plan. Required by section 373.036(1), F.S., this plan includes the
water-related programs and activities of the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, state water quality standards, and the district water management plans of
the five regional WMDs. First adopted in 1995, annual progress reports are prepared
by the Department.








District Water Management Plans. As part of the state water plan process, these
20-year plans of the water management districts address water supply, water quality,
flood protection and floodplain management, and natural systems. The initial 1994
district plans, like the Florida Water Plan, are assessed in annual progress reports.

Executive Order 96-297. Governor Chiles issued this order on September 30, 1996,
which addresses both priority lists for establishing minimum flows and levels and
regional water supply planning (See Appendix A). Many of the directives in the
Executive Order were incorporated into 1997 Legislative amendments to the Water
Resources Act.

In response to these earlier legislative and executive directives, the WMDs have completed
substantial work regarding needs and sources assessments (section 373.0394 F.S.); ground-
water basin resource availability inventories (section 373.0395, F.S.); and establishment of
minimum flows and levels (section 373.0391, F.S. and Executive Order 96-279). These
previous efforts strongly support current objectives for providing adequate, dependable water
supplies while protecting natural systems and sustaining water resources.

Prospects
Under Florida's current system of water management, water resources are managed for
multiple public purposes. To be effective, water supply solutions must be tailored to the needs
of particular geographic areas, and consider the full range of potential water supply options.
Regional water supply planning, implemented within the context of comprehensive water
resource planning, presents a monumental challenge for Florida -- but its success is critical to
meeting the future water needs of Florida's growing population while ensuring long-term
sustainability of the state's water resources and related natural systems.

In clarifying agency responsibilities for water supply, the 1997 legislation (see Appendix B)
directed the water management districts to establish water supply planning regions, conduct
districtwide assessments of the adequacy of existing and reasonably anticipated water supply
sources, and to initiate regional water supply planning for those planning regions where
existing or reasonably anticipated sources are determined to be inadequate. The legislation
also established schedules and particular items of content for regional water supply plans. The
remainder of this report explains in more detail the requirements of the new legislation and
describes the status of activities by the WMDs (and others) toward meeting these require-
ments. Appendix C provides a timeline of the related requirements for regional water supply
planning in Florida.











II. Water Supply Planning Regions and Districtwide
Water Supply Assessments

Requirements for Water Supply Planning Regions
By July 1, 1997, each of the WMDs was required to identify one or more water supply
planning regions that singly or together encompass the entire district. The regions are to be
based on surface watersheds, groundwater basins, and other factors, as appropriate. A total of
17 water supply planning regions have been established by the WMDs. These regions are
indicated in Figure 4.

Requirements for Districtwide Assessments
Each WMD was directed to conduct a districtwide water supply assessment by July 1, 1998
(Section 373.036(2)(b)4.a. and b., F.S.). For each water supply planning region identified in
the District Water Management Plan, each WMD is to determine:
Existing legal uses, reasonably anticipated future needs, and existing and reasonably
anticipated sources of water and conservation efforts; and
Whether existing and reasonably anticipated sources of water and conservation
efforts are adequate to supply water for all existing legal uses and reasonably
anticipated future needs and to sustain the water resources and related natural
systems.

Efforts to Promote Consistency in Assessments
The Department and the WMDs have coordinated to develop consistent methods for
conducting districtwide water supply assessments. The agencies have reached agreement on
important elements, including:
The overall structure of the regional assessments.
A common planning time horizon for the assessments (2020).
Common categories of water use.
Demand projection methods.

Status of Regional Water Supply Assessments
The South Florida and Southwest Florida Water Management Districts had completed
districtwide assessments in 1992. The St. Johns River Water Management District had
completed its districtwide assessment in 1994. All of the districts prepared districtwide
assessments as part of their 1994 District Water Management Plans. The current water supply
planning documents at all WMDs are being updated to incorporate the new statutory
requirements. The status of the revised regional water supply assessments is found in Table I.










Figure 4. Water Management Districts and Water Supply Planning Regions.


NWFWMD VI V











Note: Refer to Table 1 for
additional information.


SJRWMD *


SRWMD *


Kissimmee
Region


SWFWMD


SFWMD


Map produced courtesy of SJRWMD.


Water Supply Planning Regions
State of Florida, Water Management Districts

Northwest Florida Water Management District

Suwannee River Water Management District

SSt. Johns River Water Management District

SSouthwest Florida Water Management District

* South Florida Water Management District


Legend
- Region boundary

County boundary

Waterbody

Region covers entire district


1 .1













Table I. Status of Regional Water Supply Assessments


Date Assessment to
WMD Water Supply Planning Region Date Assessment be Completed or
Initiated Revised

NWFWMD I. Escambia County November, 1996 July 1, 1998

II. Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton November, 1996 July 1, 1998
(coastal corridor identified as an Area
of Special Concern)

III. Bay County (Panama City Beach November, 1996 July 1, 1998
urban corridor identified as an Area of
Special Concern)

IV. Holmes, Washington, Jackson, November, 1996 July 1, 1998
Calhoun, and Liberty Counties

V. Gulf and Franklin Counties (coastal November, 1996 July 1, 1998
corridor identified as an Area of Special
Concern)

VI. Gadsden County (upper Telogia November, 1996 July 1, 1998
Creek and adjoining areas of county
identified as an Area of Special
Concern)

VII. Leon, Wakulla, and Jefferson November, 1996 July 1, 1998
Counties

SRWMD One region for the entire district. June 1, 1997 July 1, 1998

SJRWMD One region for entire district, but with June 1, 1997 July 1, 1998
five "Work Group Areas"

SFWMD Lower West Coast July, 1997 July 1, 1998

Lower East Coast July, 1997 July 1, 1998

Upper East Coast July, 1997 July 1, 1998

Kissimmee Basin July, 1997 July 1, 1998

SWFWMD I. Northern District July, 1997 July 1, 1998

II. East Central District July, 1997 July 1, 1998

III. West-Central July, 1997 July 1, 1998

IV. Southern District July, 1997 July 1, 1998












III. Regional Water Supply Plans

Requirements for Regional Water Supply Plans
For those water supply planning regions where a district's governing board determines that
existing or reasonably anticipated sources of water are not adequate to supply water to all
existing and projected (twenty-year) reasonable-beneficial uses and to sustain the water
resources and related natural systems, the WMDs are required to initiate water supply planning
by October 1, 1998. Pursuant to Executive Order 96-297, regional water supply plans shall be
completed within eighteen months of initiation, unless a delay is justified.

Executive Order 96-297 and Chapter 373, F.S., contain detailed requirements for regional
water supply plans (see Appendices A and B). The relevant requirements in Section
373.0361(2), F.S., are summarized as follows:
A planning period of at least 20 years.
A water supply development component that includes:
1. A quantification of the water supply needs.
2. A list of water source options for water supply development, from which
suppliers may choose, which will exceed the needs identified.
3. For each option listed, the estimated amount of water available for use and
the estimated costs of and potential sources of funding for water supply
development.
4. A list of water supply development projects that meet the criteria in s.
373.0831(4).
A water resource development component that includes:
1. A listing of those water resource development projects that support water
supply development.
2. For each water resource development project listed:
a. An estimate of the amount of water to become available through the
project.
b. The timetable and the estimated costs for implementing, operating, and
maintaining the project.
c. Sources of funding and funding needs.
d. Who will implement the project and how it will be implemented.
Any recovery or prevention strategy for minimum flows and levels described in s.
373.0421(2).
A funding strategy for water resource development projects, which shall be reason-
able and sufficient to pay the cost of constructing or implementing all of the listed
projects.
Consideration of how the options serve the public interest or save costs overall by
preventing the loss of natural resources or avoiding greater future expenditures for
water resource development or water supply development.
The technical data and information applicable to the planning area necessary to
support the regional water supply plan.








The minimum flows and levels established for water resources within the planning
region.
Regional water supply plans initiated or completed by July 1, 1997, shall be revised,
if necessary, to include a water supply development component and a water
resource development component.

Efforts to Promote Consistency
The department and the five WMDs have coordinated closely on the water supply planning
process. General agreement has been reached on:

A common planning time horizon for all regional water supply plans (2020), includ-
ing a process to update water supply plans already underway that previously used
different time horizons.

Schedule for phasing in of 20-year planning horizon.

Content of Regional Water Supply Plans.

Status of Regional Water Supply Planning
The 1997 revisions to Chapter 373, F.S., do not require water management districts to initiate
regional water supply plans until October 1, 1998. However, several plans currently exist or
are in progress from previous water supply planning efforts. Such plans are being revised to
comply with the new requirement to include both a "water supply development component"
and a "water resource development component." These new components will be developed as
soon as practicable. In most cases, however, development of regional water supply plans is
just beginning, and will conform to the timeframes provided in the statute and Executive Order
96-297. Following are general descriptions of the current regional water supply planning
activities for each WMD. The statewide status of regional water supply planning is presented
in Table 2.

Northwest Florida Water Management District

To implement the water supply planning components of Executive Order 96-297 and Chapter
97-160, Laws of Florida, the Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) has
commenced a water supply planning initiative which will be implemented according to the
specifications and schedules contained in these directives. This includes identification of water
supply planning regions by July 1, 1997 (NWFWMD completed this task in November 1996),
and completion of a districtwide water supply needs and sources assessment by July 1, 1998.
The districtwide assessment will be updated every five years thereafter.

The district has contracted with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of
Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) to prepare water demand
projections in five year increments through the year 2020. Water resource impacts that could
occur as a result of the projected demands will be evaluated through a source assessment








prepared by district staff. If potential resource problems are identified, the water supply
assessment will recommend the development of a regional water supply plan for the affected
area. Regional water supply plans, if necessary, will be initiated soon after completion of the
water supply assessment and will be finished by April 2000.

Suwannee River Water Management District

The Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD) is currently in the process of
conducting a districtwide water supply assessment as directed by Executive Order 96-297 and
Chapter 97-160, Laws of Florida. Due to the relatively low overall current demand for water,
it is critical that all reasonable future demands are accounted for as accurately as possible,
including the needs of natural systems (minimum flows and levels). Projection methodologies
that are appropriate to the source data and conditions in SRWMD, and consistent with
adjacent WMDs, are being finalized as part of the assessment process.

Although SRWMD has not completed the districtwide water supply assessment, there are a
number of projects currently underway that accomplish many of the objectives of the executive
and legislative directives. These include initiating the Quality Communities Program (which
seeks to improve municipal public water supply, wastewater treatment, and stormwater
management programs through financial and technical assistance), working with municipalities
to acquire new wellhead protection areas, and improving coordination with local land use
planning programs. As more data and analytical capabilities are developed at SRWMD,
additional assistance will soon be available to local governments, communities, and major
water users.

St. Johns River Water Management District

The SJRWMD water supply planning approach will consider the entire district as one water
supply planning region, divided into five separate water supply work group areas based on
area-specific water supply planning issues. The planning process being employed is designed
to develop water supply plans for each work group area as a basis for a regional water supply
plan for the entire district. The district is applying a cooperative process that is open to water
suppliers, water users, local and state governments, environmental and special interest groups,
and the general public. The regional water supply plan for the entire district will be referred to
as the District Water Supply Plan.

The following water supply planning steps will be implemented over a period of two years:

Step 1. Investigate the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of various
alternative water supply strategies.

Step 2. Identify prospective participants for water supply planning work groups.

Step 3. Announce initiation of cooperative planning process.

Step 4. Present information and obtain input on the planning process at public
workshops.








Step 5. Develop proposed water supply plans through water supply planning work
groups.

Step 6. Present draft work group area water supply plans to major water suppliers,
local and regional government officials, and interested public within each work group
area.

Step 7. Take public comment back to water supply work groups for revisions and
finalization of draft work group area plans.

Step 8. Present draft District Water Supply Plan to the Governing Board.

Step 9. Notify work groups, major water suppliers, local and regional government
officials, and interested public on changes to the draft District Water Supply Plan by the
Governing Board.

Step 10. Develop final District Water Supply Plan.

Based on the results from the above process, the draft District Water Supply Plan will be
revised and finalized. A public workshop will be held to review the final plan on the morning
prior to the Governing board's vote on approval of the plan.

South Florida Water Management District

The SFWMD has been involved in regional water supply planning for several years, and has
established four water supply planning regions. General descriptions of work underway in
each region is described below.

Lower West Coast

The Lower West Coast Water Supply Plan was completed in February 1994. The planning
area extends across 4,300 square miles in southwest Florida, including all of Lee County, and
portions of Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, Dade, and Monroe Counties.

The current plan is based on a 1990-2010 planning horizon. Total water demand within the
planning area is projected to increase by approximately 55 percent from 307 billion gallons per
year in 1990 to 475 billion gallons per year in 2010.

Major factors influencing the availability of water in the planning area include: 1) dependency
upon rainfall, 2) limited surface water resources, 3) protection of water resources and
associated natural systems, and 4) pressure on these resources from increasing urban and
agricultural demands. These issues were addressed in a series of 12 meetings with the Lower
West Coast Advisory Committee that included people representing environmental interests,
local governments, and water users in the planning area.

Resource protection criteria were developed that established the limits for severity and
duration of declines in groundwater levels. These criteria were based on a drought return







frequency of one in ten years. Groundwater flow models were used to evaluate the extent to
which the resource protection criteria could be met while satisfying urban and agricultural
water demands.

The plan makes a number of recommendations that fall into four categories: 1) new water
source development, 2) water use efficiency, 3) modification of planning and regulatory
strategies to protect water resources and the environment, and 4) research to provide a greater
understanding of water resources and the environment.

Lower East Coast

The Lower East Coast planning process was initiated in 1991 and a draft plan was distributed
in March 1997. The planning area includes Palm Beach, Broward, and Dade Counties; Eastern
Hendry County; the southern half of mainland Monroe County; the Florida Keys; and
northeastern Collier County. The Lake Okeechobee Service Area is also included because it is
dependent on Lake Okeechobee as a water source.

A 55-member Advisory Committee was created in 1992. The committee has met numerous
times since its formation and will continue to meet through plan completion. The Committee is
composed of representatives from urban, agricultural, and environmental interest groups,
government agencies, Native American tribes and others.

The original Lower East Coast Regional Water Supply Plan (LEC Plan) process was based on
a 1990-2010 (20 years) planning horizon. During this 20-year period, the population is
expected to increase 20 percent to six million people. Urban water use will increase 25 percent
to 425 billion gallons per year, while agricultural water use will increase nine percent to 394
billion gallons per year, for a total of 819 billion gallons per year.

Increasing water storage is at the heart of this planning process. Existing regional storage
areas lack the capacity to store excess water for the dry season. Average freshwater
discharges from the coastal canals to saltwater have increased by about 650 billion gallons per
year, harming environmentally sensitive estuaries and wasting that water.

The primary analytical tool used in the planning process is the South Florida Water
Management Model. It is an integrated surface water-ground water model that simulates the
hydrology and the existing and projected water supply conditions in the region based on 26
years of historical climatic data (1965 1990). More than 100 individual options and five
alternatives (collections of individual options) were identified and analyzed.

A draft plan was developed in March 1997, shortly after significant changes were enacted in
federal law and shortly before significant changes were adopted in state water law. The net
effect was to cause the SFWMD to initiate steps to complete the integration of the LEC Plan
with the Comprehensive Review Study (Restudy) of the Central and Southern Florida Project
while beginning efforts to bring the existing planning process into full compliance with the
state's 1997 water supply legislation.








SFWMD has proposed to modify its plan and extend its planning horizon to 2020, while
developing a series of new modeling tools to better implement the 1-in-10 year level of
certainty into the plan's regulatory components, which is need to comply with the latest
legislative requirements. At the same time, some recommendations of the draft LEC Plan are
being transformed into an interim plan, to allow implementation to proceed on important water
resource/water supply development projects and providing guidance to the SFWMD budgeting
and cooperative funding programs.

The interim plan is scheduled to be delivered to the advisory committee in late 1997 and
presented to the SFWMD Governing Board in early 1998. It will include recommendations for
major construction projects that improve the storage and delivery of water supply, partnerships
with local government and others for local level water supply planning, and other related
proposals. The SFWMD has budgeted $8.41 million to begin implementing the interim plan in
fiscal year 1998.

Development of a 2020 regional water supply plan will be based on the existing LEC and
Restudy planning efforts, expanded as necessary to comply with the 1997 changes to state law.
The final plan will include implementation strategies and recovery plans to achieve minimum
flows and levels for the Everglades, Lake Okeechobee and the Biscayne Aquifer. The LEC
Plan will be completed by April 2000.

Upper East Coast

The Upper East Coast planning area covers 1,150 square miles and includes most of Martin
and St. Lucie Counties and a small portion of Lake Okeechobee County. A first draft of the
plan was issued in August 1997.

A 30 member advisory committee was convened. Committee membership included represen-
tatives of federal, state and local agencies; water utilities; the local business community;
environmental interests; and agriculture.

The current planning horizon is 1990 through 2010. Over this period, total water demand is
projected to increase 32 percent from 423 million gallons a day in 1990 to 560 million gallons
a day in 2010.

Major issues addressed include: 1) limited potential for expansion of surficial aquifer sources
due to potential impacts to wetland systems and saltwater intrusion, and 2) limited availability
of surface water sources for agricultural demands.

The analytical approach incorporates a surface water budget analysis and groundwater flow
modeling for the surficial and the Floridan aquifers. Resource protection criteria based on a
one in ten year drought were applied for evaluating potential wetland impacts as well as
potential impacts to the Floridan Aquifer. The draft plan contains water resource and water
supply development components and the "level of certainty" planning goal is a one-in-ten year
drought event.








Kissimmee Basin


The Kissimmee Basin planning area includes all of those portions of Orange, Osceola, Polk,
and Highlands County within the SFWMD; Glades and Charlotte Counties north of Fisheating
Creek, and all of Okeechobee County except for the extreme northeast area. A water supply
plan for this area will be initiated with the formation of an advisory committee in 1998.

Southwest Florida Water Management District

The SWFWMD has been involved intensively in regional water supply planning and implemen-
tation since the late-1980's. In response to observed long-term declines in hydrologic
conditions, in 1989 the district declared three Water Use Caution Areas (WUCAs), including
the Highlands Ridge, Eastern Tampa Bay and Northern Tampa Bay WUCAs. The boundaries
of these WUCAs generally were based upon hydrologic groundwater basins and therefore do
not directly coincide with the planning regions identified for the Districtwide Assessment,
which follow county boundaries. The Highlands Ridge WUCA includes portions of Polk and
Highlands counties; the Eastern Tampa Bay WUCA includes southern Hillsborough County,
most of Manatee County and northern Sarasota County; and the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA
includes all of Pinellas County, northern Hillsborough County and southwestern Pasco County.

For each of these WUCAs, a Work Group was established, comprised of representatives from
all types of water users within each WUCA (e.g., public supply, agriculture, industry), local
governments, environmental representatives and other interested parties. These Work Groups
were convened to assist the district in developing management plans for each WUCA.
Regional water management plans were adopted in 1990 and 1991, the main goal of which was
to stabilize and restore the water resource in each area through a combination of regulatory
and non-regulatory efforts.

One of the primary means of implementing the WUCA management plans was through
modifications to the district's Water Use Permitting rules for each specific WUCA. These
modifications primarily addressed additional conservation requirements and the investigation of
alternative water sources, including reuse, for water use permittees. One significant additional
change was the designation of the "Most Impacted Area" within the Eastern Tampa Bay
WUCA, within which no net increase in permitted water use was allowed by significantly
limiting the issuance of new permitted quantities. In addition, each WUCA was designated a
"Critical Water Supply Problem Area" (now referred to as a Water Resource Caution Area) as
stipulated in Chapter 62-40, Florida Administrative Code (Water Resources Implementation
Rule).

The district subsequently concluded that both the Highlands Ridge and Eastern Tampa Bay
WUCAs were components of a larger regional groundwater basin that needed to be managed
as a whole. The district declared the entire basin the Southern Water Use Caution Area
(SWUCA) in 1992. The SWUCA includes all of Manatee, Sarasota, Hardee and DeSoto
counties and portions of Hillsborough, Polk, Highlands and Charlotte counties. As with the
previous WUCA's, the district convened a Work Group to assist in the drafting of a manage-
ment plan for the area. The Work Group concluded a year-long series of meetings in late








1993. The district completed the management plan for the SWUCA and subsequently adopted
the SWUCA rule in 1994. These rules were challenged and in 1997 a state administrative law
judge found portions of the rule invalid. The district Governing Board will decide whether to
modify or rescind those portions of the rule held invalid, or whether to appeal any of these
provisions. As originally proposed, the rules would have limited further withdrawals from the
Floridan aquifer over the entire SWUCA and imposed more restrictive water conservation
requirements on all use sectors. The district has initiated an effort to reexamine the SWUCA
rule and overall management strategy. This will likely culminate in a new regional water
supply plan for the area pursuant to the requirements of the new legislation.

In the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA, large groundwater withdrawals for public supply have
caused severe environmental impacts to lakes and wetlands. Subsequent to adoption of the
WUCA rules, the district has continued to work with affected parties in an attempt to bring
restoration to damaged areas. This has focused on development of new sources of water and
concurrent reductions in withdrawals from the existing regional wellfield system. In 1996, the
Legislature required the district to establish minimum flows and levels for priority water bodies
in the area by October 1, 1997. The district has recently adopted these levels. For much of the
area, existing levels are below these established minimums. In the coming months, the
District's focus will be on development of a recovery strategy for the area, which will be
conducted in the context of developing an overall regional water supply plan for the area.

It is also important to note that, in addition to the WUCA regulatory approaches described
above, the district initiated an aggressive funding program to assist in the development of new
sources of water, with an emphasis on sustainable alternative sources. This program was
implemented through the existing cooperative funding program of the District's basip boards,
as well as a new joint initiative of the Governing and basin boards, referred to as the New
Water Sources Initiative. This later program was designed to provide twenty million dollars a
year (ten million from the Governing Board and ten million from the basin boards) to be
matched by local cooperators, including regional water supply authorities, local governments
and others. In the Tampa Bay area, the district has proposed a "Tampa Bay Partnership Plan"
which builds upon these existing funding programs to cooperate in the resolution of the area's
water supply problems.

Future regional water supply planning efforts at the district will include revisiting the SWUCA
management approach and development of a regional water supply plan for the Northern
Tampa Bay area. Together, these WUCAs encompass the majority of the East-Central, West-
Central and Southern district planning regions identified for the Districtwide Assessment.
Upon completion of the Districtwide Assessment in 1998, a determination will be made as to
the necessity of a regional water supply plan for the Northern District region.









Table 2. Status of Regional Water Supply Planning


Plan Required Date Date Plan to Be
WMD Water Supply Planning (YESINO/ Plan Completed or
Region TBD-) Initiated Revised
NWFWMD I. Escambia County. TBD
II. Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and TBD
Walton Coastal Corridor
III. Bay Co./ Panama City TBD
urban corridor
IV. Holmes, Washington, TBD
Jackson, Calhoun, and
Liberty Counties
V. Gulf and Franklin Counties TBD
(Coastal Corridor)
VI. Gadsden County (Upper TBD
Telogia Creek and Adjoining
Areas)
VII. Leon, Wakulla, and TBD
Jefferson Counties
SRWMD One water supply region TBD
established, pending
completion of districtwide
assessment
SJRWMD One Region For Entire TBD
District, With Five Work
Group Areas
SFWMD Lower West Coast Yes 1992 Completed 2/94;
Five-year Update
due 2/99
Lower East Coast Yes 1991 Draft Completed
3/97; Final TBD
Upper East Coast Yes 1994 Draft 8/97; Final
1/98
Kissimmee Basin Yes Spring 1999
1998
SWFWMD I. Northem Region TBD
II. East Central Region Yes October, 1998
1997
III. West Central Region Yes January, 1998
1997
IV. Southern Region Yes October, 1998
1997

* To Be Determined









IV. Projects and Funding


To help ensure adequate progress toward achieving water resource objectives, the 1997
amendments to Chapter 373, F.S., included guidance to the water management districts
regarding the funding of water resource development projects

Five-Year Work Program
Section 373.536(5)(c)5., F.S., requires the development of a proposed five-year water
resource development work program describing the district's implementation strategy for the
water resource development component of each regional water supply plan. The work
program is to be included in the district's budget and is to be reviewed by the Office of the
Governor, with the assistance of the Department of Environmental Protection, to evaluate the
adequacy of progress toward achieving water resource objectives.

Because this statutory requirement did not take effect until October 1, 1997, the water
resource development work programs have not been completed and no summary of the
district's efforts in achieving the elements of the work program can be made for 1997. The
Executive Office of the Governor (Office of Planning and Budgeting) is working with the five
water management districts to formulate a comprehensive budget review process. The process
will include review of the five-year water resource development work programs, as they are
included in the district's budgets upon completion or revision of the districts' regional water
supply plans.

Estimated Costs and Potential Sources of Funding
The new legislation (section 373.0361(5)(a), F.S.) requires a compilation of the estimated
costs of, and potential sources of funding for, water resource development and water supply
development projects, "as identified in the water management district regional water supply
plans." Because the act further provides that the regional water supply plans are to be initiated
by October 1, 1998, most of the plans are not yet initiated, or are in the early stages of being
updated to meet the new legislative requirements. Therefore, it is not possible to provide a
compilation of costs and potential funding sources categorized by water resource development.
and water supply development projects, as included in the regional water supply plans, for this
initial annual report.

Currently, the water management districts' budgets are not structured to easily separate out the
costs specifically for "water resource" and "water supply" development projects. During the
development of the regional water supply plans, and in working with the Governor's Office to
formulate a comprehensive budget review process, the Districts will be developing the
capability to separate out the costs for these two activities as required by statute.








The WMDs already allocate substantial portions of their budgets for achieving objectives
directly related to water resource development and water supply development. The total
estimated funds budgeted for WMD activities related to water resource development and water
supply development during Fiscal Year 1997-98 are approximately $241 million. The
following pages summarize WMD budget allocations related to water resource development
and water supply development for Fiscal Year 1997-98. The second annual report (for Fiscal
Year 1998-99) is expected to include more detailed information than is reflected in this first
report.









IV.a. FY 1997-98 Related District Expenditures:
NWFWMD


The following is a summary of NWFWMD allocations for activities related to water resource
and water supply development activities funded for fiscal year 1997-98, followed by a more
detailed explanation.



Activity Allocation
Planning and Information $1,118,078
Minimum Flows and Levels $500,000
Cooperative Funding and Technical $293,075
Assistance
Land Acquisition $23,215,062
Operations N/A



Planning and Information: $1,118,078
* Districtwide Water Supply Assessments: -- $648,078

The NWFWMD, as directed by Executive Order 96-297 and Chapter 97-160, Laws of Florida,
initiated a comprehensive Water Supply Assessment program to evaluate the water resources
of seven formally identified planning regions. The district has entered into contracts with the
U.S. Geological Survey and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences to obtain detailed
water demand projections for each of the identified regions. These projections will be
provided in 5-year increments through the year 2020.

District staff will evaluate the water resources of each of the planning regions and determine
potential water supply shortfalls. Those regions which are determined to lack sufficient
supplies to meet projected water demands-and the water needs of natural systems will require
the development of Regional Water Supply Plans.

* Regional Water Supply Plans -- $300,000

Statutorily, the Regional Water Supply Plans have to be initiated by October 1, 1998. The
NWFWMD has established a "Budget Reserve" in the amount of $300,000 to provide for the
development of required Regional Water Supply Plans. This reserve will have to be expanded
to fund the development of regional plans as provided in the new law.







* Surface Water Resources Monitoring and Data Collection -- $81,000


The district has established a surface water monitoring network consisting of approximately 75
stations. The network provides the district water quality and some water flows information.
The collected data allow the district to monitor and evaluate changes that could have a
potential negative impact on the water resources of an area. The existing network should be
expanded to provide comprehensive coverage throughout the district. The program is funded
primarily by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the United States Environ-
mental Protection Agency, and local governments.

* Groundwater Resources Monitoring and Data Collection -- $150,000

The NWFWMD has established a groundwater monitoring network of 380 wells. The
network provides water quality and water levels information. The data allows the district to
monitor and evaluate changes that could have a potential negative impact on the water
resources of an area. The existing network should be expanded to provide comprehensive
coverage throughout the region. The program is totally funded by the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.

Minimum Flows and Levels: $500,000
The NWFWMD has lacked the financial resources to initiate the comprehensive development
and implementation of minimum flows and levels (MFLs). The district has identified the
establishment of minimum flows for the Apalachicola River and Bay Ecosystem as its main
priority. Using funds provided by the SWIM program and special legislative appropriations,
the district has made significant progress in the collection and analysis of information required
for the establishment of minimum flows. The scientific studies conducted are also required as
part of Florida's efforts to negotiate an interstate water flow allocation that protects the fresh
water needs of the Apalachicola River and Bay. Chapter 97-25, Laws of Florida, adopted the
Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin Compact recently negotiated by the states of
Florida, Georgia and Alabama. The compact provides a formal framework for future
negotiations for the adoption of water flow allocations.

To expand the district's MFL efforts, a "Budget Reserve" has been established in the 1997-98
budget. This reserve, when fully funded, will be utilized for the establishment of minimum
flows and levels throughout other areas of the District. Coastal groundwater supplies in Santa
Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton counties are presently being evaluated as part of the District's
water assessment efforts. Upon completion of this evaluation, and the upon the availability of
the necessary funds, the district will expand its minimum flows and levels development efforts.

Cooperative Funding and Technical Assistance: $293,075

* Abandoned Well Plugging -- $30,000

Over the last 15 years, the NWFWMD has implemented a well abandonment program. More
than 8,000 wells have being properly abandoned since the program's initiation. Approximately








1204 wells were plugged during Fiscal Year 1996-97. The program success can be attributed
to the cooperation of the water well construction industry. The district has maintained a small
fund balance in its budgets to facilitate the plugging of wells that could have a potential
deleterious impact on the water resources of an area.

* Wellhead & Groundwater Risk Assessment -- $145,075

The district in cooperation with the Escambia County Utilities Authority, Escambia County,
and the City of Pensacola, will evaluate the risks posed to public water supply wells by
contamination. The project will also identify well head protection setbacks and criteria. The
project is 60% funded by the United States Environmental Protection Agency; 40% of the
funds are provided by the four cooperating agencies.

* Reuse Cooperative Funding -- $10,000

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 373.1961, F.S., the district has established a small
source of funding to promote reuse. The funds may be provided to local governments or other
corporate entities to facilitate the reuse of waste water. In the Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and
Walton County's Water Resources Caution Area the district has required local utilities to
evaluate the merits of reuse. Four of the area's largest water utilities provide reuse water for
irrigation. The amount of water being reused in this area exceeds 6 million gallons per day.

* Alternative Water Supply Planning -- $73,000

To fulfill the requirements of Section 373.1961, F.S., the NWFWMD has established a small
source of funding to promote the development of alternative water supplies in desigrlated
water resources caution areas. In the Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton County Water
Resource Caution Area, the district has provided partial funding for the evaluation of
desalination and other nontraditional sources of supplies. Presently, the district has entered
into a Cooperative Agreement with Holley-Navarre Water System Inc. for sharing in the cost
of a multi-well test to evaluate the water resources potential of the Sand-and-Gravel aquifer in
Southern Santa Rosa County. Other projects will be considered for funding during the fiscal
year.

* Technical Assistance to Local Governments $30,000

The district has also established a small funding source to provide local governments with
technical assistance in the development of water supplies projects.

* Xeriscape Pilot Project $5,000

The district proposes to provide partial funding for a Xeriscape Pilot Project within the service
area of the Okaloosa County Water and Sewer System. The district and Okaloosa County will
fund a demonstration project to promote and encourage the expanded use of Xeriscape.








Land Acquisition: $23,215,062


The NWFWMD is scheduled to close on the acquisition of approximately 29,600 acres of land
in Bay and Washington counties. The acquisition will be funded by Florida's Preservation
2000 Program. This property includes the most important portion of the groundwater
recharge area contributing to the flows of the spring-fed Econfina Creek. The Econfina flows
into the Deer Point Lake reservoir, which supplies Panama City and neighboring communities
with drinking water. The acquisition of this property will not only serve to protect this
significant groundwater recharge area, but will also preserve several unique habitats, and rare,
threatened and endemic plants and animal species.

Operations: Not Applicable
The Northwest Florida Water Management District does not own, operate, or maintain any
water supply or flood control works.









IV.b. FY 1997-98 Related District Expenditures:
SRWMD


The following is a summary of SRWMD allocations for water resource and water supply
development activities funded for fiscal year 1997-98, followed by a more detailed explanation.



Activity Allocation
Planning and Information $1.4 Million
Minimum Flows and Levels $600,000
Cooperative Funding and Technical $620,000
Assistance
Land Acquisition $1.05 Million
Operations N/A



Planning and Information $1,400,000
The Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD) will focus planning efforts in FY
1997-98 to complete the new water resource assessment called for by Chapter 97-160, Laws
of Florida, beginning with the update of the District Water Management Plan and continued
work on the Levy County Water Plan (in cooperation with Levy County). In addition, the
Planning and Information activities of the district will include continued operation of the basic
water resources and water quality monitoring networks.

Minimum Flows and Levels $600,000
The SRWMD continues to work on its single priority water body: the lower Suwannee River.
The project began in 1994 and is focusing effort on the floodplain wetlands and forest, estuary,
and the interaction of groundwater flows, springs, and the flow of the river itself. Work is
scheduled to be completed in 2000. Annual district funding for the project includes approxi-
mately $450,000 of contractual services and $150,000 of staff effort. In addition to district
funds, a majority of the work is being conducted cooperatively with the United States
Department of the Interior, Geologic Survey, which contributes in excess of $300,000 per year
to the project.

Cooperative Funding and Technical Assistance $620,000
In response to growing emphasis on water resources and water supply development and the
needs of local governments in north Florida, the SRWMD has initiated a formal cooperative








funding and parallel technical assistance program to assist local governments provide future
water supply, flood control and stormwater management services to their citizens. In FY
1997-98, the Quality Communities program is capitalized at approximately $620,000, which
includes $500,000 of cooperative funding of local government projects and approximately
$120,000 of technical assistance. Initial work has begun through the employment of a
consultant to work with each city and county in the district to perform a detailed needs
assessment of each local government in the district. The effort is designed to complement and
add information to the new water resource assessment called for by Chapter 97-160, Laws of
Florida. Comparable or increased funding is expected in future years.

Land Acquisition $1,050,000
For the past several years, the district has maintained an annual land acquisition account of
approximately $1,000,000 of Save-Our-Rivers (documentary stamp tax) funds to assist local
government utilities to purchase wellfield protection areas and new wellfield sites that
accomplish water supply wellfield protection, and water resource management goals. In rural
north Florida, it is often most cost effective to purchase (fee or less than fee) lands suitable for
wellfield development and wellfield protection rather than regulate land uses at the local level
to accomplish wellfield protection. The district provides technical and financial assistance to
encourage local government utilities to implement wellfield protection programs and to locate
wellfields at appropriate sites to avoid or minimize adverse water resource impacts or potential
impacts on existing legal users.

Operations N/A
The Suwannee River Water Management District does not own, operate, or maintain any
water supply or flood control works.








IV.c. FY 1997-98 Related District Expenditures:
SJRWMD


The following is a summary of SJRWMD allocations for water resource management activities
funded for fiscal year 1997-98, followed by a more detailed explanation.



Activity Allocation
Planning and Information $4.4 Million
Minimum Flows and Levels $.62 Million
Cooperative Funding and Technical $2.0 Million
Assistance
Land Acquisition $7.5 Million
Operations $3.05 Million



Planning and Information: $4.4 Million
Planning is a very significant and strategic initiative in this year's budget. The primary focus at
SJRWMD is development of a regional water supply plan, to be completed by the end of 1999.
This plan will comply with the requirements of Chapter 97-160, Laws of Florida, providing the
following information for the SJRWMD priority water resource caution areas:

* Specific water sources and strategies needed to meet water supply demands through 2020.

* A schedule for implementation.

* Identification of funding sources.

SJRWMD is conducting this planning using a public process open to all interested parties.
Five regional workgroups will meet intensively to evaluate options and propose recommen-
dations for the plan. Included for funding in this effort is:

* Additional feasibility investigations by technical consultants.

* Facilitation of workgroups, preparation of updated water use assessments.

* Development and use of groundwater flow models.

* Preparation of the regional water supply plan.








Supporting this planning effort are several necessary data collection and management
initiatives. Currently, SJRWMD is constructing a number ofsurficial and more costly lower
Floridan observation wells as part of the districtwide observation well network. This
information will be used to develop improved groundwater flow models needed for developing
regional water supply plans and monitoring wellfield impacts.

Minimum Flows and Levels: $0.62 Million
Funding is provided to complete minimum flows and levels on waterbodies as identified in the
SJRWMD Priority List submitted November, 1996 in compliance with Executive Order 96-
297, and the annual priority list proposed for submittal to DEP by November 15, 1997. Levels
and flows for approximately 17 lakes, a major riverine system, and a major spring system will
be set during this fiscal year. Funding is included for development of flow models, data
collection, peer review, and implementation in permitting.

Cooperative Funding and Technical Assistance: $2.0 Million
SJRWMD is funding an alternative water supply cooperative funding program, which provides
funding on a 50/50 basis for construction of alternative water supply sources, such as reuse of
reclaimed water. Funding is available on a competitive basis to the most worthy projects. In
addition, SJRWMD is funding the design and monitoring of several pilot projects (local
sponsors will fund construction) that have great potential for solving water supply shortfalls in
the SJRWMD Water Resource Caution Areas. Pilot projects being funding include three
wetland restoration/hydration projects and three artificial recharge projects using drainage well
technology.

Land acquisition: $7.50 Million
Land acquisition funds will be directed toward obtaining property interest in parcels that are
identified as strategic in developing water resource development projects. Several parcels have
been identified as strategic in developing wetland restoration and rehydration projects that
could increase groundwater resource development. The $7.5 million estimate for this purpose
is about 25 percent of the total SJRWMD land acquisition budget available from all sources.

Operations: $3.05 Million
Construction funding is included for several components of the SJRWMD Upper Basin Project
intended to enhance water supply for public supply and agriculture. These include:

* Construction of a new weir structure at Lake Washington for public supply.

* Rediversion project, capturing and storing drainage now diverted from the Upper St. Johns
to the Indian River Lagoon by the C-l canal for public supply, agricultural irrigation, or
augmentation of the St. Johns River.








* Three Forks March Conservation Area, providing storage during wet periods for
downstream benefits (portion attributed to water supply development estimated at 25% of
project cost).

* Aquatic weed control in the Upper St. Johns Basin.

* Artesian Well Plugging program, which serves to enhance groundwater supplies by
promoting plugging of free flowing wells through cooperative cost sharing. During the
past year approximately 48 MGD was saved by capping or plugging flowing wells.









IV d. FY 1997-98 Related District Expenditures:
SFWMD


The following is a summary of SFWMD allocations for water resource and water supply
development activities funded for fiscal year 1997-98, followed by a more detailed explanation.



Activity Allocation
Planning and Information $29.17 Million
Minimum Flows and Levels $0.81 Million
Cooperative Funding and Technical $8.1 Million
Assistance
Land Acquisition $55.96 Million
Operations $10.1 Million



Planning and Information: $29.17 Million
Funds budgeted in this category can be divided into four initiatives: water supply planning, the
Restudy of the Central and Southern Flood Control System, regional modeling, and water
resource data acquisition and analysis.

SFWMD has identified four regional water supply planning areas that together encompass the
entire district: Lower West Coast, Lower East Coast, Upper East Coast, and the Kissimmee
Basin. Water supply planning has been initiated in all areas and the plans are in various stages
of completion. In FY 1997-98, funds are budgeted to develop, complete, or revise regional
water supply plans in each of the four regions. In certain areas of smaller geographic scope,
the district has also identified the need to develop more detailed subregional water supply
plans. Five subregional water supply plans are funded in FY 1997-98: the Caloosahatchee
Basin Plan, North Palm Beach County Plan, South Palm Beach County Plan, Coastal Broward
Plan, and South Dade Plan. Most of the subregional planning efforts are being conducted as
cooperative efforts, with local governments providing a portion of the funding or staffing. In
total, about $8.1 million is budgeted in FY 1997-98 for regional and subregional water supply
initiatives.

SFWMD is conducting a "Restudy" of the Central and Southern Flood Control System (C&SF
System) in conjunction with the Army Corps of Engineers. The purpose of the Restudy is
environmental restoration and water supply. The planning horizon is 2050, and it is expected
that the Restudy will result in large scale structural changes to the C&SF System. SFWMD








has budgeted about $6.8 million in FY 1997-98 for four components of the Restudy:
Comprehensive Review of the C&SF System, Indian River Lagoon Feasibility Study, Water
Preserve Areas Feasibility Study, and the L-28 Feasibility Study. The district's portion of the
costs is 50 percent (25 percent staff time and 25 percent cash contribution). The federal
government is responsible for an equal portion of study costs and implementation costs.

SFWMD has developed extensive expertise in computer modeling to simulate the C&SF
System. About $337, 000 is budgeted in FY 1997-98 to fund regional modeling in support of
a variety of projects, including regional water supply planning and the Restudy.

In FY 1997-98, $13.7 million is budgeted for water resource data acquisition and analysis.
This funds the collection, processing and reporting of hydrologic, water quality and hydro-
geologic data. This data is used to support a variety of initiatives that are conducted by the
district, other governmental entities, and private parties.

Minimum Flows and Levels: $809,109
Funds are budgeted toward development of Minimum Flows and Levels (MFLs) for several
priority water bodies in FY 1997-98. About $77,000 is budgeted to continue development of
MFLs for Lake Okeechobee, the Biscayne Aquifer, and the Everglades. About $75,000 will be
directed toward development of MFLs for the St. Lucie Estuary and $375,000 for the
Caloosahatchee Estuary. Development of MFLs for Biscayne Bay is funded at $250,000 and
the Big Cypress Basin is funded at $37,500.

Cooperative Funding and Technical Assistance: $ 8.1 Million
The district has an Alternative Water Supply Grants Program to cost-share capital water
supply projects in Water Resource Caution Areas. In FY 1997-98, eighteen projects are
funded at $300,000 each or 50 percent of the project cost, whichever is less. Total funding for
this program is $4.9 million. An Aquifer Storage and Recovery project in Dade County is
funded at $2.5 million. This particular project is funded at a higher level because analysis
conducted as part of the regional water supply plan indicated it will have benefits to the entire
regional system. Another $600,000 is budgeted for water conservation initiatives.

Land Acquisition: $55.96 Million
The East Coast Buffer Project will be a series of reservoirs and marshes just east of the
Everglades protective levee in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties. It will capture
stormwater that would otherwise be discharged to the coast. This water will then recharge the
aquifer, satisfy a beneficial use, or be returned to the regional system. The East Coast Buffer
Project will also reduce seepage loss from the Everglades and provide wetland habitat. In FY
1997-98, $53.5 million is budgeted for East Coast Buffer land acquisition.

The Ten Mile Creek Project is part of the Critical Restoration program established by the
federal Water Resource Development Act of 1996. As local sponsor, the district will be
responsible for a portion of the total project cost, estimated to be around $30 million. This








project will reduce excessive discharges to the Indian River Lagoon and provide water supply
benefits. In FY 1997-98, $2.5 million is budgeted to begin land acquisition for the Ten Mile
Creek Project.

Operations: $10.1 Million
The district is responsible for operation and maintenance of the C&SF System. The system is
operated to fulfill the four elements of the district's mission: water supply, flood protection,
water quality, and environmental protection and enhancement. The total SFWMD operational
budget is $50.5 million. It was conservatively estimated that 20 percent of the total, or $10.1
million is related to the water supply element of the mission.








IV.e. FY 1998 Related District Expenditures:
SWFWMD


The following is a summary of SWFWMD allocations for water resource and water supply
development activities funded for fiscal year 1997-98, followed by a more detailed explanation.



Activity Allocation
Planning and Information $7.8 Million
Minimum Flows and Levels $0.80 Million
Cooperative Funding and Technical $50.6 Million
Assistance
Land Acquisition $31.9 Million
Operations Not Applicable


Planning and Information: $7.8 Million
Funding for planning and information includes:

Approximately $1.5 million for efforts associated with the Needs and Sources
update (transitioning into the districtwide assessment).

Regional Water Resource Assessment Projects (WRAPS) for the various water use
caution areas.

Water conservation and alternative source planning and water use estimates
reporting.

Approximately $4.1 million for data collection and analysis, which consists of
surface and ground water monitoring (AGWQMP, AMP, STORET, USGS
contracts, etc.).

$1.5 million for The Regional Observation and Monitoring Program (ROMP),
which provides the technical characterization of the district's ground water
resources and constructs long-term ground water level and quality monitoring sites
(175 well sites with 351 wells as of 1997) in support of the WRAPS and other
efforts.








$700,000 for the Quality of Water Improvement Program (QWIP), which involves
the identification of all known abandoned artesian wells and an incentive-based
program to ensure each is properly abandoned over 1,850 wells have been
plugged since the program inception.

Minimum Flows and Levels: $800,000
SWFWMD's minimum flows and levels initiative has relied extensively on data collection and
analysis, the costs for which are included in the Planning and Information category, above.
However, approximately $800,000 in costs are associated with the establishment of minimum
flows and levels throughout the district. This investment reflects district staff costs,
waterbody-specific analyses, monitoring efforts, scientific peer review and rulemaking support.

Cooperative Funding and Technical Assistance: 50.6 Million
This funding includes approximately $20.6 million in SWFWMD's New Water Sources
Initiative, which is comprised of 18 specific projects intended to develop alternative,
sustainable sources of water. These funds are matched by local cooperators for each water
supply project. This also includes an additional $30 million in basin board funds for coopera-
tive projects and basin initiatives. These funds are also matched by regional or local coopera-
tors in support of conservation, reuse, aquifer storage and recovery and other innovative water
supply projects and related public education. From these funding sources, the district has
proposed the Tampa Bay Partnership Plan to address the need for new, sustainable sources of
water for the Tampa Bay region. The Partnership Plan would provide $183 million in funding
for new, alternative sources of water and an additional $90 million in funding for conservation
initiatives over the next ten years.

Land Acquisition: $31.9 Million
This funding includes SWFWMD's Save Our Rivers and Preservation 2000 funds for
acquiring lands for water supply, water conservation, and resource protection.

Operations: Not Applicable
The SWFWMD does not incur any substantial costs associated with the operation or
maintenance of physical structures with the primary purpose of water resource or water supply
development. However, the district does work with local governments and regional water
supply authorities to make existing structures, originally built for flood protection purposes,
available for water resource and supply development, including the Tampa Bypass canal, which
is currently used as an augmentation source for the City of Tampa's Hillsborough River
Reservoir during low flow conditions and is also being proposed as an additional source for
both ground water and reuse.









V. Coordination of Land Use Planning with Water
Supply Planning


Executive Order 96-297 directs the department to include in this report "a section on efforts
and accomplishments in coordinating regional water supply planning and land use planning" to
show how the department and water management districts are addressing these challenges.
The following information is provided to fulfill this requirement.

Statewide Efforts
Executive Level Water Resources Coordination

In an October, 1996 Memorandum of Agreement on Water Management Coordination, the
executive officers ofDEP and the WMDs agreed to meet on a regular basis to discuss and
exchange information on water resources issues, including linking land use and water supply
planning. The DEP and WMDs must solicit the attendance and input of the executive officers
of the Department of Community Affairs (DCA), the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission,
the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Public Service Commission.

The Agreement also provides that the DEP develop an Annual Water Resources Work Plan
and Annual Progress Reports. A key component of the Water Supply section of the Work
Plan is the charge to "Discuss the ongoing efforts ofDEP, DCA, the Districts, and others to
link land use and water planning..."

The department must also, "...organize regular meetings among staff ofDEP, DCA, the
WMDs, local government representatives, regional planning councils, and others to explore
practical ways within current statutory authorities to link land use and water planning." These
are the meetings of the Land and Water Planning Work Group, discussed below.

Land and Water Planning Work Group

The members of the Land and Water Planning Work Group (LWPWG) come from the staffs of
the five WMDs, DEP, DCA, Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission, Florida Regional Councils Association, the Florida League of
Cities, and the Florida Association of Counties. The purpose of the group is to facilitate the
integration of land and water planning and management by serving as a forum for communica-
tion, clearly identifying land and water planning issues, and cooperatively devising solutions to
land and water planning problems.

The LWPWG also seeks to promote broad government and public participation in addressing
land and water issues, aid information transfer between various levels of governments and
agencies, and provide input to other groups regarding the improvement of coordination on








land and water planning issues. The group was instrumental in planning and sponsoring the
American Assembly Conference, discussed below.

American Assembly Conference and Position Paper

Recently, the most targeted effort to address land and water planning issues was the May,
1997 American Assembly Conference The State ofLand & Water: Forging Stronger Linkages.
The conference was co-sponsored by DEP, the WMDs, DCA, the Florida League of Cities, the
Florida Association of Counties, and the Florida Regional Councils Association. The
SWFWMD took the lead in organizing this conference.

Over 200 people representing all levels of government and the private sector met to discuss
successes and challenges to linking land and water planning, and to propose solutions and
actions to address the challenges. At the close of the discussions, the participants reviewed
and adopted a "Position Paper" which identifies past and present linkage efforts, and lists
recommendations for reform.

Water Planning Coordination Group

As described in other sections of this report, the 1997 Water Bill directs the water management
districts to conduct districtwide Water Supply Assessments, establish water supply planning
regions, and in areas where existing or reasonably anticipated sources are not adequate for
projected needs, to initiate development of Regional Water Supply Plans. The Water Planning
Coordination Group (WPCG) was formed to coordinate related activities of DEP, the WMDs,
and DCA.

The WPCG recognizes that a key task under the new legislation is to develop a solid,
consistent framework for regional water supply planning, including coordination between
water supply planning and land use planning, particularly in estimating future growth in order
to provide accurate water demand projections for public water supply. The group is
developing guidance to help ensure statewide consistent approaches, including an outline of
minimum contents and a uniform Format and Guidelines for the Water Supply Assessments
and Regional Water Supply Plans.

Growth Management Coordinator's Conference
The Department of Community Affairs has been holding an annual Growth Management
Coordinators Conference over the past few years that involves the eleven Regional Planning
Councils, five WMDs, DEP and other state agencies. The focus of these conferences has been
on the interagency coordination of such growth management issues as linking land use and
water management planning and Florida's sustainability.









Regional Accomplishments


At the regional level, the WMDs have numerous programs in place to work with individual
local governments on water and growth-related issues. Some of the highlights for each WMD
are summarized below.

Northwest Florida Water Management District

The NWFWMD performs some land use/water supply coordination functions through the
review of local government comprehensive plans and amendments and by providing technical
assistance to local governments. However, financial limitations have prevented the district
from implementing a comprehensive program to address linkages between land use and water
supply planning. In the future, the district intends to distribute the districtwide water supply
assessment to all local governments for use in their land use planning efforts and to offer
assistance with the use and interpretation of the information.

Suwannee River Water Management District

Since 1995, Levy County has been working with SWFWMD and SRWMD to develop and
implement the Levy County Water Plan (LCWP). Based on the format of the District Water
Management Plans, the LCWP identifies water resource issues and strategies for the four areas
of responsibility covered in the DWMPs. Relevant plans, policies, and programs of local
governments and the water management districts are referenced, and specific tasks to address
the issues are recommended.

Water supply issues addressed in the LCWP include resource availability investigations
(minimum flows and levels), demand estimates and projections for major use categories, and
improving source protection for public and domestic supplies. Implementation measures
undertaken so far have resulted in enhanced coordination between local and district staff, leak
detection analyses for municipalities, assistance with conservation land acquisition, and
improving data, maps, and analyses for use in local comprehensive plans. Continued
implementation will focus on planning and coordination in and around Municipal Services
Districts, where most of the county's future growth is planned.

St. Johns River Water Management District

The St. Johns River WMD is currently involved in reviews of local government comprehensive
plan amendments, DRI reviews, and courtesy reviews of the Evaluation and Appraisal Reports
(EARs) that local governments are required to complete.

In order to link land use and water planning, DRIs and local plan amendments are screened to
determine if they are in any special areas such as Priority Water Resource Caution Areas, areas
of significant recharge, contaminated ground water sites, or areas with established minimum
flows and levels. Staff relies on best available information, especially the geographic
information system (GIS) maps prepared by SJRWMD, to identify potential issues and to
recommend alternatives when possible.








Although WMDs have no formal authority in the EAR process, SJRWMD has offered to make
courtesy reviews of EAR documents for those local governments that request it. Some of the
main focuses of the EAR courtesy reviews have been to encourage local governments to
include new water use projection information, recognize Priority Water Resource Caution
Areas as identified by SJRWMD, and to suggest that future plan amendments incorporate
water supply source information, including alternative sources, where needed.

SJRWMD has made an aggressive effort-to develop and distribute technical data and decision-
making tools to local government officials and staff to assist them as they develop and revise
their plans. These materials also help develop an awareness of water supply issues.

Some examples of the data and tools made available are: the Local Government Outreach
Center, EAR Data Directory, needs and sources assessment, integrated plan section of the
District Water Management Plan (DWMP), and county atlases. A "Monthly Mailer" with a
variety of technical information and the number of consumptive use permits issued by county is
provided to each local government each month. All technical reports, GIS maps, and data in
other formats are provided to local governments at no cost. The programs described below
are designed to assist local governments with information on specific water resource issues.

Source Protection Program: SJRWMD offers to provide local governments with model-based
data concerning the extent of zones of contribution around public supply wells as a basis for
local wellhead protection programs. District staff provide assistance in the development of
local regulations to protect water quality within wellhead protection areas. In addition, a map
of the district has been prepared showing categories of recharge (inches per year). Upon
request by a local government, the district will delineate areas of significant recharge.as a basis
for implementing 1996 legislation authorizing reduced tax assessments to encourage their
protection. SJRWMD completed the mapping of Orange County for this program in this fiscal
year.

Needs and Sources Assessment Program: Numerous workshops have been held with local
elected officials and staff to review findings from SJRWMD's 1994 needs and sources
assessment, and to encourage involvement in the District's water supply planning process. A
Water Utilities Advisory Board (WUAB) was created by the Governing Board to address
technical assistance needs by utilities and local governments. The WUAB recommended
priority investigations for potential alternative water supplies. These investigations have been
underway for over a year and all will be completed by November 1997.

South Florida Water Management District

SFWMD has been very involved with development of Evaluation and Appraisal Reports
(EARs) for local government Comprehensive Growth Management Plans. The district
provided technical information for the local governments to use in developing the Reports and
participated in committees that were established by several local governments. SFWMD also
participated in all of the technical assistance workshops that the Department of Community
Affairs (DCA) conducted to facilitate the EAR process.








Local governments have also participated in all regional water supply planning efforts. Local
governments and DCA are represented on all water supply advisory committees. Urban water
demand projections used in all water supply plans were based on local government Compre-
hensive Plan population projections. Several subregional water supply planning efforts are
being conducted as joint efforts with local governments providing a portion of the funding and
staffing.

SFWMD has worked very closely with local governments in conducting the Restudy of the
Central and Southern Flood Control System. The Governor's Commission for Sustainable
South Florida involved local governments in development the Conceptual Plan proposed for
the Restudy. Local governments were also involved in the Water Preserve Area Feasibility
Study by participating in workshops and developing weighting criteria.

Southwest Florida Water Management District

The SWFWMD has been an active participant in attempting to enhance growth management in
Florida through better linking its water resource planning and management activities with land
use responsibilities of local, regional and state governments. This is accomplished on a daily
basis through a variety of means, such as activities of Government Affairs Coordinators
(GAC's), Local Government Planning Assistance, regulatory coordination, provision of
technical assistance, and land management agreements for district-owned lands.

Three particularly notable land and water linkage initiatives have been taken: 1) Leadership in
the statewide American Assembly conference The State of Land and Water: Forging Stronger
Linkages described earlier; 2) participation in developing the Levy County Water Management
Plan, previously described in the SRWMD section; and 3) "Linking Land and Water'Manage-
ment in Northwest Hillsborough County."

The Northwest Hillsborough project is a collaboratively funded and developed strategic plan of
the district (through its Northwest Hillsborough Basin Board) and Hillsborough County'
(through both its Growth Management Department and the City/County Planning Commis-
sion) that was published in late 1996. The goal was to develop a strategy that would blend
community values and expert knowledge into a set of integrated water management recom-
mendations. Desired outcomes include both an improved natural environment in northwest
Hillsborough County and a new model for interagency and local community collaboration. An
independently facilitated public input process was combined with staff efforts of the agencies
to create action-oriented strategies for three key areas: 1) Excellent Water Management; 2) A
Livable Rural Lifestyle; and 3) Sustainable Natural Systems.

The resulting recommendations have been endorsed by the decision makers (Boards and
Commissions) of all involved entities, and are considered a supplement to the Local Govern-
ment Comprehensive Plan and the SWFWMD District Water Management Plan. All
recommendations will require subsequent actions, and encompass proposed regulatory
standards (including modifications to the local plan and land development regulations), as well
as coordinated strategies for capital investment and budgeting.








Regional Planning Councils
Regional Planning Councils (RPCs) are each responsible for adopting a Strategic Regional
Policy Plan (SRPP). By law, local government comprehensive plans, and plan amendments,
are required to be consistent with the SRPP adopted by their respective RPC. For the past two
years, the Department of Community Affairs has entered into contracts with the five RPCs that
lie within the South Florida Water Management District's hydrological boundaries in order to
have each RPC address the recommendations of the Governor's Commission For A Sustainable
South Florida. The October 1, 1995, "Initial Report" of the Governor's Commission contained
major recommendations on land use, water management and intergovernmental coordination.
During 1997, the five RPCs jointly assessed their newly adopted Strategic Regional Policy
Plans against DCA-identified specific recommendations of the Initial Report, presented their
proposed changes to their SRPPs at the July, 1997, meeting of the Governor's Commission,
and are currently in the process of undertaking rule-making to adopt the proposed changes.








VI. Meeting Florida's Water Challenge


A solid foundation already exists for developing regional water supply plans pursuant to the
1997 amendments to Chapter 373, F.S. The Water Resources Implementation Rule, the
Florida Water Plan, and District Water Management Plans have established the statewide
policy, planning and coordination frameworks critical to regional water supply planning. As
part of earlier efforts, the water management districts have each completed substantial work
regarding groundwater basin water resource inventories, regional needs and sources assess-
ments, and establishment of minimum flows and levels. These previous efforts strongly
support current objectives for providing adequate, dependable supplies while protecting natural
systems and sustaining water resources.

The 1997 amendments to the Water Resources Act and Executive Order 96-297 direct the
water management districts to conduct regional water supply assessments and to initiate water
supply planning in areas where existing or reasonably anticipated water supplies are determined
to be inadequate for projected 20-year needs. These legislative and executive directives also
prescribe schedules for completion of tasks:

Completion of Regional Water Supply Assessments -- July 1, 1998

Initiation of Regional Water Supply Planning where needed -- October 1, 1998

Completion of Water Supply Plans -- 18 Months after initiation, unless additional
time is justified (Executive Order 96-297)

Regional water supply planning, implemented within the context of comprehensive water
resource planning, presents a monumental challenge for Florida but its success is critical to
meeting the future water needs of Florida's growing population while ensuring long-term
sustainability of the state's water resources and related natural systems. DEP and the WMDs
are working closely with other agencies and affected parties to implement the regional water
supply directives contained in the 1997 amendments to the Water Resources Act, and it is
anticipated that the required tasks will be completed as directed in the legislation.








Appendix A:


Executive Order 96-297








Ftate onf jInribra

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

EXECUTIVE ORDER NUMBER 96-297


WHEREAS, Florida has an abundance of water resources and

related natural'systems, whose sustainability'is vital to the

economic and environmental health of the State,-and

WHEREAS, Florida water law is founded on the principles that

water is a state resource that belongs to the public, and'that

water use must be managed both to protect Florida's rivers,

lakes, wetlands, aquifers, and coastal waters and to meet the

water supply needs of the public, and

WHEREAS, in certain areas of the state, withdrawals and

diversions from surface watercourses, aquifers, and surface

waters have caused harm to water resources and related natural

systems, emphasizing the need for adequate funding and prudent

development of water supplies within the context of coordinated

water supply and land use planning, and

WHEREAS, we must adequately inventory, conserve, manage, and

develop our water resources in a manner to ensure their

sustainability and the'sustainability of related natural systems,

while meeting the water supply needs of the public, and









WHEREAS, Chapters 163, 373, 380, and 403, Florida Statutes,

and various other laws, provide authority and direction to

preserve and protect the waters of the state and to plan, manage,

and provide for their proper use consistent with the public

interest, and

WHEREAS, the Land Use and Water Planning Task Force and the

Water Management District Review Commission provided

recommendations regarding water resources issues, many of which

can be implemented-under existing statutory authority, and'

WHEREAS, the Governor has the constitutional duty to

faithfully execute Florida law, and the Water Management

Districts, under the general supervisory authority of the

Department of Environmental Protection pursuant to section

373.026(7), Florida Statutes, serve as trustees of Florida's

publicly owned water resources.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, LAWTON CHILES, Governor of the State of

Florida, by the powers vested in me by the Constitution and laws

of the State of Florida, do hereby promulgate the following

executive order, effective immediately:

Section ".

To promote the establishment of minimum flows and levels, as

needed, throughout the state, the Department of Environmental








Protection (hereinafter the "Department") is directed to work

with the Water Management Districts (hereinafter the "Districts")

to ensure that by November 15, 1996, and annually thereafter,

each District submits to the Department a priority list and

schedule for the establishment of minimum flows and levels for

surface watercourses, aquifers, and surface waters within the

District.

The initial priority list and the updated priority lists are

to be based upon the importance of the waters to the state"or

region and the existence of, or potential for, significant harm

as set forth in section 373.042(1), Florida Statutes.

Special consideration is to be given to establishing minimum

flows and levels for waters within designated water resource

caution areas.

It is expected that the Southwest Florida Water Management

District will include on its initial priority list waters within

the area described in section 373.042(2), Florida Statutes.

Section 2

The Department shall work with the Districts, providing

technical and staff assistance where possible, to help ensure

that the Districts:








(1) Complete the establishment of minimum flows and levels

for surface watercourses, aquifers, and surface waters on their

initial priority lists by the end of fiscal year 1999, except

that establishment of minimum flows and levels for waters within

the area described in section 373.042(2), Florida Statutes, is to

be completed pursuant to the time requirement in section

373.042(3), Florida Statutes.

(2) Base the establishment of minimum flows and levels on

scientific determinations of the sustainability of water

resources and related natural systems, using the best information

available.

(3) Re-evaluate minimum flows and levels periodically and

revise them when necessary.

(4) Implement minimum flows and levels equitably and

fairly, and in a manner to help ensure the sustainability of

water resources and related natural systems.

(5) Develop consistent methods for establishing and

implementing minimum flows and levels where needed and

practicable, including consistent processes for peer review.

However, peer review for minimum flows and levels for waters

within the area described in section 373.042(2), Florida








Statutes, is to be conducted pursuant to section 373.042(4),

Florida Statutes.

Section 1.

The Department is directed to work with the Districts to

help ensure comprehensive water supply planning by the Districts,

for at least a 20-year planning period, which is done in

coordination with land use planning, which considers other local

and regional water supply plans, which is open to the public, and

which includes broad participation by interested and affected

parties, within.the following framework:

(1) By July 1, 1997, one or more water supply planning

regions shall be identified within each District, which singly or

together encompass the entire district, based on surface

watersheds, groundwater basins, and other factors, as

appropriate.

(2) By July 1, 1998, a district-wide water supply

assessment shall be completed which determines for each water

supply planning region, for at least a 20-year planning period:

(a) Existing legal uses, reasonably anticipated future

needs, and existing and reasonably anticipated sources of water

and conservation efforts.








(b) whether existing and reasonably anticipated sources of

water and conservation efforts are adequate to supply water for

all existing legal uses and reasonably anticipated future needs,

and to sustain the natural systems.

(c) Whether harm to the water resources or related natural

systems has occurred or is reasonably expected to occur, wholly

or partially as a result of water withdrawals.

(3) By October 1, 1998, regional water supply planning shall

be initiated for each region where sources of water are.

determined not to be adequate for the planning period to supply

water for all existing legal uses and reasonably anticipated

future needs, and to sustain the natural systems, or where harm

to the water resources or related natural systems has occurred or

is reasonably expected to occur wholly or partially as a result

of water withdrawals, in order to meet the water supply needs of

all existing and future legal uses and the natural systems within

the region.

(a) Each regional water supply plan is to be completed

within eighteen months of being initiated, unless a delay is

justified.

(b) Each regional water supply plan shall identify water

supply options, including alternative water supplies, which are







environmentally, technically, and economically feasible for the

planning region; a proposed schedule and projected costs for

implementing feasible options; and funding mechanisms.

(c) Each regional water supply plan shall incorporate the

minimum flows and levels that are established within the planning

region.

(4) The district-wide assessments and the regional water

supply plans are to be updated at least every five years.

Additional regional water supply planning is to be initiated and

completed, as needed pursuant to the guidelines in this section.

(5) Beginning November 15, 1997, and annually thereafter,

the Department will submit to the Office of the Governor and the

Legislature a report on the status of water supply planning in

each District. Working in cooperation with the Districts, the

Department of Community Affairs, and local government, the

Department will include in the report a section on efforts and

accomplishments in coordinating regional water supply planning

and land use planning.

(6) This section is not intended to restrict water supply

planning efforts, but to ensure accountability to the people of

this State and provide a consistent framework within which to

conduct regionally based water supply planning.







Section 4.

In furtherance of water supply planning pursuant to section

3 of this Executive Order, the Office of the Governor will

develop and conduct a process to investigate and formulate

recommendations on effective means for water supply development

and funding and, as necessary, water supply planning. This

process will be open to the public and will.encourage and provide

the opportunity for the voluntary participation of all interested

private interests, levels of government, and members of-.:the

Legislature. For purposes of this executive order, "water supply

development" means the development and distribution of adequate,

safe, and dependable water supplies, including traditional and

alternative supplies, for all existing and projected legal uses,

in a manner which.sustains water resources and related natural

systems.

(1) In the consideration of local, regional, and statewide

issues and approaches, as appropriate, this process will address:

(a) Mechanisms for water supply development, including the

legal and institutional framework needed for water supply

development, and the assignment of responsibilities.

(b) The relationship of water supply planning and land use

planning to water supply development and funding.








(c) Various funding options for water supply development,

with consideration of new or existing federal, state, regional,

or local government or private sources, joint ventures, grant and

loan programs, water use fees, rate structures, and others.

(d) Existing and potential incentives for, and obstacles

to, development of economically, environmentally, and technically

feasible water supplies, with particular emphasis on water

conservation, alternative water supply development, and the

application of innovative technologies.

(2) This process may include discussion of other related

issues, as appropriate, including relevant recommendations of the

Land Use and Water Planning Task Force and the Water Management

District Review Commission.

(3) The Departments of Environmental Protection and

Community Affairs are directed and the Public Service Commission,

the Office of Public Counsel, and the Water Management Districts

are requested to provide assistance as needed to carry out the

provisions of this section.

(4) By February 1, 1997, the Office of the Governor shall

submit to the Governor and the Legislature appropriate

recommendations, if any, developed through the process conducted

pursuant to this section. This process may be continued beyond








February, 1997, as deemed appropriate, to develop further

recommendations.

Section 5.

The Office of the Governor recognizes the extensive and

diligent work of the Water Management District Review Commission

and commends the Commission for its general support for

maintaining Florida Water Law and for maintaining and improving

Florida's system of water management.

Consistent with the Commission's recommendation regarding

Executive approval of District budgets, the Legislature has

enacted and the Office of the Governor will implement section

373.536(5), Florida Statutes.

Many of the Commission's recommendations which address

improving District operations and programs are consistent with

Florida law and can be implemented under existing statutory

authority. The Department is directed to work with the Districts

to develop a report, to be submitted to the Governor by November

1, 1996, which lists the recommendations of the Water Management

District Review Commission the Department and Districts are

implementing or will implement under their existing statutory

authority, and how they are implementing or will implement the

listed recommendations. The Department will provide copies of







the report to the Legislature and will make copies available to

other interested parties, including local governments.

Section 6.

This executive shall expire five years from the date it

becomes effective unless an extension is required to further the

goals stated herein.



IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my hand and have
caused the Great Seal of -lt'e State
of Florida to be affixed at
S1 Tssee, the Capitol, this
d of September, 1996.



GOVERNOR


ATTEST:



SECRET ARY OF STATE







Appendix B: Key Water Supply Planning
Provisions in Chapter 373, F.S.









Appendix B: Key Water Supply Planning

Provisions in Chapter 373, F.S.

373.016 Declaration of policy. -
(1) The waters in the state are among its basic resources. Such waters have not heretofore been conserved or
fully controlled so as to realize their full beneficial use.
(2) The department and the governing board shall take into account cumulative impacts on water resources
and manage those resources in a manner to ensure their sustainability.
(3) It is further declared to be the policy of the Legislature:
(a) To provide for the management of water and related land resources;
(b) To promote the conservation, replenishment, recapture, enhancement, development, and proper
utilization of surface and ground water;
(c) To develop and regulate dams, impoundments, reservoirs, and other works and to provide water
storage for beneficial purposes;
(d) To promote the availability of sufficient water for all existing and future reasonable-beneficial uses
and natural systems;
(e) To prevent damage from floods, soil erosion, and excessive drainage;
(f) To minimize degradation of water resources caused by the discharge of stormwater,
(g) To preserve natural resources, fish, and wildlife;
(h) To promote the public policy set forth in s. 403.021;
(i) To promote recreational development, protect public lands, and assist in maintaining the naviga-
bility of rivers and harbors; and
(j) Otherwise to promote the health, safety, and general welfare of the people of this state.

In implementing this chapter, the department and the governing board shall construe and apply the policies in
this subsection as a whole, and no specific policy is to be construed or applied in isolation from the other
policies in this subsection.
(4) The Legislature recognizes that the water resource problems of the state vary from region to region, both in
magnitude and complexity. It is therefore the intent of the Legislature to vest in the Department of Environ-
mental Protection or its successor agency the power and responsibility to accomplish the conservation,
protection, management, and control of the waters of the state and with sufficient flexibility and discretion to
accomplish these ends through delegation of appropriate powers to the various water management districts. The
department may exercise any power herein authorized to be exercised by a water management district; however,
to the greatest extent practicable, such power should be delegated to the governing board of a water
management district.
(5) It is further declared the policy of the Legislature that each water management district, to the extent
consistent with effective management practices, shall approximate its fiscal and budget policies and procedures
to those of the state.

373.036 Florida water plan; district water management plans.-

(1) FLORIDA WATER PLAN.-In cooperation with the water management districts, regional water supply
authorities, and others, the department shall develop the Florida water plan. The Florida water plan shall
include, but not be limited to:
(a) The programs and activities of the department related to water supply, water quality, flood protec-
tion and floodplain management, and natural systems.
(b) The water quality standards of the department.
(c) The district water management plans.
(d) Goals, objectives, and guidance for the development and review of programs, rules, and plans re-
lating to water resources, based on statutory policies and directives. The state water policy rule, re-
named the water resource implementation rule pursuant to s. 373.019(20), shall serve as this part of










the plan. Amendments or additions to this part of the Florida water plan shall be adopted by the
department as part of the water resource implementation rule. In accordance with s. 373.114, the
department shall review rules of the water management districts for consistency with this rule.
Amendments to the water resource implementation rule must be adopted by the secretary of the
department and be submitted to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Represen-
tatives within 7 days after publication in the Florida Administrative Weekly. Amendments shall not
become effective until the conclusion of the next regular session of the Legislature following their
adoption.
(2) DISTRICT WATER MANAGEMENT PLANS.--
(a) Each governing board shall develop a district water management plan for water resources within
its region, which plan addresses water supply, water quality, flood protection and floodplain manage-
ment, and natural systems. The district water management plan shall be based on at least a 20-year
planning period, shall be developed and revised in cooperation with other agencies, regional water
supply authorities, units of government, and interested parties, and shall be updated at least once every
5 years. The governing board shall hold a public hearing at least 30 days in advance of completing the
development or revision of the district water management plan.
(b) The district water management plan shall include, but not be limited to:
1. The scientific methodologies for establishing minimum flows and levels under s. 373.042,
and all established minimum flows and levels.
2. Identification of one or more water supply planning regions that singly or together encom-
pass the entire district.
3. Technical data and information prepared under ss. 373.0391 and 373.0395.
4. A districtwide water supply assessment, to be completed no later than July 1, 1998, which
determines for each water supply planning region:
a. Existing legal uses, reasonably anticipated future needs, and existing and rea-
sonably anticipated sources of water and conservation efforts; and
b. Whether existing and reasonably anticipated sources of water and conservation
efforts are adequate to supply water for all existing legal uses and reasonably antici-
pated future needs and to sustain the water resources and related naturalsystems.
5. Any completed regional water supply plans.
(c) If necessary for implementation, the governing board shall adopt by rule or order relevant portions
of the district water management plan, to the extent of its statutory authority.
(d) In the formulation of the district water management plan, the governing board shall give due con-
sideration to:
1. The attainment of maximum reasonable-beneficial use of water resources.
2. The maximum economic development of the water resources consistent with other uses.
3. The management of water resources for such purposes as environmental protection, drain-
age, flood control, and water storage.
4. The quantity of water available for application to a reasonable-beneficial use.
5. The prevention of wasteful, uneconomical, impractical, or unreasonable uses of water
resources.
6. Presently exercised domestic use and permit rights.
7. The preservation and enhancement of the water quality of the state.
8. The state water resources policy as expressed by this chapter.
(3) The department and governing board shall give careful consideration to the requirements of public
recreation and to the protection and procreation offish and wildlife. The department or governing board may
prohibit or restrict other future uses on certain designated bodies of water which may be inconsistent with these
objectives.
(4) The governing board may designate certain uses in connection with a particular source of supply which,
because of the nature of the activity or the amount of water required, would constitute an undesirable use for
which the governing board may deny a permit.
(5) The governing board may designate certain uses in connection with a particular source of supply which,
because of the nature of the activity or the amount of water required, would result in an enhancement or


I









improvement of the water resources of the area. Such uses shall be preferred over other uses in the event of
competing applications under the permitting systems authorized by this chapter.
(6) The department, in cooperation with the Executive Office of the Governor, or its successor agency, may
add to the Florida water plan any other information, directions, or objectives it deems necessary or desirable for
the guidance of the governing boards or other agencies in the administration and enforcement of this chapter.

373.0361 Regional water supply planning.-
(1) By October 1, 1998, the governing board shall initiate water supply planning for each water supply
planning region identified in the district water management plan under s. 373.036, where it determines that
sources of water are not adequate for the planning period to supply water for all existing and projected
reasonable-beneficial uses and to sustain the water resources and related natural systems. The planning must be
conducted in an open public process, in coordination and cooperation with local governments, regional water
supply authorities, government-owned and privately owned water utilities, self-suppliers, and other affected and
interested parties. A determination by the governing board that initiation of a regional water supply plan for a
specific planning region is not needed pursuant to this section shall be subject to s. 120.569. The governing
board shall re-evaluate such a determination at least once every five years and shall initiate a regional water
supply plan, if needed, pursuant to this subsection.
(2) Each regional water supply plan shall be based on at least a 20-year planning period and shall include, but
not be limited to:
(a) A water supply development component that includes:
1. A quantification of the water supply needs for all existing and reasonably projected future
uses within the planning horizon. The level-of-certainty planning goal associated with identi-
fying the water supply needs of existing and future reasonable-beneficial uses shall be based
upon meeting those needs for a 1-in-10 year drought event.
2. A list of water source options for water supply development, including traditional and
alternative sources, from which local government, government-owned and privately owned
utilities, self-suppliers, and others may choose, which will exceed the needs identified in sub-
paragraph 1.
3. For each option listed in subparagraph 2., the estimated amount of water available for use
and the estimated costs of and potential sources of funding for water supply development.
4. A list of water supply development projects that meet the criteria in s. 373.0831(4).
(b) A water resource development component that includes:
1. A listing of those water resource development projects that support water supply develop-
ment.
2. For each water resource development project listed:
a. An estimate of the amount of water to become available through the project.
b. The timetable for implementing or constructing the project and the estimated
costs for implementing, operating, and maintaining the project.
c. Sources of funding and funding needs.
d. Who will implement the project and how it will be implemented.
(c) The recovery and prevention strategy described in s. 373.0421(2).
(d) A funding strategy for water resource development projects, which shall be reasonable
and sufficient to pay the cost of constructing or implementing all of the listed projects.
(e) Consideration of how the options addressed in paragraphs (a) and (b) serve the public
interest or save costs overall by preventing the loss of natural resources or avoiding greater
future expenditures for water resource development or water supply development. However,
unless adopted by rule, these considerations do not constitute final agency action.
(f) The technical data and information applicable to the planning region which are contained
in the district water management plan and are necessary to support the regional water supply
plan.
(g) The minimum flows and levels established for water resources within the planning
region.










(3) Regional water supply plans initiated or completed by July 1, 1997, shall be revised, if necessary, to include
a water supply development component and a water resource development component as described in
paragraphs (2)(a) and (b).
(4) Governing board approval of a regional water supply plan shall not be subject to the rulemaking
requirements of Chapter 120. However, any portion of an approved regional water supply plan which affects
the substantial interests of a party shall be subject to s. 120.569.
(5) By November 15, 1997, and annually thereafter, the department shall submit to the Governor and the
Legislature a report on the status of regional water supply planning in each district. The report shall include:
(a) A compilation of the estimated costs of and potential sources of funding for water resource
development and water supply development projects, as identified in the water management district
regional water supply plans.
(b) A description of each district's progress toward achieving its water resource development objec-
tives, as directed by s. 373.0831(3), including the district's implementation of its 5-year water resource
development work program.
(6) Nothing contained in the water supply development component of the district water management plan shall
be construed to require local governments, government-owned or privately owned water utilities, self-suppliers,
or other water suppliers to select a water supply development option identified in the component merely
because it is identified in the plan. However, this subsection shall not be construed to limit the authority of the
department or governing board under part II.

373.0421 Establishment and implementation of minimum flows and levels.-
(1) ESTABLISHMENT.-
(a) When establishing minimum flows and levels pursuant to s. 373.042, the department or governing
board shall consider changes and structural alterations to watersheds, surface waters, and aquifers and
the effects such changes or alterations have had, and the constraints such changes or alterations have
placed, on the hydrology of an affected watershed, surface water, or aquifer, provided that nothing in
this paragraph shall allow significant harm as provided by s. 373.042(1) caused by withdrawals.
(b) Exclusions.-
1. The Legislature recognizes that certain water bodies no longer serve their historical hydro-
logic functions. The Legislature also recognizes that recovery of these water bodies to histori-
cal hydrologic conditions may not be economically or technically feasible, and that such
recovery effort could cause adverse environmental or hydrologic impacts. Accordingly, the
department or governing board may determine that setting a minimum flow or level for such
a water body based on its historical condition is not appropriate.
2. The department or the governing board is not required to establish minimum flows or
levels pursuant to s. 373.042 for surface water bodies less than 25 acres in area, unless the
water body or bodies, individually or cumulatively, have significant economic, environmental,
or hydrologic value.
3. The department or the governing board shall not set minimum flows or levels pursuant to
s. 373.042 for surface water bodies constructed prior to the requirement for a permit, or pur-
suant to an exemption, a permit, or a reclamation plan which regulates the size, depth, or
function of the surface water body under the provisions of chapter 373, chapter 378, or
chapter 403, unless the constructed surface water body is of significant hydrologic value or is
an essential element of the water resources of the area. The exclusions of this paragraph shall
not apply to the Everglades Protection Area, as defined in s. 373.4592(2)(h).
(2) If the existing flow or level in a water body is below, or is projected to fall within 20 years below,
the applicable minimum flow or level established pursuant to s. 373.042, the department or governing
board, as part of the regional water supply plan described in s. 373.0361, shall expeditiously imple-
ment a recovery or prevention strategy, which includes the development of additional water supplies
and other actions, consistent with the authority granted by this chapter, to:
(a) Achieve recovery to the established minimum flow or level as soon as practicable; or
(b) Prevent the existing flow or level from falling below the established minimum flow or
level. The recovery or prevention strategy shall include phasing or a timetable which will
allow for the provision of sufficient water supplies for all existing and projected reasonable-









beneficial uses, including development of additional water supplies and implementation of
conservation and other efficiency measures concurrent with to the extent practical, and to
offset, reductions in permitted withdrawals, consistent with the provisions of this chapter.
(3) The provisions of this section are supplemental to any other specific requirements or authority
provided by law. Minimum flows and levels shall be reevaluated periodically and revised as needed.







Appendix C: Water Planning Timelines




Appendix C
Water Supply Planning Timeline

Event 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

WMDs: Identify one or more water supply
regions in each district


WMDs: Complete a district-wide water supply
assessment (20-year planning period)


WMDs: Develop regional water supply plans
for regions with supply problems "


WMDs: Prepare annual Progress Report on (DWMPs) (Revise DWMPs)
District Water Management Plans A A A A A A A


DEP: Submit to Gov. and Legislature a report
on water supply planning at each district


DEP: Prepare annual Progress Report on (FWP) (Revise FWP)
Florida Water Plan A A A A A




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs