Title: Floods on Horse Creek From The Mouth to SR 62
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00004679/00001
 Material Information
Title: Floods on Horse Creek From The Mouth to SR 62
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Prepared by the Staff of the Southwest Florida Water Management District/Peace River Basin Board
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - Floods on Horse Creek From The Mouth to SR 62 (JDV Box 76)
General Note: Box 27, Folder 1 ( East Central and Central Florida Regional Planning Council - 1995-1997 ), Item 1
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00004679
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

People who own property within flood
prone areas should be particularly interested
in the U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD) flood insurance
program. It is a federally-subsidized program
authorized by Congress in 1968 to protect
property owners, who up to that time were
unable to get coverage through the private
insurance industry. The program for the
first time made flood insurance available
to individuals at affordable rates. In return
for the Federal subsidy, state and local
governments are required to adopt certain
minimum land use measures to reduce or
avoid future flood damage within their
flood prone areas. The most important
of these requires floor levels of all new
construction to be located above the 100-
year flood elevation. Local building or
zoning departments can be contacted for
information on specific building require-
ments.


In December 1973, Congress passed the
Flood Disaster Protection Act, greatly
expanding the available limits of flood in-
surance coverage and imposing two new
requirements on property owners and
communities. First, after March 1, 1974,
property owners in communities where
flood insurance is being sold must purchase
flood insurance to be eligible for any new or
additional Federal or federally related
financial assistance for any buildings
located in areas identified by HUD as
having special flood hazards. Second, all
identified flood prone communities must
enter the program by July 1, 1975.

The insurance is available to any property
owner in a community that has made ap-
plication to the flood insurance program and
has been approved by HUD. Flood in-
surance information can le obtained from
any licensed property and casualty in-
surance agent or broker.


FLOODS

ON

HORSE CREEK

FROM THE MOUTH

TO S.R. 62


DE SOTO &


HARDEE COUNTIES,
FLORIDA


PREPARED BY THE STAFF OF THE
SOUTH WEST FLORIDA WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
PEACE RIVER BASIN BOARD
BROOKSVILLE, FLORIDA
FEBRUARY, 197 7


L










WHY STUDY FLOOD PLAINS

The flood plain was created by Nature as a
"holding area" to store excess water.
Surrounding every natural body of water, it
is delineated by the topography, geology
and climatic conditions of the region. When
the flood plain is left undistrubed by man,
there are no "flood disasters."

It is only when man comes on the scene,
building his home or business within the
flood prone area, that the disasters occur.
Though the land probably appeared "high
and dry" when purchased, it will inevitably
be flooded when heavy rains, hurricanes, or
sometimes even normal rainy seasons
occur.

As part of the SWFWMD's flood plain
management program, flood-stage frequen-
cies are determined to identify flood
prone areas. This data is gathered for three
specific purposes. First, it is provided to
local governments for use in their zoning or
building regulations. Second, the data is
provided to the public to inform interested
citizens of potential flood hazards in their
area. Finally, the data is used by the
District for the enforcement of its official
rules and regulations.




FLOOD PLAIN MANAGEMENT

Historically, man has attempted to control
floods with large scale public works projects
such as channelization, levees, floodwalls,
fill and dams. When levees and fill are
placed in a natural flood plain, they reduce
the ability of the area to store or convey
excess water, and thereby increase flood
elevations in the creek. Flood control
projects tend to instill confidence for
development in the protected flood plain.
However, if the project fails, damage may
be much more extensive because of
increased flood plain development.


Florida's flood plains were formed by
Nature as drainage channels and holding
basins for flood water resulting from heavy
rainfall. Prior to development in the flood
plain, floods occurred periodically but there
was little economic damage. Now, annual
flood losses in the United States total about
$1-billion, and are increasing despite
federal investments of more than $9-billion
in flood control projects in the last 30 years.



Natural Flood Plain
With Normal Flow


Natural Flood Plain
With 100 bar Flood
S;A __


Constricted Flood Plain
a With Normal Flow


Constricted Flood Plain
With 100 Yer Flood






Illustrated here is an example of flooding
problems which would not have occurred
had development within the flood plain
been prevented. The fill which was placed
in the flood plain has restricted the natural
flood conveyance and created a higher flood
elevation.


Realizing these problems, government
agencies involved in flood control work are
shifting emphasis from public works to
flood plain management techniques. The
theory is that since Nature has already
provided us with flood plains for con-
veyance and storage of flood waters, man's
use of those flood plains should be com-
patible with periodic and inevitable -
flooding.





AERIAL MAPPING AND FLOOD
PLAIN DELINEATION

As early as the 1960's the Governing Board
of the SWFWMD recognized the need for
something to be done to prevent the
destruction of the flood plains of Florida's
rivers and lakes. Already the sponsor of a
multi-million dollar pubic works project,
the Board also realized that even more
expensive protective works would be
demanded if natural flood plains continued
to be replaced with construction and fill.

In 1971 the SWFWMD instituted an Aerial
Topographic Mapping and Flood Plain
Delineation Program. Its purpose was to
assist counties., local governments, and
private citizens in a more thorough un-
derstanding of flood plains and initiation of
sensible and effective flood plain manage-
ment. In addition to reducing the need for
expensive and unnecessary public works
projects, effective management zoning
would result in reduced property loss and
human suffering which accompanies a
flood. Controlled development along
streams, waterways and lakes would also
serve in the restoration of our now polluted
and degenerated surface waters. Healthy
rivers and lakes could again exist. In the
interest of this program the Peace River
Basin Board, has approved this project
involving the delineation of the flood plain
of Horse Creek.


Q




t


Old wooden bridge near Pine Level two
miles south of SR 70 in DeSoto County
on Horse Creek. Twenty five year is just
above the rail of bridge.


SR. 64 Bridge in Hardee County about
seven miles west of Ona. One hundred
year flood is about 1.5 feet below deck of
bridge.


FLOOD ELEVATIONS


ON


HORSE CREEK


.... ] ........ ... ...... i iii il I r .....


~I -







FLOOD PLAIN INFORMATION
ON HORSE CREEK


This pamphlet is produced and distributed
by the Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District (SWFWMD) in the interest of
public welfare and safety. It is intended to
alert private citizens and local governments
to the hazards of flooding and the benefits
which can be derived from effective flood
plain management. The pamphlet outlines
the availability of technical information
regarding the flood plain; flood plain
management techniques which can be used
to avoid damage and loss of property; and
some of the regulatory requirements which
exist today.

The District has also completed a report
entitled "Flood Plain Information on
Horse Creek from the Mouth to SR 62,
DeSoto and Hardee Counties, Florida."
This report includes tables and graphs which
show the extent and heights to which floods
in the study area can be expected to rise.
Copies of the full report are on file at the
local government offices in both DeSoto
and Hardee Counties. Information about
the study, or about obtaining copies of
the report may be obtained from the
SWFWMD, office of Aerial Mapping and
Flood Plain Delineation, 5060 U.S. Highway
41 South, Brooksville, Florida 33512
(telephone (904) 796-7211);


HORSE CREEK

Horse Creek originates in the very southern
parts of Hillsborough and Polk Counties
from there it flows almost directly south
through the western parts of Hardee
and DeSoto Counties. It flows into Peace
River about 7 miles southwest of Nocatee
and 2 miles northwest of Ft. Ogden.


Water drains into Horse Creek from a
watershed of about 260 square miles.
Most of the watershed is relatively flat. The
phosphate industry owns or controls a
large portion of the watershed. It is anti-
cipated that phosphate will be mined first
in Hardee County and later in DeSoto
County. There has been some housing
development within the flood plain par-
ticularly in DeSoto County.








100 YEAR FLOOD

ELEVATIONS ON

HORSE CREEK


LOCATION WATER EL.

IN FT MSL

S.R. 72 29.4

Co. Rd. 6665 665
686.
nm Lily

S.R. 02 121.7


RANG


FIGURE 1
HORSE CREEK
STUDY AREA


_ __1____1 _____ ___~_ ___




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