Title: 1986 Annual Report of The Southwest Florida Water Management District
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 Material Information
Title: 1986 Annual Report of The Southwest Florida Water Management District
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Southwest Florida Water Management District
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - 1986 Annual Report of The Southwest Florida Water Management District (JDV Box 91)
General Note: Box 23, Folder 1 ( Miscellaneous Water Papers, Studies, Reports, Newsletters, Booklets, Annual Reports, etc. - 1973 -1992 ), Item 33
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: WL00004530
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
I 25th ~~Ann vrar19198


Southwest
Florida
Water
Management
District




1986
Annual
Report





























































Tall cypress trees line the banks of the Withlacoochee River This scene was photographed in early spring at the
beginning of the wet season.



Cover photo:
Hardwood swamps are essential Florida wetland habitats. They provide food and shelter for a host of wildlife
species and help maintain the quality of natural waters.






Message from the Chairman




Thisyear marks the 25th anniversary of the Southwest Florida Water Management
District and provides an opportunity to review our achievements and recognize the
contributions of many dedicated people.
The District was created in 1961 to address the serious flooding problems in south-
west Florida. Through the years the District's regional water resource responsibilities
expanded but its commitment remained unchanged to preserve, protect and manage
our fresh water resources.
In 1986 we ended a difficult chapter in the District' history. The role and relation-
ship between the Governing Board and the Basin Boards was resolved through contin-
uing open communication, improved cooperation and trust. The Fifth Judicial Circuit
Court in and for Hernando County released Basin Board tax funds which had been
sequestered in 1984 by a court order With this behind us, the District will again focus
on its commitment to provide the leadership and expertise for management of our
water resource on a regional basis.
As we monitor and permit the fresh water quantities withdrawn in the District,
we are improving our data collection methods to provide us a more accurate report on
the status of the District's water resources and the demands on these resources. The
Governing Board also adopted a revised water shortage plan to eliminate some of the
major problems experienced during our last water shortage in 1985.
To improve efficient water use and promote conservation, the District passed a reso-
lution calling for voluntary elimination of daytime irrigation. I am pleased that this
first step towards water conservation has received widespread support by local govern-
ment and the public.
We were fortunate that we completed the 1986 calendar year without any District-
imposed water shortage restrictions. However with the growth in southwest Florida, we
must increase our water conservation efforts by all users. The District has initiated a
comprehensive conservation program which is highlighted in this report.
In the next year we will develop a long-range plan to ensure that we are better
prepared in the future to manage our water resources. We will also improve our
cooperation and communication with local government and strengthen our compli-
ance and enforcement efforts. Public access to the District will be improved with the
opening of additional offices in the northern and southern parts of the District.
I want to offer my sincere thanks for the dedicated service of those Governing Board
members leaving the District in 1986, former Chairman Bruce Samson, Ronald
Lambert and Jim Taft. I also welcome the new Governing Board members, Dr Robert
Bramson, Roy Harrell and Dr William Wilcox.
As we enter a new quarter century, we face many challenges. But with dedicated
Governing and Basin Board members and a highly professional staff we can preserve
and protect the sensitive environment that supports our water resource system and
provides a high quality of life for the citizens of southwest Florida.


Michael Zagorac, Jr.



































Senior staff members pictured out-
side the District office in Brooks-
ville are from left: William K.
Hennessey, Deputy Executive
Director; Kent A. Zaiser Deputy
General Counsel; Peter G. Hubbell,
Deputy Executive Director; Gary
W Kuhl, Executive Director; and
Daniel P Fernandez, General
Counsel.


From the Executive Director...





The year 1986 was one of progress and accomplishment at the Southwest Florida
Water Management District.
In the past several years, we have been entrusted with a number of new responsibili-
ties by the Florida Legislature. Most of these programs are a result of legislation in the
areas ofgrowth management, storm water and surface water management, ground
water quality improvement, land acquisition in hydrologically- and environmentally-
sensitive areas, isolated wetlands protection, and accountability of our available fresh
water resource. Much of the work by our Boards and staff to implement these activities
has come to fruition in 1986.
In our regulatory program, we sought this past year
to improve permit compliance, to increase coordination
a between the Department of Environmental Regulation,
S the Department of Natural Resources and the District in
reviewing phosphate mining activities, to develop a closer
working relationship with agricultural water users and
bi to initiate a public supply water use advisory committee.
We are proud of a land acquisition program that has
purchased approximately 17,500 acres of
environmentally-sensitive lands in the last 18 months.
Our real estate personnel continually revise and review
ourfive-year purchase program to establish land acquisi-
tion priorities for our rapidly urbanizing area of
Florida.
Our finance and planning activities include long-range programming to assure a
well thought out approach to managing the water resource. Water conservation and
planning for drought periods have become routine procedure at the Southwest District.
The District legal staff has come of age this past year in dealing with several com-
plex permit hearings, in increasing our enforcement program, and in resolving some
difficult problems related to our Governing Board and Basin Board responsibilities.
The field operations staff dealt with growing facility needs and planned for
improved structure operations in the event of hurricanes. Resource management per-
sonnel worked closely with our Basin Boards in developing flood control data and
accompanying projects. The personnel staff completed a policy handbook for our
employees and Board members.
The Information Resources Department continued to fine tune our new computer
system while the public information staff improved communications with media and
local governments.
Looking back at our accomplishments this pastyear Ifind many reasons to be
proud of the increasing quality, enthusiasm and professionalism of our staff here at the
District.


04 = l7


L







An Introduction to Southwest






Protection of the Water
.' Resources
S" The Southwest Florida Water
.-.C. Management District is one
a of five water management
P districts charged by the Flor-
ida Statutes to protect the
Water resources of the state.
It has the authority to 1) levy
taxes for water management
S- purposes, 2) issue permits for
water withdrawal, well con-
struction and surface water
management, and 3) develop
and implement water conser-
vation and education
programs.
The Southwest District was
originally created for flood
control in 1961 after massive
IA, A flooding in southwest Florida
by Hurricane Donna. Since
then, the state legislature
has added many diverse
responsibilities along with its
continuing flood control
activities.

The District Service Area
The District today covers
10,200 square miles in all or
part of 16 counties in south-
west Florida. It includes rap-
idly growing urban centers,
productive citrus groves,
tomato and strawberry farms.
and some of the state's largest
phosphate mining operations.
The District is divided into
eight basins, whose bound-
aries follow the natural flow of
water. A ninth basin is com-
posed solely of the Green
Swamp because of its hydro-
logical significance.












Who Oversees the
District Activities
Southwest is directed by a
nine-member Governing
Board, with members
appointed to four-year terms
by the governor of Florida.
Six Governing Board mem-
bers come from specific
watershed basins and three
are appointed at large.
Each basin is overseen by a
Basin Board whose members
are appointed by the governor
to three-year terms each.
Board members reside within
their specific basins and
offer a local perspective on
water issues.


Governing and Basin Board
members serve without
compensation.

Funding
The Governing Board may
levy up to .30 mills annually
for District-wide projects,
regulatory programs and
administration. Each Basin
Board may levy up to .70 mills
annually for specific basin
projects.

Ground and Surface
Water
About 86 percent of the fresh
water supplied to the resi-
dents of the District is ground


water which comes from the
Floridan Aquifer. This large
porous limestone aquifer
underlies much of the state
and is one of the largest aqui-
fers in the United States.
The remaining 14 percent
of the fresh water comes from
surface water sources, such
as the Hillsborough, Manatee
and Braden reservoirs. A very
small percentage is from
other sources such as reverse
osmosis.
Rain provides 100 per-
cent of the recharge for the
Floridan Aquifer and surface
water sources.


1he Southwest District was originally created for flood


control in 1961 after massive flooding in southwest


Florida by Hurricane Donna. Since then, the state legisla-


ture has added many diverse responsibilities along with


its continuing flood control activities.





















































1 Withlacoochee River Basin
2 Coastal Rivers Basin
3 Green Swamp
4 Pinellas-Anclote River Basin
5 Northwest Hillsborough Basin
6 Hillsborough River Basin
7 Alafia River Basin
8 Manasota Basin
9 Peace River Basin 5







Southwest Florida Water Resources


These graphs help illustrate
the fresh water resources of
southwest Florida by showing
rainfall, water use and water
availability.

Rainfall
The rainfall chart shows
average amounts for the
16-county area from 1945 to
1985. Rainfall peaked in 1959
with 79.2 inches recorded
that year. This was followed
by another wet year in 1960
with the passage of Hurricane
Donna.
Annual average District
rainfall is represented by the
horizontal line at 52 inches. In
general, before the mid-1960s
rainfall levels were above
average, but since then have
trended below.

Water Use
As the water use figures indi-
cate, total pumpage remains
fairly constant. The figures
for industry trend lower, due
mostly to required conserva-


District Annual Rainfall


tion efforts and poor market
conditions of the phosphate
industry. Agricultural use has
remained consistent over the
past 15 years. Public supply
has shown the greatest
increase, and as our region
grows in population, we can
expect continued growth in
urban need for fresh water.
We are fortunate to have
one of the world's most pro-
ductive aquifer systems for
our use. It can supply vast
amounts of high quality water,
but it needs our protection in
the scientific placement of
wells and the avoidance of
contaminants.

Ground Water
The Floridan Aquifer is illus-
trated by the May and Sep-
tember, 1986 potentiometric
surface maps. The potentio-
metric surface is the height
water will rise relative to sea
level in a tightly cased well
penetrating the aquifer being
measured.


The aquifer is replenished
(recharged) by rain. Ground
water within the aquifer gen-
erally flows from the higher
elevations in the Green
Swamp toward the Gulf of
Mexico.
Note on the two compari-
son charts that the potentio-
metric surface is higher in
September. This happens
every year after summer
rains seasonally recharge the
ground water supplies.
The movement of water
into the aquifer is related to
soil type. Overlying soils vary
from north to south through-
out the District. In general,
the north is characterized by
more porous soils which allow
the aquifer to be replenished
by rainfall more quickly.
The soils are generally less
permeable further south. The
south typically has much less
percolation of rainwater and
takes longer to recover from
pumping.


Inches
80
70
60
50
40
30


6














Estimated Annual Water Use from 1970 to 1985 for 16 county
Southwest Florida Water Management District


Public Supply
Industry
Agriculture
Rural


1970
187,600,000
530,600,000
588,800,000
no data


1975
229,700,000
467,400,000
683,300,000
110,700,000


1980
309,500,000
334,200,000
547,100,000
87,800,000


1985
391,150,000
278,660,000
680,620,000
62,870,000


1,307,000,000 1,491,100,000 1,278,600,000 1,413,300,000


SRural
Agriculture
* Industry
SPublic Supply


Generalized Potentiometric Surface of the Floridan Aquifer

Elevation of the Floridan Aquifer in feet above mean sea level









LO less than 30 feet


30 to 60 feet

60 to 90 feet

90 to 120 feet

greater than 120 feet


September 1986


Millions of
Gallons per day
700


May 1986






Water Conservation


Traditionally the District has
addressed water conservation
through water use permitting
and a variety of public educa-
tion projects. Now, due to the
increased need for conserva-
tion brought on by the region's
unprecedented growth,
Southwest has embarked on a
more aggressive and in-depth
program.


In May 1986, the Govern-
ing Board adopted a resolu-
tion calling for year-round,
voluntary lawn irrigation
restrictions, limiting outdoor
irrigation to between 5 p.m.
and 9 a.m. for all residents of
the District. This prompted
cities and counties within the
District to pass similar ordi-
nances for conservation.


Also in 1986, the District
placed educational materials
in the public school system.
A District-produced 12-
minute water conservation
video tape was provided to
junior and senior high schools
throughout the 16-county
service area. The tape
explains southwest Florida
hydrology and why water
conservation is important.
A comprehensive Water
Resources Atlas of Florida
was mailed to high school,
college and public libraries as
a reference book on water in
Florida. Water conservation
posters also were delivered
to junior and senior high
schools, and continue to be
mailed on request.
For agriculture, a new pro-
gram has been started to help
farmers increase efficiency of
water use. The program is
called Agricultural Irrigation
Monitoring, or AIM, and in it
District staff will visit area
farms on request and install
equipment to monitor water
use. Data then is gathered
and analyzed, and the
scientifically-based informa-
tion will be provided to farm-
ers to help them save water.
In conjunction with AIM,
two mobile laboratories are
in operation to benefit area
growers. The vehicles are
equipped with tools to mea-
sure soil moisture and water
flow. They will respond to


Drip irrigation is a water saving method which loses very little water to evaporation. Here Marvin Brown of
Dover shows how the irrigation lines are actually run within the planting beds of a strawberry crop.
8













farmers' requests for a scien-
tific analysis of their water
use.
Agricultural demonstration
projects are underway. One
involves planting a variety of
central and southwest Florida
crops, then studying various
irrigation methods on test
sites. Another measures the
effectiveness of various crop
covers against freeze damage.
For public supply, other
demonstration projects will
be implemented. Several have
been planned which demon-
strate water-saving methods
for landscape. One method
used, Xeriscape, combines
design, plant selection and
irrigation techniques to maxi-
mize efficiency of water use.
Another significant pro-
gram is the distribution of
water conservation grants.
There has been $250,000
budgeted as matching funds
for conservation projects for
all water users: agriculture,
industry and residential/
commercial. Project applica-
tions were submitted through
December 1986 and final proj-
ect selection is in early 1987
Many projects which receive
the grant money should be
started in 1987.
It is hoped that these pro-
grams will build public aware-
ness of the need for water
conservation and provide
information on specific water-
saving techniques.


Citrus is the largest agriculture crop in Florida, with much of it grown in the Southwest Florida Water
Management District. The District has many conservation programs aimed at helping agriculture use
water more efficiently, saving the grower money and saving the District water (Photo courtesy of Florida
Department of Citrus.)


1


~S~






Save Our Rivers and

Other Land Acquisition Programs


On most sunny weekends,
dozens of boaters can be seen
canoeing on the slowly mean-
dering Withlacoochee River
in Citrus and Hernando
counties.
Canoeists wanting a little
more pace can find small
white-water rapids to glide
through on certain areas of
the Hillsborough River.
The Peace River flowing
through the central portion of
Florida offers camping and
canoeing opportunities along
its journey from its birth place
in the Green Swamp to Char-
lotte Harbor many miles to
the south.
Land acquisition to protect
Florida's rivers and other


fresh water sources for gen-
erations to come is a major
objective of the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District.
The District owns approxi-
mately 120,000 acres of
unspoiled land in its 16-county
area.
Purchasing land offers rec-
reational benefits, protects val-
uable wetlands and helps assure
a safe drinking water supply
as southwest Florida grows.
The Green Swamp is the
District's largest land pur-
chase, with approximately
49,000 acres held in public
trust.
This 850-square-mile wil-
derness area north of Lake-


purchasing land offers recreational


benefits, protects valuable wetlands and


helps assure a safe drinking water supply


as southwest Florida grows.


--
:" li/
1;1!,1 I:r III''?~ 1-I.
1 r5;Ilr'!i ~
b 'I 1 i i


- U rll


land and west of Orlando
forms the headwaters of four
major Florida rivers the
Oklawaha (located outside the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District), Peace,
Hillsborough and Withlacoo-
chee. It is a major water
storage area for central and
southwest Florida.
Other District land pur-
chases include well field areas
and sensitive river flood plains.
Approximately 26,000
acres have been purchased
through Florida's Save Our
Rivers program. Five years
old in 1986, Save Our Rivers is
funded through the state's
Documentary Stamp Tax on
land transfers.
Other acquisitions are
made with District or Basin
Board funds.
In the 1985-86 fiscal year,
approximately 4,500 acres
was purchased by the Dis-
trict. Of that, approximately
4,028 acres along the Withla-
coochee River was purchased
with Save Our Rivers funds.
Other land purchases include
460 acres along the Anclote
River in Pasco County and the
78-acre Jerry Lake in Pinellas
County.
In addition, the District
purchased another 10 miles
along the Withlacoochee
River in December 1986. This
included the 9,869-acre Flying
Eagle Ranch in Citrus County
and the 3,056-acre Carlton
Tract in Sumter County. Both
were Save Our Rivers
purchases.


---
~----











































































.... --2,7-
'' "


.0 a P I


Two boaters motor down a southwest Florida river headingfor home after a day offishing. Many rivers in southwest Florida are
preserved for use byfuture generations under the state Save Our Rivers land purchase program.


rr No







District Lands: Public Uses


An important achievement
in 1986 was the completion of
a compatibility study to assure
District lands remain ecologi-
cally sound, but are available
for public use. The study
entitled "Uses of District-
Owned Lands A Compat-
ibility Study," is the first part


of a three-year analysis of
land use and management
practices.
The Southwest Florida
Water Management District
holds in public trust approxi-
mately 120,000 acres of land
for various water manage-
ment purposes.


These lands, most of which
are relatively undisturbed
and wetland-dominated, range
from large rural tracts to iso-
lated pockets within primarily
urban areas. They contain
lakes and reservoirs, flood-
plains of several rivers and
major well fields.


Sawgrass Lake Park is one of many recreational areas located on District lands. It includes a boardwalk
through a hardwood swamp, a staffed nature center and classroom, picnic areas and a wildlife observa-
tion tower The park is operated by the Pinellas County Parks Department in cooperation with the
Pinellas County School Board.


ji












While these areas are to
remain in their natural state
for their primary purpose of
water management, it is the
intent of the District that
they be available to the public
for compatible uses.
Throughout the year, the
District receives many
requests for use of these
lands. Requests include hunt-
ing and fishing, hiking,
horseback riding and camping,
plus cattle grazing, power line
easements and vehicle entry.
To create a consistent,
established mechanism for
responding to these requests,
the first phase of the anal-
ysis was completed in 1986.
A computer program was
designed to evaluate the
impacts of a list of land uses
on the various ecological com-
munities occurring within the
District. This provides a well-
documented procedure to
address each land-use
request.
The next phase will be the
development of a planning
tool in which actual land use
issues, such as fire and
hydrologic management,
restoration, maintenance,
preservation, buffering and
recreation, will be evaluated
for the various District land
holdings.


Throughout the year the District


receives many requestsfor use of these


lands. Requests include hunting and


fishing, hiking, horseback riding and


camping, plus cattle grazing, power line


easements and vehicle entry.







Financial Information





Combined Balance Sheet All Fund Types and Account Groups
Southwest Florida Water Management District
Fiscal Year Ending September 30,1986 Unaudited


Assets
Cash (primarily interest-bearing NOW accounts) ................. $ 49,986
Time Certificates of Deposits ................................ 20,397,544
Receivables ................................................... 862,719
Deposit-Registry of Court ......................................... 6,792
Inventories .................... .......... ................... 220,831
Fixed Assets:
Four River Basins Florida Project ...................... 76,431,917
Land and Improvements ........................... 61,423,033
Structures and Buildings ............................. 11,492,516
Machinery and Equipment .......................... 6,289,259
Aerial Topographic Maps ............................ 7,804,503
Monitor Wells ..................................... 3,839,578
Other ................. ..............................109,371
Amount to be provided for payment of
unpaid vacation and vested sick leave ............................ 740,002
Total Assets ................................ $189,668,051

Liabilities
Accounts and Vouchers Payable ............................... $ 1,298,414
Interest Payable ......................... ........................ 399
Payroll and Related Liabilities ..................................... 597,226
Deferred Revenues.......................... ................... 9,585,216
Advance from other governmental agencies for land acquisition and
construction, aquatic weeds ........................... 442,042
Other Liabilities ................................................... 1,171
Accumulated unpaid vacation and vested sick leave .................... 740,002

Total Liabilities............................... $12,664,470

Fund Equity
Investment in General Fixed Assets ........................... $167,390,178
Fund Balances:
Reserve for Encumbrances ........................... 2,914,336
Unreserved:
Designated for subsequent year's expenditures .......... 7,200,612
Undesignated surplus ............................. (501,545)

Total Fund Equity ........................... $177,003,581
Total Liabilities and Fund Equity ............. $189,668,051


r













Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Charges in Fund Balance Governmental Funds
Southwest Florida Water Management District
Fiscal Year Ending September 30,1986 Unaudited

Revenues:
Taxes ................. .................................. $14,943,932
Intergovernmental Revenue .................................. 8,650,916
Charges for Service ............................................ -0 -
Interest on Invested Funds ..................................... 1,198,551
Leases ..................................................... 165,615
Other Revenues ............................................... 251,293

Total Revenues.................................. $25,210,307

Expenditures:
Administration ............................................ $ 3,606,666
Legal ...................................................... 366,298
Resource Regulation ......................................... 4,881,318
Resource Management ....................................... 3,486,069
Operations ................................................. 4,237,167
Real Estate ................................................. 874,996
Tax Commissions .............................................. 731,311
Capital Projects Outlay ....................................... 7,234,396
Debt Service Outlay .......................................... 0 -

Total Expenditures .............................. $25,418,221
Revenues under Expenditures....................... (207,914)


Revenue Sources







59% 'Taxes


1% Leases
1% Other Revenue

5% Interest on
Invested Funds


34% Intergovernmental
Revenue







Basin Boards/Senior Staff


Alafia River Basin Board
Walter H. Harkala, Chairman Ex Officio, Plant City
Alfred H. Varnum, Vice Chairman, Lithia
Robert L. Roderick, Secretary, Plant City
J. Donald Davis, Brandon
Martha B. Kjeer, Riverview
Paul C. Major, Lithia
Patricia B. Odiorne, Brandon

Coastal Rivers Basin Board
John R. Grey, Vice Chairman, New Port Richey
Charles P Barnes, Secretary, Crystal River
Harry P Timmons, Brooksville

Hillsborough River Basin Board
Walter H. Harkala, Chairman Ex Officio, Plant City
Patricia R. Pieper, Vice Chairman, Land O'Lakes
e.w. Jean Perchalski, Secretary, Temple Terrace
A. Donald Bailey, Seffner
Sylvia A. Espinola, Tampa
Alvaro Fernandez, Tampa
Bob L. Sapp, Plant City
John B. Sargeant, Lakeland

Manasota Basin Board
Mary A. Kumpe, Chairman Ex Officio, Sarasota
Gordon D. Hartman, Vice Chairman, Bradenton
John J. Whelan, Secretary, Sarasota
Anne M. Bishopric, Sarasota
Calvin Bryant, Sarasota
Berryman T. Longino, Arcadia
Dan C. McClure, Palmetto
Edwin T. Rathke, Sarasota


Northwest Hillsborough Basin Board
Robert T. Bramson, M.D., Chairman Ex Officio, Tampa
Richard R. Powell, D.D.S., Vice Chairman, Tampa
Gail B. Parsons, Secretary, Odessa
Nicholas D. Carullo, Odessa
Robert E. Gadson, Tampa
Frank D. Jackson II, Tampa
Peace River Basin Board
Horace E Herndon, Co-chairman Ex Officio, Lake Wales
William H. Wilcox, Ph.D., Co-chairman Ex Officio, Punta Gorda
Carl Simmons, Vice Chairman, Wauchula
C. Lamar Daniels, Secretary, Winter Haven
Sherida L. Ferguson, Lakeland
James N. Layne, Ph.D., Lake Placid
James Lloyd Ryals, Fort Ogden

Pinellas-Anclote River Basin Board
Michael Zagorac, Jr., Co-chairman Ex Officio, Belleair
Roy G. Harrell, Jr., Co-chairman Ex Officio, St. Petersburg
David H. Knowlton, Vice Chairman, St. Petersburg
James W. Mitchell, Secretary, New Port Richey
John G. Hubbard, Dunedin
Elizabeth P Kujawski, Indian Rocks
Jay B. Starkey, Jr., Odessa

Withlacoochee River Basin Board
Wm. O. Stubbs, Jr., Chairman Ex Officio, Dade City
Norvell W. Hunt, Vice Chairman, Zephyrhills
Charles E. Booth, Secretary, Brooksville
Herbert C. Craig, Yankeetown
Dalton E Newton, Dunnellon


Senior Staff


Executive Director
Gary W Kuhl


Deputy Executive Directors
William K. Hennessey
Peter G. Hubbell

General Counsel
Daniel P Fernandez

Deputy General Counsel
Kent A. Zaiser


Senior Staff
Jay S. Davis, Director of Public Communications
Mark D. Farrell, Director of Resource Management
Zolda R. Favot, Director of Human Resources
Carl N. Hansen, Director of Operations
Richard V. McLean, Director of Resource Regulation
Fritz H. Musselmann, Director of Real Estate
Richard S. Owen, Director of Planning
Jerry I. Simpson, Director of Information Resources
James D. Yager, Director of Administration and Finance
Shirley S. Crane, Manager of Boards and Executive Support


I ,






Governing Board






Governing Board members:
Michael Zagorac, Jr., Chairman, Belleair
Wm. O. Stubbs, Jr., Vice Chairman, Dade City
Mary A. Kumpe, Secretary, Sarasota
Walter H. Harkala, Treasurer, Plant City
Horace E Herndon, Lake Wales
Roy G. Harrell, Jr., St. Petersburg
Robert T. Bramson, M.D., Tampa
William H. Wilcox, Ph.D., Punta Gorda



Committee appointments:*

Land and Resource Management
Horace E Herndon, Chairman
Walter H. Harkala
William H. Wilcox, Ph.D.

Finance and Administration
Roy G. Harrell, Jr., Chairman
Wm. O. Stubbs, Jr.
Horace E Herndon
Mary A. Kumpe

Regulation
Walter H. Harkala, Chairman
Robert T Bramson, M.D.
William H. Wilcox, Ph.D.

Policy and Planning
Mary A. Kumpe, Chairman
Robert T. Bramson, M.D.
Roy G. Harrell, Jr.
Wm. O. Stubbs, Jr.


Governing Board members are from left: Horace E Herndon,
Wm. O. Stubbs, Jr, Dr. Robert T Bramson and Walter H. Harkala.


Governing Board members are from left: Dr William H. Wilcox,
Roy G. Harrell, Jr, Mary A. Kumpe and Michael Zagorac, Jr


*Governing Board chairman is ex officio member of each committee.







Southwest Florida Water Management
District Offices


Brooksville (District Headquarters)
2379 Broad Street
Brooksville, Florida 33512-9712
(904) 796-7211, Suncom 628-0111


Bartow Office
2020 State Road 60 East
Bartow, Florida 33830
(813) 533-6972


Tampa Office
7601 Highway 301 North
Tampa, Florida 33610
(813) 985-7481

Punta Gorda Office
3201 Golf Course Boulevard
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950
(813) 637-6167


The Governing Board of the Southwest Florida Water Management District believes that as a governmental agency it
is obliged to keep the public it serves as fully informed as possible regarding its purpose, actions and objectives. This
Annual Report is intended to help serve that purpose.


This document was printed at a cost of $4,988.76 or $1.247 cents per copy.




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