Title: Water Restrictions Imposed in North; New Measures Limit Irrigation to Two Days Per Week
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 Material Information
Title: Water Restrictions Imposed in North; New Measures Limit Irrigation to Two Days Per Week
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Water Management Monthly - Jan. 1994
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - Water Restrictions Imposed in North; New Measures Limit Irrigation to Two Days Per Week (JDV Box 91)
General Note: Box 23, Folder 1 ( Miscellaneous Water Papers, Studies, Reports, Newsletters, Booklets, Annual Reports, etc. - 1973 -1992 ), Item 13
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: WL00004510
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text















A Newsletter of the Southwest Florida Water Management District


LONI LY Public Communications De]


Water Restrictions Imposed I


New Measures LimitIrrigation ToTwo Di


N ewly enacted water
restrictions limit lawn
and landscape irrigation to two
days per week in the northern
third of the Southwest Florida
Water Management District,
following action by the
District's Governing Board at
its December 20 meeting in
Brooksville. The affected area
includes all of Citrus, Her-
nando and Sumter counties, as
well as the portions of Lake,
Levy, and Marion counties
within the District.
Residents of these areas
with even-numbered addresses
may water on Tuesdays and/or
Saturday, while residents with
Sodd-numbered addresses may
water on Wednesdays and/or
Sunday. Irrigation on
designated days is not permit-
ted between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
No watering is allowed on
Monday, Thursday or Friday.
Scant rainfall through the
summer and fall caused
declines in underground water
sources and lake levels,
prompting the new conserva-
tion measures. Only 19 inches
of rain fell in the northern part
of the District this summer,
compared to normal summer
rains of approximately 31
inches. As a result, water


levels have declined. "Rkcords
show that over the last five
years, the northern counties
have accumulated an average
rainfall deficit of 36 inches,"
said Gary Florence, Director of
Hydrologic Data for the District.
"The winter dry season is
well under way, and water use
is on the rise," Florence added,
"but water levels are much
lower than they should be. We
can't control the rain, but we
can control our water use to help
protect our water resources."
Streamflow is only one
third of normal for this time of
year, and is lower than it was
at this time last year. Water
levels in some wells are below
historical averages, and still
declining. The Floridan
Aquifer in the northern part of
the District is interconnected
with water levels in lakes and
rivers. Decreased demand on
the aquifer will help these
surface waters.
"One good rain is not going
to get us out of this situation;
even one good season won't do
it," said District Water Short-
age Coordinator B.J. Jarvis,
"so we aren't just waiting for
rain to solve our problem."
-Stepped-up efforts to
educate residents about the


need to conserve already are
under way. Public facilities
such as libraries and local
government offices will receive
conservation information for
free distribution to their
customers. The District has
also increased its coordination
with local law enforcement
,agencies to improve compli-
ance with restrictions, and is
dedicating more District staff
to enforcement as well.
"The restrictions alone will
not splve the problems, but
they will help us better manage
the situation," said Peter
Hubbell, Executive Director of
the District. "Recreation,
agriculture, and of course the
environment, are all affected
by poor water conditions. It's
very important that everyone
does his or her part to use less
water during this water
shortage," he added.
Residents can help solve
the problem by learning and
following the irrigation
restrictions, and by looking for
other ways to conserve water
indoors and outdoors. For
more information on the new
restrictions, contact the District
Water Shortage Hotline toll-
free at 1-800-848-0499.


Restrictionsfor
Northern Counties,
Effective Dec. 28, 199i
The new two-day -
per week irrigation
restrictions cover all
of Citrus, Hernando
and Sumter counties,
and the parts of Lake,
Levy and Marion
counties within the
Southwest Florida
Water Management
District. Represented
by the shaded area,
these counties now
are under the same /
two-day per week Pinel
restrictions as the
rest of the District.
Residents with even-
numbered addresses
may water on Tuesdays
and/or Saturdays, while
residents'with odd-
numbered addresses may
water on Wednesdays and/
Sunday. Irrigation betwei
10 a.m. and 4 p.m. isprohi
No watering is allowed on
Monday, Thursday or Frid
any day, as long as an autc
Additional restrictions
industrial and commercial
Shortage Hotline at 1-800


I


















Public Communications Department Volume II, Issue 11 January 1994




,osed In North;


So'Two Days Per Week

Restrictions for
Northern Counties, Levy
Effective Dec. 28, 1993
The new two-day Marion
per week irrigation
restrictions cover all
of Citrus, Hernando Citrus
and Sumter counties,
and the parts of Lake, Sumter
Levy and Marion Hemando
counties within the
Southwest Florida L I .
Water Management Pasco
District. Represented
by the shaded area,
these counties now
-- ] Hillsborough I1'
are under the same Hillsborou Polk
two-day per week Pinellas
restrictions as the
rest of the District._ _
Residents with even-
numbered addresses Manatee Hardee
may water on Tuesdays
and/or Saturdays, while
residents with odd- DeSoto
numbered addresses may \ arasota
water on Wednesdays and/or
Sunday. Irrigation between 'harlotte
10 a.m. and 4 p.m. is prohibited.
No watering is allowed on
Monday, Thursday or Friday. Cars may be washed at any time on
any day, as long as an automatic shutoffnozzle is used.
Additional restrictions apply for golf courses, agricultural,
industrial and commercial uses. Contact the District's Water
Shortage Hotline at 1-800-848-0499for more information.









Chiles Announces Florida Yards And Neighborhoods

Basin Appointments Program Wants You (And Your Yard!)


Governor Lawton Chiles
recently announced the
appointment of several newv
members to Basin Boards of
the Solthw'est Florida Water
MNanagenent District along ,
with the reappointment of
several current members.
Joining the Withlacoochee
River Basin Board as new.
members are James Gnrffin of
Hernando County. Julia Haile
of Levy County and Eleanor
Dixon of Citrus Count .
Vangie Rich of Citrus
County and Robert Buckner of
Hernando County were
reappointed to the Coastal
Rivers Basin Board. Eeel n


Henderson of Hernando
County and Alfred Torrence of
Pasco County join the board as
new members.
On the Hillsborough River
Basin Board, Bob Gilder of
Hillsborough County and Clark
Sherwood of Polk County were
reappointed Julie Baker of
Hernando Count) and Calvin
Kuenzel of Pasco Counti are
new members of the board.
Basin Boards address local
water resource issues and may
fund local water management
projects. Their members are
appointed b) the Governor to
three-year terms, which they
serne w without compensation.


The Florida Yards and
Neighborhoods Program.is
now accepting applications
from interested neighborhoods.
in Hillsborough, Manatee and
Pinellas counties for the 1994
program year.
Florida Yards and Neigh-
borhoods is an environmental
education and action initiative
through which local environ-
mental experts teach' and
promote concepts of environ-
mentally sound landscape
maintenance and pollution
prevention. Target issues
include reduced residential
stormwater runoff, water
conservation, and improved
home landscapes that comple-
ment the natural environment
rather than competing with it.


A pilot program concluded
recently, and participating
neighborhoods are needed for
the 1994 effort.
Selected communities will
work with the Florida Yards
and Neighborhoods-team for
12 months to improve environ-
mental conditions in their
areas. The program provides
information, advice and
demonstrations on landscape
design and maintenance that-
helps protect lakes, rivers and
bays. Water conservation, .
wildlife habitat and energy
savings are also addressed.
Plus, many of the benefits to
the environment can also save
homeowners time and money.
Funding for FloridaYards
and Neighborhoods is provided


by the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency, the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection, and the Tampa Bay
and Sarasota Bay National
Estuary Programs. Other key
participants include County
Cooperative Extension Service
offices, concerned citizens, the
landscape industry, the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District, and local
governments in the region.
For more information and
an application packet, call the
Florida Yards and Neighbor-
hoods hotline at (813) 582-
2107 in Hillsborough and
Pinellas counties. In Manatee
County, call (813) 749-3053.
Sarasota County residents
should call (813) 951-4240.
















District and WCRWSA Plan Together ForThe Future


New cooperative efforts by
the Southwest Florida Water
Management District'and the
West Coast Regional Water
Supply Authority could yield
their first dividends in 1994
with a pilot project to rehydrate
a wellfield in northwest
Hillsborough County.
The two agencies have
begun working together on a
five-year revision of the
authority's water supply
development plan, which
addresses conservation, reuge,
location of new wellfields,
rehydration of existing
wellfields, and other issues.
The Section 21 wellfield,
owned by the City of St.
Petersburg, is planned to be the
site of a rehydration pilot
project. Withdrawals from the
Wellfield already are near the
maximum permitted, with
substantial impacts to the
surrounding environment.
According to Deputy
Executive Director Rich
McLean of the District,


rehydration of the wellfield
would be achieved by two
means. The first, which could
be operational later this year,
would withdraw stormwater
from a nearby channelized
creek during periods of high
flow and divert it to the
wellfield.' There, the water
would augment lakes and
wetlands. After soaking into
the ground, the water could,
help lessen drawdowns of the
aquifer normally caused by
heavy pumping.
Several means are avail-
able to distribute water over
the wellfield, including
infiltration ditches and large
sprinklers. Horizontal wells
- which use large porous
tubes laid several feet under-
ground to force water back
into the ground also are an
option.
A second proposed
rehydration process would use
highly treated reclaimed water,
for which McLean said
permits would be needed from


the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
Several treatment plants could
potentially provide water for
rehydration. For the Section
21 wellfield, use of reclaimed
water would also involve the
participation of Hillsborough
County, which operates
treatment plants in the area.
"Our primary objective is
to get water whether it's
stormwater or reclaimed water
back on the wellfields to
mute environmental impacts
and maintain or increase
- production at the wellfield,"
said McLean.
Wellfield rehydration on
this scale never has been
attempted within the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District. Rehydration has been
used in Western states, although
under different hydrologic
conditions.
McLean said the District
Sand the water supply authority
also are focusing their plan-
ning efforts on how to con-


Pumps like these at Cypress Creek Wellfield send water to the
Tampa Bay area, which.may soon send reclaimed water back to
wellfields to offset the effects of heavy urban water use.


serve existing water, to make
supplies last longer, how to
best reuse water to extend the
supply, and where to locate
new sources. "This is the first
time we've ever done anything
like this," he said. "I think it's
making a difference for water
resources, and it also improves


the working relationship
between the two agencies."
For more information about
cooperative efforts of the
District and the West Coast
Regional Water Supply
Authority, contact Rich
McLean at SWFWMD toll-free
at 1-800-423-1476, Ext. 4606.




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