Title: New Water Source Strategies Outlined; Criteria Now in Place to Select Projects for Funding
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 Material Information
Title: New Water Source Strategies Outlined; Criteria Now in Place to Select Projects for Funding
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Water Management Monthly - Dec. 1993
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - New Water Source Strategies Outlined; Criteria Now in Place to Select Projects for Funding (JDV Box 91)
General Note: Box 23, Folder 1 ( Miscellaneous Water Papers, Studies, Reports, Newsletters, Booklets, Annual Reports, etc. - 1973 -1992 ), Item 12
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: WL00004509
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text











A)Newsletter of the Southwest Florida Water Management District


M .O Public Communications Department V


New Water Source Strategies Ou


Criteria Now In Place To SelectProjects For F


Selection criteria for the
first year's allocation of the
-New Water Supply Fund will
focus on water resource projects
that offer the most regional
benefit while being cost-
effective in the long-term,
according to a November
presentation to the Governing
Board of the Southwest Florida
Water Management District.
The New Water Supply
Fund is a financial assistance
program established last
September by the District to
promote increased water
conservation and safe use of
alternative water sources. Local
governments, water suppliers,
agricultural interests, industry
and other water users would be
eligible to apply for assistance
through the fund. New sources
of water are needed to ease
demand, particularly on
groundwater sources. District
studies have indicated that
depleted groundwater and


Hydrologic conditions in the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District declined in
November as most of the area
experienced below normal
rainfall for the sixth ume in
seven months.
No ember data showed that
the northern part of the Distmct
received just .34 inches of rain.
only 17 percent of its histoncal
1.95 inch November average.


resulting saltwater intrusion
pose serious long-term water
supply problems, especially in
the southern half of the District.
Board members in August
reviewed the framework for the
New Water Source Initiative
master plan, and the criteria
discussed in November are
among the first work products
from that effort. Also, four
"Action Group" meetings in
December gathered input on the
program from governments,
utilities, and large scale water
users such as mining and
agriculture.
The District *sill set up the
selection criteria as a series of
three tests to determine which
projects receive funding.
First is a group that could be
characterized as "qualification
criteria." These include:
* the extent to which.a project
impacts the environment,
especially the water resource;
* the project's consistency with


dr.. and also relatively warm."
said Hydrologic Data Manager
Granville Kinsman. "Thlh latest
month of below -normal rainfall

November wSas

extremelydry,

and relatively

w *ar ..


the District Water Management
Plan and local Comprehensive
Plans;
* the project's ability to obtain
necessary permits;
* the District's past experiences
with the cooperator; and,
* project schedule.
"If a project did not satisfy
these criteria, it would not be
evaluated further this year," said
project manager Lois Ann
Sorensen of the Resource
Projects Department. Projects
meeting these criteria, however,
would next be evaluated based
on "resource impact" criteria,
including:
* how much stress to water
resources will be relieved or
avoided by the project;
* the proximity of the project to
the District's declared Water
Use Caution Areas; and,
* the project's cost effective-
ness; how much water is saved
or developed for the money
spent.


go into the dry season, meaning
things could get worse before
they get beerr"
Other hvdrologic indicators
declined in November. Most
lakes in the District remained
below adopted management
lev els, except for a few in Polk
County that were slightly above
normal. Streamflow and
groundwater levels fell through-
out the District, and two wells in


*fs and* V"
% g a





waterr Con






Many alternative sources of water
Florida. Some will be morefeasiL

The third group contains
criteria called "enhancement
elements." These include:
* the degree of local or
regional support or participation
in the project; and,
* additional efforts by the
cooperator to ensure the long-
term success of the project.
In this initial year of the
program, District staff will use
a list of known projects that
meet the criteria, as well as
other projects suggested by
participants. These "corner-
stone" projects will serve as
examples of efforts that meet
the intent and spirit of the
program. These should be
'ranked in time for discussion at

December Got

Meeting Da
The Governing Board of the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District will hold


Hydrologic Conditions Update




.- nrst year s alocauon 01 me
,New Water Supply Fund will
focus on water resource projects
that offer the most regional
benefit while being cost-
effective in the long-term,
according to a November
presentation to the Governing
Board of the Southwest Florida
Water Management District.
The New Water Supply
Fund is a financial assistance
program established last
September by the District to
promote increased water
conservation and safe use of
alterative water sources. Local
governments, water suppliers,
agricultural interests, industry
and other water users would be
eligible to apply for assistance
through the fund. New sources
of water are needed to ease
demand, particularly on
groundwater sources. District
studies have indicated that
depleted groundwater and


Hydrologic conditions in the
Southwsest Florida Water
Management District declined in
November as most of the area
expenenced below normal
rainfall for the sixth tme in
seen months.
November data showed that
the northern part of the District
received just .34 inches of rain.
only 17 percent of its historical
1.95 inch November average.
The central part of the District
received .51 inches, compared to
its 1.90 inch norm. Southern
counties got .73 inches, com-
pared to a 1.80 inch average.
"November was extremely


pose senous long-term water
supply problems, especially in
the southern half of the District.
Board members in August
reviewed the framework for the
New Water Source Initiative
master plan, and the criteria
discussed in November are
among the first work products
from that effort. Also, four
"Action Group" meetings in
December gathered input on the
program from governments,
utilities, and large scale water
users such as niining and
agriculture.
The District will set up the
selection criteria as a series of
three tests to determine which
projects receive funding.
First is a group that could be
characterized as "qualification
criteria." These include:
* the extent to which.a project
impacts the environment,
especially the water resource;
* the project's consistency with


dry. and also relatively warm."
said Hydrologic Data Manager
Gran ille Kinsman. "Ths latest
month of below -normal rainfall

November was

extremelydry,

and relatively

w&arm...

is another notch in a cumulative
fi e-wear deficit of 35 inches in
the northern part of the District.
Surface water are groundwater
levels there are very low as we


rtan anu local %-omprenensive
Plans;
* the project's ability to obtain
necessary permits;
* the District's past experiences
with the cooperator; and,
* project schedule.
"If a project did not satisfy
these criteria, it would not be
evaluated further this year," said
project manager Lois Ann
Sorensen of the Resource
Projects Department. Projects
meeting these criteria, however,
would next be evaluated based
on "resource impact" criteria,
including:
* how much stress to water
resources will be relieved or
avoided by the project;
* the proxirlity of the project to
the District's declared Water
Use Caution Areas; and,
* the project's cost effective-
ness; how much water is saved
or developed for the money
spent.


go into the dry season, meaning
things could get worse before
they get better."
Other hydrologic indicators
declined in No\ember. Most
lakes in the District remained
below adopted management
levels, except for a few in Polk
County that were slightly above
normal. Streamflow and
groundwater levels fell through-
out the District, and two wells in
the northern area continue to set -
new record low s for the month.
For more informauon, call
Hydrologic Data Manager
Granville Kinsman at 1-800-
423-1476. Ext. 4284.


Many alternative sources of water can be developed in southwest
Florida. Some will be more feasible than others in certain areas.


The third group contains
criteria called "enhancement
elements." These include:
* the degree of local or
regional support or participation
in the project; and,
* additional efforts by the
cooperator to ensure the long-
term success of the project.
In this initial year of the
program, District staff will use
a list of known projects that
meet the criteria, as well as
other projects suggested by
participants. These "comer-
stone" projects will serve as
examples of efforts that meet
the intent and spirit of the
program. These should be
'ranked in time for discussion at


the February 1994 meeting of
the Governing Board.
The Governing Board and
Basin Boards will consider
funding for these proposed and
recommended projects in the
Fiscal Year 1995 budget
process. "Some projects could
begin in FY 1994 if all ,
participants are in agreement
and ready to begin work,"
Sorensen noted.
For more information about
the New Water Sources
Initiative, contact project
managers Lois Ann Sorensen
S(Ext. 4283) or Lou Kavouras
(Ext. 4296) in the Resource
Projects Department at 1-800-
423-1476.


The Governing Board of the
Southwest Florida Water
Management District will hold
its December meeting on
Monday and Tuesday, Dec: 20
and 21, rather than the usual last
Tuesday and Wednesday of the
month. The change was made to
avoid schedule conflicts with
Christmas and New Year's


Day,holidays.
Governig Board meetings
return to their normal schedule
with the January meeting, set for
Jan. 25 and 26 in Brooksville.
District offices wil be
closed on Thursday and Friday,
Dec. 23 24, in observance of
Christmas, and on Dec. 31 in
observance of New Year's Day.


Hydrologic Conditions Update


December Governing Board

Meeting Date Changed


~ ~_ __ I __ ^~







SWUCA Workshop Set For January 12 In Tampa


A January 12 public
workshop scheduled for 9 a.m.
at the Sheraton Inn Tampa,
7401 East Hillsborough
Avenue in Tampa, will focus
on strategies to meet increas-,
ing demand with limited water
supplies in the southern half of
the Southwest Florida Water
Management District. The
SWFWMD Governing Board
requested the workshop to
learn more about possible
solutions to complex water
supply problems in the
Southern Water Use Caution
Area (SWUCA), which covers


5,100 square miles and extends
from Hillsborough and Polk
counties in the north to
Charlotte County in the south.
District studies have shown
that overuse and the resulting
saltwater intrusion threaten
groundwater resources in this
eight-county area.
This is the second public
workshop on the plan. The
first was held in Bartow. At
the first workshop, Governing
Board members heard a
presentation by District staff
on problems facing the
SWUCA, then discussed the


draft management plan:
A nine-month work group
process gathered input from
all water use groups in the
SWUCA, and has helped
reshape original District
proposals for managing water
supplies in the area. The
District has prepared a draft
SWUCA Management Plan,
based on District research and
the input from the work group.
The plan relies on a two-
pronged strategy: more
stringent regulation, along
with development of alterna-
tive water supplies.


A number of options will'
be presented to the board for
possible adoption during
rulemaking proceedings set to
begin in early-1994. Different
approaches to allocating
supplies and trimming water
use based on historical use,
across the board cuts, or
restricting the reallocation of
permitted but unused quanti-
ties of water form the basis
ofthe different options, The
common thread in each option
is increased efficiency in all
categories of water use.
For more information on


why SWUCA rules are
needed, call the Public &,
Communications Department
at SWFWMD at 1-800-423-
1476, Ext. 4757, and ask for
the "Water Resouices In
Jeopardy" flyer. For more on
the SWUCA plan, call
Resource Evaluation Manager
Andy Smith toll-free at the
District at 1-800-423-1476,
Ext. 4235. And if you need
information about the January
12 workshop, call Claudia
Alligood at 1-800-423-1476,
Ext. 4610.






District &Tampa Chamber Join Forces


All five of Florida's water
management districts consider
continued funding for the
Surface Water Improvement
and Management (SWIM) and
Preservation 2000 (P2000)
programs vital to protecting
the state's water resources.
These two issues are the
Districts' primary legislative
goals for 1994. Business
people at the Greater Tampa
Chamber of Commerce agree
that a good environment means
good business. As a result, the
Chamber has adopted SWIM
and P2000 as legislative
priorities, and will support
District efforts to secure state
funding for these programs in
1994.
The District and the Tampa
Chamber were also partners in
establishment of the Environ-
mental/Growth Management
Response Team, a group set up
to improve communication
between regulatory agencies
and the businesses they
regulate.


"Possibly the most impor-
tant aspect of this coalition is
that is promotes two-way
communication," said Peter G.
Hubbell, Executive Director
for the District. Hubbell
formulated the response team,
and now serves as its chair-
man. "While it's very impor-
tant for agencies to reach out to
the business community, it's
equally important that the
business community strives to
understand the missions and
statutory requirements of
regulatory agencies," he added.
The response tearh consists
of top-level representatives
from federal, state and local
agencies: the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers, U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection, Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission,
Florida Department of Trans-
portation, Southwest Florida
Water Management District,
Tampa Bay Regional Planning
Council, Tampa Port Author-


ity, Hillsborough County City-
County Planning Commission,
Hillsborough County Environ-
mental Protection Commission,
Hillsborough County and the
City of Tampa.
Response team members
are discussing ways to stream-
line permitting processes while
maintaining environmental
safeguards. Some improve-
ment may be possible simply
through better communication,
according to Hubbell. "Busi-
nesses and governments can
work together when both
parties understand that the
economic growth this area
needs can be accomplished in
an environmentally-sensitive
way, and that quality of life
issues are a critical factor in the
economic viability of the area"
he said.
For more on the Environ-
mental/Growth Management
Response Team, contact Susan
Kessel toll-free at SWFWMD '
at 1-800-423-1476, Ext. 4760.




I xv .illll, I aiipa r IuL lUiiuil-


DWMP Process Continues On Schedule


Input from public workshops
this fall continued to shape the
District Water Management
Plan, a document which will
guide water resource manage-
ment and protection at the
Southwest Florida Water
SManagement District for years to
come.
A series of 12 workshops
throughout the District,began
October 5 in Ocala, followed by
sessions in Bushnell, Bartow,
and Arcadia, along with
Sarasota, Inverness, Brooksville,
Dade City, Tampa, Clearwater
and Port Charlotte. The last of
this round of work-shops was
held in Sebring on December 16.
Each workshop included two
sessions; a 2 to 4 p.m. segment
for local government participa-
tion, followed by a 6 to 8 p.m.
session for public comment and
input.


"Local government represen-
tation-has been very strong at
these meetings," said Terry
Johnson, strategic planning
manager for the District. "We
also heard from many residents,
letting us know which issues
were most important to them."
Water supply concerns
topped the list, according to
Johnson. Key supply issues
included implementation of the
District's Southern Water Use
Caution Area (SWUCA) plan
and its effect on agriculture,
business and future growth in
the region. The expanded use of
reclaimed wastewater and
stormwater also gained notice.
Water quality was a major
concern, especially in the
southern part of the District.
Land use impacts from agricul-
ture and mining, wellhead
protection boih for private and


municipal supplies and better
stormwater management were
leading water quality issues.
Johnson stressed that
residents and government
officials will have additional
opportunities to contribute to the
plan's development in coming
months. "We plan to have more
workshops in the spring,
including at least one in
conjunction with a regularly
scheduled meeting of the
District's Governing Board," he
said. Meeting dates and
locations will be announced and
publicized as soon as the
schedule is set, Johnson added.
Each of the state's five water
management districts is prepar-
ing a District Water Manage-
ment Plan. The five District
plans eventually will become
part of a statewide Florida Water
Plan, coordinated by the state


0------*







Green Swamp Plan


Now Under Review


A management plan for
protection and public use of the
Green Swamnp Wildeme n
Present e began formal re' iew at
the Novemnber meeting of the
Land & Re'.ource Management
Committee of the Southwest
Flonda Water Management
District Go eming Board.
The plan h ich considers
citizen input received through a
series of public workshops -
identities se eral areas w within the
District-os ned portion of the
Green S\w amp that need special
protection to ensure present action
of the water management and
w ddlife \ alues that pmmpted
purchase of the property These
include floodplain and associated
wetland s. stems of the Withla-
coochee Ri\er, the Ba\root Slough
sN sten. and areas know n tOR
prmo ide important habitat for
threatened and endangered
\i ldlife or plant species. Careful
management is also needed for
archaeological sites and long-term
en\ tronmental monilonng
statlonfs
Property> in the Green Swamp
Sildemess Preser\e was acquired
b\ the District for a variety of
reasons, including flood control,
w after quality enhancement,
ground after replenishment, and
the protecuon of potable water
supplies.
'The Green Swamp forms the
heart of west-cenral Florida's
h drologic system." said Gene
Kelly. a planner at the District. "t
also provides an expansive area of
wildlife habitat that is widely
recognized to be of statewide
significance." he added. The

Department of Environmental
Protection. Together with a
revised State Water Policy, the
plan will lay the groundwork for
effective management and
protection of Florida's water
resources well into the next
century.


unportance of the Green Sw amp to
w wildlife has led to its designation
as a "core habitat" area by the
Florida Greenway s Commission,
according to KellU.
The District now owns 97.775
acres about 18 percent of the
560.(CK)-acre Green Sw\amp
Together w ith adjacent ptlicly -
owned lands including the
49.(X0-acre Richloan Tract of the
Withlacoochee State Forest, which
borders the Presern e on the north
- approximately. I50.0(0 acres in
the Green Swamp now are
protected through public ow ner-
ship. Both the District and the
State of Florida ha e proposed
additional purchases of enturon-
mentally-senslti e lands in the
Green Sw amp
The District makes its lands
avadable--or many kinds of public
recreation Hunting, fishing.
horseback ending. camping. hiking.
canoeing, btrd-% watching and
bicycling will be allowed on
specific areas of the Green Swamp
Wildemess Preser\e. Permits \ill
be required for some activities. and
can be obtained from the District's
Land Resources Department at 1-
800-423-1476. Ext. 4452. A
major goal of the plan for the
Present e is to ensure thai recre-
ational use of the property remains
compatible w ith \\ ddlife and w ater
management needs.
The Governing Board w ill
review the draft plan further at its
December meeting. For more
information on the Green Swamp
Wilderness Preser e. contact Gene
Kelly in the District's Planning
Department at 1-800-423-1476,
Ext. 4414.

To learn more about the
District Water Management Plan
or the upcoming workshops,
contact Terry Johnson, the
District's Strategic Planning
Manager, toll-free at 1-800-423-
1476, Ext. 4408.




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