Title: Materials for the Growth Management Course Relating to the State Comprehensive Plan, Strategic Regional Policy Plan and Integration of Land Use and Water Planning of March 23, 1994
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 Material Information
Title: Materials for the Growth Management Course Relating to the State Comprehensive Plan, Strategic Regional Policy Plan and Integration of Land Use and Water Planning of March 23, 1994
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
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Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - Materials for the Growth Management Course Relating to the State Comprehensive Plan, Strategic Regional Policy Plan and Integration of Land Use and Water Planning of March 23, 1994 (JDV Box 49)
General Note: Box 21, Folder 2 ( Land and Water Planning Task Force - 1994 - 1995 ), Item 46
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: WL00004409
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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STATF OF FLORIDA

Office of tte (ibternor
THE CAPITOL
TALLAHASSEE. FLORIDA 32399-0001 Ja
LAWTON CHILES i II
GOVERNOR W
SWork.^ C: ;y

HAND-DELIVER



March 23, 1994



Mr. Chuck Littlejohn
Chamber of Commerce
Tallahassee, Florida

Dear Chuck:

Enclosed please find materials for the Growth Management Short
Course relating to the State Comprehensive Plan, Strategic
Regional Policy Plans, and integration of land use and water
planning.

Please call me if you have any questions or need additional
information.

Sincerely,



Robert B. Bradley, Deputy Director
Office of Planning and Budgeting

RBB/tbt

Enclosure

cc: Jake Varn
Ben Starrett
Wayne Daltry








FLORIDA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
1994 GROWTH MANAGEMENT SHORT COURSE
April 27 & 28, 1994
STATE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN (SCP) REVISION
Dr. Robert B. Bradley
I. Background

A. Florida's current State Plan, Chapter 187, Florida Statutes, has its origins in the late Sixties and early
Seventies.

1. In 1967 (Chapter 67-157), the Legislature named the Governor as the state's chief planning officer,
created an Office of State Planning and Programming, and mandated the preparation, timely
revision and amendment of "a plan or plans which shall be known as the Florida state plan." This
plan was to "...provide long range guidance for the physical, social and economic development of
the state." The plan was to consist of long range goals and objectives as well as shorter term,
specific objectives and plans. It was argued that "it is necessary to provide long range objectives,
guidelines and plans that should be followed by the state and local governments to insure the most
efficient use of tax monies...".

2. In 1972, the Legislature enacted the State Comprehensive Planning Act mandating a planning
process to "provide long-range guidance of the orderly social, economic and physical growth of the
state by setting forth goals, objectives and policies." The statute envisioned, among other things,
that the budgets of state agencies would be based upon and consistent with a state plan.

B. These legislative initiatives emphasized the importance of state planning as the foundation of policy
making for both state and local governments. Two aspects of this approach were especially
noteworthy:

1. First, these efforts were the first steps in implementing a Planning, Programming, Budgeting
System (PPBS). The state budget, in this view, should be focused on programs and based on a
long range plan. These efforts led to the formulation of a state program structure that was
supposed to be keyed to the State Plan and serve as the framework for the state budget document.

2. Second, in conjunction with other developments, efforts led to a concern for the preparation and
use of a State Comprehensive Plan in guiding the decisions of regional and local growth
management planning.

C. For the last twenty years, the State has wrestled with implementing these two aspects of the original
approach to the State Plan.

1. For much of the Seventies, it can be argued neither was successful.

2. In the Eighties, a State Plan was enacted, and regional and, especially local growth management
planning met considerable success based on requirements for consistency and concurrency. The
link between the State Plan and state budgeting was not forged, although the state budgeting system
continued to use a program structure like that envisioned in the Sixties. (See Figures I and II)

D. In the Nineties, the uses of the State Plan in growth management and state budgeting are again under
consideration.

II. The Emerging Approach Toward State Planning

A. Major Elements

1. Strategic
2. Balanced
3. Integrative
4. Accountable









B. Implementation Venues


1. On-going Planning Activities

2. Environmental Land Management Study Committee III (ELMS III)

The Committee was established pursuant to Governor Chiles' Executive Order 91-291. The ELMS
III Committee's final report, Building Successfil Communities, released in December 1992,
contained 174 recommendations. Many of these recommendations were incorporated into the 1993
omnibus Growth Management Bill (Chapter 93-206, Laws of Florida).

II. Emphasis on Strategic Planning

A. Change in Focus

In 1991, the Chiles' Administration initiated a process to move public agencies from comprehensive
planning to a more strategic and focused approach.
B. Agency Planning Process

1. Agency Functional Plans (AFPs): In 1986, all state agencies were required to develop AFPs to
provide comprehensive policy guidance for all agency programs and "functions." The AFPs were
agency focused, lengthy, complex and output oriented documents which included many agency
operating policies.

2. Agency Strategic Plans (ASPs): In 1991, the agency planning process was revised to assist agencies
to develop plans that were meaningful to agency decision makers, focused on identified agency
priorities for long term implementation. A key component of the ASPs are specific, time certain,
measurable objectives that are results and outcome oriented. (See Figures III and IV)

C. Regional Planning Process

1. Comprehensive Regional Policy Plans (CRPPs): The 1992 Governor's Third Environmental Land
Management Study Committee and the 1993 Legislature respectively reviewed and evaluated the
activities and responsibilities of Florida's Regional Planning Councils (RPCs). The CRPPs were
found to be complex, lengthy and in some cases ineffective policy documents. Being
comprehensive, the plans addressed all of the goals and policies of the State Comprehensive Plan.
The CRPP plan components included policy clusters, performance standards and measures, and
three types of implementation strategies understandable to few except planning professionals.

2. Strategic Regional Policy Plans (SRPPs): In addition to revising other RPC responsibilities, the
1993 Legislature enacted Chapter 93-206, Laws of Florida, (commonly called the ELMS bill) which
requires RPCs to develop new SRPPs to replace their CRPPs. (See Figure V)

SRPP Scope: These new SRRPs must address affordable housing, economic development,
emergency preparedness, natural resources of regional significance and regional transportation.
SRPPs may address other issues of importance to the region, including social issues. These new
plans, being strategic contain more focused goals, policies, and related trends and conditions
assessments. The Governor's Office, in developing minimum criteria for SRPPs, modeled the new
regional plans after the agency strategic plans.

IV. Emphasis on Balance and Integration

A. Change in Focus

In 1991, the Chiles' Administration initiated attempts to balance and integrate various elements and
processes in state planning.








B. Agencv Coordination Agreement


Pursuant to an initiative by Lieutenant Governor Buddy MacKay, the Governor's Office, Departments
of Commerce, Community Affairs, Environmental Regulation, Natural Resources, Labor and

Employment Security, Transportation and the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission entered into an
agency coordination agreement in 1991, as an initial step toward implementing a coordinated growth
policy framework. The agreement focuses on consistent and complementary policies on economic
development, environmental protection, integrated planning for land use, water use and transportation
and improved state/local relationships.

C. Growth Management Portion of the State Comprehensive Plan

1. Legislative Requirements: Chapter 93-206, Laws of Florida, requires that the Governor's Office
draft a strategically oriented growth management portion of the State Comprehensive Plan which
will address the integration of state (including the state water use plan, state land development plan
and Florida transportation plan), regional and local planning efforts for physical growth and
development in the state. (See Figure III) During the Summer and Fall of 1993, the Governor's
Growth Management Plan Advisory Committee developed findings and recommendations regarding
the growth management portion of the State Comprehensive Plan. The Committee recognized the
need for balance among the state's principles, goals and policies for growth management. The
state's policies for environmental protection and economic development and urban redevelopment
and sprawl are examples of the balance issues considered by the Committee.

2. Strategic Guiding Principles: The Growth Management Plan Advisory Committee found that
adequate data and information necessary to make informed decisions with respect to the items
mandated by the Legislature for inclusion in the Growth Management Portion are not readily
available, are nonexistent or will be forthcoming from agencies with the necessary expertise. The
Committee concluded that the Growth Management Portion should ultimately recognize the diversity
of Florida's communities, the need to integrate state policies, the need to provide clarity and
balance in implementing and interpreting the goals and policies of the State Comprehensive Plan
and the need for state, regional, local and private sector entities to work together in a cooperative
manner in developing and implementing Florida's growth management policies and programs. The
Committee included 12 strategic guiding principles related to physical growth and development in
its Final Report.

D. Land Use and Water Planning Task Force

1. Among its other requirements, Chapter 92-206, Laws of Florida, mandates that the Governor's
Office appoint a task force to consider the most appropriate legal relationship between the water
management districts' (WMDs) district water management plans (DWMPs), the Growth
Management Portion of the State Comprehensive Plan, SRPPs and the local government
comprehensive plans, and the future role and scope of the state water use plan.

2. Established in late 1993, the Governor charged the task to consider the legislative mandates and to
consider and recommend options regarding the integration and coordination of the state water use
plan, state land development plan and the Florida transportation plan. The task force is scheduled
to submit its final report and recommendations to the Governor and Legislature in October 1994.

E. Intergovernmental Coordination Element (ICE)

1. The newly adopted ICE Rule (Chapter 9J-5.015, Florida Administrative Code) requires that local
governments greatly enhance the ICE in their local government comprehensive plans. The new ICE
establishes a process to determine if development proposals would have significant impacts on other
local governments or state or regional resources or facilities identified in the applicable state or
regional plan and establish a process for mitigating these impacts.

2. As a part of their dispute resolution requirements, each regional planning council must develop a
similar process for evaluating extrajurisdictional impacts of development projects and other greater
than local planning issues. These activities are aimed at integrating coordinated decision making as
part of governmental activities regarding growth and development in the state.








IV. Emphasis on Accountability


A. Change in Focus

In 1991, the Chiles' Administration began the effort to introduce additional accountability into state
planning.
B. Agency Strategic Plans

1. Agency Strategic Plans (ASPs): State agencies are beginning to develop their fourth ASPs, focused
on agency priority directions for long term implementation within the context of the SCP and other
statutes. Agencies have been challenged to involve their decision makers in the ASP process to
ensure the plans reflect the agencies long term priorities, are outcome oriented, with meaningful,
time certain and measurable objectives. These measurable objectives are the key to evaluating an
agency's effectiveness and are part of the framework for an agency's priority budget requests.

2. ASP Performance Reports: Each agency is required to submit an annual performance report that
accounts for progress toward attaining the ASP objectives. The purpose of this report is to
formalize the evaluation cycle of the agency planning process, to assess and disseminate information
for the Governor's Office, Legislature and other interested observers to evaluate agency progress in
the prior year, as well as, provide information to the agency to continue the development of its
ASP.

C. Benchmarks

1. The development of statewide indicators for use in assessing the state's performance in addressing
its priorities has been seen as part of the process for revising the State Plan since 1991. Florida
Benchmarks, like Oregon's Benchmarks or Minnesota's Milestones, would be used over time to
evaluate the physical, social and economic conditions of the State in broad terms. Not goals or
targets in and of themselves, the benchmarks could serve as effective indicators of progress toward
desired ends or results, results and could serve state decision makers in setting policy agendas and
evaluating policy decisions.

2. Commission on Government Accountability to the People (GAP): Originally established by
Executive Order in November 1992, the Commission succeeded the Partners in Productivity which
concluded its work in 1991. The GAP was formed to report on the performance of and make
recommendations to improve the services provided by the State of Florida. The GAP is currently
involved in developing the first set of statewide benchmarks.

D. Evaluation and Appraisal Reports (EARS)

1. As an integral component of the state's overall accountability, the EARs are the mechanism for
local governments and regional planning councils to evaluate and account for their progress towards
the outcomes established in their respective comprehensive plans and strategic regional policy plans.

a. Local Government Comprehensive Plan EARs: Each local government must evaluate and submit
an evaluation and appraisal report to the DCA regarding the effectiveness of its comprehensive
plan within seven years after local government plan adoption. The first local government EARS
are due in the Fall of 1995.

b. Strategic Regional Policy Plan EARs: Each regional planning council must evaluate and submit
an evaluation and appraisal report to the Governor's Office at least once every five years
assessing the successes or failures of the plan and preparing necessary amendments, revisions or
updates to the plan. The SRPP EARS may recommend amendments to the SCP and other
statutes. The first SRPP EARS are due in the Spring of 2000.









V. Revision of the State Comprehensive Plan


A. Chapter 93-206, Laws of Florida, requires that measurable objectives be included in the SCP.
Additionally, the Act requires that the Governor's Office conduct a biennial review of the SCP and
recommend any needed revisions to the Legislature. Pursuant to this requirement, the Governor's
Office has initiated an evaluation of the SCP which is to be completed in October 1995.


B. Related Developments

1. Constitutional Amendment 4

In November 1992, Floridians strongly supported a "State Budgeting, Planning and Appropriations
Process" Constitutional Amendment to Article III, Section 19 of Florida's Constitution. This
amendment requires the Governor to recommend to the Legislature biennially any revisions to the
SCP, and to report to the Legislature on the progress in achieving the plan's goals.

2. Performance Based Program Budgeting

C. Issues in the Review and Revision of the State Plan

1. Overarching Considerations

a. How is the State Plan used now?
b. What are its strengths and weaknesses?
c. How should and can the State Plan be used?
d. What opportunities can be realized through revision? What challenges must be overcome?

2. Specific Issues

a. development and nature of objectives
b. Status and treatment of Growth Management and Non-growth Management features of the Plan
c. Relationship between policies and substantive law
d. Use of visioning in the revision
e. Extent of reformatting and structural change
f. Magnitude of textual and contextual change to ensure consistency, currency, coherence, and
meaning
g. Nature, extent and structure of public participation

3. Procedure for Revising the State Comprehensive Plan

a. Evaluate the existing goals and policies of the State Comprehensive Plan involving state
agencies, regional entities and local governments.
b. Complete Florida Benchmarks under development by the GAP Commission.
c. Develop the Growth Management Portion of the State Comprehensive Plan.
d. Develop and complete a visioning component.
e. Incorporate public participation and input in all phases of the revision process.
f. Develop and recommend revisions for consideration by the Administration Commission and
Legislature.













FLORIDA'S PLANNING PROCESS: 1993
FIGURE I


STATE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN (SCP)
PLAN(SCP) j 4 GOVERNOR'S ANNUAL REPORT
Reviewed and Analyzed Biennially
Reviewed ad A d B y -Infrastructure & Capital Outlay Needs
(s. 186007(8) & 188.031) -impacts of Growth & Development
S-Economic Conditions & Trends
Assess effect of growth management policies
Annual ASP Issue recommendations for needed changes
Performed (ss. 186.031 & 216.0154)
*Performance
OCA OPB ASP Report
SP .u(s. 186.022)
Rule Rule Instructions




STATE AGENCY AGENCY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT
STRATEGIC PLANS PROGRAMS
Statement of Agency "CIP Annual 5-Year Facilities Needs
Priorities Instructions Assessments
(s. 186.021) (s. 216.0158)




LBR
S LBR GOVERNOR'S POLICYIPROGRAMIBUDGET
4 Instructions
n RECOMMENDATIONS
-Operational Budget (s.216.163)
-State CIP (s. 216.0158)
-Infrastructure Investments &
S DCA Recommendations (s. 186.007(5)(a))
Contract -Substantive Legislative Recommendations (s. 216.164)



STRATEGIC REGIONAL
POLICY PLANS
Evaluation and Appraisal State MONITORING
Reports Every 5 Years Agency and
(ss. 186.508 & 186.511) Review EVALUATION
-Fiscal Administration
-Trends & Conditions
-Performance Agreements
LOCAL GOVERNMENT -Effectiveness Studies
COMPREHENSIVE DCA -Program Evaluations
PLANReview (s. 186.006)
Evaluation and Appraisal Reports Annual Capital Planning
Every 5 Years
Every 5 Years Progress Report
(ss. 163.3167 & 163.3191) Progress R
(s. 216.0162)


LAND
DEVELOPMENT
REGULATIONS
(s. 163.3202)


3/14/94






FIGURE I

FLORIDA'S PLANNING PROCESS
Chapters 186 and 163, Florida Statutes

CONSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR
THE STATE PLANNING DOCUMENT
Set Goals
Biennial Review and Progress Report by Governor
Agency plans must be consistent with State Plan



STATE PLAN
Goals & Objective


ECONOMIC ; a.--.


* Proposed Revisions by October 1995
* Requires objectives


SSTRATEGIC REGIONAL POUCY PLANS
SAffordable Housing
SEconomic Development
SEmergency Preparedness
* Natural Resources of Regional Significance
Regional Transportation
* Other Optional Regional Issues


LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMP
SCapitol Improvements
SIntergovernmental Coordination
* Future Land Use
* Traffic Circulation
* Public Facilities


REHENSIVE PLANS
* Conservation
* Recreation & Open Space
* Housing
* Coastal, where applicable
* Other: Optional Elements
7







STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS MODEL


<-.- STRATEGIC PLANNING


E
&C
Political, Soc
Citizen & Cli
Slakeholder






Slate Plan
Legislative Mandales
Federal/Judicial -
Mandales


xlte
:onc
:icta
cieta
ent C
Anal


rnal Trends
Jitions Scans
I, Technological Influences
demandss and Satisfaction
lysis (Public Participation)


--- -- ---- ---- --SRATEGIC PLAN- -
I .I

Agency OBJECTIVES
_n3 STI,
-" Mission OUTCOMES S
- & Vision PERFOnMANCE M
-< BASELINES

-------------------- --


BUDGET,
OPERATIONAL
WORKPLANS, AND
IMPLEMENTATION


Organizational
Strengths & Weaknesses
Internal Trends and Conditions
* Management/Organization Structure
* Personnel & Resource Capabillies
J


PERFORMANCE REPORT
& EVALUATION


OPERATIONAL PLANNING ->


>1 <


1- -





C)
n

00


-I-
m~
z






COMPARISON uA AFPs and ASPs


1986 AGENCY FUNCTIONAL PLANS (AFPs)


PURPOSE:
* Provides comprehensive policy guidance for agency programs
and functions, and specify objectives to be used in evaluating
the agency's achievement of its policies and the goals and
policies of the State Comprehensive Plan.


SCOPE:
* Comprehensive of all agency "functions" and operations. A
detailed and often complex internal agency document.

USE:
* Describes internal agency activities and operations, process,
workload, and agency based measures.

* Statement of agency policies to guide all programs and
functions.


KEY COMPONENTS:
* Mission Policy clusters
* Agency objectives/measures, Operating policies


1994 AGENCY STRATEGIC PLANS (ASPs)


PURPOSE:
* Statements of an agency's priority directions to cary out its
mission as specified by the SCP and other statutory mandates.
Developed with a five year outlook and provides a framework
for an agency's budget request and information resource
management needs and plans.

SCOPE:
* Strategic; Describes the agency's highest priorities and
outcomes for Floridians.

USE:
* Management tool to aid in decision-making and policy
development.

* Provides a stronger linkage between planning and budgeting.

* A communications' tool for the Governor, Cabinet, Legislature,
interest groups, and the public.

* Specifies the outcomes, results, and impacts of agency activities
on its customers and constituents.

* Annual ASP Performance Reports ensure accountability
through an assessment of objectives and progress made in
previous year's ASP.


KEY COMPONENTS:
Mission Priority issues,
Trends and conditions Objective
Strategies.


Note: Section 186.021, Florida Statutes provides authority for ASPs.






COMPARISON OI< FPPs and SRPPs
1986 COMPREHENSIVE REGIONAL POLICY PLANS 1994 STRATEGIC REGIONAL POLICY PLANS
(CRPPs) (SRPPs)


PURPOSE:
* A long range guide for the physical, economic, and social
development for the region.

SCOPE:
* Comprehensive; addresses the goals and policies of the State
Comprehensive Plan.




USE:
* CRPP standards and measures used for RPC DRI reviews and
as the basis for RPC appeal of DRIs.

* CRPP used to review LGCPs and LGCP amendments.


KEY COMPONENTS:
* Regional description Goals
* Policies Performance standards
* Implementation strategies


PURPOSE:
A long range guide for the physical, economic, and social
development for the region.

SCOPE:
Strategic; addresses affordable housing, economic
development, emergency preparedness, natural resources of
regional significance, regional transportation, and other issues
important to the region.


USE:
SRPP used to review DRIs.

RPCs DRI appeal authority was repealed, however RPCs may
recommend that DCA appeal a DRI.

* SRPP used to review LGCPs and LGCP amendments. Review
is limited to effects on regional resources and facilities.

* Key regional resources and facilities identified in SRPPs can be
used by local governments to satisfy some of their
Intergovernmental Coordination Element (ICE) requirements.

* RPCs and SRPPs cannot be used for regulatory or permitting
purposes.

KEY COMPONENTS:
* Optional vision statement 0 Strategic regional subject areas
* Trends and conditions Goals
* Policies Coordination Outline


Note: Section 186.507, Florida Statutes and Chapter 27E-4, Florida Administrative Code provides authority for SRPPs.




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