Title: Sub-committee Meeting Agenda of 4/29/94 - Land Use and Water Policy Task Force State Issues
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Title: Sub-committee Meeting Agenda of 4/29/94 - Land Use and Water Policy Task Force State Issues
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Language: English
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Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
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Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - Sub-committee Meeting Agenda of 4/29/94 - Land Use and Water Policy Task Force State Issues (JDV Box 49)
General Note: Box 21, Folder 2 ( Land and Water Planning Task Force - 1994 - 1995 ), Item 35
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: WL00004398
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
123 P01/06 APR 21 '94 08:27


ORSHEFSKY HOLDINGS, INC.


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Jake Varn


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AGENDA

LAND USE AND WATER POLICY TASK FORCE
STATE ISSUES SUB-COMMNITEE

4/29/94

1. CALL TO ORDER

2. APPROVAL OF MINUTES

3. OPENING REMARKS

A. Review of Charge to Sub-committee
B. Other

4. DISCUSSION

A. Overview of State Plan purpose and intent

1. Review of State Comprehensive Plan ("SCP)

Legislative Intent 186.002

Review of nature/type of policies

Discussion of Amendment 4 Legislation (Teresa Tinker)
Genesis/present status
Content
Future Role for State Plan and Growth Management Portion
Future Role for Agency Strategic Plans
Distinguish role of translationall plans" from new role for
agency strategic plans.?

Established time frames/types of planning documents

Existing Linkages -- Horizontal and Vertical

2. Overview of Growth Management Portion C'GMP") of SCP

Review of legislative elements: 186.009

Potential points for "linkages"; .g 186.009 (2) (c), (d), (1), and (3)(a)


DATED: 4/21/94


+3055279313 ORSHEFSKY


PAGE: 1




+3055279313 ORSHEFSKY 123 P03/06 APR 21 '94 08:2

9:50 B. State Water Use Plan C'SWUP'

Where Are We Now, and How Did We Get Here? (Tom Swihart))

Review of Authorizing Legislation -- Existing and Historical

373.036, F.S. -- State Water Use Plan
373.039, F.S. -- Florida Water Plan
373.016, F.S. -- Legislative Intent
373.023, F.S. -- Scope of Chapter 373
373.026, F.S. -- Powers of DEP

186.022, F.S. SWUP as Agency Strategic Plan?

Current Status: How was the SWUP developed? Are current revision
efforts under way? Is SWUP "adopted", and if so how?

Current Content -- Review of SWUP

How is the SWUP Currently Used?
Planning Uses
Regulatory Uses
Budgeting Uses

Relationship of SWUP to Other Planning Documents
State Plan
Growth Management Portion
WMD Plans
SWIM Plans
Ecosystem Management Efforts
Other Planning Documents

Relationship of SWUP to Chapter 17.40 FAC
-- Current status of 17.40 FAC

Establish time frames/types of planning documents

Existing Linkages -- Horizontal and Vertical

Examples:
-- 373.036 (1) -- Horizontal to State Plan
-- 373.0395 -- Vertical to Local Comp Plans


PUBLIC COMMENT

REQUESTS OF FULL TASK FORCE

A. Request For Further Direction, If Any
B. Other

SCHEDULING/NEXT MEETING

ADJOURN


8


5.

6.




7.

8.
DATE


PAGE: 2


D: 4/21/94




123 P04/06 APR 21 '94 08:28


Statutory Materials


186.002, F.S. --
186.009, F.S. -
186.022, F.S. --

373.036, F.S. --
373.039, F.S.--
373.016, F.S. --
373.023, F.S.--
373.026, F.S. -
373.0395, F.S. -
373.0391, F.S. -
373. 0397, F.S. -
373.042, F.S. --
373.046, F.S.-
373.103, F.S.-
373.114, F.S.--
373.1961, F.S. -
373.2235, F.S.-
373.2295, F.S -


* Rule 17.40 FAC

* CS for SB 2998 -
S Art. III, 19 --

* CS/CS/SB 1346 -


Legislative Intent
Growth Management Portion of the State Plan
State Agency Strategic Plans

State Water Use Plan
Florida Water Plan
Legislative Intent
Scope of Chapter 373
Powers of DEP
WMD Ground Water Inventory
WMD Tech Assistance to Local Govts.
Biscayne/Floridan Aquifers
Minimum Flows
Interagency Agreements
Delegation of Powers to WMDs
FLAWAC Review of WMD decisions
Water Production/Planning by WMDs
Prior Acquisition of Land (local govt capital planning)
Interdistrict Water Transfer.


Amendment 4 State Plan Legislation
Amendment 4 Constitutional Provision

1994 Water Policy Legislation


Other Materials

Powell Land Use Article
21 FSU Law Review 223-246

Concerned Citizens of Putnam County v. St.. Johns WMD. 622 So.2d 520
(1st DCA 1993)


DATED: 4/21/94


+3055279313 ORSHEFSKY


PAGE: 8




+3055279313 ORSHEFSKY 123 P05/06 APR 21 '94 08:28

I.. I IIIOUSE MEMER AMENO NT

ill YNo. CS/cS/CS/3 13




1 Section 14. Effective July 1, 1994, sections 403.817

2 and 403.8171, Florida Statutes, as amended by chapter 93-213,

3 Laws of Florida, are repealed.
4 Section 15. Subsection (16) oEisection 373.019,

S Florida Statutes, is amended to read:
6 373.019 Definitions.--When appearing in this chapter
7 or in any rule, regulation, or order adopted pursuant thereto,
8 the following words shall, unless the context clearly
9 indicates otherwise, mean:

10 (16) "State water policy" means the comprehensive

11 statewide policy as adopted by the department pursuant to ss.

12 373.026 and 403.061 setting forth goals; objectives, and
13 guidance for the development and review of programs, rules,
14 and plans relating to water resources. The waters of the

15 state are amonq its most basic resources. Such waters should
16 be.managed to conserve and protect watek resources and to

17 realize the full beneficial use of thesi resources. The Land

18 Use and water Planning task force was established by chanter
.19 93-206, L.O.,., to formulate recommendations to the
20 leoailature on the relationship between district water
21 management plans, the growth management portion of the state
22 comprehensive plan, regional policy planA, and local
23 comprehensive plans. In order to provide for consistency

24 between growth management policy and water management nalicy
25 the task force shall make recommendations to the 1995
26 legislature on the mechanisms and procedures for establishing
27 and amending water policy. In an attempt to consider these
28 recommendations and receive the benefit bf a review by House
29 and Senate Natural Resources Committees. the amendments to
30 chapter 17-40. F.A.C., adopted by the Environmental Regulation
31



Submit original Code: 001346-009-1553
and nine copies Date; 04/15/94
Op. Number: 483 Times 5:14 p.m.




+3055279313 ORSHEFSKY 123 P06/06 APR 21 '94 08:29


I!1 II IIlEOll U[IHSE KIABER AMENDMENT

Bill No. CS/CS/Sa 1346




1 Commission on December 1, 1993, shall not become effective

2 until July 1., 1995.

3 Section 16. Subsection (2) of Section 77, chapter 93-

4 206, Laws of Florida, is amended to rand:

5 Section 77. (1) In light of the importance of water
6 resources for the future development of the state, an
7 important policy question remains regarding the legal
8 relationship that should exist between water and land

9 planning.

10 (2) The Governor shall establish a task force with

11 public-sector and private-sector representatives, including
12 local government officials, and to include one member of the
13 Environmental Requlation Commission, one representative of
14 environmental interests and one representative at regulated

15 interests, to formulate recommendations for legislative action

16 on the most appropriate legal relationship between district
17 water management plans, on the one hand, and the growth
18 management portion of the state comprehensive plan, strategic

19 regional policy plans, and local comprehensive plans, on the
20 other. In addition, the task force shalll consider the future
21 role and scope, if any, of the state water use plan following
22 legislative adoption of the growth management portion of the
23 state comprehensive plan. The task force shall submit its

24 recommendation to the President of the Senate and the Speaker
25 of the.House of Representatives by Octobbe 1, 1994.

26 Section 17.Effective July 1, 1994, subamction (4) is
27 added to subsection 373.411, Florida Statutes, to read:-
28 373.441 Role of counties, municipalities and local
29 pollution control programs in permit processing.--
30 (4) The department shall review environmental resource
31 permit applications for electrical distribution and



Submit original ICode: 001346-009-1553
and nine copies iDate: 04/15/94
Op. Number: 483 Tilme: 5:14 p.m.








OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR


GROWTH MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGIC POLICY PLANNING UNIT
2105, THE CAPITOL
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32399-0001

Memorandum


To: Land Use and Water Planning Subcommittee Lead Staff ke Varn
-t,^ Jake Varn
From: Teresa Tinker N
S: Working Copy
Subject: Lead Staff responsibilities

Date: May 3, 1994


This should assist you in your responsibilities as the lead staff person for your subcommittee.

1. The scheduling of subcommittee meeting time, location and agenda material should be
coordinated through the subcommittee chair and yourself.

2. Once the meetings have been scheduled, notify Paul Carlson at (904) 488-7793, in
order for the meetings to be properly noticed for public participation. Please let us
know of meeting times and locations as early as possible.

3. The Governor's Office should recieve a copy of all subcommittee agenda material for
our files.

4. Each subcommittee meeting should be audio recorded and written minutes prepared.
These minutes should then be distributed to the subcommittee members and the
Governor's Office. The Governor's Office will distribute the minutes to other Task
Force members and interested persons.

5. It is encouraged that the subcommittees meet during the time set aside at the Full Task
Force meetings. Other subcommittee meetings may be held, as deemed necessary.

6. Each subcommittee has staff support other than yourself assigned. Please use these
individuals to assist in setting up the meetings and preparing agenda material.

7. The Sunshine Law requirements that apply to the Full Task Force also apply to the
subcommittees. If you have any questions regarding these requirements, please call
my office for clarification.

Thank you for your assistance in staffing the Task Force subcommittees. If you have any
questions, feel free to call me or Paul Carlson at (904) 488-7793.


I I I




TEL:904-488-9005 May 09,94


Land Use and Water Planning Task Fc

Work Schedule and Tentative Agenda Items


Varn
Copy


Friday, May 13
Jacksonville


Full Task Force (10:00 am noon)

* Consumptive Use Permitting


Ecosystem Management

State Issues Subcommittee (12:30 pm 3:00 pm)


Monday, June 20
Orlando


Friday, July 8
Pensacola


Friday, July 22
Hollywood


Thursday, September 1 -
Friday, September 2
Tallahassee


Friday, September 23


Subcommittee Meetings


Present and Discuss Regional Issues Subcommittee Findings and
Recommendations


Present and Discuss State Issues and EAR Subcommittee
Findings and Recommendations


Formulate Task Force Recommendations and Approve Final
Report


If needed


Note: Subcommittees may meet at times in addition to those noted above.


GOV. OFF. OPB


16:42 No.014 P.02





0 o
Soutri Florida


TTT"
John R. Wodraska, Execu director
Tilford C. Creel. Deputy Executive Director


Water Management District
Post Office Box V 3301 Gun Club Road
West Palm Beach, Florida 33402
Telephone (305) 686-8800
Florida WATS Line 1-800-432-2045


IN REPLY REFER TO:


December 10, 1985



Mr. Wayne E. Daltry
Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
221 West First Street
Fort Myers, FL 33901

Dear Mr. Daltry:

Our meeting with you on November 18, 1985 was beneficial in that opportunities
for greater coordination, communication and cooperation between our agencies
became clearly evident. This letter is by way of confirming the date of
S December 17, 1985 for a meeting between our agency and yours at our offices at
10:00 a.m. This meeting is being held so we don't lose the momentum gained at
our last meeting and to follow up on some action items; a meeting agenda is
attached.

We look forward to seeing you or your representatives) on the 17th. If
further information is required please call me (Extension 254) or Patricia
Walker (Extension 631).

Si rely,



Ji arvey
As i tant to the Director

JH:ph
Enclosure


Rhoads
Rogers
Horvath
Creel
Wodraska


DEC 11 1985

S.W. FL-OIDA REGIONAL
PLANNING COUNCIL


Stanley W Hole
Chairman Naples


William E Sadowski
Vice Chairman Miami


Neil Gallagher Nathaniel P Reed
Cloud Hobe Sound


Kathleen Shea Abrams John F. Flanigan Timer E. Powers
Miami Shores North Palm Beach Indiantown


Nancy H Roen Oscar M Corbin. Jr
Plantation Ft Myers


cc: P.
R.
J.
T.
J.


* __





9 Q cr













JOINT MEETING OF
THE REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCILS

AND
THE SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

Tuesday, December 17, 1985

10:00 AM


AGENDA

I. Geographic, Land Use and Water Resource information exchange, including
IBM-AT's and associated hardware and AutoCad software program.

II. State Water Use Plan review update presentation by District Staff.

III. Regional Policy Plans Update by Regional Planning Council Staff.






STATE OF FLORIDA

(ffict of the (oiterntr a
"" rTHE CAPITOL am
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32399-0001 W rkfi C y
LAWTON CHILES
GOVERNOR R E CE VED
May 6, 1994 9
^ O 9 1994
Carlton Fields. Talanassee
TO: Members, Land Use and Water Planning Task Force C ,"Io var ssee

FROM: Teresa B. Tinker
Policy Coordinator, Growth Management and Strategic Planning Policy Unit


The next meeting of the Land Use and Water Planning Task Force is scheduled for Friday, May 13, 1994, in
the Garden Complex at the Holiday Inn at the Airport, 195/Airport Road, Jacksonville, Florida, from
10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m.

Subcommittee Meetings

The State Issues Subcommittee will meet Friday, May 13, from 12:30 p.m. until 3:00 p.m., in the Garden
Complex, at the Holiday Inn at the Airport, 195/Airport Road, Jacksonville, Florida.

The EAR Subcommittee will not meet.

The Regional Issues Subcommittee will not meet.

Full Task Force Meeting Materials

The following materials are enclosed:

Meeting Agenda;

A newspaper article received from Sue Dudley;

April Meeting Summary;

Florida: Beginning Ecosystem Management, Department of Environmental Protection

Letter from Wayne Daltry, Executive Director, Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council.

There is a shuttle service from the Jacksonville Airport to the Holiday Inn.

June 20, 1994, is our next scheduled date for the Task Force and/or subcommittees to meet. This meeting will
be held in Orlando, Florida. Further details will be discussed at the May meeting.

I look forward to seeing you on the 13th. Please call me at (904) 488-7793 if you have any questions,
comments or concerns about the upcoming meeting or the enclosed agenda materials.






Land Use and Water Planning Task Force Meeting

May 13, 1994
11:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
Garden Complex
Holiday Inn at the Airport
195/Airport Road
Jacksonville, Florida


AGENDA



FULL TASK FORCE

10:00 am Opening Remarks Vicki Tschinkel, Chair

10:05 Welcome Brian Teeple, Executive Dirctor, Northeast Florida Regional
Planning Council

10:10 Ecosystem Management Pam McVety, Department of Environmental
Protection

Discussion to follow presentation

11:00 Discussion Consumptive Use Permitting Issue
(Should the Task Force take up this issue, and if so, how?)

11:30 Public Input

12:00 pm Break/Lunch

12:30 Subcommittee Meetings

State Issues Garden Complex

EAR (will not meet)

Regional Issues (will not meet)

3:00 Adjourn (Subcommittees may adjourn before 3:00)







Land Use and Water Planning Task Force Meeting


May 13, 1994

AGENDA

Page 2


NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC




Public comments regarding the Task Force charge and issues for consideration by the Task
Force will be taken at 11:30 a.m. Written comments may be submitted to:

Land Use and Water Planning Task Force
Attention: Teresa Tinker, Policy Coordinator
Growth Management and Strategic Planning Policy Unit
Executive Office of the Governor
Room 2105, The Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0001


H:\opbgmp\lwtask\5-13-94\agenda.dft


















Planning coordination urged


A task force is studying how best to bring harmony to
land-use planning and water management.


By Victor Hull
REGIONAL REPORTER
Money and natural resources are being
wasted in Florida because governments
are not required to coordinate land-use
planning and water management, public of-
ficials said Friday.
Under the current system, Hillsborough
County can permit a shopping center with-
out regard to a wellfield next door that sup-
plies drinking water for neighboring Pinel-


las County, the officials told a state task
force meeting in St Petersburg. And Man-
atee County can invest millions of dollars
in developing a water supply, only to be
told later by state regulators that it won't
be allowed to produce as much water as it
expected.
The result is a chaotic and inefficient
system that produces conflicts among local'
governments, between water managers
and local governments and between citi-


zens and public officials. The solution is to
develop a system to tie growth plans, wa-
ter supply and water management deci-
sions together, somehow and make them
on a broad, regional level, they said.
"It needs to be faced on a statewide ba-
sis," Hillsborough County Commissioner
Jan Platt told the task force. "This is a
problem. There are solutions, and I hope
you will find them.
"There really needs to be a regional ap-
proach.to dealing with land-use decisions
and water planning."
Gov. Lawton Chiles has assigned the 18-

PLEASE SEE PLANNING ON 9B


ARASTA H ALTR / SATA1 Y, FE Y 26,




SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE / SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1994


Coordination urged in water, land plans


PANNING FROM IB
rtember task force to figure out just
htfw it should be done. The group,
called the State Land Use and Water
Planning Task Force, was created
last year as a part of a law revising
Florida's growth management pro--
gram. Its formal job is to recom-
.mend legislation on "the most ap-
propriate legal relationship" among
water management district plans
arid state, regional and local growth
ilans.
: 'Friday's meeting was the third for
the group, which plans to wrap up its
work in September.
Most of the work so far has cen-
:ered on collecting information from
public officials. No formal proposals
lave emerged. Some task force
members suggested that sweeping
changes are needed in the way wa-
ter management districts and state
environmental agencies are set up.


Others believe only minor tinkering
is necessary. ..
"My concern is, there's enough
processes in place today, if people of.
good will want to sit down and dis-
cuss a problem," said Jack Malloy,.
an attorney for A. Duda & Sons, one'
of the state's largest landowners.
"My concern is that we attempt to
keep the resolution of conflicts as
close to the problem as possible."
But, said task force member and
Charlotte County Commissioner
Sue Dudley, "When you're talking
water, you're going way beyond the
local government's ability to make a
decision. It's much broader."
The panel that addressed the task
force included Platt, Manatee Coun-
ty Commissioner Stan Stephens,
Pasco County Commissioner Ann
Hildebrand, Southwest Florida Wa-
teManagement District Executive
Director Peter Hubbell and Harold
Aiken, executive director of a Tam-


pa Bay area regional water supply
authority.
Stephens complained that the wa-
ter-management district, commonly
known as Swiftmud, has shifting
rules that are costly to local govern-
ments. Several years ago, he said,
Swiftmud told Manatee County
that it wouldn't be able to enlarge its
reservoir on the Manatee River.
"They said, 'You'll have to use
ground water,' Stephens said.
"We did seek ground water. Now
we're being told they're going to
limit ground-water use."
Manatee County has come under
fire in the past for approving devel-
opment that would affect the city of
Bradenton's water supply. In 1992,
the Tampa Bay Regional Planning
Council and the state opposed Man-
atee County's approval of a 4,421-
acre development along University
Parkway that is in the heart of the
Evers Reservoir watershed, the


sole source of drinking water for the
city of Bradenton.
The Tampa Bay region has expe-
rienced notorious "water, wars"
over the availability of water over
the last 20 years. Pinellas County
and St Petersburg have to import
their water from Hillsborough and
Pasco counties. Pasco, the least
populous county in the bay area, has
the most abundant water supplies.
"Northwest Hillsborough County
wells are used by Pinellas and St.
Petersburg," Platt said. "Hillsbor-
ough receives a great deal of water
from Pasco. The land-use decisions
in Pasco could impact my county,
and the land use in Hillsborough can
affect Pinellas. But I don't see a
broad overview taken when these
decisions are made.".
Aiken, who heads the West Coast
Regional Water Supply Authority,
said the water utility has no say over
the development around wellfields
used by the authority. Yet the devel-
opment approved today can affect
the decisions the authority has to
make perhaps a decade in the future
on how to get water to support that
growth.


I-











Southwest Florida Regional


December 1, 1982


Mr. William Tatum, Executive Director
Southwest Florida Water Management
District
5060 U.S. Highway 41, South
Brooksville, FL 33512

RE:r Memorandum of Understanding between the Southwest Florida Water
Management District and the Southwest Florjda Regional Planning
Council.

Dear Mr. Tatum:

At our November 18, 1982 Council meeting, the Southwest Florida Regional
Planning Council unanimously endorsed the Memorandum of Understanding
between our agencies and authorized me to execute the agreement. I am
pleased to return to you a signed original for your files.

I look forward to continue working with your agency.

Sincerely,

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL
PLANNING COUNCIL



Wayne Daltry
Executive Director

WED/DB/cb


Enclosure


~-r: ~; ;,jji-~-. sj-.; .;..-...r;i;c;; 1-~;1 ------------ ---.^ ----- -~---~ --I-I__


Planning Council











MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL

AND THE

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT



WHEREAS, the SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL,

hereinafter referred to as the "COUNCIL," is the designated agency for the

implementation of the Development of Regional Impact (DRI) review process in Region

Nine (9); and

WHEREAS, the SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT, herein-

after referred to as the "DISTRICT," has responsibility and expertise in the area of water

resources and should be included in the DRI review process; and

WHEREAS, the COUNCIL'S responsibility for implementation of Chapter 380.06,

Florida Statutes, can be aided by the DISTRICTS special knowledge of the water

resources in the region; and

WHEREAS, the purpose and intent of this Memorandum of Understanding is to

delineate responsibilities and foster cooperation between the DISTRICT and the

COUNCIL regarding reviews of Applications for Development Approval (ADA).

NOW, THEREFORE, the COUNCIL and the DISTRICT hereby understand and agree

as follows:

ARTICLE 1

Upon request of the COUNCIL, the DISTRICT shall attend pre-application confer-

ences and review Development of Regional Impacts/Applications for Development

Approval. The DISTRICT shall prepare a report and recommendations on issues that are

clearly within the DISTRICT'S jurisdiction. The DISTRICT shall specifically consider the

Environment and Natural Resources questions of Water, Wetlands, and Flood Plains, and

the Public Facilities questions of Wastewater Management, Drainage, and Water Supply










from the Department of Community Affairs' ADA questionnaire, as well as the Addenda

questions which have been prepared by the DISTRICT and submitted to the COUNCIL.

The DISTRICT may additionally consider information contained in other portions of the

ADA deemed appropriate and necessary in order to complete its report, including

addenda questions prepared by the COUNCIL and made a part of the ADA.



ARTICLE 2

Prior to each pre-application conference which the DISTRICT is requested to attend,

the DISTRICT shall receive four (4) copies of the pre-application conference materials so

that a minimum of five (5) working days is provided to review these materials and pre-

pare for the pre-application conference. At the pre-application conference, the

DISTRICT shall identify the types of permits issued by the DISTRICT, the level of infor-

mation required, and the permit issuance procedures as applied to the proposed

S development.



ARTICLE 3

Upon request by the COUNCIL, the DISTRICT may participate in the DRI site visit

as deemed appropriate and necessary. All DRI site visits, including those requested by

the DISTRICT, shall be scheduled by the COUNCIL.



ARTICLE 4

The DISTRICT shall receive four (4) copies of the ADA within five (5) working days

after its submission to the COUNCIL, unless provided directly to the DISTRICT by the

applicant at the time of its submission to the COUNCIL. Within ten (10) working days

after receipt of the ADA, the DISTRICT will respond to the COUNCIL concerning infor-

mation sufficiency.











ARTICLE 5

The COUNCIL shall forward to the DISTRICT a copy of any sufficiency notification

of an ADA provided to the appropriate local governmentss. The COUNCIL shall notify

the DISTRICT in writing when it has received the local government notice of public

hearing. Upon notification of the public hearing being scheduled, the DISTRICT will have

twenty (20) working days to prepare and submit its final ADA report. The DISTRICT'S

ADA report shall be attached to the COUNCIL'S report and recommendations for sub-

mission to the local government.



ARTICLE 6

The DISTRICT shall receive from the COUNCIL one (1) copy of the COUNCIL'S

report and recommendations to the local government.



ARTICLE 7

One (1) copy of the local government's Final Development Order, and one (1) copy of

the COUNCIL'S assessment of the Development Order if prepared, shall be provided to

the DISTRICT by the COUNCIL.



ARTICLE 8

DRI's reviewed by the DISTRICT must be within the DISTRICTS boundaries,

pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes. In the event a DRI is not located entirely

within the DISTRICT'S boundaries, the review will be coordinated with the appropriate

water management district or districts in which the DRI is located.



ARTICLE 9

The DISTRICT'S report on any ADA will address those questions identified above in

ARTICLE 1, and comments will be prepared on each question. The final review will be










comprised of an appropriate analysis of the potential regional effects of the DRI on those

water resource issues addressed by these questions. The DISTRICT will not be evaluating

the ADA for conceptual permit approvals, nor will the DISTRICT make a final recom-

mendation. The final recommendation shall be that of the COUNCIL. At the sole

discretion of the DISTRICT, the DISTRICT may have a representative present at the DRI

public hearing.



ARTICLE 10

Either party may terminate this agreement at any time by giving notice by

registered mail of such termination, specifying the effective date, at least thirty (30)

days before the effective date of such termination.



ARTICLE 11

The COUNCIL understands that the reviews by the DISTRICT of ADAs are limited

to review by the DISTRICT'S staff and should not be construed as having been approved

by the DISTRICTS Governing Board. The statutory time frame imposed by Chapter 380

does not allow sufficient time in which to allow consideration and action by the

Governing Board of the DISTRICT prior to the staff submitting final ADA reports to the

COUNCIL. The COUNCIL agrees that DISTRICT staff activities pursuant to the pro-

visions of this Memorandum shall in no manner waive, estop or pre-empt the DISTRICT'S

Governing Board from taking such action as it deems appropriate; neither shall such

provisions or activities waive, estop or pre-empt the DISTRICT from exercising its

regulatory and permitting authority as prescribed in Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, and

Chapter 40D, Florida Administrative Code.





(i


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the COUNCIL and the DISTRICT have executed this agree-

ment, consisting of five (5) pages on this fourth day of November, 1982.


SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL
PLANNING COUNCIL


By: ve Drect
-Execu/ive Director /


SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT


By:
Executive Director c,! .


//- S--L V- >FC_


6J~


_ __


Witnessed by:



0y IM (IC


6A nqq')







-^' Southwest Florida Water

Management District
... MICHAEL ZAGORAC. JR.. Chairman. Belleoir WALTER H. HARKALA, Vice Chairman, PlanI City
1961 // ANNE M. BISHOPRIC. Secretary. Sorosoto HORACE F. HERNDON. Treasurer. Loke Wales
ROY G. HARRELL. JR.. St. Petersburg ROBERT T. BRAMSON. M.D.. Tompo
WILLIAM H. WILCOX. Ph.D.. Port Chorlotte MARY ANN HOGAN. Brooksville CHARLES A. BLACK. Crystal River
GARY W. KUHL. Executive Director DANIEL P. FERNANDEZ. General Counsel
E*iMS WILLIAM K. HENNESSEY. PETER G. HUBBELL. JERRY I. SIMPSON. Deputy Executive Directors
June 20, 1988
q6) jni/



Wayne Daltry
Executive Director
Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
2121 West First Street
Ft. Myers, Florida 33901

Dear Mr. Daltry:

Enclosed is one fully executed, revised Memorandum of
Understanding between the Council and the District. The District
has retained one copy of the MOU for our files. I appreciate
your initiating this effort to have our MOU address reviews of
Local Government Comprehensive Plans.

We look forward to working with the Council on these and other
issues of mutual interest.

Sincerely,



ichard S. Owen JUN 21 1988
Planning Director

RSO:pam SW. FLORIDA REGIONAL
Enclosure PLANNING COUNCIL

cc: B. Wilcox
A. Bishopric
G. Kuhl












2379 BROAD STREET. BROOKSVILLE. FLORIDA 34609-6899
PHONE (904) 796-7211 or 1-800-423-1476 SUNCOM 628-4097














MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE

THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL

AND

THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT


WHEREAS, the SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL, hereinafter

referred to as the "COUNCIL", is the designated agency for the implementation

of the Development of Regional Impact (DRI) review process in Region Nine (9);

and,

WHEREAS, the SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT, hereinafter

referred to as the "DISTRICT", has responsibility and expertise in the area of

water resources and should be included in the DRI review process; and

WHEREAS, the COUNCIL'S responsibility for implementation of Chapter 163,

186, and 380, Florida Statutes, can be aided by the DISTRICT'S special

knowledge of the water resources in the region; and

WHEREAS, the purpose and intent of this Memorandum of Understanding is to

delineate responsibilities and foster cooperation between the DISTRICT and the

COUNCIL regarding reviews of Applications for Development Approval (ADA) and

Local Government Comprehensive Plans.

NOW, THEREFORE, the COUNCIL and the DISTRICT hereby understand and agree

as follows:


ARTICLE 1

Upon request of the COUNCIL, the DISTRICT shall attend pre-application

conferences and review Development of Regional Impacts/Applications for

Development Approval. The DISTRICT shall prepare a report and recommendations

on issues that are clearly within the DISTRICT'S jurisdiction. The DISTRICT

shall specifically consider the Environment and Natural Resources questions of

Water, Wetlands, and Flood Plains, and the Public Facilities questions of

Wastewater Management, Drainage, and Water Supply from the Department of

Community Affairs' ADA questionnaire, as well as the Addenda questions which

have been prepared by the DISTRICT and submitted to the COUNCIL. The

DISTRICT may additionally consider information contained in other portions of

the ADA deemed appropriate and necessary in order to complete its report,

including addenda questions prepared by the COUNCIL and made a part of the

ADA.













ARTICLE 2

Prior to each pre-application conference which the DISTRICT is requested

to attend, the DISTRICT shall receive four (4) copies of the pre-application

conference materials so that a minimum of five (5) working days is provided to

review these materials and prepare for the pre-application conference. At the

pre-application conference, the DISTRICT shall identify the types of permits

issued by the DISTRICT, the level of information required, and the permit

issuance procedures as applied to the proposed development.


ARTICLE 3

Upon request by the COUNCIL, the DISTRICT may participate in the DRI site

visit as deemed appropriate and necessary. All DRI site visits, including

those requested by the DISTRICT, shall be scheduled by the COUNCIL.


ARTICLE 4

The DISTRICT shall receive four (4) copies of the ADA within five (5)

working days after its submission to the COUNCIL, unless provided directly to

the DISTRICT by the applicant at the time of its submission to the COUNCIL.

Within ten (10) working days after receipt of the ADA, the DISTRICT will

respond to the COUNCIL concerning information sufficiency.


ARTICLE 5

The COUNCIL shall forward to the DISTRICT a copy of any sufficiency

notification of an ADA provided to the appropriate local governmentss. The

COUNCIL shall notify the DISTRICT in writing when it has received the local

government notice of public hearing. Upon notification of the public hearing

being scheduled, the DISTRICT will have twenty (20) working days to prepare

and submit its final ADA report. The DISTRICT'S ADA report shall be attached

to the COUNCIL'S report and recommendations for submission to the local

government.

ARTICLE 6

The DISTRICT shall receive from the COUNCIL one (1) copy of the COUNCIL'S

report and recommendations to the local government.


ARTICLE 7

One (1) copy of the local government's Final Development Order, and one

(1) copy of the COUNCIL'S assessment of the Development Order if prepared,

shall be provided to the DISTRICT by the COUNCIL.














ARTICLE 8

DRI'S reviewed by the DISTRICT must be within the DISTRICT'S boundaries,

pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes. In the event a DRI is not located

entirely within the DISTRICT'S boundaries, the review will be coordinated with

the appropriate water management district or districts in which the DRI is

located.


ARTICLE 9

The DISTRICT'S reports on any ADA will address those questions identified

above in ARTICLE 1, and comments will be prepared on each question. The final

review will be comprised of an appropriate analysis of the potential regional

effects of the DRI on those water resource issues addressed by these

questions. The DISTRICT will not be evaluating the ADA for conceptual permit

approvals, nor will the DISTRICT make a final recommendation. The final

recommendation shall be that of the COUNCIL, At the sole discretion of the

DISTRICT, the DISTRICT may have a representative present at the DRI public

hearing.


ARTICLE 10

A number of Clearinghouse Review items involve the special expertise and

jurisdictional responsibilities of the DISTRICT. COUNCIL staff will forward

such items to the DISTRICT at the staff's discretion, and will incorporate

any responses received by the DISTRICT into the comments submitted to the

agency soliciting Clearinghouse Review.


ARTICLE 11

Consistency with Regional Comprehensive Policy Plans is a requirement of

the Growth Management Act of 1985. The DISTRICT will be reviewing Local

Government Comprehensive Plans to ensure that sound water resource planning,

consistent with the provisions of the Growth Management Act, is adhered to.

As issues related to consistency with the Regional Plan are identified by

DISTRICT staff, or issues of significance to water resource management are

identified by COUNCIL staff, contact will be made to coordinate their

resolution. Any written comments, objections, or recommendations received

from the DISTRICT regarding Regional Plan consistency will be included in the

COUNCIL staff report to the COUNCIL.














ARTICLE 12

Either party may terminate this agreement at any time by giving notice by

registered mail of such termination, specifying the effective date, at least

thirty (30) days before the effective date of such termination.


ARTICLE 13

The COUNCIL understands that the reviews by the DISTRICT of ADAs are

limited to review by the DISTRICT's staff and should not be construed as

having been approved by the DISTRICT'S Governing Board. The statutory time

frame imposed by Chapter 380 does not allow sufficient time in which to allow

consideration and action by the Governing Board of the DISTRICT prior to the

staff submitting final ADA reports to the COUNCIL. The COUNCIL agrees that

DISTRICT staff activities pursuant to the provisions of this Memorandum shall

in no manner waive, estop or pre-empt the DISTRICT'S Governing Board from

taking such action as it deems appropriate; neither shall such provisions or

activities waive, estop or pre-empt the DISTRICT from exercising its

regulatory and permitting authority as prescribed in Chapter 373, Florida

Statutes, and Chapter 40D, Florida Administrative Code.


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the COUNCIL and the DISTRICT have executed this

Agreement, consisting of four (4) pages on this 14th day of June, 1988, A.D.




Witnessed by: SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING
COUNCIL



ive Director


SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT
DISTRICT



--- Exeutive Director





r AGREEMENT BETWEEN

THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL

and

THE SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT


WHEREAS, the SOUTHWEST FLORIDA.REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL, hereinafter

referred to as the "COUNCIL", is the designated agency for the implementation

of the Development of Regional Impact process in Region Nine (9); and,

WHEREAS, the SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT, hereinafter

referred to as the "DISTRICT", has special resources and expertise in the area

of natural resources and is included in the review process by administrative action;

and,

WHEREAS, the COUNCIL'S responsibility for implementation of Chapter 380,

Florida Statutes, can be aided by the DISTRICT'S special knowledge of natural

resources in the region;

NOW, THEREFORE, the COUNCIL and the DISTRICT hereby agree as follows:


ARTICLE 1

The DISTRICT shall prepare and submit to the COUNCIL an impact assessment

report for each Application for Development Approval (ADA). The report shall include

an analysis, based on the information in the ADA, of the magnitude of any positive

or negative impacts of the proposed project on groundwater quality and quantity,

surface water quality and quantity, and on the demonstrated ability of the project

area and Region to absorb the increased demand for water supply, sanitary sewage

disposal, and storm drainage. The report may also include analyses of such other

relevant water and natural resource matters upon which the DISTRICT may wish to

coinent. Statements regarding the DRI'S conformance with local and federal criteria

shall also be included where applicable.

ARTICLE 2

The DISTRICT shall receive four (4) copies of the Application for

Development Approval (ADA) and within seven (7) working days of the receipt of

the ADA, the DISTRICT will respond in writing to the COUNCIL concerning information

adequacy.





ARTICLE 3


Upon the DISTRICT'S receipt of the COUNCIL'S notification to the local

governing body to set their-public hearing date, the DISTRICT will have fifteen

S (15) days to prepare and submit its impact assessment report. The DISTRICT

will issue only one (1) impact assessment report prior to Council action on the ADA.

After receipt of the Council's notification to the local governing body, no ADA

revisions will be accepted by the DISTRICT within the final fifteen day review

period. The COUNCIL will forward a copy of the Development Order to the DISTRICT

upon receipt from the local governing body. The DISTRICT may formally respond to

the COUNCIL upon review of the Development Order issued by the local jurisdiction.


ARTICLE 4


The COUNCIL shall encourage applicants to meet with the DISTRICT prior

to the preparation of the ADA. A representative of the COUNCIL may attend.

ARTICLE 5


Upon request a representative from the DISTRICT will attend the COUNCIL

public hearing prepared to comment on the projects) under review.

ARTICLE 6
.-a--
The DISTRICT'S impact assessment report will be attached to the COUNCIL'S

final report as an appendix.


ARTICLE 7


All DRf projects reviewed must be within the DISTRICT'S boundaries as

established January 1, 1977. In the event a DRI is not located entirely within
the DISTRICT'S boundaries, the DISTRICT will coordinate its review with the Water

Management District or Districts in which the balance of the DRI is located.

ARTICLE 8


If, for any cause, the DISTRICT or the COUNCIL fail to fulfill in a

timely manner their obligations under this Agreement, or if the DISTRICT or the

COUNCIL shall violate any of the covenants, agreements, or stipulations of this

document, either party will thereupon have the right to terminate this Agreement
I






by giving written notice by registered mail to the other party of such termination
and specifying the effective date of such termination. Either party may terminate
this Agreement at any time by giving written notice by registered mail of such termin-
ation and specifying the effective date thereof, at least thirty (30) days before
the effective date of such termination.

ARTICLE 9

In the carrying out of work under this Agreement, the DISTRICT will

not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of
race, creed, color, sex, physical disability, or national origin. Such action
shall include, but not be limited to, the following: employment, upgrading,
demotion, or transfer; recruitment or recruitrient advertising; layoff or termin-
ation; rates of pay or other forms of compensation; and selection for training,
including apprenticeship. The DISTRICT agrees to post in conspicuous places,
available to employees and applicants for employment, notices to be provided by
the government setting forth the provisions of this non-discrimination clause.
The DISTRICT will, in all solicitations or advertisements for employees placed
by or on behalf of the DISTRICT, state that all qualified applicants will receive
consideration for employment without regard to race, creed, color, sex, physical
disability, or national origin.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the COUNCIL and the DISTRICT have executed this

Agreement, consisting of three (3) pages, as of the /1J day of ~- 197:
A.D.
SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING
COUNCIL
Execu ed in the sence of:
By
1L/ Chairman

As to COUNCIL ATTEST:

By
Executive Director

SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT"
BY ITS ING BOARD
ecuted in the presence of: -
By
Chairman

As to I R ATTEST:
As to DISTRICT


II, -






SAGREEIMENII BETWEEN

THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL

and
THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN FLORIDA FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT

WHEREAS, the SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL, hereinafter

referred to as the "COUNCIL", is the designated agency for the implementation

of the Development of Regional Impact process in Region Nine (9); and,

WHEREAS, the CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN FLORIDA FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT, or

its successor agency, hereinafter referred to as the "DISTRICT", has special

resources and expertise in the area of natural resources and is included in the

review process by administrative action; and,

WHEREAS, the COUNCIL'S responsibility for implementation of Chapter 380,

Florida Statutes, can be aided by the DISTRICT'S special knowledge of natural

resources in the region;

NOW, THEREFORE, the COUNCIL and the DISTRICT hereby agree as follows:-


ARTICLE 1

The DISTRICT shall prepare and submit an impact assessment statement

for each Application for Development Approval (ADA) in Region Nine (9) to the

COUNCIL. The analysis shall include a factual analysis of the magnitude of any

positive or negative impacts of the proposed project on groundwater quality and

quantity, surface water quality and quantity, and on the demonstrated ability of

the project area and Region to absorb the increased demand for water supply,

sanitary sewage disposal, and storm drainage. The Statement may also include

factual statements and analyses of such other relevant water and natural resource

matters as the DISTRICT wishes to comment upon. Conformance with local and federal

criteria shall also be included where applicable.


ARTICLE 2

The DISTRICT shall receive four (4) copies of the Application for

Development Approval (ADA) and within seven(7) working days of the receipt of

the ADA, the DISTRICT will respond in writing to the COUNCIL concerning

information adequacy.


C_ __






A [l-. C 3


Upon receipt of COUNCIL notification to local government to set
their public hearing date, the DISTRICT will have fifteen (15) days to prepare *A

and submit its Development of Regional Impact (DRI) analysis. The DISTRICT

will issue only one (1) DRI analysis prior to Council action on the ADA. io

project (ADA) revisions will be accepted by the DISTRICT within the review

period. The COUNCIL will forward a copy of the Development Order to the DISTRICT

upon receipt from the local jurisdiction. The DISTRICT may formally respond'to

the COUNCIL upon review of the Development Order issued by the local jurisdiction.


ARTICLE 4

The COUNCIL shall encourage applicants to meet with the DISTRICT,prior

to the preparation of the ADA. A representative of the COUNCIL may attend.


ARTICLE 5

Upon request a representative from the DISTRICT will attend the COUNCIL
meeting prepared to comment on the projects) under review.


ARTICLE 6

If the DISTRICT DRI analysis, or portions thereof, are included in the
COUNCIL'S final report, they must be properly referenced and quoted. The DISTRICT'S

DRI analysis will be attached to the COUNCIL'S final report as an appendix.


ARTICLE 7

All DRI projects within the DISTRICT'S boundaries, scheduled to be

changed on December 31, 1976, will be reviewed free of charge by the DISTRICT.


ARTICLE 8

This Agreement is for the period October 1, 1976 to September 30, 1977.


ARTICLE 9

If, for any cause, the DISTRICT or the COUNCIL fail to fulfill in a
timely manner their obligations under this Agreement, or if the DISTRICT or the

COUNCIL shall violate any of the covenants, agreements, or stipulations of this

document, either party will thereupon have the right to terminate this Agreement

by giving written notice by registered mail to the other party of such termination

and specifying the effective date of such termination.






-y I


!v


SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLAN;IING
COUNCIL


Vice Chairman

ATTEST:


Executive Director


CENTRAL AilD SOUTHERN FLORIDA FLOOD
CONTROL DISTRICT, by ITS GOVERNING


S Executed in the presence f:



As to TR ICT


Either party may Lermina Le this Agreement at any ti;me by giving
written notice by registered mail of such termination and specifying the effec-

tive date thereof, at least thirty (30) days before the effective date of such

te rmi nation.


ARTICLE 11

In the carrying out of work under this Agreement, the DISTRICT will'
not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of

race, creed, color, sex, physical disability, or national origin. Such action

shall include, but not be limited to, the following: employment, upgrading,

demotion, or transfer; recruitment or recruitment advertising; layoff or termin-

ation; rates of pay or other forms of compensation; and selection for training,

including apprenticeship. The DISTRICT agrees to post in conspicuous places,

available to employees and applicants for employment, notices to be provided by.

the government setting forth the. provisions of this non-discrimination clause.
The DISTRICT will, in all solicitations or advertisements for employees placed

by or on behalf of the DISTRICT, state that all qualified applicants will receive

consideration for employment without regard to race, creed, color, sex, physical
disability, or national origin.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the COUNCIL and the DISTRICT have executed this
Agreement, consisting of three (3) pages, as of the day of if -, 1975,
A.D.





f John Wodraska e Director
South Florn ida _Tilford C. Creel. Deputy Executive Director

i,. Water Management District
o f Post Office Box 24680 3301 Gun Club Road -' i
West Palm Beach, Florida 33416-4680 i ..
Telephone (305) 686-8800
Florida WATS Line 1-800-432-2045 ;
JAN 22 IO-Pg
IN REPLY REFER TO: January 20, 1988 JAN 22
.W. FLORIDA REGIONAL
PLANNING COUNCIL
Mr. Wayne E. Daltry
Executive Director
Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council
2121 West First Street
Fort Myers, FL 33901

Dear Mr. Daltry:

Subject: Rule 40E-4.301(1)(i) (Compatibility with local zoning and
comprehensive plans).

In follow-up to my earlier letter of November 9, 1987, I am writing to inform you of
the action taken by the Governing Board at its December 11, 1987 Board meeting
regarding the proposed adoption of the rule to repeal the requirement for local
government comprehensive plan and/or zoning approval priorto permit issuance.

After much discussion and consideration of both the written comments received
prior to the Board meeting and the public comments received at the meeting, the
Board voted to delay a decision on the repeal of this rule until the March 1988
Governing Board meeting in order to give the District an opportunity to consider
the consultant's report on the Land Use/Water Management Institutional
Relationship Study now underway and to visit again with the Joint Administrative
Procedures Committee of the Legislature, the Governor's Office, and other outside
interests affected by the rule and/or its appeal. Enclosed for your information is a
copy of the District's letter to the Joint Administrative Procedures Committee
regarding this decision. Please note that your letter to the District regarding the
proposed rule repeal was also included as an attachment.

We appreciate your interest in this matter and will keep you apprised of any future
developments as they occur. If you have any further questions regarding the rule
repeal and/or the study, please contact either Jim Sturgis or Steve Reel at the
number noted above.
Sincerely,


Til d C. Creel
Deputy Executive Director

TCC/scl
Enclosure
- cc: Jim Sturgis
Steve Reel

Nancy H. Roen J.D. York
Chairman Plantation Vice Chairman Palm City
Nathaniet P. Reed Oscar M. Corbin. Jr Arsenio Millan Fritz Ste James F. Garner Mike Stou Doran A. Jason
Hobe Sound Ft Myers Miami Belle Glade Ft Myers Windermere Key Biscayne






... So6ih Florida .o..:.,,.

l- ~, a- after Management District
(i | .. ..' *" ;f j : : ,;G.,?. .-;-.., :-:. C G. :ubRoad

-- ... .' .-' "... : _. ... _.: .: 5

.;; R-EPI.Y REFE T ;O :
January 4, 1988
CuLYJP c -:. c Phie
586489750 h 586489766

The Honorable W. D. Childers
The Florida Senate
211 Senate Office Building
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
and

The Honorable Rick Dantzler
Florida Pouse of Representatives
310 House Office Building
Ta!llahasse, FL 32399-1300

Gept e'en:

Subject: Rule 4CE-4.301(i)(i) (Compatibility with local zoning and
6 comprehensive plans).
This iettes is written to inform you of the District's Governing Board action
regardcri repeal of District's Rule 40E-4.3C1(1)(i). At the public hearing held on
Decemrrber 1i, 1987, the Governing Board, by motion, respectfully delayed decision
on this important matter until the March Governing Board meeting in order to give
the District an opportunity to consider the consultant's study report and to have an
cpportuni-y to visit again with the Committee, the Governor's office, and other
outside interests affected by the rule and/or the repeal of the rule.
As chairman of the District's Governing Board, I would like to assure you that the
District fuiiy appreciates the Joint Administrative Procedures Committee position
and is not intending to usurp legislative authority. The Governing Board did initiate
the rulemaking process at its May 1987 meeting. The District.has received numerous
written and oral objections to the repeal of the rule from local governments and
l,. region! planning councils. Copies of letters are attached. During this time, the
District has not received any support for repeal of the rule. We believe the rule is
consistent with the local and state planning goals, and has gained considerable local
and regional support. Even though the District'staff believes.in the'merits of the
rule and that there is statutory authority for the rule, they recommended repeal of
the rule based on the Committee's objection. Hobv.&ver, the- Goveriinrg Board felt
that because of the demonstrated support of the rule, the' rule should not be
repealed at this time as there is a statutory construction to support the r6le.
The District has contracted with a consultant who is.in the process of studying many
of the legal planning issues raised by local and regional governments in their
opposition to repeal of the rule. We hope that the study will result in an effective

.;,, ( ? I* .... J D Y' .
rt n,$,, ,.. ..i i 1.-: ".... .* ,... JL. j, n.. I 1., ... F,,t :i Jam es F. Garner tl.l. Stoutl A J. '
a..... ... ". **' -- .'*-, Fi Myers vlnzcrmere nr, ,.,c.ty",







The Honorable W. D. Childers
. and
The Honorable Rick Dantzler
December 30, 1987
Page 2



relationship between the District and other agencies and governments in
implementing the local and state planning goals.

We look forward to working with yoit-ris- i


Smf cerel,



Na Ro n
irma, Governin Board


Enc!csures

cc: The Honorable Pat Frank /
The Honorable Curt Kiser .*
The Honorable Peter Dunbar-
r- 1The Honorable Brian Rush''
Mr. Carol Webb, Executie Di'ector
..:r. Oscar M. Ccrbin, Jr.C-Gcve-ninc Bcard Member
Mir. James Garner, Governing Ecard M.ember
M.s. Doran A. Jason, Governinc Soard Member
Mr. Arsenic Milian, Governngc Board Member
Mr. Nathaniel P. Reed, Governing Board Member
Mr. Fritz Stein, Governing Board Member
Mr. Mike Stout, Governing Board Member
Mr. J.D. York, Governing Board Member






"

\..









INTERAGENCY AGREEMENT FOR OCT 8g 1992 *
RECIPROCAL EXCHANGE-OF-INFORMATION



THIS AGREEMENT, entered into this 12th day of October,
1992 1992, between the SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT, ("the District" and SOUTHWEST FLORIDA
REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL (" the Council ").

WHEREAS, both parties are governmental agencies maintaining
Geographic Informational Systems (GIS) and other digital storage
and retrieval systems; and

WHEREAS, both parties support and encourage an exchange of
information and material among governmental agencies in order to
provide maximum service to the public at minimum public cost; and


WHEREAS, the District and the Council have
both established a policy of no-cost reciprocal exchange-of-
information services.

NOW, THEREFORE, for mutual consideration and benefit to both
parties, the parties agree as follows:

1. Upon the request of the Council the
S District shall provide GIS data in digital format at no cost (or
at actual cost if economic circumstances warrant) to
the Council All data will be delivered in
accordance with District Procedure 13-2.

2. Upon request of the District, the Council
shall provide GIS data in digital format at no cost (or at actual
cost if economic circumstances warrant) to the District.

3. The District and the Council may agree
upon the exchange of information in custom report forms through
written notice signed by both parties. These forms will be
provided at no cost (or at actual cost if economic circumstances
warrant).

4. Either party may refuse or delay a specific request for
data on the basis of availability of information technology or
staff resources. Such refusals shall be made in writing.

5. This Agreement may be terminated without cause by
either party upon fifteen (15) days prior to written notice
delivered to the other party.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have entered into this
Agreement on the date first written above.








Witness:


SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT
DISTRICT


By: Z
Peter G. Hubbell
Executive Director


Aprod by Aorney By:






Approved by Attorney:___


~L~e~









Southwest Florida Regional IPlanning Council


P.O. Box 3455, N. Ft. Mycrs, FL 33918-3455 SUNCOM 721-7290 / 7291
FAX 813-995-7895


May 3, 1994


The Honorable Victoria Tschinkel
Chairman, Governor's Land and Water Task Force
Office of the Governor
The Capitol
TALLAHASSEE, FL 32399-0001

Subject: RPC/WMD Coordination

Dear Vicki:

The last L/WTF meeting had an assertion presented as fact which was so factually wrong that
there are now witnesses that I can be stunned into silence, nor was I the only one. The assertion
was that Districts and RPCs really do not coordinate, except informally. Further essays into "bad
blood" were made and not refuted-that stunned silence, again. Consequently, I would appreciate
it if the record was adjusted to be factual, so that if and where there are coordination problems,
the actual problems can be addressed.

First, RPC/WMD coordination is ongoing and there is a strong history of that. I enclose
as Attachment I, our very first of such agreements, with the Central and Southern Flood
Control district, and as Attachment II, one of the following year when the South Florida
Water Management District "arose from the waves." Attachment III is our first with
SWFWMD and Attachment IV reflects one of the updates undertaken at need.

Second, such coordination is broad and deep. Attachment V reflects a basic effort to
have basic data sharing, without concern of "who is on first."

Third, there is a history of Districts and Regions in addressing Land/Water Use
coordination. In fact, an early successful effort was derailed by JAPC in 1988.
Attachment VI is a correspondence snapshot of this joint effort by RPC/WMD to defend
the WMD effort.

Fourth, such coordination even addresses issues of Statewide importance, such as the
State Water Use Plan. A sample of such an effort is provided in Attachment VII, which
was selected because of the L/WTF discussion "who uses the State Water Use Plan?" We
did at the time in order to ensure consistency with the Regional Comprehensive Policy
Plans. The SWFRPC is still unaware of any inconsistencies, considering the RCPP was
updated in 1991 with the assistance of the Districts.







PrI'rmm nil rc, vdlvd p:lpcr q3 -









TO: The Honorable Victoria Tschinkel MAY 5 1994
DATE: May 3, 1994
PAGE: 2 Growth Management &
Planning Policy Unit

Fifth, new coordination efforts have been undertaken to implement ELMS III. The nature
of the discussion of the April 29th meeting made me believe that the Task Force members
have forgotten that each district has ex-officio members on the Council. Further, at
RPC/WMD meetings there has been the discussion of the use of a "cross acceptance"
review as part of the Strategic Plan preparation.

I hope that this information is of use. RPCs and WMDs do coordinate. If there are failures to
report, the Technical Advisory Committee can be charged to analyze and report back on the
particulars of the failure, and the Task Force can then judge if the failure is a systemic problem,
or one of circumstance.

Thank you for your consideration of this matter,

Sincerely,

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL



ay E. Daltry
Executive Director

WED/nlg

cc: Teresa Tinker, EOG
Commissioner Sue Dudley















































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Florida Department of

Environmental Protection

I Mairjor\ Stonenian Douglas Building
I.a ton Chile 3)900 C)onlnl t l" ltli BoIilva d Virginia IL. therell.
(;.rn,,r Tallahassee. Florida 32399-3000 secr.,,a,-


April 1994


Dear Friend:
I am pleased to send you the attached copy of Beqinning
Ecosystem Management. This document describes how we intend to
implement ecosystem management at the Department of Environmental
Protection. I hope you will read it carefully and join us in our
effort to develop a holistic approach to management of Florida's
environment.
Sincerely,

0 U.\ B&-^
Virginia B. Wetherell
Secretary

VBW
Attachment


Irinllil mon r,-r.ld paiiir.

















Beginning Ecosystem Management
(An action plan for development of an ecosystem management implementation strategy)



Florida Department of Environmental Protection


Lawton Chiles, Governor

Virginia B. Wetherell, Secretary


April 25, 1994












WHAT IS ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT?





Ecosystem:

A community of organisms, including humans, interacting with one another
and the environment in which they live.



The Department's Working Definition of Ecosystem Management:

Ecosystem management is an integrated, flexible approach to management of
Florida's biological and physical environments -- conducted through the use
of tools such as planning, land acquisition, environmental education,
regulation, and pollution prevention -- designed to maintain, protect and
improve the state's natural, managed, and human communities.



Explanation:

Ecosystem management recognizes that the environment is comprised of many
interconnected systems and subsystems. Land, water, air, and living things are
all linked and cannot be managed in isolation from one another. A major
goal of the department is to create a program that supports a holistic
approach to environmental management.











Table of Contents


Letter from the Secretary ..................................

Part I
Introduction ............................................

Part II
Beginning Ecosystem Management Report....................


Part III
Ecosystem Management Project Implementation .................

Part IV
Developing the Ecosystem Management Implementation Strategy ....

Committees:

Ecosystem Management Implementation Strategy Committee ..
External Steering Committee ..........................
Land Acquisition/Greenways Committee .................
Education Committee ..............................
Incentive-Based Regulatory Alternatives Committee .........
Pollution Prevention Committee ........................
Science and Technology Committee .....................
Public Land Management Committee ....................
Role of Private Landowners Committee ..................
Intergovernmental Coordination Committee ...............
Training Committee .................................
Audit/Evaluation Committee ..........................


........... 1



........... 3



............ 8
.~8


. ....... 11
........ 14
. ....... 17
........ 19
. ....... 21
........ 23
........ 25
. ....... 28
. ....... 31
. ....... 33
........ 35
........ 36


Part V
Area Implementation Strategies ....................................... 38

Part VI
Conclusion ....................................................... 38


Figures
Ecosystem Management Dominant Principles ............................... 4
Graphic Illustration of Ecosystem Management Process ...................... 6
Ecosystem Management Goals and Objectives Chart ........................ 7






Florida Department of

Environmental Protection

we Marjory Sioneman IDoiuglas Iuilding
la.wIo (:hil, ( 3 :() Commonwealih Ihoulevard Virginia, It. W4.hlcr,.ll
governorr Tallahassee, Ilorida 32399-3000 s.cre.ary

April 25, 1994



Dear Reader:

We are at a turning point in the history of our interaction with the environment.
In Choosing a Sustainable Future: The Report of the National Commission on the
Environment. 1993 the Commission describes two future scenarios, either of which is
ours for the choosing:

If America continues down its current path, primarily reacting to environmental
injuries and trying to repair them, the quality of our environment will continue to
deteriorate, and eventually our economy will decline as well. If, however, our
country pioneers new technologies, shifts its policies, makes bold economic
changes, and embraces a new ethic of environmentally responsible behavior, it is
far more likely that the coming years will bring a higher quality of life, a healthier
environment, and a more vibrant economy for America.

We believe the second alternative is preferable, and we propose to achieve it
through ecosystem management. The current system of environmental protection has
brought about significant improvements in various aspects of our natural environment
and we are proud of those accomplishments. Yet, many contend that the incremental
improvements we must constantly seek as we react to new problems are causing
significant economic impacts. They argue that our system for achieving environmental
quality is too restrictive to support a healthy economy. In some respects they are right.
Piecemeal regulation in response to escalating environmental threats ultimately results in
a complex system of environmental laws that are difficult to understand and comply with.

This is not to say we need less protection for the environment. Our environment
deserves the highest level of protection we can provide. What is needed is a change in
the way we provide that protection. We are proposing such a change through
implementation of ecosystem management.

Ecosystem management is a process for managing environmental resources. The
concept has been around for some time and is well understood by many scientists and
land managers, but specific implementation guidance does not exist. We are writing the
book as we go and expect it will take about a year to flesh out all the details. However,
certain aspects of the process are, nevertheless, taking shape. At a minimum, ecosystem


Prilntel on riryri-dl ipaiMr.










management implies that project-level decisions must involve larger-scale ecological
considerations. An implicit assumption is that humans cannot avoid decisions which
affect ecosystems and, therefore, should strive to make those decisions with knowledge of
the physical, biological, and social relationships that define those systems. An implicit
objective is to find an appropriate balance between preservation of natural systems on
one hand and sustainable development on the other.

These are not new concepts. Large-scale planning, and balancing preservation
with sustainable development have been concerns of the environmental community for
many decades. What is new is the technological, regulatory, and social contexts in which
these concerns are addressed.

Our ecosystem management concept is based on an environmental strategy that
encourages innovation, pollution prevention, incentive-based regulatory alternatives, and
more coherent cross-media efforts to produce collaborative solutions to environmental
problems. Changes in public attitudes and day-to-day lifestyles are clearly important.
Environmental education is critical to changing the way people think and act in relation
to their environment, and will be a key component of ecosystem management. Our
strategy calls for no radically new programs, but demands a more efficient, coordinated
implementation of existing programs. We will use and build upon tools which already
are available to create new and better ways to manage and protect Florida's
environment.

Ecosystem management will not occur over night. It will evolve as the
Department of Environmental Protection matures. Committees comprised of staff and
interested outside parties are being established to seek new and innovative ways to use
the department's planning, management, and regulatory programs to improve how we
protect Florida's environment. The roles of these committees and the process we will
follow are described in the following pages. The primary goal of this effort is to provide
for the maintenance of a healthy, sustainable environment for the benefit of present and
future generations.

In closing, please let me extend to you my invitation to join us in developing our
ecosystem management strategy. Public involvement is vital to the process. As you read
the pages following, I hope you will consider how you might be able to participate. If
you have ideas or comments, or are interested in a particular committee, please call Pam
McVety at (904) 488-7454, or FAX her at (904) 488-7093. We appreciate whatever help
you are able to provide.



Virginia B. Wetherell
Secretary













I. INTRODUCTION


The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is required by the Florida
Environmental Reorganization Act of 1993 to develop and implement measures to
"Protect the functions of entire ecological systems through enhanced coordination of
public land acquisition, regulatory, and planning programs." The DEP will accomplish
this using a management concept known as ecosystem management.

As its first step, the DEP convened an Ecosystem Management Work Group to
review the legislative directive and report on how ecosystem management could be
implemented. The Work Group developed the following definition for ecosystem
management:

Ecosystem management is an integrated, flexible approach to management of
Florida's biological and physical environments-conducted through the use of tools
such as planning, land acquisition, environmental education, regulation, and
pollution prevention--designed to maintain, protect, and improve the state's
natural, managed, and human communities.

The recommendations of the Work Group were submitted to the Governor,
Cabinet, and Legislature in December, 1993. Based on the Work Group's
recommendations, the DEP has begun a planning process to implement an ecosystem
approach to management of Florida's environment. This report explains the process the
DEP will follow, the goals the agency has set, and the expected results.

The goals the DEP has set are: better protection and management of Florida's
environment; development of an agency structure and culture based on a systems
approach to environmental protection and management; and an ethic within the citizenry
of shared responsibility and participation in protection of the environment. For each
goal the agency has set a number of objectives, detailed later in this document, which
describe desired outcomes.

In implementing ecosystem management, the DEP will be guided by following
principles, adapted from the paper "What is Ecosystem Management" by R.E. Grumbine
in Conservation Biology, March, 1994.












ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT DOMINANT PRINCIPLES

1. Connectedness A focus on any one level of natural systems is not sufficient. When working on a problem at
any one level or scale, managers must recognize the connections among all levels. This is a "systems" perspective.

2. Ecological Management This requires working across administrative and political boundaries and large
landscapes over long periods of time. It involves not just land and water, but air.

3. Ecological Integrity This means managing to protect, maintain, and restore native diversity, ecological patterns,
and the processes that maintain diversity.

4. Data Collection Ecosystem management requires research and monitoring of baseline conditions of natural
systems, as well as better management and use of existing data.

5. Evaluation/Auditing Managers must track the results of their actions so that success or failure may be evaluated
quantitatively. Evaluating/auditing creates an ongoing feedback loop of useful information.

6. Adaptive management This assumes that development of scientific knowledge is ongoing and that management
is a learning process where incorporating the results of previous actions allows managers to remain flexible and
adapt to uncertainty.

7. Interagency cooperation Protecting and managing systems requires cooperation between federal, state, and local
management and regulatory agencies, as well as private parties. Managers must learn to work together and
integrate conflicting legal mandates and management goals.

8. Organizational change Implementing ecosystem management requires changes in the structure of the agency
and the way it operates.

9. Humans are critical People cannot be separated from nature. Humans are fundamental influences on ecological
patterns and processes, and are in turn affected by them.

10. Values Regardless of the role of scientific knowledge, human values play a dominant role in ecosystem
management goals.





Implementation of ecosystem management along these thematic guidelines is
intended to improve protection and management of Florida's ecosystems. We anticipate
the following as a result:

1. A new era of cooperative action between all levels of government resulting
in identification of shared goals and implementation of integrated planning
and management across political boundaries.

2. A true partnership between the citizens of the state and their government,
in which all parties recognize a common responsibility for the environment
and share a commitment to active involvement in its protection.

3. An unprecedented statewide environmental resource monitoring database
and network to provide accurate, up to date information on the state of the
environment to decision makers at all levels of government as well as
private citizens.










4. Applied use of research and advanced technology to improve
communication, data management, environmental education, program
planning, and resource management and evaluation.

5. Achievement of sustainable levels of use of our natural resources to ensure
that the needs of current and future generations for food, water, shelter, a
viable economy, and a clean, healthy, diverse environment are met.


The remainder of this document details the steps DEP will follow over the next
year to fully implement ecosystem management. Page 6 is a graphic illustration of the
process, and page 7 lists the agency's ecosystem management goals and objectives.

Part II, which begins on page 8, explains how this report was developed. Part III
deals with the six ecosystem management projects the DEP and the WMDs are
implementing around the state. Part IV details the process for developing the Ecosystem
Management Implementation Strategy. Part V discusses the development of site-specific
Area Implementation Strategies, and Part VI summarizes the entire process.









SUMMARY OF THE DEP's ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

GOALS AND IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY



GOALS
BETTER PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT OF FLORIDA'S ECOSYSTEMS
> AGENCY STRUCTURE AND CULTURE BASED ON ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT
I PUBLIC ETHIC OF SHARED RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ENVIRONMENT



A


DEVE






PLANNING


Implement
ecosystem man- g
IMPLEMENTATION /agement through '
agency programs, site
specific plans, and partner- ,
ships between government, envi-
ronmental, and business groups, and
the public.

Broad based committees develop a comprehen-'
LOPMENT / se ecosystem management implementation strate- .
gy that addresses a systems approach to land acquisition .
and management, science and technology, education, plan-.
ning, pollution prevention, alternative regulatory incentives,
auditlevaluation and training.

Develop a framework and action plan for ecosystem management through
implementation of the Secretary's organizational structure, Internal visioning, ,
public Interaction, and consensus building with affected parties.

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BLUILIN A FONA @,ION FORi>iIj


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION





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DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Ecosystem Management Goals and Objectives


Objectives:
-More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural resources;
-More effective partnerships with other local, state and federal government agencies;
-A comprehensive, permanent environmental resource database and monitoring network around the state;
-A voluntay alternative regulatory program that focuses on net environmental benefit;
-Adoption of WMD rules for minimum flows and levels and protection areas for priority water bodies, in coordination with Georgia and Alabama, as
needed;
-Expanded use of pollution prevention to other department programs;
-Develop EM Area Implementation Strategies (AISs) and establish permanent DEP/WMD area management teams;
-Establish temporary planning and management committees, as needed, to assist in developing the AISs;
-Coordinated public land acquisition with the WMDs and others to create a complete a system of publicly owned protected areas and greenways;
-A DEP Ecosystem Management Implementation Strategy that is closely tied to local government comprehensive plans, Strategic Comprehensive
Regional Policy Plans, WMD Water Plans, the Florida Water Plan, and other related plans.

oal2 Agency structre andcultrebasedoa systems ah t e omealroteion and management.
Objectives:
-Implemen the Secretary's ecosystem management organizational structure;
-Develop an ecosystem vision for the department;
-Improve scientific and technical capabilities to allow wider interagency and public access and use of environmental data, and to provide better
information to decision makers;
-Develop audit procedures to assess ecosystem management results; and
-Instill the ecosystem philosophy and principles at all levels and in all programs of the agency.

Goal An eth w n th izenrY of ard re siiitndartiptn protect of the nvirnnmat
Objectives:
-Revitalize and enhance the DEP's environmental education program;
-Promote ecosystem management through environmental education;
-Increase citizen participation in agency decision making;
-Continue and expand use of citizen volunteers to accomplish resource management projects on public lands;
-Develop a new partnership with private landowners in managing natural systems;
-Promote increased voluntary pollution prevention activities within the regulated community; and
-Encourage development of grassroots, citizen-based ecosystem management activities.











I. BEGINNING ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT (EM) REPORT



This report was developed between December, 1993 and April, 1994. The tasks
undertaken by DEP in the development of this report, and the time frames for
completion were as follows:

1. Meet with representatives of the environmental community, business
groups, government agencies, universities, and the five WMDs to solicit
input for the report. Ongoing throughout report development.

2. Solicit written ideas from all employees. Ongoing throughout report
development.

3. Review literature on ecosystem management. Ongoing throughout process.

4. Meet with DEP central and field staff representatives to discuss
development of a process to implement EM. December 8, 1993 March 9,
1994.

5. Prepare first draft of report for discussion at visioning meetings. By
January 31, 1994.

6. Conduct first visioning meeting with selected DEP staff representing a
cross section of agency programs and expertise. February 1 & 2, 1994.

7. Revise draft EM report to incorporate input from visioning meeting. By
March 7, 1994.

8. Conduct second visioning meeting. March 8 & 9, 1994.

9. Revise draft EM report to incorporate input from visioning meeting. By
March 15, 1994.

10. Meet with senior staff to review and finalize draft report. By March 31,
1994.

11. Print and distribute final report. By April 29, 1994.











I. ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION


The DEP, in cooperation with the five WMDs has begun implementing EM in the
Apalachicola River and Bay, the Suwannee, Wekiva, Lower St. Johns, and Hillsborough
Rivers, and Florida Bay/Southern Everglades.

Besides being diverse geographically, these projects are different in the degree of
study and the level of coordinated (system) management that has already occurred. By
implementing EM in these areas, the DEP will gain experience in a wide variety of
situations. Successes and failures will be monitored and considered in developing the
DEP's Ecosystem Management Implementation Strategy.

The steps the agency followed in implementing these six EM projects are as
follows:


1. Preliminary discussions with DEP and WMD senior staff on project
feasibility and potential sites. January 20 January 25, 1994.

2. Written instructions distributed to team members, and work begins on
team implementation reports. January 25, 1994.

3. Teams meet in Tallahassee with Secretary Wetherell to discuss instructions
and any initial problems. January 31, 1994.

4. Teams review current programs, identify management issues in the six
project areas, and prepare draft implementation reports. January 31 -
February 8, 1994.

5. Teams meet in Tallahassee and present draft reports. February 8, 1994.

6. Based on input from the February 8 meeting, reports are revised as
needed. Reports are then edited, compiled into a single document,
printed, and prepared for distribution. February 9 21, 1994.

7. Reports distributed/press conference on ecosystem management.
Implementation of report recommendations begins. March 2, 1994.










IV. DEVELOPING THE EM IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY


The EM Implementation Strategy (EMIS) will be the agency's principal EM
guidance document. It will be developed through an open process, with input from all
interested parties. The EMIS will set the direction for implementation of EM through
site specific Area Implementation Strategies (AISs), agency programs, and partnerships
between government, environmental and business groups, and the general public. The
EMIS will be developed as follows:

1. Establish 12 committees to address EM issues. By April 29, 1994.

2. Establish an external EM steering committee of interested parties from the
business community, environmental groups, and the general public. By
April 29, 1994.

3. Review and revise in-house decision making process as needed to support a
systems management philosophy. February 1994 December 1994

4. Conduct a literature review and develop an EM library. Ongoing
throughout the entire process.

5. Committees develop draft reports containing issue analyses and
recommendations. By October 31, 1994.

6. Committee chairs meet to identify and reconcile conflicts. Ongoing
throughout process, culminating between January 2 and February 23, 1995.

7. Produce Ecosystem Management Implementation Strategy (EMIS)
document. February 24 March 24, 1995.

8. Distribute EMIS for public review and comment. March 28 April 28,
1995

9. Review and incorporate public input as appropriate April 29 May 27,
1995

10. Finalize and distribute EMIS. June 1995.

The committees established under tasks 1 and 2, above, will be responsible for
analyzing the many issues relating to EM and recommen';ng a preferred course of
action for the department. Goals, objectives and tasks for each committee follow.













Ecosystem Management Implementation Strategy Committee


Guidance: The charge of this committee is to develop a strategy to guide
ecosystem management, including the desired relationships between existing and needed
DEP programs, and between DEP and other agencies, interest groups, and the general
public. From the document this committee will produce, any employee, or any member
of the public should be able to understand the role of DEP programs, and how those
programs link to groups outside the agency in implementing ecosystem management.

The committee will be made up of the chairs of the other committees, including
the co-chairs of the External Steering Committee, to ensure the final document includes
the products of those committees. The committee will review the merger report to avoid
duplicating work that has already been done. The committee will also serve as a forum
to resolve any conflicts among the other committees.

The committee is ultimately responsible for ensuring the coordination and
implementation of all goals and objectives; however, some objectives are especially
significant to this committee. Those are listed in the box below.



Goals and objectives the committee will address:

Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's cosystems.
a. A DEP Ecosystem Implementation Strategy that is closely tied to local government
comprehensive plans, regional policy plans, WMD Water Plans, the Florida Water Plan,
and other related plans

b. Develop EM Area Implementation Strategies (AISs), and establish permanent
DEP/WMD area management teams.

c. Establish temporary planning and management committees, as needed, to assist in
developing the AISs

Goal 2: An agency structure and culture based on a systems approach to environmental
management.

a. Develop an ecosystem vision for the department.

Goal 3: An ethic within the citizenry of responsibility and participation in protection of the
environment.
a. Increase citizen participation in agency decision making.










Committee Tasks


1. Finalize an ecosystem management vision for the DEP.

2. Review and finalize the principles of ecosystem management.

3. Identify all existing programs within DEP and their relationships to one
another, and propose an organizational structure, not bound by convention
or tradition, which promotes program integration across division lines to
achieve ecosystem management goals.

4. Develop "Critical Environmental Needs" list primarily relying on the
Florida Assessment of Comparative Environmental Risk report being
developed by the F.S.U. Center for Public Management.

5. Identify "gaps" in coverage between existing programs and identified critical
needs.

6. Prioritize management activities based on critical environmental needs.

7. Develop criteria for defining ecosystem management areas and identify
additional areas to implement ecosystem management. (Note: Our
approach does not require that this committee define ecosystem
management boundaries. Rather, it will define the criteria for setting
ecosystem boundaries. Actual boundaries will be set at the local and
regional levels by ecosystem management teams).

8. Develop a format for the Area Implementation Strategies (AISs) and
guidance for selecting members of the permanent management teams and
temporary planning and management committees.

9. Describe the desired relationship with WMDs, and local, state, and federal
comprehensive and environmental planning efforts, and based on input
from the Intergovernmental Coordination Committee, make
recommendations on how to achieve the desired condition.

10. In formulating strategies, consider the six Baseline Ecosystem Management
Areas as working examples of ecosystem management, and make use of the
lessons learned from these projects. These areas represent our first
cor-Jinated attempt at ecosystem management. They should be studied
closely and targeted for early auditing so that our final product reflects
what we learn from our experience.










EM Implementation Strategy Committee Tasks (con't)


11. Coordinate internal case studies focusing on ecosystem management
implementation.

12. Identify and implement innovative, incentive-based enforcement
approaches that are consistent with DEP EM principles.

13. Coordinate public input in strategy development.

14. Coordinate employee input in strategy development.

15. Conduct a symposium (with external steering committee) on ecosystem
management.

16. Conduct public meetings (with external steering committee) to obtain
citizen input.

17. Coordinate activities of all committees.

18. Compile, print, and distribute final ecosystem management strategy
document.

19. Provide articles to the education committee for a quarterly ecosystem
management newsletter.

20. Develop a process by which all department programs, including rulemaking
and Policy Coordinating Committee decisions will be reviewed for
consistency with the EM principles, and modified, as needed, to be
consistent.

21. Coordinate and compile legislative and budget needs for the department to
implement EM.













External Steering Committee


The External Steering Committee is free to adjust its agenda. The following is
based on the DEP's understanding of the interests of the business community,
environmental groups, and the general public.

A primary purpose of this committee is to obtain the thoughts, ideas, and
concerns of as large a cross section of the citizenry as possible. It should be comprised
of people who represent a wide range of interests, including those who manage land and
run factories, citizens who do not represent any particular interest group, and ecology
experts from the universities.

The committee will be co-chaired by nongovernmental interests. The co-chairs
will also sit on the Ecosystem Management Implementation Strategy Committee (EMIS).
The committee will consider establishing regional subcommittees to report on matters of
local concern.


Goals and objectives the committee will address:

Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural
resources.

b. A voluntary alternative regulatory program that focuses on act environmental benefit

Goal 2: An agency structure and culture based on a systems approach to environmental management

a. Develop an ecosystem vision for the department

Goal 3: An ethic within the citiznry of responsibility and participation i protection of the
environment

a. Increase citizen participation in agency decision making.

b. Continue and expand use of citizen volunteers to accomplish resource management projects
on public lands.
c. Promote increased voluntary pollution prevention activities within the regulated community.
d. Develop a new partnership with private landowners in managing natural systems.
e. Encourage development of grassroots, citizen-based ecosystem management activities.












Committee tasks:

1. Co-chairs organize and select members of the external steering committee.

2. Using the issues being addressed by the committees, establish external
subcommittees, as needed, to address ecosystem management from a
citizen's perspective.

3. Develop recommendations on how to establish a citizen volunteer corps.

4. Identify and propose projects to get citizens involved in ecosystem
management.

5. Make recommendations on how to fund citizen-based ecosystem
management activities.

6. Act as liaison to the EMIS Committee.

7. Assist in development of an ecosystem vision for the DEP with Florida's
citizens.

8. Conduct a symposium (with EMIS Committee) on ecosystem management.

9. Conduct public meetings (with EMIS Committee) to obtain citizen input.

10. Provide articles to the education committee for a quarterly ecosystem
management newsletter.

11. Serve as a forum for coordination of the ideas, suggestions, and concerns of
nongovernmental interests.

12. Provide input to the Incentive-Based Regulatory Alternatives Committee
which is developing alternative regulatory approaches that use incentives to
encourage private landowners and regulated community to participate in
ecosystem management.

13. Develop strategies to implement voluntary pollution prevention incentive
programs within the regulated community (in coordination with the
Pollution Prevention Committee).

14. Develop strategies to improve citizen participation in agency decision
making.


C












External Steering Committee Tasks (con't)


15. Develop strategies to increase use of citizen volunteers to perform resource
management tasks on public lands.

16. Help encourage grassroots, citizen-based ecosystem management activities.

17. Help develop cross-training programs between agency regulatory staff and
the business community (in coordination with the Training Committee) so
that both business and government employees have a better understanding
of the problems facing each other.



























*












Land Acquisition/Greenways Committee


Guidance: Acquisition of land for resource protection is a critical part of
ecosystem management. It is vitally important that the DEP acquisition program is
coordinated to the highest degree possible with the programs of other governmental and
nongovernmental entities to ensure a systematic approach. A major component of this
effort will involve data collection and sharing between land purchasing entities and
between the acquisition program and other parts of the agency. The committee will look
into what improvements are needed in this regard.

It is important, too, that acquisition goals be carefully analyzed to ensure that the
right lands are being acquired to meet the goals of ecosystem management. The
committee will conduct such an analysis by inventorying existing state-owned lands,
developing criteria for determining the types and location of lands needed to complete
the state public lands system, and using that criteria to identify specific lands which need
to be acquired. In doing this analysis, the committee should rely heavily on, but not be
bound by, the work that has already been done by the Division of State Lands, the Office
of Greenways and Trails, the WMDs, TNC, TPL, FNAI, the Greenways Commission,
and similar groups.


Goals and objectives the committee will address:
Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. Coordinated public land acquisition with the WMDs and others to create a complete system
of publicly owned protected areas and greenways.
b. More effective partnerships with other local, state and federal government agencies.
Goal 2: An agency structure and culture based on a systems approach to environmental management.
a. Instill the ecosystem philosophy at all levels and in all programs of the agency.
Goal 3: An ethic within the citizenry of responsibility and participation in protection of the
environment.
a. Promote ecosystem management through environmental education.
b. Increase citizen participation in agency decision making.












Committee tasks:


1. Evaluate current coordination of land acquisition programs with local,
state, and federal agencies, the WMDs, and nonprofit groups, and make
recommendations for improvement where needed.

2. Evaluate current land acquisition procedures and make recommendations
for streamlining the process.

3. Develop criteria to define the nature and extent of publicly owned and
protected lands needed to preserve or restore the major ecosystems of the
state.

4. Develop a list of specific lands which need to be acquired to complete such
a system.

5. Review procedures for citizen input into acquisition and management
decisions and identify areas where improvement is needed.

6. Identify public education needs relative to land acquisition and greenways,
and recommend ways to improve deficiencies.

7. Evaluate land acquisition and greenway data for relevance to other
divisions, and recommend ways to make it more useful and accessible for
other purposes.

8. Evaluate land acquisition and greenway data needs relative to data
collected by other divisions and make recommendations on how that data
could be made more useful and accessible.

9. Identify and inventory all lands in public ownership, both upland and
submerged.

10. Provide articles to the Education Committee for use in the quarterly
ecosystem management newsletter.













Education Committee



Guidance: This committee will address environmental education needs within the
department and develop strategies and materials to convey the ecosystem management
philosophy. It will evaluate how internal and external education programs can be better
coordinated. It will produce a quarterly ecosystem management newsletter to keep
interested parties aware of the agency's activities. It will also make recommendations
relative to the department library. The committee will address both short and long-term
education needs, and will recommend a budget to meet those needs.

Part of the committee's charge is to evaluate and make recommendations for
establishing an "extension service" to do public outreach work, to provide technical
assistance to private landowners interested in applying ecosystem management
techniques, and to assist other local, state, and federal land managers upon request. The
committee should look at the county extension offices of the U.S. Department of
Agriculture for ideas.



Goals and objectives which will be addressed by the committee:

Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural
resources.

b. More effective partnerships with other local, state and federal government agencies.

Goal 2: An agency structure and culture based on a systems approach to environmental management.
a. Instill the ecosystem philosophy at all levels and in all programs of the agency.

Goal 3: An ethic within the citizenry of responsibility and participation in protection of the
environment.

a. Revitalize and enhance the DEP's environmental education program.
b. Promote ecosystem management through environmental education.
c. Develop a new partnership with private landowners in managing natural systems. and
d. Encourage development of grassroots, citizen-based ecosystem management activities.










Committee tasks:


1. Make recommendations on incorporating ecosystem management into the
agency's environmental education program.

2. Take the lead in producing a quarterly ecosystem management newsletter
under the leadership of the Environmental Education Director. Articles
for the newsletter will come from the other committees. The Education
Committee will develop a schedule for when the articles are due each
quarter and will compile, edit and print the newsletter.

3. Develop brochures for increasing voluntary pollution prevention through
education, using ideas generated by the Pollution Prevention Committee.

4. Work with the existing state interagency environmental education group to
identify environmental education programs inside and outside the agency
and make recommendations on how these could be coordinated for greater
effectiveness, and how they could be improved to further ecosystem goals.

5. Evaluate the capabilities and needs of the department library and
recommend how it can be improved. Include recommendations to make
library materials more accessible to the field.

6. Evaluate new technologies for mass education, and recommend areas
where the department can take advantage of them. Explore such things as
computer learning and credit courses offered via satellite.

7. Work with other appropriate committees to develop ideas for educational
materials which would encourage ecosystem management on privately
owned lands.

8. Develop recommendations for establishing an "extension service" that, at a
minimum, will have one information specialist position in each district.

9. Expand the DEP's speakers bureau which identifies experts in various
fields who can be called upon to speak on their particular subject as
needed.

10. Coordinate DEP ecosystem management education programs with the
Florida Advisory Council on Environmental Education and the Department
of Education.

11. Develop budget recommendations for an enhanced DEP environmental
education program and for the DEP library by July, 1994.













Incentive-Based Regulatory Alternatives Committee


Guidance: The primary function of this committee is to develop the concept of
net environmental benefit, incentives for its use, and criteria for its application. This is
to be an alternative to the existing regulatory program. Important to this task is to
identify which regulatory aspects will not be subject to the alternative regulatory
approach.

Some areas of regulation are more flexible than others. For example, we might
allow someone to build a bigger dock than is normally allowed (assuming there was no
significant resource damage) if they agreed to provide a substantial shoreline buffer.

However, there are some things on which the agency should never compromise.
Drinking water quality, or disposal of hazardous wastes are examples. The committee
should determine what these "no compromise" issues are, keeping in mind that there can
be no weakening of health related standards or unacceptable cross media impacts.

In its work, the committee should also look at the problems caused by cumulative
impacts, and recommend regulatory alternatives to address this concern.



Goals and objectives to be addressed by the committee:

Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural
resources.
b. More effective partnerships with other local, state and federal government agencies.
c. A voluntary alternative regulatory program that focuses on net environmental benefit
Goal 2: An agency structure and culture based on a systems approach to environmental management
a. Instill the ecosystem philosophy and principles at all levels and in all programs of the agency.
Goal 3: An ethic within the citizenry of responsibility and participation in protection of the environment
a. Promote increased voluntary pollution prevention activities with the regulated community.
b. Develop a new partnership with private landowners in managing natural systems.












Committee tasks:


1. Develop alternative regulatory approaches that provide incentives for
private landowners and the regulated community to participate in
ecosystem management.

2. Fully develop the concept of "net environmental benefit" and how it could
be applied.

3. Recommend regulatory alternatives which address the problem of
cumulative impacts.

4. Review case studies to determine if and how a net environmental benefit
policy might have resulted in better environmental protection had it been
an option at the time the project was permitted or denied.

4. Develop concept for any needed legislation.

5. Provide articles to the Education Committee for use in the quarterly
ecosystem management newsletter.











Pollution Prevention Committee


Guidance: This committee is charged with developing strategies to increase
pollution prevention. It should look at all existing programs both inside and outside the
agency for ideas, but should not be constrained by what is currently being done.
Prevention is a concept that has not been implemented to its full potential. The
committee should address prevention activities for government, business, industry, and
the general public. Everyone pollutes to some degree and the effects are cumulative.
The committee should consider a wide range of prevention alternatives which can be
implemented at all levels of society resulting in a cumulative prevention effect.


Goals and objectives to be addressed by the committee:

Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural resources.
b. More effective partnerships with other local, state and federal government agencies.
c. Expand use of pollution prevention to other department programs.
Goal 2 An agency structure and culture based on a systems approach to environmental management.
a. Develop audit procedures to assess ecosystem management results.
b. Implement the ecosystem philosophy at all levels and in all programs of the agency.
Goal 3: An ethic within the citizenry of responsibility and participation in protection of the
environment.
a. Promote ecosystem management environmental education.
b. Promote increased voluntary pollution prevention activities within the regulated community.
c. Encourage development of grassroots, citize-based ecosystem management activities.


Committee tasks:

1. Develop recommendations for implementing pollution prevention activities
in other DEP programs. Examples could include an "Adopt a Waterway"
program, activities such as the Eco-Neighborhood program, expansion of
drop off spots and -nesty days for disposal of hazardous waste, private
sector incentives for recycling oil, paint, solvents, etc., and establishment of
reporting procedures at the manufacturing or wholesale level for sales of
pesticides, herbicides, etc.










Pollution Prevention Committee Tasks (con't)


2. Develop recommendations for encouraging voluntary pollution prevention
within the regulated community and the public at large.

3. Develop recommendations for citizen-based pollution prevention
campaigns.

4. Develop a list of ideas for the Education Committee to use in the
development of educational materials promoting pollution prevention.

5. Work with the Audit/Evaluation Committee to develop audit procedures
to measure the effectiveness of pollution prevention programs.

6. Develop ideas on how other local, state, and federal agency programs
could further DEP pollution prevention goals.

7. Develop a volunteer system of retired professionals to assist small
businesses and the general public to reduce or eliminate pollution sources
(similar to WRAP). This can be tied into the extension service concept
being developed by the Education Committee.

8. Provide articles to the Education Committee for use in the quarterly
ecosystem management newsletter.

9. Evaluate low cost pollution prevention devices, such as water flow
restrictors on toilets, for residential or commercial use, and recommend
ways to make information on the best devices available to the public.

10. Develop concept for any needed legislation.











Science and Technology Committee


Guidance: The foundation of ecosystem management is science and technology.
Science provides the information needed to understand and manage ecosystems, and
technology provides tools to obtain and use that information. This committee will
evaluate all aspects of DEP's data management and technology, and recommend
improvements to achieve EM goals. These types of evaluations are needed on a periodic
basis, so the committee will make recommendations on the composition of a permanent
Science and Technology Committee.

In its evaluation of the agency's science and technology capabilities and needs, the
committee will address the role of research. To gauge the effectiveness of its EM
programs, the agency needs feedback from the managed systems. This feedback will
come partly from inventory and monitoring efforts, partly from the Area Implementation
Strategies, and partly from research. The committee will identify existing research and
monitoring activities and recommend additional research to fill in the gaps in our
feedback system. It will also work with the universities and private research institutions
to develop partnership programs for conducting basic and applied ecosystem research.

Another important function of the committee is to recommend how DEP can
better share its data with other governmental and nongovernmental groups. EM involves
a high level of interaction between various government agencies and private interests. It
is important that our data (and theirs) is accessible if we are to make the best decisions
regarding the environment. The committee will also identify which data should not be
generally available (i.e. location of unprotected cultural resources).

The committee will have four subcommittees: biological monitoring, water quality
monitoring, data management, and research.


Goals and objectives to be addressed by the committee:

Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural
resources.
b. More effective partnerships with other local, state and federal government agencies.
c. A comprehensive permanent environmental resource database and monitoring network
around the state.


~













Goals and objectives to be addressed by the committee (con't'


Committee tasks:

1. Develop comprehensive GIS capabilities to analyze data about Florida's
environment.

2. Develop permanent, up to date, comprehensive environmental resource
monitoring programs around the state. The committee should look at
programs to address water quality and quantity (surface and groundwater),
biological, chemical, hydrogeology, soils and sediment, air, and other
resources the committee feels need comprehensive monitoring.

3. Evaluate and make recommendations for a program to provide greater
access to data by private citizens engaging in ecosystem management
activities.

4. Evaluate and make recommendations for a program to improve data
sharing with other local, state, and federal agencies.

5. Identify and catalog all research pertaining to ecosystem management and
identify areas of greatest need.

6. Develop an ecosystem management research program that includes
identification of research needs, prioritization, peer review, a funding
mechanism, implementation, and a partnership with universities and private
research institutions.

7. Develop a biennial DEP in-house research review workshop.


Goal 2: An agency structure and culture based on a systems approach to environmental management
a. Improve cientificand technical capabilities to allow wider interagency and public acce and
use of environmental data, and to provide better information to decision makers.
b. Instill the ecosystem philosophy at al level and in all programs of the agency.
Goal 3: An ethic within the citizenry of responsibility and participation in protection of the
environment
a. Develop a new partnership with private landowner in managing natural systems.











Science and Technology Committee Tasks (con't)


8. Prioritize additional data gathering within each data type (i.e. air, water,
geology, etc.).

9. Develop strategies for dissemination of data with consideration of security,
inter- and intra-agency coordination, and formatting to meet wide ranging
user needs.

10. Develop cooperative data management and monitoring programs with
other local, state, and federal agencies and nongovernmental organizations.

11. Evaluate current quality assurance and quality control procedures and
recommend improvements, as needed.

12. Evaluate and recommend improvements to the tools and support services
needed by staff to manage, analyze, and display EM data. The committee
should consider computer network and processing capacity, software
requirements, and training needs.

13. Evaluate the need for establishing a council of environmental research
managers to improve linkages among various research efforts.

14. Assess the benefits of holding periodic intra-departmental research review
seminars.

15. Develop approximate implementation budget for recommendations.

16. Provide articles to the Education Committee for use in the quarterly
ecosystem management newsletter.


----------------











Public Land Management Committee


Guidance: Ecosystem management is already occurring on some public lands.
For example, the Division of Recreation and Parks uses "greenlines" to map managed
lands within the context of surrounding land uses. Managers use these maps to identify
outside threats to park lands. Then, through coordination with other levels of
government and adjacent landowners, they try to reduce those threats by encouraging
land use decisions that are sensitive to the needs of the park. This committee will
identify and evaluate other existing programs which embody EM principles, and suggest
improvements, as needed, to agency land management programs.

The committee will address ways to improve coordination with other
governmental and nongovernmental land managers, as well as non-land-managing
divisions of the department. Finding ways to better link the regulatory, enforcement,
scientific, and land management parts of the agency is critical to this effort.

The committee will develop strategies to bring active management to the millions
of acres of largely unmanaged sovereignty submerged lands, and to manage and restore
state-owned wetlands to maximize benefits to the ecosystems which contain them.

The committee will look into how to increase volunteerism in public land
management, looking to programs such as Citizen Support Organizations for ideas. The
committee will also address the data needs of public land managers and recommend how
those needs can be better met.

The committee will have four subcommittees: upland management, wetland
management and restoration, submerged lands management and exotic species control.


Goals and objectives to be addressed by the committee:

Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural
resources.
b. More effective partnerships with other local, state and federal government agencies.
c. Adoption of WMD rules for minimum flows and levels and protection areas for priority
water bodies, in conjunction with Georgia and Alabama, as needed.












Goals and objectives to be addressed by the committee (con'O

Goal 2: An agency structure and culture based on a system approach to environmental management.
a. Instill the ecosystem philosophy and principles at all levels and in all program ofthe agency.
Goal 3: An ethic within the citizenry of responsibility and participation in protection of the
environment.
a. Increase citizen participation in agency decision making.
b. Continue and expand use of citizen volunteers to accomplish resource management projects
on public lands.
c. Develop a new partnership with private landowners in managing natural systems.
d. Encourage development of grassroots, citizn-based ecosystem management activities.




Committee tasks:


1. Make recommendations on implementing holistic land management across
division lines.

2. Make recommendations on how to better coordinate DEP land
management activities with those of other local, state and federal land
managers to achieve ecosystem management goals.

3. Evaluate land management data and technology needs and make
recommendations for improvement to the Scientific and Technical
Committee.

4. Recommend ways to increase citizen involvement in public land
management.

5. Develop an active ecosystem management program for sovereignty
submerged lands.

6. Coordinate with the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
the Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, an others in development of
recommendations to comprehensively address the problem of nuisance
upland and aquatic exotic plant and animal species.











Public Land Management Committee Tasks (con't)


7. Develop a list of mechanisms or programs that will assist land managers in
the protection of public resources such as: (1) seeking agency
representation on or involvement with the Education, Lcensure and
Testing Advisory Committee to the Florida Real Estate Commission to
promote education of real estate professionals on ecosystem management
issues, and (2) addressing best management practices for land development
through building code requirements.

8. Work closely with the WMDs, as needed, to ensure timely development of
rules for minimum flows and levels and protection areas for priority water
bodies.

9. Provide articles to the Education Committee for use in the quarterly
ecosystem management news.

10. Develop approximate implementation budget for recommendations.











Role of Private Landowners Committee


Guidance: Traditionally, environmental protection efforts have focused on
acquisition and regulation. These two tools have accomplished a lot, but it's clear they
are not enough. There is a substantial amount of private property in Florida which, if
sensitively managed, could help sustain the state's embattled ecosystems. The committee
will identify ways to encourage private landowners to participate in government
sponsored, voluntary land stewardship programs, and will recommend ways to modify
government programs as needed to encourage rather than discourage good stewardship
on private lands.

On the other side of the coin, there is a great deal of land management expertise
in the private sector (both business and nonprofit). State land managers could benefit
from this expertise if more mechanisms were in place to encourage "cross pollination"
between public and private land managers. The committee will recommend strategies to
promote such an exchange of ideas. This committee will be co-chaired by private
landowners. In carrying out its charge, the committee will look at local, state and
federal, industry, and non-profit models for ideas. The primary goal is to establish
cooperative partnerships between public and private land managers which result in better
protection of the state's ecosystems.



Goals and objectives to be addressed by the committee:

Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural
resources.

Goal 2: An agency structure and culture based on a systems approach to environmental management.
a. No objectives under this goal.
Goal 3: An ethic within the citizenry of responsibility and participation in protection of the
environment.
a. Promote ecosystem management environmental education.
b. Promote increased voluntary pollution prevention activities within the regulated community.
c. Develop a new partnership with private landowners in managing natural systems.
d. Encourage development of grassroots, citizen-based ecosystem management activities.











Committee tasks:


1. Work with the Education Committee to develop materials to encourage
ecosystem management on private lands.

2. Work with external committees to determine what private landowners
believe their role should be.

3. Review federal and other state programs for ideas on public/private
cooperation on land management.

4. Identify large private land management entities which have adopted
environment friendly management policies, and find out why they did so,
what benefits they have realized, and what problems they encountered.

5. Define the elements of a "partnership" with private landowners (i.e. what
are the rights and responsibilities of the partners; who gives what to the
partnership). The committee should also address the process by which
these partnerships will be built.

6. Identify privately owned lands with potential for voluntary reclamation,
restoration, or preservation.

7. Develop a voluntary, incentive-based program to encourage protection of
ecological functions on private lands.

8. Develop a voluntary, incentive-based program to encourage restoration of
degraded ecosystems on private lands.

9. Identify environmental regulatory programs that serve as disincentives to
good land stewardship practices, and make appropriate recommendations
for modification.

10. Provide articles to the Education Committee for use in the quarterly
ecosystem management newsletter.











Intergovernmental Coordination Committee


Guidance: This committee is to look at how to integrate the DEP's ecosystem
management program with other agency programs that are important to achieving
ecosystem management goals. Of particular importance will be the WMD planning
activities, the local government comprehensive planning process, and federal programs
and activities. The committee will, at a minimum, have subcommittees to address these
three issues.

The committee will consider technology needs to improve coordination, such as
computer linkages and data standardization. The committee will not address how the
needs will be met, only what the needs are. The Science and Technology Committee
will develop strategies for meeting identified technology needs.

The committee will also address organizational changes to facilitate better
coordination. Again, the committee will only identify what is needed. For example, the
committee may determine there is a need for an ecosystem management coordinator in
each division. The committee does not need to specify where the position will come
from. It will be up to agency management to make those kinds of decisions.

The committee will coordinate with the Task Force on Land and Water Planning
which is also working on strategies for better intergovernmental coordination.

This committee should be small enough to work effectively, but should have local,
state, federal, and WMD representatives "on call" to provide input on an as needed basis.
If the standing committee tries to include everyone who DEP needs to coordinate with, it
may be too large to function.


Goals and objectives to be addressed by the Committee
Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural
resources.
b. More effective partnerships with other local, state and federal government agencies.
Goal 2: An agency structure and culture based on a systems approach to environmental management.
a. Improve scientific and technical capabilities to allow wider interagency and public access and
use of environmental data, and to provide better information to decision makers.











Committee tasks:


1. Fully describe all local, state, federal and nongovernmental programs and
activities (not just regulatory) which relate to ecosystem management, and
provide this information to the appropriate committees) as early as
possible.

2. Identify any existing linkages between these programs and activities and
those of the DEP.

3. Make recommendations on how to link compatible programs for better
resource protection.

4. Identify and describe management gaps and recommend program initiatives
to fill those gaps.

5. Identify and describe conflicting management goals at the local, state, and
federal levels, and recommend measures that will minimize conflicts and
lead to more productive resolution of conflicts that do arise.

6. Develop a draft interagency agreement by which the signing parties agree
to act consistently with the ecosystem management principles.

7. Provide articles to the Education Committee for use in the quarterly
ecosystem management newsletter.











Training Committee


Guidance: The DEP's implementation of ecosystem management will involve
programs and activities throughout the department. There will be a need to develop
training programs of two types. First, there must be internal programs including cross-
training of staff to implement ecosystem management. Second, there is a need to go
outside the agency to develop private-sector training of agency employees so that they
understand the businesses and industries affected by department programs. This
committee will be co-chaired by a private citizen.


Goals and objectives to be addressed by the committee:

Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural
resources
b. Expand use of pollution prevention to other department programs.
Goal 2: An agency structureand culture based on a systems approach to environmental management.
a. Instill the ecosystem philosophy and principles at all levels and in al programs of the agency.
Goal 3: An ethic within the citizenry of responsibility and participation in protection of the
environment

a. Continue and expand use of citizen volunteers to accomplish resource management projects
on public lands.
b. Promote increased voluntary pollution prevention activities with the regulated community.




Committee tasks:

1. Define the scope of training needs for DEP employees to facilitate an
ecosystem management approach to their activities.

2. Identify where internal cross training is appropriate and feasible.

3. Establish a program to encourage the private sector to train DEP
employees about their business or industry.

4. Develop approximate implementation budget for recommendations.

5. Provide articles to the Education Committee for use in the quarterly
ecosystem management newsletter.













Audit/Evaluation Committee


Guidance: The natural resource audit/evaluation process is the final step, and a
continuing process, in ecosystem management. By this process, programs are evaluated
to determine if their effects on an ecosystem's natural resources are those that were
intended. Two audit procedures are needed. One, which would generally pertain to
resource management of public conservation lands, should be similar to the current
resource management audit process that the Division of Recreation and Parks now uses
to evaluate the effectiveness of management activities on natural and cultural resources.
The other should be designed to evaluate the effectiveness of department programs
relative to the goals of ecosystem management.

The committee should also consider how the Strategic Assessment of Florida's
Environment (SAFE) program, which is currently being revised by the F.S.U. Center for
Public Management, could contribute to the evaluation of DEP programs.

The committee must closely track the activities of the other committees to ensure
that those groups take the evaluation process into consideration in developing their
recommendations. The committee will be convened for two years. The first year will be
primarily working with the other committees and looking at the SAFE program. In the
second year, the committee will develop recommendations for an audit/evaluation
process.



Goals and objectives to be addressed by the committee

Goal 1: Better protection and management of Florida's ecosystems.
a. More holistic coordinated management of public lands and resources, including cultural
resources.
b. A voluntary alternative regulatory program that focuses on net environmental benefit
Goal 2: An agency structure and culture based on a systems approach to environmental management.
a. Develop audit procedures to assess ecosystem management results.










Committee first year tasks:


1. Work with the other committees to ensure they consider the evaluation
process in their recommendations. The committee should also look at how
the monitoring programs being developed by the Scientific and Technical
Committee will fit into the audit/evaluation program.

2. Look at existing models inside (i.e. Parks, Inspector General) and outside
(Auditor General, other states, federal, corporate) the department for
ideas.

3. Evaluate the SAFE program, how it applies to ecosystem management, and
how it can be used for a periodic report on the state of the environment.

4. Provide articles to the Education Committee for use in the ecosystem
management newsletter.

Committee second year tasks:

1. Develop audit/evaluation procedures to evaluate effectiveness of ecosystem
management on public lands.

2. Develop audit/evaluation procedures to evaluate effectiveness of
alternative regulatory incentives, voluntary pollution prevention programs,
volunteer resource management programs, and ecosystem management on
private lands.

3. Develop procedures to audit programmatic implementation of ecosystem
management.

4. Develop approximate implementation budget for recommendations.










The EMIS, developed through the work of the above committees, will be the
document which guides EM at all levels and in all programs of the DEP. However, it
will not provide sufficient detail for on-the-ground management of specific ecosystems.
This need will be met through the development of Area Implementation Strategies. The
next section explains how those will be developed.


V. AREA IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES

The Area Implementation Strategies (AISs) are the final step in the process of
effecting a system approach to management of Florida's environment. AISs will be
developed through the cooperative efforts of the DEP and the WMDs. They will guide
management of the ecosystems identified and prioritized using criteria developed in the
EMIS. They will be prepared following a five step process as follows:

1. Gather and analyze information on the ecosystem;

2. Identify management needs to meet the goals expressed in the EMIS, and the site
specific requirements of the ecosystem;

3. Develop management alternatives to meet identified needs;

4. Select and implement the alternatives) which will best meet goals; and

5. Evaluate results and refine management as needed.

The AISs, will be prepared in cooperation with local, state, and federal
government agencies, regional planning councils, environmental groups, the business
community, and the general public. The AISs will stress the theme of shared
public/private responsibility for environmental protection. As part of the AIS
development process, each team, under guidance from the WMDs, will determine the
need and a schedule for establishing minimum flows and levels, and protection areas for
priority water bodies.


VI. CONCLUSION

To summarize, the process the DEP will follow to implement ecosystem
management began with the Ecosystem Management Work Group which made
recommendations on how the DEP could accomplish its legislative charge to protect
entire ecological systems. The process con* rued with the development of this report
and the concurrent implementation of ecosystem management projects on six selected
systems around the state.











The next major effort will be to develop the Ecosystem Management
Implementation Strategy (EMIS) which will set ecosystem management direction for the
department. The EMIS will be implemented through development of site-specific Area
Implementation Strategies that will guide on-the-ground management activities.


~




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