Title: Land Use and Water Planning Task Force District Water Management Plan Example: Water Supply Needs and Sources, July, 1994
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00004389/00001
 Material Information
Title: Land Use and Water Planning Task Force District Water Management Plan Example: Water Supply Needs and Sources, July, 1994
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - Land Use and Water Planning Task Force District Water Management Plan Example: Water Supply Needs and Sources, July, 1994 (JDV Box 49)
General Note: Box 21, Folder 2 ( Land and Water Planning Task Force - 1994 - 1995 ), Item 26
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00004389
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text







LAND USE AND WATER PLANNING TASK FORCE

DISTRICT WATER MANAGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLE:

WATER SUPPLY NEEDS AND SOURCES


JULY, 1994










ISSUE: WATER SUPPLY NEEDS AND SOURCES


Introduction
A key component of each District Water Management Plan (DWMP) is
the projection of future water demands and the identification of
sources which are available to meet these demands. Each District
has addressed this requirement within the Needs and Sources
Section of the Water Supply chapter of their respective DWMP.

This portion of the DWMP has been chosen to demonstrate how a
DWMP is not self-executing, but rather must be implemented
through subsequent regulatory and non-regulatory actions of the
District. Further, this example serves to demonstrate how
certain aspects of a DWMP may be applicable to entities external
to a District (e.g., local governments).

This example is based upon provisions of the Southwest Florida
Water Management District's draft DWMP and is not necessarily
representative of issues addressed or conclusions reached in
other DWMPs. In addition, it is important to note that the
Southwest District is currently in the midst of several water
supply planning and regulatory initiatives, and this example does
not attempt to reflect the latest components of these efforts.

Future Water Use Needs
The District is divided into four planning regions for purposes
of water supply planning. Figure 1 depicts total water use
projections for each major type of use within each planning area.
Demand projections were based upon methodologies applicable to
each major use type. For instance, for public supply, population
projections typically form the basis for demand projections. The
District relied extensively upon provisions of existing water
supply plans in developing its demand projections. These
projections form the basis for estimating future water supply
needs.

Water Supply Sources
The District performed a series of resource evaluations to
identify potential sources to meet projected water use needs. A
significant element of this effort included the evaluation of
existing water supply plans, including those contained within
local government comprehensive plans and those of the three
regional water supply authorities within the District. Major
sources of water which were investigated included ground water,
surface water and conservation, including alternative sources
such as desalination and reuse.

Ground Water
Opportunities and constraints upon further groundwater supply
development are represented in Figure 2. This Figure depicts
declines in the potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer
from a period of time considered redevelopmentn" (i.e., prior to
major water withdrawals) to a recent year (May of 1989). As











Total Water Use Projections


E RECREATION

E MINING

INDUSTRIAL

AGRICULTURAL 800 Nort

RURAL 700-

600
7PU BLC 4 00

400
600 300






500
West Central
00100
0




11990 1995 2000 2010 2020
600- year









year East Central
58000





4700
South 800


0 00
400
105









1990 1995 2000 2010 2020
South1990 1995 2000 2010 202000






year
Figure 1


020







Potentiometric Surface of the Floridan Aquifer
Decline from Predevelopment to May 1989



< 5 FEET

S5-10 FEET

I 10-20 FEET

20 40 FEET

40 60 FEET

S> 60 FEET
........ Generalized Delineation
of major ground-water
basins


Figure 2









indicated in Figure 2, tremendous stress exists on the Floridan
aquifer in the southern portion of the District. Regional
impacts can be seen in terms of significant declines in lake
levels along the Highlands Ridge, water quality deterioration in
coastal areas, and in terms of impacts on existing legal users by
a reduction in pumping efficiencies. As a result of these
observed impacts, more detailed hydrologic investigations have
been conducted in these stressed areas, interim management
measures have been imposed, and more detailed, comprehensive
management plans have been prepared.

Opportunities do exist for further ground water development in
the northern portion of the District.

Surface Water
All major rivers, creeks, springs and canals within the District
were evaluated for water supply development opportunities.
Dependable yields were estimated, in part, upon a limit of a ten
percent flow reduction to avoid unacceptable environmental
impacts.

Conservation
Conservation is often considered in water supply plans as a
component of developing the future demand projections. This can
have the affect of hiding the potentially significant savings
attributable to conservation in the demand projections. This can
lead to a de-emphasis of the importance of conservation in water
supply planning. In order to clearly demonstrate the important
role conservation will play in southwest Florida, the Needs and
Sources Plan identifies conservation as a source of water.
Future sources projected to be acquired through conservation are
determined for each specific water use type utilizing
methodologies applicable to that use type. For instance,
agricultural savings can be achieved through improved irrigation
technologies which increase efficiencies and through best
management practices. Public supply conservation can be achieved
through increased plumbing efficiencies, water efficient
landscaping, water utility system leak detection and repair
programs, conservation-oriented rate structures, to name just a
few.

Management Plan
The Plan identifies what role each source of water will play in
meeting future demands. The Plan contains provisions which serve
as guidance to the District's future actions and also has
significant implications upon other entities responsible for
water supply planning and development.

For instance, based upon the knowledge that ground water supplies
in the southern portion of the District are already severely
impacted by existing withdrawals, the District has placed a cap
on ground water withdrawals in the most impacted area along the
coast. In addition, the District is proposing to expand the area










encompassed by a this cap to include the entire southern
groundwater basin, as shown in Figure 3. The District has
identified other sources to meet growing water demands, including
expansion and interconnection of the Peace River facilities (see
Figure 4).

Each of these components, including examples of how they are
implemented, are summarized in Figure 5 and are briefly reviewed
below.

Policies
Three over riding policies have guided the development of the
District's water supply management strategy. The first is that
local sources will be developed to the greatest extent
practicable prior to importing water from a distant source. The
second is that, as previously mentioned, conservation is
considered a source of new water to reduce existing demand and
meet future needs, and will be aggressively pursued. The third
is that all future public supply sources developed outside a
service area will be developed and operated by the appropriate
regional water supply authority. Each of these policies have
subsequent regulatory implications.

Other policies are also evident in the Plan, such as the
District's policy to assist in the accomplishment of alternative
and new water supply source development through technical and
financial assistance. Policies such as this do not have direct
regulatory implications but rather guide the District in its
budgetary actions.

Rule Adopted Provisions
One of the most direct ways in which the Plan is to be
implemented is through revisions to the District's water use
permitting rules. Provisions such as the limitations on further
increases in ground water withdrawals, per capital limits and
various conservation measures are adopted in rule form. These
rule provisions have direct applicability to permittees, but also
have, or should have, ramifications on local government
comprehensive planning.

Strategic Regional Policy Plans (SRPPs)
The regional planning councils must identify regionally
significant natural resources as one component of their SRPPs.
The water management district would recommend the Peace River as
a regionally significant natural resource based at least in part
on its importance to meeting future water needs.

Technical Assistance to Local Governments
One final way in which the Plan can be realized is through
providing related technical assistance to local governments
consistent with the Plan's provisions. Examples of technical
assistance include water conservation options for local
governments (water audits, leak detection and repair, rate
structures, etc.), projected water demands for each major use
type, etc.









Southern
District
Water Use
Caution Area



Eastern Tampa
Bay WUCA


Figure 3










Recommended Future Regional Sources



East Couty
Welleld
SfRecommended
Regional Sources
1 Carlon Wellield Expansion
--^-. -..---- 2 PRMRWSA- Peace River Expansion


Reservoir


- IVerna Wellfeld



E 1
Carla. Wellleld
/K I Z^i Euion


Potential Regional Sources
Existing Public Supply
WUP> 500,000 gpd
> 10 mgd
4-10 mgd
2-4 mgd
S< 2 mgd
Existing Distribution Pipeline
-- Proposed Distribution Pipeline


K---


Shell Criek
L Re lvoir


Figure 4














NEEDS AND SOURCES PLAN IMPLEMENTATION


POLICIES
Regulatory
Non-regulatory


RULE ADOPTED PROVISIONS
Water Use Permitting Implications
Local Government Comprehensive Plan Implications


STRATEGIC REGIONAL POLICY PLANS
Regionally Significant Resources


TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO LOCAL GOVERNMENTS


Figure 5


I .


I '
I i




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs