Title: Federal Register / Vol 56 No.168 Thursday, August 29, 1991 / Notices - Notice of Final Rule-Change permit number, Correct printing and typographical errors, and modification of the types of discharges covered by the generall permit
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Title: Federal Register / Vol 56 No.168 Thursday, August 29, 1991 / Notices - Notice of Final Rule-Change permit number, Correct printing and typographical errors, and modification of the types of discharges covered by the generall permit
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Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - Federal Register / Vol 56 No.168 Thursday, August 29, 1991 / Notices - Notice of Final Rule-Change permit number, Correct printing and typographical errors, and modification of the types of discharges covered by the generall permit (JDV Box 95)
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Federal Reister / Vol. 56. No. 168 / Thursday. August 29, 1991 / Notices


ACTION: Notice of final rule-Change
permit number, correct printing and
typographical errors, and modification
of the types of discharges covered by
the general permit.
SUMMARY: The Regional Administrator,
EPA. Region IV is today issuing the final
notice that amends the July 17, 1989 (54
FR 29986) notice and modifies the final
National Pollutant Discharge
Elimination System (NPDES) General
Permit for Petroleum Fuel Contaminated
Ground/Storm Waters in the State of
Florida, and to correct printing and
typographical errors.
Due to varying hydrological
conditions and the proximity of the
ground water table to the surface in
various areas of the State of Florida.
construction-related excavation and
many other activities have the need to
discharge ground/storm water to waters
of the U.S. for very short periods of time.
in most cases, less than 10 days. This
general NPDES permit does not cover
storm water discharges from other
construction industrial activity areas.
The Clean Water Act (CWA) requires
that point source discharges of
pollutants to waters of the United States
be covered by NPDES permits. These
short-term discharges are necessary to
facilitate initiation and completion of
subsurface activities or the long-term
maintenance of ground water levels for
other purposes. This final modification
to the general permit allows coverage of
certain discharges that meet the criteria
set in the modification. The final permit
requires analytical tests of the proposed
discharge water to determine whether
there is contamination from sources
other than petroleum fuels. Discharges
of waters that have been tested to show
no other source of contamination will be
covered by the general permit with no
exchange of correspondence between
the operator and EPA. Region IV.
DATES: This general permit modification
shall be effective on Thursday, August
29.1991 at 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight
Savings Time. Notification of coverage
for those facilities requiring coverage by
the general permit modification will be
by certified mail from the Director,
Water'Management Division, EPA,
Region IV. The date for coverage under
the general permit modification will be
the date of the Director's letter assigning
the NPDES number for general permit
coverage.
In accordance with 40 CFR 23.2, the
Region hereby specifies that this permit
modification shall be considered the
final agency action, for purposes of
/L' judicial review, on the date specified
above. The administrative record.
including draft permit modification, fact


sheet, state certification, comments
received, and additional information are
available by writing the EPA. Region IV,
or for review and copying at 345
Courtland St., NE., Atlanta. Georgia
30365, between the hours of 8:15 A.M.
and 4:30 P.M.. Monday through Friday.
Copies will be provided at a nominal
charge per page. Additional information
concerning the permit may be obtained
at the address and during the hours
noted above: Ms. Alice Crosby, Public
Notice Coordinator. 404/347-3004.
ADDRESSES: Notifications required
under this permit should be sent to:
Director. Water Management Division,
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
Region IV, 345 Courtland Street NE..
Allanta, Georgia 30365.
Request for Coverage: Written
notification of intent to be covered by
this general permit modification (if
required) shall be provided as described
in the permit Part II Section F.c.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Larry Cole. Environmental Engineer.
Facilities Performance Branch. Water
Management Division, U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency. 345
Courtland Street. NE.. Atlanta, Georgia
30365, (404) 347-3012.
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
I. Introduction
On Monday. July 17,1989 (54 FR
299006), EPA. Region IV issued the Final
NPDES General Permit for Petroleum
Fuel Contaminated Ground/Storm
Waters in the State of Florida. On
Friday. February 22,1991, (50 FR 7379)
EPA, Region IV published a notice of the
proposed modification to the NPDES
General Permit for Petroleum Fuel
Contaminated Ground/Storm Waters in
the State of Florida (56 FR 7379). On
Thursday. March 21, 1991. EPA, Region
IV public noticed the draft permit
modification in the State of Florida
(Public Notice No. 91FLI018) in order to
receive comments on the permit
modification that is being issued in final
form today. All the public comments
received during this period are included
in the administrative record and were
considered by Region IV in the
formulation of a final determination of
the conditions in today's final general
permit modification. The Region
published a detailed fact sheet with the
draft general permit modification (50 FR
7380).
The Region is incorporating by
reference that fact sheet and other
information as part of the final fact
sheet for today's final permit
modification. The discussions presented
in these sections should be consulted in
reviewing the applicability and scope of


the final general permit modification to
different sites of concern. A formal
hearing is available to challenge any
NPDES permit issued under 124.15
except for a general permit. Persons
affected by a general permit may not
challenge the conditions of a general
permit as a right in further agency
proceedings. They may instead either
challenge the general permit in court, or
apply for an individual permit under
122.21 as authorized at 122.28 and then
request a formal hearing on the issuance
or denial of an individual permit.
Additional information regarding these
procedures is available by contracting
Mr. Kevin Smith, Office of Regional
Counsel at the address above or at (404)
347-2335.
II. Other Legal Requirements
A. Executive Order 12291
The Office of Management and Budget
has exempted this action from the
requirements of Executive Order 12291
pursuant to section 8[bl of that order.
B. Paperwork Reduction Act
EPA has reviewed the requirements
imposed on the regulated facilities in
this final general permit under the
Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980. 44
U.S.C. 3501 ct seq. The information
collection requirements of this permit
have already been approved by the
Office of Management and Budget in
submissions made for the NPDES permit
program under the provisions of the
Clean Water Act (the Act).
C. State Certification Requirements
Section 301(()(1)(c) of the Act requires
that NPDES permits contain conditions
which ensure compliance with
applicable State water quality standards
or limitations. Under section 401(a)(1) of
the Act, EPA may not issue or modify an
NPDES permit until the State in which
the discharge will originate grants or
waives certification to ensure
compliance with appropriate
requirements of the Act and State law.
EPA requested certification on the
amendments and modification regarding
this general permit on January 29, 1991.
On August 12, 1991. the Florida
Department of Environmental
Regulation waived certification of the
general permit modification.


D. Effective Dote
The final NPDES general permit
modification issued today is effective on
Thursday, August 29.1991.
E. Regulatory Flexibility Act
After review of the facts presented in
this document, I hereby certify, pursuant


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Federal Register / Vol. 56, No. 168 / Thursday, August 29, 1991 / Notices


to the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 605(b), that
this NPDES general permit modification
will not have a significant impact on a
substantial number of small entities.
Moreover, the permit reduces a
significant burden on regulated sources.
Greer C. Tidwell,
RegionalAdministrator.
Summary of Comments
Appendix A-Public Comments
Public notice of the draft permit
modification was published at 56 FR
7379 (February 22, 1991). Additionally,
the permit was public noticed in the
State Of Florida on March 21, 1991
(Public Notice No. 91FL018) to allow an
additional 30-day comment period from
interested parties within Florida which
would be considered in the formulation
of a final decision regarding the
proposed permit modification.
The following parties responded with
written comments on the general permit
modification: Florida Power & Light
Company, Florida Power Corporation,
BellSouth, Broward County Board of
County Commissioners and the U.S.
Department of Interior Fish & Wildlife
Service.
(1) Comment: Two commenters stated
that there is a need to dewater for the
installation of cables, power lines,
foundations and piping which are
usually short-term activities associated
with uncontaminated water. One
commenter stated that the proposed rule
would aid in obtaining a simplified
approval for these construction related
dewatering activities when waters from
a point source would be discharged to
waters of the U.S. However, the 10 days
delineated in the proposed General
Permit is not an adequate amount of
time for some dewatering activities
involving short-term construction
related dewatering of uncontaminated
water and believed that a more
appropriate duration of time would be
90 days. This amount of time would
enable companies who have to dewater
long sections of narrow trenches to
perform the work in segments, would
not affect the overall quantity or quality
of the water being discharged; however,
it would enable companies to perform
the work under the General Permit in a
segmented manner.
Response: The 10 days delineated by
EPA in the summary section were only
general (e.g., short term tank
replacements) in nature and were not
intended to impose a maximum amount
of time that construction related
activities could discharge. As long as
tests verify that the water is
uncontaminated, based on the results of
the analytical tests required by the


permit, the segmented work could
continue for these types of activities;
however, water from dewatering
activities of this nature that cover long
stretches should be tested at scheduled
points to ensure that no contamination
exists. Any discharge from dewatering
of trenches or similar activities to the
same surface water body or to a
municipal separate storm sewer system
serving the same surface water body
shall be considered to be one project
subject to coverage under this permit.
However, the operator of the project
shall consider the discharge length of
time and whether or not the discharge is
contaminated to determine the
appropriate monitoring and/or Notice of
Intent requirements of this permit. This
permit does not give an operator any
designated or implied authority to use a
municipality's storm sewer system. We
recommend that municipalities be
notified in advance of any proposed
discharges to their systems.
(2) Comment: One commenter
supported the proposed modification to
include the discharge of uncontaminated
groundwater from dewatering
operations and believed it would reduce
the paperwork for both EPA and local
project managers.
(3) Comment: The Fish & Wildlife
Service stated that the discharges
allowed under the modified permit
should have no adverse impact on
species or habitats under Service
trusteeship.
(4) Comment: One commenter stated
that it was unclear whether the phrase
"construction related activity" would
include excavation work related to the
repair or damaged telecommunications
cable. Delays in restoring critical
telephone service to a hospital or
government facility could be hampered
by delays associated with laboratory
turnaround time and would not be
feasible for these types of operations.
The commenters stated that the
analytical requirements should be
modified to include site tests, such as
color change to minimize financial
impact and eliminate delays caused by
laboratory turnaround time. Also,
having to apply for an individual permit
in such situations is even less feasible.
Response: This permit modification is
intended to cover any dewatering
activity, regardless of the purpose. The
final general permit has language in part
II, section B that addresses the concerns
of this comment. All dischargers
complying with the requirements of this
permit are covered by this language, and
application for an individual NPDES
permit will not be necessary. The only
alternative to obtaining coverage under
this general permit is to submit an


application for an individual permit,
which would require at least 60 days to
issue on a fast-track approach after the
application is received. Discharging to
waters of the U.S. under any
circumstances without NPDES coverage
is a violation of the Act.
(5) Comment: One commenter stated
that during installation of underground
telecommunications, dewatering could
occur in several locations in a stretch of
right-of-way which may measure several
miles, and sampling should be limited to
one set of samples per project rather
than one set for every point source
which may result from that project.
Response: See response to comment
(1).
(6) Comment: One commenter stated
that the proposed modified general
permit would require analysis for TOC,
pH, Total Mercury, Total Cadmium,
Total Copper, Total Lead, Total Zinc,
Total or Hexavalent Chromium, Benzene
and Naphthalene before discharge
begins. The commenter questioned the
rationale for requiring such extensive
analytical work for groundwater and
storm water which is not expected to be
contaminated in the first place. Also, the
general permit conditions associated
with cleanup of petroleum
contamination does not require
extensive analysis for metals and since
ground water at service stations or other
underground storage tank sites are more
likely to be contaminated with heavy
metals than the ground water beneath a
right-of-way, this is not a fair
requirement.
Response: The modified general
permit addresses extensive analysis for
metals in petroleum fuel contaminated
groundwater sites which, according to
the amended F.A.C. "Section 17-
770.600(8)(a-d), of February 20, 1990,
modifies the test procedures of Part
I.C.(a) that were issued on Monday, July
17, 1989. Therefore, the metals are
addressed, particularly at sites where
the origin of contamination is not
identified, plus additional priority
pollutant scans using EPA Method 624
and 625.
Therefore, these tests are not more
severe than the sampling required for
known petroleum fuel contaminated
groundwater. EPA believes the analysis
required for these dewatering projects
serves to verify whether the
groundwater is contaminated from other
sources. This general permit will reduce
the administrative burden on the
discharger and EPA. Any potential
discharger that does not agree with the
requirements of the general permit can
submit an individual NPDES application


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Federal Register / Vol. 56, No. 168 / Thursday, August 29, 1991 / Notices


and have site-specific considerations
given to permit issuance.
(7) Comment: One commenter stated
that it was unclear what levels would be
used to determine when petroleum
contamination is present and
recommended that the Total Petroleum
Hydrocarbon (TPH) test be used instead
of benzene, naphthalene and Total
Organic Carbon (TOC). Also, naturally
occurring organic would make the TOC
test meaningless and that analytical
requirements should be very basic for
short-term discharges which last three
(3) days or less. Very short-term
operations do not have the same
environmental impact as operations
which last several days or weeks.
Response: EPA has identified water
quality criteria levels, established in
Florida Administrative Code Section 17-
770.730, as thresholds to indicate
potential contamination for benzene and
naplithalene which is greater than 1.0
ug/1 and 100.0 ug/1 respectively. As for
p-i, levels exceeding the water quality
standards of Chapter 17-302 would be
the indicator of contamination. For Total
Mercury, Total Cadmium, Total Copper.
Total Lead, Total Zinc, and Total or
Ilexavalent Chromium, indicators of
contamination from metals would be
analytical results exceeding Chapter 17-
302 fresh and marine waters criteria. For
Total Organic Carbon (TOC) the
indicator would be levels greater than
10.0 mg/1, which is based on EPA,
Region IV, Environmental Services
Division data on natural background
surface water samples not greater than
4.4 mg/1 and Standard Methods Tests
indicating typical municipal wastewater
effluents for TOC in the 5.0-6.0 mg/1
range. Additionally, TOC samples from
streams and creeks from various areas
of Florida indicate TOC levels not
greater than 56 mg/1 which could be
reflective of industrial discharge
contamination. Storm water discharges
that have been determined to be
uncontaminated with petroleum fuels
from dike drains at bulk storage
terminals have reported TOC levels
around 14.0 mg/1.
Therefore, EPA has determined that
the TOC test be maintained as a screen
to indicate contamination. EPA does not
concur with using the Total Petroleum
I hydrocarbon (TPH) test instead of
benzene, naphthalene and TOC since
data has verified that the analytical
procedures used to conduct the TPH test
are not as sensitive as the method used
to perform the tests on benzene or
naphthalene and is not recommended to
be used in place of the other tests, since
S the TPH test alone may miss potential
contamination of aromatic compounds.


It should be emphasized that these are
screening levels of the proposed
discharge water and should be
performed prior to discharging to a
surface body. If excessive levels of these
contaminants are verified, the facility is
not allowed to discharge to a surface
water body under this general permit
modification.
(8) Comment: One commenter stated
that the final storm water NPDES
permitting requirements allow similar
facilities to qualify for general permits,
thus allowing facilities to limit the
number of samples taken. Commenter
stated that for storm water
requirements, only 10% of the facilities
are required to collect samples and for
facilities in the same general permit
group, no more than 100 samples are
required. The commenter stated that a
similar general permitting scheme could
be established for routine, short-term
discharges which result from excavation
work.
Response: The commenter is referring
to the group application requirements
for storm water discharges associated
with industrial activity, whereby in Part
1 of the group application, 10% of the
group members are identified for the
purpose of submitting analytical data in
Part 2 of the application (November 16,
1990, 55 FR 47990). The group
application concept is a tool to reduce
the administrative burden on NPDES
permitting authorities that will not exist
after the application deadline passes.
This requirement cannot be applied to
the storm water discharges covered by
this general permit since these
discharges are not specifically identified
as one of the eleven (11) categories of
storm water discharges. Also, ground
water discharges are not storm water.
III. Other Changes to Final Permit
Modification
1. In Part I A.3(a), this sentence was
added: For discharges contaminated by
petroleum fuels that last for less than a
week, daily monitoring will be required
for the applicable parameters.
2. In Part I A.3(d), the sentence was
revised to read: All discharges covered
by 3(a) and 3(b) of this section must
submit a Notice of Intent (NOI) in
accordance with Part II, Section F. Also,
in Part I A.3(d), this sentence was
added: Additionally, no Discharge
Monitoring Reports (DMR) forms are
required to be submitted to EPA, Region
IV.
3. The coverage of this modification
has been clarified to eliminate the
reference to "construction-related
activities" as being the source of
regulated discharges of ground water.
The language in part:LA.3 hastbeen


revised to state that.produced ground
water from "any activity" is covered by
this permit as applicable. Additionally,
indicator parameters are listed in Part
I.A.3 with recommended screening
levels to determine potential
contamination.
Appendix B-General Permit To
Discharge Under The National Pollutant
Discharge Elimination System
In compliance with the provisions of
the Clean Water Act (CWA or Act), as
amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq..
discharges of treated ground water and
storm water incidental to ground water
cleanup operations which are
contaminated with petroleum fuels are
authorized to discharge to waters of the
United. States within the State of Florida
in accordance with effluent limitations.
monitoring requirements and other
conditions set forth herein. This NPDES
general permit became effective on July
17, 1989 (54 FR 29986) and consists of
part I, part II, part III, part IV and part V.
This general limit is being modified to
change the general permit number,
correct typographical errors and to
allow any activity that may cause point
source discharge of ground waters to
waters of the U.S. after performing
analytical tests required by this
modification. It also allows the
discharge of ground water which has
been treated to the levels required in
part I, A.1 or A.2 for discharges less than
thirty (30) days.
This proposed modification shall
become effective on August 29, 1991, or
upon notification of coverage. (See part
II, Section F for application and
coverage requirements of the general
permit and the amended part It, Section
F requirements of this modification.)
This permit and the authorization to
discharge shall expire at midnight, July
16, 1994.
W. Ray Cunningham,
Director. Water Managenmnt Divismn.
Modification to the Final NPDES
General Permit For Petroleum Fuel
Contaminated Ground/Storm Waters in
the State of Florida
General Modifications to the General
Permit
I. Change the General Permit Number
The general permit number is changed
from FLG040001 to FLG830000. This
change is necessary to make the
numbering system for this general
permit category consistent with the
nationwide system developed by EPA
Headquarters.


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Federal Register / Vol. 56, No. 168 / Thursday, August 29, 1991 / Notices


Specific Modifications to Parts of the
General Permit
II. Correction of Printing and
Typographical Errors Plus Revisions in
References to State Regulations
Part I A.1: In the effluent limitations
chart under "Effluent Characteristic,"
the unit of measure for Total Lead,
which reads "p1," is revised to read
"il."
Part I A.2: In the effluent limitations
chart under "Discharge limitations," the
Daily Maximum limit for Naphthalene
which reads "100 0," is revised to read
"100.0."
Part I of the general permit is being
modified as specified below:
A. Effluent Limitations and Monitoring
Requirements
Existing Sources and New Dischargers
3. During the period beginning on the
effective date of the permit and lasting
through the term of this permit, the
permitted is authorized to discharge
produced ground water from any
activity by a point source to waters of
the United States. The effluent
limitations and/or monitoring conditions
applying to each allowable discharge is
dependent on the duration of the
discharge as outlined below:
Analytical tests on samples of the
proposed discharge water are required
to determine if contamination exists
from other sources. The parameters to
be measured include TOC, pH, Total
Mercury, Total Cadmium, Total Copper,
Total Lead, Total Zinc, Total or
Hexavalent Chromium, Benzene and
Naphthalene.
Analytical test results exceeding the
values below shall be considered an
indication of contamination from other
sources:

Indicator if discharge is into
Parameter Fresh Marine
waters water

TOC ................................. 10.0 mg/I ...... 10.0 mg/I
pH, std. units............... 6.0-8.5........... 6.5-8.5 mg/I
Total Mercury................. 0.20 pg/I ....... 0.10 jpg/I
Total Cadmium............... 0.80 pg/l....... 5.0 pg/I
Total Coppper ................ 0.03 mg/I...... 0.015 mg/I
Total Lead....................... 0.03 mg/1..... 0.05 mg/I
Total Zinc........................ 0.03 mg/I..... 1.0 mg/I
Total Chromium.............. 1.0 mg/I......... 1.0 mg/I or
Hexavalent Chromium... 0.50 mg/I..... 0.50 mg/I
Benzene.......................... 1.0 ig/I......... 1.0 jIg/1
Naphthalene.................. 100.0 pg/l..... 1000.0 pig/I

All discharges must comply with
permit requirements:
(a) If contamination exists from
petroleum fuels and the discharge will
occur for less than thirty (30) days, the
permitted shall comply only with the
applicable effluent limitations and


monitoring requirements in part I, A.1 or
A.2 for Benzene, pH and/or
Naphthalene and Total Lead. One (1)
grab sample per seven (7) days is
required during the discharge period and
the total volume discharged recorded.
Monitoring results shall be submitted to
EPA within thirty (30) days of
termination of the discharge. For
discharges contaminated by petroleum
fuels that last for less than a week, daily
monitoring will be required for the
applicable parameters.
(b) If contamination exists from
petroleum fuels and the discharge will
occur for more than thirty (30) days after
commencement of discharge, the
permitted shall comply with all
conditions and requirements in part I,
A.1 or A.2 of this general permit.
(c) If contamination from other
sources does exist, as indicated by the
results of the analytical tests required
by this Section, the discharge will not be
covered by this general permit, and the
operator shall apply for an individual
NPDES permit at least 90 days prior to
the date a discharge to waters of the
U.S. is expected.
(d) All dischargers covered by 3(a)
and 3(b) of this section must submit a
Notice of Intent (NOI) in accordance
with Part II, Section F. However, if
contamination from petroleum fuels or
other sources is not shown, the
discharge is covered by this general
permit without having to submit a
request for coverage to EPA, Region IV.
EPA may at any time request the data
resulting from the analytical tests.
Additionally, no Discharge Monitoring
Reports (DMR) forms are required to be
submitted to EPA, Region IV.
Part I.C-Test Procedures: In part LC
which reads "Section 17-70.008(9)(a-e)
of the petroleum site cleanup criteria
rule," shall be revised to read as
"Section 17-770.600(8)(a-d) of the
Petroleum Contamination Cleanup
Criteria, amended February 20, 1990."
Part I.C.a-Test Procedures: In part
I.C.a, which reads "Section
17.70.008(9)(d) of the State Underground
Petroleum Environmental Response
Program," is revised to read as "Section
17-770.600(8)(c)1, of the Petroleum
Contamination Cleanup Criteria,
amended February 20, 1990."
Part II Section F.a(4)-Application
Requirements: In part II Section F.a(4),
which reads "Florida Administrative
Codes (FAC) 17-70.006, 17-70.008 and
17-70.010, respectively," is revised to
read, "Florida Administrative Code
(FAC) 17-770.300, 17-770.600 and 17-
770.700, respectively, amended February
20, 1990."
Part II Section F.c.-This Section of
the General permit is being modified to


continue the paragraph as noted below:
However, dischargers seeking coverage
under part I A.3(a) will be required to
submit the date the discharge is
expected to cease, and the same
information in Section F.a. above,
except items (2), (3) and (4). Dischargers
meeting the conditions set forth in part
I.A.3(d) are not required to submit a
Notice of Intent (NOI).
Part II Section G.5- Additional
General Permit Conditions: In the Part
which reads "Special Protection,
Outstanding Florida Waters, as set forth
by FAC 17-3.043," shall be revised to
read, "Special Protection, Outstanding
Florida Waters, Outstanding National
Resource Waters, as set forth by FAC
17-302.700, amended February 20, 1990."
Part IV-Two references to "NPDES
Guidance Document" are corrected to
read "NPDES Best Management
Practices Guidance Document." Also,
the correct address to submit written
requests to obtain a copy is: Director,
Water Management Division, U.S. EPA,
Region IV, 345 Courtland St., NE.,
Atlanta, Georgia 30365.
IFR Doc. 91-20630 Filed 8-28-91; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6560-50-M


FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS
COMMISSION

[PR Docket No. 91-162; DA 91-1001]

Private Land Mobile Radio Services;
Kansas Public Safety Plan
AGENCY: Federal Communications
Commission.
ACTION: Notice.
SUMMARY: The Chief, Private Radio
Bureau and the Chief Engineer released
this Order accepting the Pubic Safety
Radio Plan for Kansas (Region 16). As a
result of accepting the Plan of Region 16,
licensing of the 821-824/866-869 MHz
band in that region may begin
immediately.
EFFECTIVE DATE: August 16, 1991.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Betty Woolford, Private Radio Bureau,
Policy and Planning Branch, (202) 632-
6497.
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
Order
Adopted: August 8, 1991.
Released: August 16, 1991.
By the Chief, Private Radio Bureau and the
Chief Engineer:
1. On March 12, 1991, Region 16
(Kansas) submitted its pubic safety plan
to the Commission for review. The plan


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