Title: Abstract - Natural Resources study of Potential of Reverse Osmosis
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00004207/00001
 Material Information
Title: Abstract - Natural Resources study of Potential of Reverse Osmosis
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - Abstract - Natural Resources study of Potential of Reverse Osmosis (JDV Box 43)
General Note: Box 18, Folder 3 ( Treatments of Water - 1983 ), Item 30
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00004207
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text




ABSTRACT

Natural Resources studied the potential of reverse osmosis

as an alternative to more conventional methods of providing potable

water needs in the state. Reverse osmosis is a desalination

technique which in effect separates the impurities out of the

water as the water is forced through a semipermeable membrane

at high pressure. The committee found there are currently 70

desalination plants operating in Florida utilizing reverse osmosis

technology. Reverse osmosis was found to be superior to other

methods of desalination and to be generally competitive on a cost

basis with more conventional systems of water supply. The cost

effectiveness of reverse osmosis increases with the size of the

plant and the process is superior to conventional treatment systems

in removing pollutants. The committee recommended that reverse

osmosis be considered when selecting a method of water supply

in light of its comparable costs, superior quality of water

produced, and reduced impact to groundwater aquifers as compared

with more conventional methods of water supply.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs