Title: Developments of Regional Impact - Guidebook for Preparation of the Application for Development Approval
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 Material Information
Title: Developments of Regional Impact - Guidebook for Preparation of the Application for Development Approval
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Dept. of Adm. Div of State Planning Bureau of Land and Water Management
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - Developments of Regional Impact - Guidebook for Preparation of the Application for Development Approval (JDV Box 43)
General Note: Box 18, Folder 2 ( Water Management - 1977-1983 ), Item 3
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: WL00004161
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text










DEVELOPMENTS OF REGIONAL IMPACT

GUIDEBOOK
FoR PREpARATION of ThE


APPLICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT


DEpARTMENT Of AdmiNiSTRATiON
DivisioN of STATE PlANNINq
BUREAU of LANd ANd WATER MANAqEMENT


APPROVAL


i













Lt. Gov. J. H. "Jim" Williams
Secretary
Department of Administration


Wallace W. Henderson
Assistant Secretary
Department of Administration


R. G. Whittle, Jr.
Director
Division of State Planning


Eastern W. Tin
Chief
Bureau of Land and Water Management




Division of State Planning Staff Assisting In
The Preparation of This Report Included:


James May . .
Gil Backenstoss, Jr.


Alan Visintainer
Connie Carpenter
Suzy Starnes .
Beryl Javery .
Clyde Henderson
Jon Curry .


Senior Planner
Associate Planner and
Project Coordinator
Associate Planner
Secretary
Secretary
Secretary
Publications Coordinator
Illustrator


. .
. .




mu


DSP-BLWM-34-76


DEVELOPMENTS OF REGIONAL IMPACT

GUIDEBOOK


for preparation of the

APPLICATION FOR DEVELOPMENT APPROVAL











State of Florida
Department of Administration
Division of State Planning
Bureau of Land and Water Management
660 Apalachee Parkway
Tallahassee, Florida 32304

June 1976


This public document was promulgated
at an annual cost of $2,192.32 or
$3,654 per copy to provide information
for the preparation and review of
Applications for Development Approval,
pursuant to Chapter 380, F.S.









I
j
rF


Introduction . . . . .


Part I. Application Information and Instructions


Part II.


General Section . . .

Maps . . . .

General Project Description .

Environment and Natural Resources

Economy . . .

Public Facilities . .

Public Transportation Facilities

Housing . . . .

Appendices


Page

1-8


9-10


11

11-12C

13-14

14-29

30-37

37-53

53-61

61-65

















TABLE OF CONTENTS












INTRODUCTION



This guidebook has been prepared by the Division of State

Planning to aid developers in the preparation of an application

for development approval (ADA) and to aid regional planning

agencies and local governments in the review of an ADA. This

guidebook is not.a rule and does not establish procedure or

policy. Rather, it is intended as a reference tool to provide

a better understanding of the ADA informational requirements so

that the information can be effectively used to foster better

planning within the DRI process by all participants.

"The Florida Environmental Land and Water Management Act

of 1972" (Chapter 380, Florida Statutes) defines developments

of regional impact in Section 380.06(1), Florida Statutes, as

... any development which, because of its character, magnitude,

or location, would have a substantial effect upon the health,

safety, or welfare of citizens of more than one county."

Furthermore, the Administration Commission, pursuant to Section

380.06(2), F.S., adopted by rule specific guidelines and stand-

ards to be used in determining whether particular developments

shall be presumed to be of regional impact. This rule, adopted

as Chapter 22F-2, Florida Administrative Code, provides criteria

for twelve types of developments which are presumed to be of

regional impact. When a developer intends to undertake a


m













development of regional impact (DRI) and the proposed develop-

ment is not within an area of critical state concern but is

within the jurisdiction of a local government with zoning or

subdivision regulations, the developer is required by Section

380.06(6), F.S., to file an application for development approval

(ADA) with the appropriate local.government having jurisdiction.

Filing an ADA with the jurisdictional local government and

the appropriate regional planning agency initiates the DRI

review process. Simultaneously, a copy of the ADA should be

transmitted to the Division of State Planning. Upon receipt of

an ADA, the regional planning agency has 15 working days in

which to determine the sufficiency of the information provided.

In order to provide reasonable assurance that an ADA will be

complete, all information requested must be included in the ADA.

If .the information in an ADA is determined to be insuffi-

cient, the applicant will be notified, in writing, of any

additional information desired. The applicant has two options:

(1) Provide a letter within five days, stating that the
additional information will be provided to the
regional planning agency and the local government.
The applicant may choose to supply some of the
requested information and decline, in writing, to
provide the balance.

(2) An applicant may notify the regional planning agency
that the requested additional information will not
be provided.

After the preliminary review, if the application is

acceptable, the regional planning agency will notify the local












government and the applicant in writing. The local government

is then required to set a DRI public hearing date at its next

scheduled meeting. Notice of the DRI public hearing must be

published at least 60 days in advance of the hearing, and notice

of the public hearing must be given to the Division of State

Planning, the regional planning agency, and other persons

designated by the Division of State Planning in Section 22F-1.21

of the F.A.C. Upon receipt of notice that a DRI public hearing

has been scheduled, the regional planning agency has 50 days in

which to prepare and transmit a report and recommendations on

the regional impact of the proposed development to the local

government.

After the DRI public hearing is held, during which the local

government must consider the recommendations and report of the

regional planning agency, the local government has 30 days within

which it must issue a development order, unless a time extension

is requested by the applicant. The development order should

approve, approve with conditions, or deny the application for

development approval. The development order should address all

of the regional issues raised by the regional planning agency,

indicating how these issues have or have not been resolved.

Development orders should be sent promptly to the Division

of State Planning, the regional planning agency, and the appli-

cant. Upon transmittal of the development order to the Division













of State Planning, a 30 day period begins during which appeals

may be initiated. Four parties may appeal a development order:

the landowner, the developer, an appropriate regional planning

agency, or the Division of State Planning. No development

approval should be issued by local government during this 30

day appeal period and no development should be undertaken.

Any appeal is to the Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission

(the Governor and Cabinet). The Adjudicatory Commission has

120 days in which to act, once an appeal has been filed.

This is a simplified explanation of the DRI process. For

further information, consult Chapter 380, F.S., and Chapter

22F-1 of the Florida Administrative Code.

The primary purpose of a DRI review is to provide local

government decision makers with a regional perspective when

permitting large scale developments. The review should be

comprehensive and is intended to evaluate the proposed develop-

ment from a broader regional viewpoint than the subsequent reviews

which will be required for specific local and state permits.

Generally, these other permits will be sought after the DRI

review is complete and when additional detailed design and

engineering plans for the development have been prepared.

Although the review process does not begin until filing of

the ADA, the time period prior to filing which is used for

preparation of the ADA is a planning period during which many












significant development decisions are made. During this planning

period the developer should maintain frequent and continuous

contact with both the local government and the regional planning

agency. Continuous communication with the appropriate agencies

should aid in developing a plan that is compatible with local

and regional goals and objectives. The ADA is a planning tool

and the process of preparing it is intended to influence

positively the development being proposed.

The design of the ADA form has been largely determined by

the nature of the DRI process itself. The ADA concentrates on

the developer's site planning process and on data that will be

available early in the planning process. It does not supplant

considerations which are addressed by subsequent local and

state functional permits. The ADA structures the method by

which the developer prepares, compiles and submits information

about the proposed development to the local government with

jurisdiction, to the appropriate regional planning agency, and to

the Division of State Planning. The ability of the regional

planning agency and local government to adequately review the

proposed development is heavily dependent upon the quality of

information provided in the ADA.

This guidebook provides supplemental information for each

question in the ADA. The guidebook comments are in the same

sequence as the ADA questions and the question and comment













numbering system is identical. It is suggested that the appli-

cant and reviewing agencies refer to all guidebook comments;

however, the corresponding numbering system should provide quick

access to specific sections.

The guidebook discussion and comment is intended to assist

in the preparation of a high quality ADA by explaining: (1) the

type of information required, (2) the reasons why this informa-

tion is necessary, (3) acceptable sources for certain information,

(4) appropriate methods of presenting data, (5) the level of

detail preferred, (6) the roles and responsibilities of all

participants with regard to particular sections, and (7) other

basic factors which must be taken into consideration during the

preparation and review of the ADA.

Part III of the ADA, which includes specific questions on

nonresidential DRI's is not addressed by this guidebook.


The Role of the Developer

The developer initiates the DRI process by preparing an ADA

and initiates the DRI review process by filing the ADA with the

local government. In the ADA, the developer provides information

on:

(1) the size, type, location and description of the
proposed development;

(2) the site planning approach utilized;

(3) the development site, such as soils, vegetation,
wildlife, floodprone areas, etc.;











(4) some direct impacts, such as traffic generation,
water demand, solid waste generation; and
(5) measures that will be utilized to minimize
adverse impacts.
Additionally, upon completion of regional and local review,
developers and the landowner have standing to appeal local

development orders to the Florida Land and Water Adjudicatory
Commission.

The Role of the Regional Planning Agency

The regional planning agency's primary function is to review
the ADA, determine the positive and negative impacts of the

proposed development, and prepare a report and recommendations
for the local government, in accordance with the provisions of
Section 380.06(8), Florida Statutes. In addition, the regional

planning agency:

(1) assists the developer prior to the formal filing
of an ADA;
(2) reviews the proposed DRI in the context of regional
trends, including the aggregate impacts resulting
from this and other proposed development in the
region;

(3) determines and evaluates any subsidiary development
which will be generated by the proposed DRI;
(4) compares the proposed development to any adopted
regional plans or policies;
(5) develops a system for accumulating regional resource
data and a method for utilizing it in DRI reviews,
and for making it available to local governments and
developers;


7

hi













(6) reviews development orders for possible appeals
to the Florida Land and Water Adjudicatory Commis-
sion; and

(7) assists local governments in monitoring compliance
with Chapter 380.


The Role of Local Government

The local government with jurisdiction over the proposed

DRI performs the following functions:

(1) considers the report and recommendations of the
regional planning agency, as well as consistency of
the proposed DRI to local land development regu-
lations and the objectives of an adopted state land
development plan applicable to the area;

(2) provides for citizen participation through the DRI
public hearing;

(3) issues a development order and transmits it to the
developer, regional planning council and Division of
State Planning; and

(4) monitors and enforces compliance with the DRI
development order subsequent to its issuance.


The Role of the Division of State Planning

The functions of the Division of State Planning include:

(1) preparation and adoption of DRI forms and procedures;

(2) preparation of the state land development plan;

(3) monitoring of potential DRI's;

(4) monitoring of compliance with Chapter 380; and

(5) review of development orders for possible appeal
to the Florida Land and Water Adjudicatory
Commission.












PART I. APPLICATION INFORMATION AND INSTRUCTIONS

Questions 1 through 9 contain introductory information

relative to the intent, the applicant, the development and

permits.

Question 1. Statement of intent to undertake a develop-

ment of regional impact is as required by Section 380.06(6), F.S.

Questions 2, 3, & 4. Applicant information is important

so that communication can be facilitated during the review

process, and so that legal relationships are properly identified

for the purposes of accountability and enforcement.

Question 5. The applicant may refer to plat book and page

number, or utilize a metes and bounds description, but in every

case the description must include the section, township and

range. The description, while properly identifying the develop-

ment location, is also necessary for the local government to

properly advertise the public hearing as required by Section

380.06(7), Florida Statutes.

Question 6. Use Chapter 22F-2, Florida Administrative Code,

to identify each type of development of regional impact proposed,

and use the appropriate units found in that Chapter to define

the development size. The additional information requested for

a residential DRI is necessary to properly define the scope of

the project proposed.

Question 7. Pursuant to Section 380.06(4), F.S., any










developer may submit two types of questions to the Division of
State Planning. They are: (1) whether the proposed development
is a development of regional impact; and (2) if so, has the
development established vested rights (been grandfathered),
according to the criteria contained in Section 380.06(12), Florida
Statutes. If either type of binding letter has been requested
from and issued by the Division of State Planning, the informa-
tion must be submitted to assure that all reviewing agencies
have background information leading up to the DRI-ADA.
Question 8. This has reference to municipal and county
governments or combinations thereof, in the event that the
development crosses local jurisdictional lines.
Question 9. The intent of this question is to make the
applicant and reviewing agencies aware of future permits which
will be required and to consider the potential relationships
among them for future planning purposes. Early coordination
with subsequent review agencies may allow identification and
resolution of potential problems that could be resolved in the
initial planning stages of the proposed development.
Item 10. Instructions in the DRI-ADA are self-explanatory
and are not addressed in this Guidebook.







10



A.













PART II. GENERAL SECTION

Question 11. Maps

Graphic representation of existing and proposed conditions

is emphasized in the DRI-ADA for several reasons. Presentation

of certain types of information in graphic form can clearly

describe conditions with minimum narrative discussion; maps

simplify the process of making comparative evaluations of

information; and they can be effectively used as a reference

to interrelate narrative and statistical data provided else-

where in the DRI-ADA.

Scales for individual maps have not been specified in the

DRI-ADA so that the applicant and the reviewing agencies have

the flexibility to mutually agree upon scales which will be

most useful for planning and review purposes for the specific

development being considered.

It is suggested that the applicant contact the local and

regional agencies (see the Regional Planning Agency Map -

Appendix F), at the earliest possible time to agree upon scales

for the various maps. To the extent possible, Maps C, D, E,

F, G, and H should be of the same scale. The decision on scales

should consider available base data, the size of the proposed

development, the actual size of the maps which will result,

and the ability of the applicant to clearly show all necessary

information at the scale prescribed.













Some overlap of information will occur among the various

maps and the applicant should use a method of presentation

which emphasizes the specific map subject. The map require-

ments and instructions in the DRI-ADA are self-explanatory,

however, the following map chart in this guidebook provides

some sources of information for map preparation, a cross-

reference of specific DRI-ADA questions to specific maps, and

clarifying guidelines which should aid in the preparation and

review of the maps.

All maps should include a north arrow, date of preparation,

and revision dates when applicable.













Question 11. Map description and reference
Note: The project boundaries
should be illustrated on each


chart.
and major unit boundaries
map.


SUGGESTED SOURCES OF CROSS REFERENCE TO
MAP DATA AND BASE MAPS DRI-ADA QUESTIONS REMARKS
Fla. DOT General Highway
maps by county may be used
A General as a base map. These maps, Provide area information such as
Location for most counties, are proximity to municipalities,
available at a scale of county lines, major highways,
1" = 2 miles. See Appendix A and significant landmarks. Also
for further source informa- include Section, Township, and
tion. Range identification.

B Aerial Fla. DOT, USGS, or Delineate the project boundaries
Photography U.S. Dept. of Agriculture on the photographs. The appli-
have recent photography cant should also identify land
covering most areas of the features or planning details
state. Private photogram- that would be helpful in eval-
metric services are also uating the proposed development,
available. See Appendix B however, the photo should not be
for further source informa- used as a substitute for other
tion. maps.

C Topography U.S.G.S. Quadrangle Maps, Identify the project boundaries
USGS Flood Prone Area Maps, and delineate all significant
and HUD Flood Hazard natural and man-made features.
Boundary Maps are potential Include existing contours, water
sources of base information, bodies, drainage areas and
For some particular develop- patterns, flood prone areas,
ments or special areas, an buildings, roads, bridges, canals
on-site topographical survey water control structures, and
may be necessary. See other items which will help
Appendix C for further delineate existing surface
source information. conditions.


I


I~ I











SUGGESTED SOURCES OF CROSS REFERENCE TO
MAP DATA AND BASE MAPS DRI-ADA QUESTIONS REMARKS

D Existing The source of data for this Direct reference: Identify and classify the
Land Use map may be a combination of Questions 12-B, existing land uses in accordance
information from aerial 19-A, and 20-F. with the Florida Land Use And
photography, topographic Cover Classification System,
and vegetation maps, local Level II, (See Appendix D)
land use maps, and field
review.

E Soils The U.S.D.A. Soil Conserva- Direct reference: Identify the various soil types
tion Service is a potential Question 14-A found on the site and delineate
source for base information, the extent of each type in a
It may be necessary to obtain way that will facilitate com-
information through private prisons to other existing
sources when the SCS has not conditions and proposed land
undertaken soil surveys for uses. For certain types of
a particular area. See development, e.g., areas proposed
Appendix E for further source for percolation ponds, additional
information, detail or field data may be
necessary.

F Vegetation The source of data for this Direct Reference: Identify the vegetation types
Associations map may be a combination of Question 18-C existing on the site in accord-
information from aerial ance with the Florida Land Use
(types) photography, topographic and And Cover Classification System,
soils maps, and field review. Level III (Appendix D), and
delineate the area of coverage
for each type.

G Master The base map for these plans Direct Reference: These plans should generally
Drainage can be prepared primarily from Question 22-A, and identify and delineate all
Plans the preceding map information, 22-B. existing and proposed drainage
however some information from features and areas. Sufficient
the master development plan relates to: Questions detail should be provided, to
should also be included for 15, 16, and 17. evaluate the adequacy of the
clarity, system and make sound planning
decisions.


I - -------------- --------- ----------------------------- -------------p~- I


I




-~ J decisons* 1


SUGGESTED SOURCES OF CROSS REFERENCE TO
MAP DATA AND BASE MAPS DRI-ADA QUESTIONS REMARKS

H Master The base map for this plan Direct reference: This plan should illustrate the
Development should include the project Questions 12-A, 12-B, proposed development from a
Plan boundaries. Data sources 20-F, 23-C, 27-A, 28, conceptual standpoint and should
include information from other 29, 30, and 32-F. include sufficient detail to
maps as necessary to clarify provide an understanding of the
the proposed plan of proposed progression of develop-
development. ment as well as the final develop-
ment configuration. This plan
should be a product of all
factors considered in the DRI-
ADA process.
The base map may be a Fla. DOT
I Service General Highway Map by county, Relates to:
Areas or a general map obtained through Questions 21, 22, Delineate the project boundaries,
the local government or private 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, identify the existing public
source. The information 28, 29, and 30. facilities and services that
included on this map should be relate to the development, and
compiled primarily from local show the service areas as they
government data sources. See relate to the proposed project.
Appendices A & F for detailed
source information.

J Highway The base map might be a Fla. DOT Direct Reference:
and General Highway Map by county, Question 31-A, This map will show the existing
Transportation a local government major and 31-E. highway and transportation network.
Network thoroughfare map, or other It will become the base for a more
appropriate street or highway detailed series of maps as speci-
map. Information regarding fied in Questions 31-A and 31-E.
existing state and local highway
and transportation systems should
be included. See Appendices A & F
for detailed source information,




- -


Question 12. General Project Description

12-A. This question is intended to provide a concise

description of the proposed development as it appears on the

Master Development Plan (Map H), in terms of type, size, phasing,

buildout and general overview for all persons reviewing the

application. This section should provide a general understanding

of the proposed development and establish a common frame of

reference for the detailed information that follows in other

sections of the DRI-ADA. This should be one of the last sections

to be finalized because it extracts and summarizes information

from the maps and other sections of the DRI-ADA.

12-B. This information, in chart form, is intended to show

the rate of change from existing land uses (Map D) to those

provided for by the Master Development Plan (Map H). It will

help.reviewing agencies understand the progression of change by

land use and cover type that is expected to take place. It is

the intent to establish the progression of change by phase;

however, for developments with an expected buildout of less than

10 years, annual or biennial descriptions will be more

appropriate. (See Map H instructions in the DRI-ADA form).

Utilization of the Florida Land Use and Cover Classification

System here (see Appendix D), and in other sections of the

DRI-ADA, will provide a basis for uniform comparison of

information from various sources.



13



I.













12-C. This discussion will allow the applicant to demon-

strate that sufficient consideration has been given to the

compatibility of the type of development proposed to particular

site characteristics, and that sufficient expertise has been

utilized in the applicant's planning process. It is not the

intent to impose a particular method of process; however,

communication between the applicant and reviewing agencies

regarding methodology is encouraged at the earliest possible

time in the planning process. The information provided here

should be general because identification of all methodologies,

models, assumptions and standards is to be included in various

sections of the application in accordance with Instruction 10-J

of the DRI-ADA form.


Question 13. Environment and Natural Resources: Air

13-A. The intent of this question is to identify potential

air pollution sources, and to quantify the emissions by type and

by weight. The unit of measurement requested, i.e., pounds per

day, is compatible with that used by the Department of Environ-

mental Regulation in their air pollution permit procedures and

provides the information needed to determine what effect the

emissions will have on existing air quality. Ambient air quality

data, frequently expressed in parts per million, is not requested

from the applicant because the important factor to be established

is whether this proposed development will contain any significant



14

Ki


L












sources of air pollution, regardless of the existing air quality.

The regional planning agency, in reviewing the proposed develop-

ment, should consider all emissions; however, in areas where

concentrated air quality problems exist, the projected emissions

may become more significant. The regional planning agency should

gather ambient air quality data from federal, state and local

agencies especially for those areas where air quality is

considered to be a problem, so that they can determine the degree

of adverse impact.

13-B. The Department of Environmental Regulation has two

types of air pollution permits: (1) a stationary source permit,

and (2) a complex source permit. A stationary source of air

pollution is one that can be specifically identified and the

emission data should adapt well to tabulation on the chart in

Question 13-A of the DRI-ADA. On the other hand a complex source

of air pollution has many variables and cannot be as clearly

identified. For example, a complex source of air pollution might

be a large parking lot where automobiles generate the emissions

and where the generation rate will vary from day to day and hour

to hour. This type emission data does not adapt easily to tabu-

lation on the chart in 13-A of the DRI-ADA, and therefore the

preparation of the complex source permit may be the most practical

and meaningful method of reporting.

It is not intended that air pollution permits be issued by













the Department of Environmental Regulation prior to the sub-

mission of the DRI-ADA, however it is suggested that the

applicant be in contact with them and be familiar with their

permitting procedures and requirements, particularly Chapter 17-2

and 17-4, Rules of the Department of Environmental Regulation

(formerly Department of Pollution Control).

13-C. This question will allow the applicant to discuss

and explain any proposed plans for controlling or reducing air

emissions resulting from this proposed development. If the

emissions reported in 12-A or 13-B have been adjusted relative

to these planned controls, explanation of these adjustments

should be provided in response to this question.


Question 14. Environment and Natural Resources: Land

14-A. This question is directly correlated with the Soils

Map (Map E), which identifies and delineates the soil types

found on the development site. The intent of this question is

to describe the properties and characteristics of the soil

types identified. The chart provided for this purpose is compati-

ble with information contained in U.S.D.A. Soil Conservation

Service published soil surveys. The SCS District Conservationist

is the appropriate person to contact for the soil survey informa-

tion, and Appendix E of this Guidebook contains information,

including addresses, for contacting the Soil Conservation Service.












When available, SCS information should be used, however, other

methods of reporting are acceptable, provided (1) the information

is no less detailed than that found in the published surveys,

(2) the methodology is clearly explained, and (3) the terminology

is well defined. The information reported should be in sufficient

detail to identify potential planning and design problem areas,

and although it is not necessary at this time to include informa-

tion in sufficient detail to undertake final site planning and

design, the applicant may provide such information if it is

available. The format provided should not be considered limiting

if additional or more detailed soils information is available.

The resource information provided on the soils map and chart

interrelates with many other questions in the DRI-ADA, e.g.,

15 (Water), 16 (Wetlands), 18 (Vegetation and Wildlife), 22

(Drainage), and 24 (Solid Waste). The significance of the

interrelationship will vary depending on the existing natural

conditions or the type of facility proposed. However, the

applicant and the reviewing agencies should consider both

potential positive and negative relationships in their respective

planning and review procedures.

14-B. When there are soil limitations the applicant is

asked to do additional study in determining how that problem

will be overcome. This question could be answered with a

general discussion of several alternate solutions and a specific



17













and detailed discussion of a particular solution. This provides

the applicant with an opportunity to discuss how soils informa-

tion,.and particularly information on soil limitations, has

been utilized in the site planning process. The regional planning

agency's comments will relate to regional impacts and the appli-

cant should be aware that other specific state and local reviews

will be made prior to issuing specific permits.

Where there are very severe, severe, or moderate soil

limitations and the applicant is using an SCS published soil

survey as a source of information, the limitation terminology

will be defined by the soil survey. If the applicant is using

another source of information, it is important that the method-

ology and terminology be consistent with that used in the

answer to 14-A of the DRI-ADA.

It is also important to understand the difference between

limitations and suitability. Published information from the

Soil Conservation Service states that "These (limitation) ratings

do not necessarily indicate suitability, because most soils can

be made suitable for many uses if their limitations or hazards

are overcome. The ratings do show the degree or intensity of

the problems that require solution before the soils can be used

for the purpose indicated. Many soils that have severe limita-

tions for a specified use can be made suitable for that use,

if it is feasible to apply the intensive management needed to












overcome limitations." (Emphasis added). Therefore, the appli-

cant and the reviewing agencies should consider the intensity

and desirability of site alterations needed to overcome any

Lng limitations and the relationship of these alterations with other
natural systems.

14-C. The applicant should undertake sufficient study to

determine if significant mineral deposits exist since it may no

longer be practical to recover mineral resources after develop-

ment has occurred. If they do exist, and extraction is proposed,

provisions should be made in the overall planning process to

accommodate the removal, and responses to other questions in

the DRI-ADA should reflect these accommodations.

14-D. This question is intended to elicit a discussion of

the procedures, methods, and controls which will be used to

minimize erosion. This question does not require final clearing

or grading plans; however, the manner in which these major site

alterations take place could have a significant effect on erosion.

Therefore, the proposed approach to clearing and grading deserves

comment. The various soil types identified in 14-A of the

DRI-ADA may have differing erosion potential characteristics

and this factor should be considered. This question closely

relates to Questions 13 (Air), 15 (Water), and 22 (Drainage) of

the DRI-ADA and the information should be coordinated closely.

The regional planning agency will review the impact of soil













erosion from a regional standpoint, and the applicant should be

aware that many local governments have requirements relative to

erosion control. The information provided in the DRI-ADA will

not necessarily be to the level of detail necessary to obtain

local permits.

14-E. The intent of this question is for the applicant to

identify any unusual ground and subsurface characteristics in

the development area, and to discuss how these characteristics

relate to the proposed plan. This question interrelates with

the general discussion in 12-C, and also with the more specific

discussion in Questions 15 (Water), 16 (Wetlands), 17 (Flood

Plain) and 18 (Vegetation and Wildlife). The regional planning

agency will also use the information while evaluating other

questions in the ADA, e.g., Questions 21 (Wastewater Management),

22 (Drainage), 23 (Water Supply) and 24 (Solid Waste) in the

Public Facilities Section. The-Department of Natural Resources,

Division of Resource Management, Bureau of Geology may have

information available that would be helpful in answering this

question. Appendix J contains information and the address for

contacting them.


Question 15. Environment and Natural Resources: Water

15-A. To adequately examine water related issues it is

necessary to establish a data base relative to existing ground


--












and surface water distribution and flow. Consequently, informa-

tion which should be provided by the applicant includes: the

names of creeks, streams, and rivers flowing to and from the

development area, the direction of flow, and the quantity of flow;

the names of ponds, lakes, and retention areas associated with

the development area, and the .quantity of water storage area

presently available; the name of the aquifer over which the

development is proposed, the direction of lateral groundwater

movement, and the recharge characteristics in the area; and

information relating to the water table not covered elsewhere

in the DRI-ADA. This information relates to the discussion of

geologic features in 14-E and should also be closely coordinated

with Questions 14 (Land), 16 (Wetlands) and 17 (Flood plains).

The data base established by this question will be used

extensively by the regional planning agency in their review of

the Public Facilities Section of the DRI-ADA, particularly for

Questions 21 (Wastewater Management), 22 (Drainage), 23 (Water

Supply), and 24 (Solid Waste). The Water Management District

Offices and the Department of Natural Resources, Division of

Resource Management, Bureau of Geology may have water resource

information available that would be helpful in answering this

question, and Appendices G and J of this Guidebook contain

information and addresses for contacting them.

15-B. The intent of this question is to establish a data













base for existing quality of ground and surface water that will

be affected by this development. The water systems identified

in 15-A.of the DRI-ADA should have identified the primary systems

which should be discussed as to water quality. The data base

established by this question will be used extensively by the

regional planning agency in their review of the Public Facilities

Section of the DRI-ADA, particularly for Questions 21 (Wastewater

Management), 22 (Drainage), 23 (Water Supply), and 24 (Solid

Waste). Therefore, the description of existing water quality

should be expressed in parameters that will be compatible with

those used in the applicable questions in the Public Facilities

Section (such as water supply, wastewater treatment, and storm

water disposal) so that meaningful comparisons can be made.

Choice of specific parameters should be decided after consulta-

tion with 'the regional planning agency. The Department of

Environmental Regulation District Offices may have water quality

information available that would be helpful in answering this

question. Appendix H of this Guidebook contains information

and addresses for contacting them.

The regional planning agency will review the impact of the

proposed development on water quality from a regional perspective.

However, it is important to recognize that base data on water

quality may not be readily available, or may require extended

seasonal testing. Such information may be required at a later


r












date during water quality permitting. Therefore, the regional

planning agency should make its review consistent with, but

not necessarily at the same level of detail, as other existing

local, state and federal water quality permitting programs.


Question 16. Environment and Natural Resources: Wetlands

16-A. The intent of this question is to determine the

acreage of fresh or salt water swamp or marsh within the develop-

ment boundaries. Note that in accordance with the Florida Land

Use and Cover Classification System, wetlands can be characterized

by vegetative communities or soil types, as well as by inundation

or saturation. (See Appendix I for the detailed Wetlands

definition). Information reported on Map D and on the land use

chart in 12-B correlates directly with the information to be

reported in this question. The information should also be

coordinated with Questions 15 (Water) and 17 (Flood Plains). The

data base established by this question will be used extensively

by the regional planning agency in their review of the Public

Facilities Section of the DRI-ADA, particularly for Questions k

(Wastewater Management), 22 (Drainage), 23 (Water Supply),

24 (Solid Waste), and 27 (Recreation and Open Space). The Water

Management District Offices, the Department of Environmental

Regulation District Offices, and the Department of Natural

I Resources may have information available that would be helpful

in answering this question. The Florida Game and Fresh Water













Fish Commission does not have published information available

with regard to wetlands, however they can assist in delineating

wetlands and assessing their relative values for fish and wild-

life and they can assist the regional planning agencies in

evaluating this aspect of the ADA. Appendices G, H, and J of

this Guidebook contain information and addresses for contacting

the appropriate offices.

16-B. The land use chart developed for Question 12-B will

provide a source of information for this response. The applicant

should consider the potential effects of alterations, which could

include filling, dredging, drainage, underdraining, flooding,

changing vegetation, etc. The regional planning agency should

compare the effects of proposed alterations on the resource

systems of the area, such as water, drainage, wildlife and

vegetation, in evaluating potential positive or negative impacts.

The information should also be related to the Public Facilities

Section of the DRI-ADA as discussed in 16-A above, of the

Guidebook.

16-C. It is intended that the applicant identify the

location and size of wetland areas that will be preserved in their

natural state. A comparison of Map D (Existing Land Use) and

Map H (Master Development Plan) as well as an evaluation of the

land use chart developed for Question 12-B should provide a source

of data for this response. The discussion of the approach to be




~-q


used in preserving these wetland areas should be in sufficient

detail to demonstrate that the method will be effective.

Ecological function of the wetlands to be preserved and the

potential effectiveness of the applicant's method of preservation

should be.considered by the regional planning agency in assessing

the positive and negative impacts.


Question 17. Environment and Natural Resources: Flood Plains

17-A. The National Flood Insurance Act of 1968 as amended

requires HUD to publish information on known flood-prone

communities and to notify them of their tentative identification

as such, following which the community must either make prompt

application for participation in the flood insurance program or

satisfy the Secretary (HUD) that it is no longer flood-prone.

The Federal Insurance Administration, under HUD, has taken on

the responsibility of identifying flood hazard areas. When a

community participates in the National Flood Insurance Program,

it is furnished with Flood Hazard Boundary Maps which identify

the 100-year flood prone areas. When these maps are available,

they are a primary source of data to respond to Question 17-A

(Flood Plains) of the DRI-ADA. These maps will be available

more frequently for urbanized areas than for rural areas. When

available, these maps should also be used as a source of data

for Map C (Topography) and the information should be closely

coordinated with Questions 15 (Water) and 16 (Wetlands) of the



25












DRI-ADA. Appendix K of this Guidebook contains information for

contacting the Federal Insurance Administration. In areas

where HUD Flood Hazard Boundary Maps are not yet available, other

information sources may include USGS Flood Prone Area Maps,

water management district maps, etc.

The National Flood Insurance Act does not prohibit develop-

ment of land within identified flood hazard areas, but if

developed, structures must be insured and plans reviewed to

accomplish a minimum of damage if floods do occur. Quite often

potential flood problems can be identified and overcome early in

the planning process, with substantial savings to the developer,

the homeowner, and the governmental agencies responsible for

providing extensive public improvements and disaster relief.

Therefore, if any development is proposed within the 100-year

flood prone area, the applicant should provide sufficient informa-

tion relative to floor elevations and methods to be used to

compensate for the potential flood hazard for the regional

planning agency to evaluate the potential effectiveness of the

controls. They will also use the flood prone area information in

their reviews of the Public Facilities Section of the DRI-ADA,

particularly for Questions 21 (Wastewater Management), 22

(Drainage), 23 (Water Supply) and 24 (Solid Waste).

17-B. If communities having identified flood prone areas

do not participate in the flood insurance program, they may be













denied federally related financing for any development within

the identified areas. As a condition for participation in the

Flood Insurance Program, communities must develop and implement

certain minimum land use controls. These controls will provide

the basis for final construction permits within any flood prone

area. Therefore, the applicant should contact the local govern-

ment with jurisdiction in regard to any such regulations, prior

to undertaking major planning and design efforts.


Question 18. Environment and Natural Resources: Vegetation and
Wildlife


18-A. This question adds to the basic resource data being

collected and is intended to give a better understanding of the

character of the undeveloped site. Discussion of Map F

(Vegetation types) is helpful in understanding the natural systems

found in the area, and when linked with other questions such

as 14 (Land), 15 (Water), 16 (Wetlands) and 17 (Flood Plains),

a better understanding of the overall ecosystem is achieved. ehe

applicant and reviewing agencies must continually look at the

interrelationships among all of the natural resource systems

to plan for, and evaluate, the effects of the total ecosystem.

18-B. There are several lists for rare and endangered

plant species. Appendix L of this Guidebook provides information

and addresses for obtaining the latest available lists.

Discussion of measures to be taken to protect rare and endangered













plant species should be related to open spaces and preservation

areas, which if proposed, should be shown on Map H (Master

Development Plan). The regional planning agency must consider

the proposed development within the framework of the regional

ecosystem when assessing impacts related to rare and endangered

plant species.

18-C. The vegetation type discussion in 18-A of the

DRI-ADA should be a helpful guide in determining what wildlife

is found on the site. Discussion of measures which will be

taken to protect wildlife on the site should relate to areas

proposed to remain natural and undisturbed, as shown on Map H

(Master Development Plan). The applicant should discuss the

ability of wildlife to adapt to changed conditions and make a

comparison of wildlife existing on the site with that which is

expected to exist on site upon completion of the development.

The Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, Bureau of Environmental

Protection offices can assist the regional planning agencies in

assessing the fish and wildlife impacts of a development and can

provide advice on special management steps which might be needed.

Appendix J of this Guidebook contains information for contacting

the appropriate office.

18-D. There are several lists for endangered and threatened

wildlife species. Appendix L of this guidebook provides informa-

tion and addresses for obtaining the latest available lists.












Since endangered or threatened wildlife species are of unique

concern, the discussion of measures proposed to protect them

should be more specific and detailed than that provided for

wildlife in general under Question 18-C.


Question 19. Environment and Natural Resources: Historical
and Archaeological Sites

19-A. These sites are significant because they are irre-

placeable. It is not the intent to require a historical or

archaeological survey for every development site, however the

applicant must submit documentation to demonstrate that sufficient

study was undertaken to determine whether or not any significant

sites exist. The Department of State, Division of Archives,

History and Records Management, is the appropriate agency to

contact regarding historical and archaeological information and

Appendix J of this Guidebook contains information, including the

address for contacting them.

19-B. If significant historical or archaeological sites

are found to exist, the applicant should provide details rega: -ng

their protection or preservation. It is not the intent that

access be provided to every site, however if this alternative

is chosen, it should be considered early in the planning process.

For some sites it may be appropriate to prohibit public access

until restoration or salvage operations are completed by an

officially designated organization.













Question 20. Economy: Employment and Economic Characteristics

The type development proposed, whether it be residential or

other type found in Part III of the DRI-ADA, will be a key

factor in responding to this question. The responses should

provide many indicators of the overall economic impact of the

development on the region.

20-A. The basic intent of this question is to estimate how

much money will be expended for construction, over what period

of time, for what specific purposes, and what portion will be

spent within the region. The expenditures are to be projected

by phase, as designated on Map H (Master Development Plan), and

on the Land Use Chart in Question 12-B of the DRI-ADA. This

information will establish a data base that relates to other

parts of Question 20 (Economy), e.g., 20-I which discusses

market conditions, 20-J which discusses tax yield, and 20-K

which discusses public facility costs. Information on the

number of construction employees will also be used in responding

to 20-C which discusses employment by income group.

20-B. For nonresidential developments there will be two

basic types of employees: (1) those employed during construction

of the development; and (2) those who will be employed within the

development upon completion. This question is concerned with the

number, type and total annual payroll of the latter group. It

is intended that the employment be reported at the end of each












phase and that the employment information be an aggregate of

any previous phases. The phasing should be that designated by

Map H (Master Development Plan) and the Land Use Chart in Question

12-B of the DRI-ADA. The Standard Industrial Classification

Manual is prepared by the Federal Office of Management and

Budget, and is available from .the Superintendent of Documents,

U. S. Government .Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 -

Stock #4101-0066 and will provide a common frame of reference for

reporting. This information establishes a data base that

relates to other parts of Question 20 (Economy), e.g., 20-C which

discusses employment by income groups, 20-D which discusses

specialized skills for permanent employees, and 20-E which

discusses where permanent employees will be drawn from. This

question also relates to Question 32 (Housing) with regard to

the number of dwelling units that might be needed to house

permanent employees. Information on seasonal employment is not

intended to identify minor fluctuations but rather relates to

those developments that have a definite identifiable season, e.g.,

a pari-mutuel racetrack.

20-C. Generally, one chart is required for all developments

to determine the number of construction employees and their

income level by phase. For nonresidential developments a second

.chart is also requested so that the temporary construction

employees will be readily identifiable from those persons who



31













find permanent employment in the development. This question

will provide information that directly relates to Question 32

(Housing) of the DRI-ADA with regard to the number and type of

dwelling units that may be needed. This information, in turn,

may have an effect on the response to Question 20-J which

discusses ad valorem taxes. The phase reporting should be

compatible with phases designated by Map H (Master Development

Plan) and the land use chart in Question 12-B. The salary

categories requested in the DRI-ADA are compatible to, and

derived from, the 1970 Census User's Guide. This tie to census

data should be valuable to the applicant and reviewing agencies

because of its broad base and interrelationship with other

socio-economic resource data.

In reviewing this question, the regional planning agency

should evaluate the impact of the proposed development on the

region's labor market and assess-the ability of employees to

find housing either within the development or in other areas

reasonably accessible to their place of employment.

20-D. This question, applicable only to nonresidential

developments, provides an opportunity to examine the potential

interrelationship with existing or proposed educational and

vocational programs within the region. For instance, if the

needed skill level does not exist in the region, can it be made

available by training persons now residing in the region, and


--












what impact will that have on educational facilities within the

region? This may relate to Question 26 (Education) of the

DRI-ADA. Or, if it is apparent that employees will have to be

drawn from outside the region, this should be referenced to

Question 20-E which discusses where employees will come from,

whether they have the needed skill level, and whether they need

training that can be provided within the region. Some compari-

sons can be made with previous questions, especially with regard

to income level, Question 20-C, and type of employment which

will become available, Question 20-B.

20-E. This question, applicable to only nonresidential

developments, examines the total work force situation and

provides an opportunity for the regional planning agency to

examine interrelationships regarding other various potential

impacts. For instance, will any in-migration create a need for

new housing, and will that in turn generate other spinoff

developments? These matters should be related to Question 32

(Housing). There are also other potential interrelationships to

be considered, e.g., Question 20-K which discusses public

facility costs; all of the public facility Questions 21 through

30; and Public Transportation Facilities (Question 31). The

applicant is asked to provide the actual data, and may project

* data into potential impact situations. However, it is the

responsibility of the regional planning agency to make final



33













impact assessments by considering the total scope of possible

impact interactions, projecting potential ancillary developments,

and commenting on both positive and negative aspects of the

development.

20-F. The intent of this question is to determine the

direct loss of agricultural or forestry resources and its effect

on the economy. However, it is also intended that the applicant

and the reviewing agencies recognize the numerous ties with other

sections of the DRI-ADA and the long range cumulative effects of

the loss of agricultural land. Some questions that interrelate

are: the rate of land use change (12-B), provision of open

space (Map H), preservation of natural areas and habitats (18),

erosion potential (14-D), storm water disposal (22), water

quality (15-B), water supply (23), and others. Thorough

consideration of this question early in the planning process

might reveal factors which could lead to modifications of planning

procedures relative to many matters other than economy.

20-G. This question applies to any development of regional

impact containing residential dwelling units and asks for an

estimation of the extent to which the development will be self-

sustaining in terms of employment opportunities, retail goods,

service facilities and amenities. The land use chart in Question

12-B will provide a source of this information and depending on

the diversity of land uses, there may be a significant effect on












the responses to Questions 21 through 30 (all of the public

facility sections), and Question 31 (Public Transportation

Facilities).

20-H. Governmental assistance may have a slight or a

significant effect on the regional economy, depending upon the

type of assistance received. Government assistance could

result in tax exempt structures, while on the other hand outside

money may be brought into the area. The applicant and the

reviewing agencies must have a thorough understanding of the

guidelines and conditions of the assisting agency to assume

conformance with the requirements and to evaluate the impact.

The regional planning agency will assess the impact in light of

the specific guidelines and conditions.

20-I. It is recognized that market studies, in many

instances, are considered confidential. However, the information

they contain is valuable in understanding the total economic

picture of the development area, as well as the relationship of

a specific development to the overall local and regional economy.

A matter of primary importance in this question is the potential

problem of overbuilding. It is not intended that the applicant

reveal the names of specific tenants, clients, customers, etc.,

but rather the intent of the question is to obtain a general

market study relating to market conditions, variables, and general

feasibility of the proposed development. The market study is an



35


Al













important part of the overall planning process, but is only a

part. All of the interrelationships must be considered by the

regional planning agency in assessing the total impact.

20-J. This question requires the applicant to analyze the

estimated average annual ad valorem tax yield by phase.

Sufficient detail should be included to show how the projections

were made and when the revenue would be realized by the local

government. It is suggested that the applicant contact

the local government and the regional planning agency before

beginning preparation of this response to agree upon an appro-

priate format. The regional planning agency will use the

capital improvement cost information from Question 20-K of the

DRI-ADA which shows the expenditures made necessary by the

proposed development. It will compare this information with the

estimated revenue yields in determining positive or negative

economic impacts. Depending on the type and size of the

development proposed, the applicant may choose to prepare a

more sophisticated analysis beyond the scope of that which is

requested. This could include estimated tax yields to different

levels of government from revenue sources other than ad valorem

taxes. These yields would be weighed against the various

necessary public outlays and expenditures. This may be worth-

while on very large projects to demonstrate a viable tax structure.

Should the applicant choose this course of action, it would be











the responsibility of the regional planning agency to review and

consider all these additional factors in making their final

impact assessment.

20-K. The intent of this question is for the applicant to

review and analyze the Public Facilities Questions (21 through 3n)

and the Public Transportation.Question (31) of the DRI-ADA and

determine what capital costs of these facilities will be borne

by the local government. The applicant may address any matters

which may offset the public costs. The regional planning agency

should consider all information submitted in reviewing the over-

all impact and when comparing this information to tax yield

information provided in Question 20-J of the DRI-ADA.

Question 21. Public Facilities: Waste Water Management

21-A. To respond to this question the applicant must

consider the housing section (32), if the proposed development

is primarily residential, and other specific sections in Part ITI

of the DRI-ADA if the proposed development is nonresidential or

is a multiple land use type development. The applicant should

provide supporting data on how the flow information was generated.

Characteristics of industrial or other effluent should be

expressed in parameters which will be compatible with those used

in the Natural Resource Questions (15, 16 and 17) and the Public

Facility Questions (22, 23, 24 and 25) of the DRI-ADA. Choice

of specific parameters should be decided after consultation with



37
i













the regional planning agency.

Peak flow generally will not be needed because the regional

planning agency will be assessing the impact on existing and

proposed sewage treatment facilities and will not be evaluating

the capacity of collection systems. However, state and local

agencies will need peak flow information at a later time to review

and approve the detailed sewer plans and to issue permits.

21-B. For on-site treatment and disposal, the applicant is

asked to provide information necessary for the regional planning

agency to adequately consider and evaluate the overall

suitability of the proposed system as it relates to the site, to

the type of development, and to any local or regional wastewater

treatment plans. The applicant is not asked to provide detailed

engineering plans, but it is suggested that contact be made

with the'appropriate Department of Environmental Regulation

District Office listed in Appendix H for any available planning

guidelines. This question also offers the opportunity to consider

the effects on surface and groundwater quality, Question 15.

Relating the facility capability to demand generated by phase is

useful in evaluating the system, as well as relating information

to other DRI-ADA questions. Identifying the agency or party

responsible for maintenance is important to assure that there

will be a continuous effort towards mitigation of adverse

impacts. Discussion of effluent disposal relates to surface and


__












ground water quality and availability, Questions 15 and 23.

Where spray irrigation is proposed, the soil data in combination

with the other requested information will be helpful in evaluating

the suitability of the site, (relates to Questions 14, 16, 17

and 18 of the DRI-ADA). The method of sludge treatment and

disposal may relate directly to air quality if burning is
proposed (see Question 13). It is important to recognize that
there are numerous potential interrelationships in this question

which are not specifically mentioned above. This discussion
merely provides some examples, and is not all encompassing.

21-C. Regarding septic tanks, the applicant is asked to
provide information necessary for the regional planning agency

to evaluate the effects on the natural systems, such as surface
and ground water (Question 15), and to evaluate the suitability
of the site especially with regard to soils and water table
(Question 14-A). The regional planning agency should also

consider the relationship of septic tanks to existing or planned

sewage treatment facilities in the region as a part of their
impact assessment.

21-D. This question is intended to assure that the agency
or firm proposed to provide service is given sufficient informa-

tion to assess the increase in sewage generation, so that
necessary capital improvements can be programmed in advance. The
regional planning agency will discuss the positive and negative


39



L.


r













impacts of this proposed service, including its relationship to 3

any existing or proposed regional system and competing demands

for existing or planned treatment capacity.


Question 22. Public Facilities: Drainage

22-A. It is intended that the applicant describe the

elements of the Master Drainage Plan (Map G) and discuss design

capacity criteria that will be used later when construction plan

preparation is begun. The response should address existing and

proposed drainage elements and the natural resource data from

previous questions of the DRI-ADA, e.g., 14 (Land), 15 (Water),

16 (Wetlands), 17 (Flood Plains) and 18 (Vegetation and Wildlife)

are items that should be used in determining what design criteria

will be appropriate for what portions of the system. All signifi-

cant elements of the system should be discussed in general terms.

It is not intended that the applicant include detailed engineering

plans of the local collection system. The regional planning

agency will review the information along with information found

in Question 22-C to determine the overall adequacy of the system

and the design criteria. It is not intended that construction

permits be issued prior to DRI-ADA submission. However, the

applicant should note that in some areas of the state there may

be other permitting requirements prior to construction of drainage 1

facilities. At a minimum the applicant should contact the

appropriate water management district to determine permitting








i

requirements for drainage systems. Appendix G of this Guidebook
contains information for contacting them.
22-B. The acreage figures pertinent to storm water disposal
will be based on conceptual plans and it is recognized that some
modification and revision may take place prior to final con-
struction approval by a local government. The information
requested supplements the information on the Master Drainage Plan
(Map G), and should be compared with the natural resource sections
of the DRI-ADA, particularly Questions 14 (Land), 15 (Water),
16 (Wetlands), 17 (Flood Plains), and 18 (Vegetation and Wildlife).
The regional planning agency will assess the impacts relative
to the total drainage areas and potential development within
them, and will compare proposed retention to anticipated runoff
(see Question 22-C) which can be expected as a result of the pro
posed impervious surfaces.
22-C. For this question, the resource data relative to
|existing volume and quality of runoff should be obtained from
Question 15 (Water) of the DRI-ADA. The phasing information
should be compatible with the information found on the Master
development Plan (Map H) and described in Question 12-B. The
intent is to demonstrate that adequate measures have been planned
Handle runoff as the development proceeds. The information
should relate to the resource data base established in Questions
(Land), 15 (Water), 16 (Wetlands), 17 (Flood Plains) and 18
(Vegetation and Wildlife). The specific parameters for water


41













quality and the units of measurement for volume should be

consistent with those used previously in Questions 15-B, 22-A

and 22-B. The regional planning agency will use this informa-

tion to evaluate the Master Drainage Plan (Map G) as it relates

to volume and quality of runoff.

22-D. Identifying the agency or party responsible for

maintenance is important to assure that there will be a contin-

uous effort towards mitigation of adverse impacts. This

information will give the regional planning agency an oppor-

tunity to discuss potential operation and maintenance programs

and thereby relate this to the overall impact assessment.


Question 23. Public Facilities: Water Supply

23-A. To respond to this question, the applicant must

consider the type of development proposed, whether it be

residential (refer to 32-Housing), nonresidential (refer to

specific sections of Part III of the DRI-ADA), or multiple land

use types. The applicant should generate the water demand from

the type of development proposed and provide the supporting data

on how the demand information was generated. Reporting by phase

will be helpful to the regional planning agency in comparing

water demands to water supply projections (reference should be

made to the phasing discussion in Question 12-A and the water

supply information in Question 23-B). Peak daily demand is not

requested because this is typically a consideration only in




42













final design plans for local water supply facilities and

distribution systems. However, if significant seasonal varia-

tions in water demand are anticipated, the developer should

discuss these variations including the'peak seasonal demand and

duration.

23-B. This question provides a basis of comparison for

water demands reported in Question 23-A with sources of water

supply reported here. This information provides data which is

valuable in reviewing the available water supply and should be

used by the regional planning agency in addressing potential

effects. The sources of supply by phase should be related to

the phasing and land use changes in Question 12-B, and also to

natural resource data established by Questions 14 (land), 15

(Water), 16 (Wetlands), 17 (Flood Plains), and 18 (Vegetation

and Wildlife). The proposed water sources should also be

considered in light of Public Facility questions such as 21

(Wastewater Management), 22 (Drainage), and 24 (Solid Waste).

The regional planning agency should consider whether, and the

extent to which, the proposed development will efficiently use or

unduly burden the water supply of the region.

23-C. Existing and proposed water wells are to be shown on

Map H (Master Development Plan) and the use of wells should be

related to the phasing on that Map and as discussed in Question

12-A. The water supply from wells can then be related to



43













Question 23-B of the DRI-ADA. For large wells, the diameter,

depth, and pumping rates should be provided for each well, and

if available, aquifer characteristics and pump test data should

be provided. If the use of individual dwelling unit wells is

proposed the data should be provided in a summary form, i.e.,

typical diameter, typical depth, average pumping rates, general

location, and approximate number proposed. Any plans for phasing

out individual wells should be related to the overall phasing

of the project. When proposing the use of wells the applicant

should consider the natural resource data established in Questions

14 through 18. In their review, the regional planning agency

should consider the natural resource data mentioned above as

well as Public Facility Questions such as 21 (Wastewater Manage-

ment), 22 (Drainage), and 24 (Solid Waste). Comparisons should

also be made with regard to withdrawal rates versus available water

supply as projected through the overall development build-out.

The applicant should contact the appropriate water management

district to determine permitting requirements for water supply,

Appendix G of this Guidebook contains information for contacting

the Water Management Districts.

23-D. Identification of the party responsible to operate

and maintain the internal water system is important to assure

that there will be a continuous effort towards mitigation of

adverse impacts. Both positive and negative aspects will be

considered by the regional planning agency in its impact assess-

ment.












23-E. This question is intended to assure that the agency

or firm proposed to provide service is given sufficient infor-

mation to assess the increase in water consumption, so that

necessary capital improvements can be programmed in advance.

The regional planning agency will discuss the positive and

negative impacts of this proposed service, including its rela-

ig tionship to any existing or proposed regional system and competing
demands for existing or planned water supply sources.

23-F. This question relates to Question 30 on fire protection

ns as well as Question 23-B on sources of water. The applicant must

consider the specific type of development proposed. Some

examples of considerations are: will there be a high-rise

building; will there be special hazards such as chemicals used

in a particular industrial development; if the development is,

ter or includes an airport, are there special safety requirements?

The regional planning agency will evaluate this information as

it relates to water availability and source. Local governments

should recognize that this subsection might disclose an important

positive or negative local impact and they must carefully

evaluate that impact.


Question 24. Public Facilities: Solid Waste

24-A. Solid waste includes such items as garbage, trash,

rubbish, and junk. The applicant must consider the type develop-

ment proposed, i.e., whether it be residential (refer to













32-Housing) nonresidential (refer to specific sections of

Part III of the DRI-ADA), or multiple land use types, in order

to establish a basis for projecting the volumes of solid waste

expected to be generated. The supporting data for projecting

the volumes should be provided. This information, utilizing

the phasing discussion in Question 12-A, will be used by the

regional planning agency in evaluating the effects on natural

resource data report in Questions 14 (Land), 15 (Water), 16

(Wetlands), 17 (Flood Plains) and 18 (Vegetation and Wildlife).

The projection at the end of each phase should be an aggregate

of previous phases so that the regional planning agency can address

the progression of impacts. The Department of Environmental

Regulation may have information available that would be helpful

in developing generation rate data for solid waste. Appendix H

of this Guidebook contains information for contacting them.

24-B. When on-site solid waste disposal is proposed the

applicant is requested to provide additional information about

the operation. The applicant is not asked to provide engineering

details at this time, but it is suggested that contact be made

with the appropriate Department of Environmental Regulation

District Office for planning and design guidelines which may be

available. Sub-parts (1) through (4) of this question relates

to natural resource data established in Questions 14 (Land),

15 (Water), 16 (Wetlands), 17 (Flood Plains), and 18 (Vegetation




m -~


and Wildlife) of the DRI-ADA. These sub-parts also relate to

Public Facility Questions 22 (Drainage), and 23 (Water Supply).

Sub-part (5) of this question provides for identification of

the party responsible for operation and maintenance of the solid

waste disposal facility. This is important to assure that

there will be a continuous effort towards mitigation of adverse

impacts. The regional planning agency should determine whether

the operation is compatible with surrounding land uses, natural

resource systems of the area, and any regional solid waste

disposal plans.

24-C. This question is intended to assure that the agency
or firm proposed to provide service is given sufficient infor-

mation to assess the increase in solid waste generation, so that

necessary capital improvements can be programmed in advance.

The regional planning agency will discuss the positive and

negative impacts of this proposed service, including its rela-

tionship to any existing or proposed regional operation and

competing demands for existing or planned solid waste disposal

operations.

Question 25. Public Facilities: Energy Supply

25-A. The proposed type and scope of development, i.e.,
whether it be residential (refer to 32-Housing), nonresidential

(refer to specific sections of Part III of the DRI-ADA), or

multiple land use types, must be considered by the applicant to





47













determine what demand for energy will exist at the end of each

phase of development, as defined by Map H (Master Development

Plan) and the phasing discussion in Question 12-A. Peak hour

demand is required for electrical power because electrical gener-

ating facilities must be designed for peak loads. On a practical

level, lack of storage capability sets electrical facilities

apart from each other types of public facilities. Depending on

the types of energy sources proposed, the regional planning

agency will have to consider effects on various natural resource

systems, i.e., Questions 14 (Land), 15 (Water), 16 (Wetlands),

17 (Flood Plains), and 18 (Vegetation and Wildlife), economic

factors (Question 20-K) related to capital outlay, and Question

23 (Water Supply) in determining the overall impact.

25-B. Generally, this question will relate most often to

emergency generating facilities, which are frequently found in

conjunction with hospitals, shopping centers, and other types

of developments that require a continuity of service. If the

purpose of an on-site electrical generating facility is to

provide more than emergency service, the regional planning agency

should assess the impact of the facility as it relates to other

facilities serving the region.

25-C. This question is intended to assure that the agency

or firm proposed to provide service is given sufficient informa-

tion to assess the increase in electricity demand, so that












necessary capital improvements can be programmed in advance.

The regional planning agency will discuss the positive and nega-

tive impacts of this proposed service, including its relationship

to any existing or proposed regional network and competing

demands for existing or planned generation capability.

25-D. This question offers an opportunity for the applicant

to explore and report on any energy conservation considerations,

e.g., reduced needs or more efficient use, which have been or will

be incorporated into the planning process. These considerations

might relate to energy demands, transportation, housing, multiple

land uses, waste water disposal, water supply and others. This

question is not limited to site planning considerations, but

also asks for provisions which are contemplated for design and

construction of the development, e.g., provisions which will

affect later decisions between the developer and his builders.

Discussion of specific examples is encouraged.

25-E. This question differs from 25-D in that it offers the
opportunity to discuss alternate energy sources, as opposed to

conservation methods. New and technologically advanced systems

may be discussed and comparisons should be made with commonly used

systems. Discussion of specific examples is encouraged. The

regional planning agency will consider whether the applicant has

Undertaken sufficient study of these potential alternatives and

determine the positive or negative impacts of such systems.



49



L













Question 26. Public Facilities: Education

26-A. The applicant must consider housing characteristics

(refer to Question 32-Housing, of the DRI-ADA) of the proposed

development, and relate the information by phase of development

as defined by Map H (Master Development Plan) and the phasing

discussion in Question 12-A. The chart is set up so that the

applicant can generate the information by grade levels used by

the local school system. The phase information will be helpful

in understanding the progression of impacts, and there should be

consideration of Question 20-D, especially for projects with

extended buildout periods. The regional planning agency will

relate this information to the existing school system conditions

and evaluate the possible regional impacts. Local officials

should consider the potential fiscal impacts and implications

which should be discussed by the applicant in Question 20-K.

26-B. This question directly relates to demand figures

reported in 26-A, and provides the applicant an opportunity to

consider making school sites or facilities available to the local

school board. The intent is to encourage consideration of the

issue, but not to require site dedications in every case. The

regional planning agency will evaluate the direct and indirect

impacts relative to this subsection in terms of efficient use or

undue burden on existing and proposed school facilities.

26-C. The intent of this subsection is to insure that the

local school board is aware of the proposed development so that













they can make appropriate consideration of it in their capital

improvement program. For example, there is an opportunity to

project possible increased tax revenues (refer to Question 20-J)

and compare them with the projected capital improvement require-

ments and operating costs resulting from the development.


Question 27. Public Facilities: Recreation and Open Space

27-A. The applicant is required to provide information

relative to the recreational facilities and open space proposed

on site. This information must also be related to Map H (Master

Development Plan) and to the existing natural conditions,

Questions 13 through 18 of the DRI-ADA, in the areas proposed

for this type of development. The regional planning agency will

evaluate'the impact of the proposed facilities, as well as

determine the adequacy of the facilities from a regional stand-

point in meeting the needs of the residents in the area.

27-B. Many times the public does have access to undeveloped

private lands for fishing, hunting, and other activities. If

this is the case the applicant should discuss these existing con-

ditions. It is understood that private lands may be made

unavailable to the public at any time, and the discussion must

be considered in this light by reviewers. The regional planning

agency will use this information in conjunction with natural

resource questions 13 through 18 of the DRI-ADA in assessing

positive and negative impacts.













27-C. Information relative to the dedication of parks and

open space to specific agencies relates to Question 20-K, and

will help the regional planning agency assess any impacts as

they relate to any regional recreation and open space plans

and programs. Identification of the party responsible for

maintenance is important to assure that there will be a continuous

effort towards mitigation of adverse impacts.


Question 28. Public Facilities: Health Care

This information will be used by the regional planning agency

in directly evaluating the impact of the proposed facilities, as

well as in determining the adequacy of the facilities from a

regional standpoint in meeting the health care needs of the

residents in the area. Local officials should consider the

potential fiscal impacts and implications which should be dis-

cussed by the applicant in Question 20-K.


Question 29. Public Facilities: Police

This information will be used by the regional planning agency

in directly evaluating the impact of the proposed facilities as

well as in determining the adequacy of the proposed police

services and facilities from a regional standpoint in meeting the

needs of the residents in the area. The applicant should include

information relative to any private or public security systems

which are proposed.




r --







Question 30. Public Facilities: Fire

This information will be used by the regional planning

agency in directly evaluating the impact of the proposed facil-

ities, as well as in determining the adequacy of the facilities

from a regional standpoint in meeting the needs of the residents

in the area. The applicant should coordinate the information in

Question 23-F with this response.


Question 31. Public Transportation Facilities: Transportation
Considerations

In this section of the DRI-ADA, it is intended that the

applicant make a thorough transportation analysis to a level of

detail that results in an assessment of impact of the proposed

development on the existing transportation network. Transporta-

tion will also have an effect on natural resource sections of

the DRI-ADA, i.e., Questions 13 (Air), 14 (Land), 15 (Water),

16 (Wetlands), 17 (Flood Plains), 18 (Vegetation and Wildlife),

and 19 (Historical and Archaeological Sites). The applicant

should consider the potential effects on these systems, however,

the regional planning agency will be responsible to assess the

impact on these resources. Map J (Highway and Transportation

Network) is an important tool in presenting the information

requested in this section and specific subparts of Question 31

provide instructions as to how this map should be used. The

primary impact area should be determined in consultation with














the regional planning agency and local government. This area

will be delineated on Map J, and is the key area for which

transportation data should be reported. The applicant and the

regional planning agency should give consideration to all existing

and proposed developments within this area when addressing the

transportation section. The District Offices of the Florida

Department of Transportation may have traffic data available

that would be helpful in completing DRI application,and Appendix

A of this Guidebook contains information and addresses for con-

tacting them. Local governments may also have information avail-

able in the form of Urban Area Transportation Studies, Major

Thoroughfare Plans, Public Transit Plans, etc. and early contact

with them regarding transportation matters is suggested. It is

not intended that final engineering plans be prepared prior to

submitting the DRI-ADA, however, it is intended that data sub-

mitted with the DRI-ADA be to a level of detail sufficient to

begin preparation of transportation facility construction plans,

e.g., turning movements for intersections should be known, but

actual intersection design is not required. The following

outline describes the basic information requirements for the

subparts of Question 31 (Public Transportation Facilities) in the

sequence requested: (a specific discussion of each subpart

follows this general section).

(A) Existing Highway Network conditions.


m w




r








(B) Projections of traffic increases on the existing
network that are expected from sources other than
the development proposed in this DRI-ADA.

(C) Projections of traffic expected to be generated
by the proposed development. .... .

(D) An estimate of the internal/external split of
the traffic projections for this proposed
development.

(E) Assign the trips expected to be generated by this
proposed development and show traffic increases
which are expected from other sources to determine
the expected resultant network conditions.

(F) Describe highway network modifications which will
be necessary as a result of the expected total
traffic increase.

(G) Describe any plans .for public transit or other
means of moving people which will alleviate highway
network pressures.

The entire Transportation Section is to be reported within

the phasing framework as defined by Map H (Master Development

Plan) and discussed in Question 12-A. This reporting by phase

provides a basis for interrelating information within the Public

Transportation Facilities Section (Question 31), as well as

with other questions in the DRI-ADA. Information reported at

the end of each phase is to be an aggregate of information for

all previous phases. This method of reporting will provide an

understanding of the rate of change and will be helpful in

evaluating the progression of impacts.

31-A. The existing highway transportation network within

the primary impact area should be shown on Map J. The intent













of this question is for the applicant to use Map J as a base to

display data which describes existing traffic conditions on the

highway network. The type of information to be included is

thoroughly described in Question 31-A of the DRI-ADA. The

Florida Department of Transportation District Offices should be

the primary source of this data for primary and secondary roads.

Local government offices may have information available regarding

streets and roads other than state roads. The levels of service

and roadway capacities should be directly referenced to the

Highway Capacity Manual 1965. Copies of this manual can be

reviewed at the Florida Department of Transportation District

Offices and many local government traffic engineering offices.

The manual can be purchased from the Transportation Research

Board, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20418.

Any planned or programmed improvements or new facilities should

also be shown as a part of this data, and the agency letter of

current status is intended to confirm a realistic target date

for construction of the improvements or new facilities. The

information provided in response to this question will establish

the base for the entire transportation section, and particularly

for responding to Question 31-F which discusses future improve-

ments which may be necessary as a result of the proposed

development.

31-B. To respond to this question the applicant should

consider growth patterns and proposed development in the region.

56


R ~- -----f--- ..












Whatever method is used to project through traffic should be

clearly explained and all assumptions stated. In some areas the

Urban Area Transportation Study will provide a source of such

traffic projections." The Florida Department of Transportation

and local agencies should be consulted for any other available

projections and for anticipated regional growth trends. Local

and minor streets are not of primary importance in these projec-

tions unless they will become major or significant corridors in

the future transportation plan. Reporting by phase should be

in accordance with the method and for the reasons described in

the general section above. The information provided in response

to this question directly relates to Question 31-E where total

highway network loading will be addressed.

31-C. To project vehicle trips expected to be generated by

this proposed development, the applicant should consider the type

development proposed, whether it be residential (refer to Ques-

tion 32-Housing), nonresidential (refer to specific sections of

Part III of the DRI-ADA), or a multiple land use type development.

Reporting by phase should be in accordance with the method and

for the reasons described in the general section above. Discus-

sion of standards and assumptions used, i.e., trip generation

rates by land use type, modal split, persons per vehicle, etc.,

should include sufficient supporting data to assure reliability

so that the regional planning agency can evaluate the projections.




57
i














The information reported in response to this question directly

relates to Question 31-E, where total highway network loading

will be addressed, and to Question.31-F where future highway

improvements will be addressed.

31-D. This question provides an opportunity for the

applicant to explore the extent to which on-site development,

e.g., recreation facilities, shopping, employment, etc., will

capture trips generated by the development. To estimate internal/

external split, origin-destination determinations should be made

by the applicant. Information reported in Question 20-G, which

discusses needs and demands satisfied within the proposed develop-

ment should provide data that will be helpful in the response

to this Question. Reporting by phase should be in accordance

with the method and for the reasons described in the general sec-

tion above. Sufficient supporting data should be provided to

clearly demonstrate the reliability of the internal/external

split. Both average daily traffic and peak hour trips are requested

because both measurements are used frequently in highway trans-

portation planning. The external trip information generated in

this Question directly relates to Question 31-E, where trip

assignment to the highway network is discussed, and to Question

31-F where future highway improvements are discussed.

31-E. In this question the applicant is to assign all

traffic to the highway network by phase. Reporting by phase


_ _





r i


should be in accordance with the method and for the reasons

described in the general section above. To respond to this

question the applicant is to use Map J (Highway and Transportation

Network) as a base, and a separate map should be used for each

phase if necessary. The trips generated by the proposed develop-

ment are to be shown separately from the traffic not generated

by the proposed development. However, both factors should be

shown on the same base map for each phase. By reporting in this

manner the regional planning agency will have the ability to

compare traffic conditions if the development did not occur, to

traffic conditions if the development does occur, and the total

traffic loading of the network will also be clearly illustrated.

All of the data reported in Question 31-A through 31-F will be a

source of information for this response, and it will also be a

data base for the regional planning agency in evaluating the

impact. The response to this question directly relates to

Question 31-F which discusses future highway improvements.

31-F. Based on the projected traffic information which has

been built in the subparts of Question 31, the applicant is to

determine the adequacy of the highway network and determine what

improvements or additions may be needed as a result of the pro-

posed development. It is not intended to require final plans

for the improvements, however, it is intended that the applicant

clearly identify the specific areas where improvements will be




59













necessary and to provide sufficient information to determine

how extensive and costly these improvements will be. This ques-

tion directly relates to Question.20-K, which discusses public

facility improvement costs to local government. If the applicant

is proposing to assume certain costs, this fact should be stated.

The regional planning agency should evaluate the costs and suita-

bility of the improvements, as well as effects on the natural

resource systems mentioned in the general section above, in

assessing the overall impact of the proposed improvements. Ulti-

mately, the method and procedures by which any needed improvements

are to be accomplished should be specifically addressed in the

local development order.

31-G. This question may have an effect on the entire Public

Transportation Facility Section of the DRI-ADA. Plans for pro-

viding public transit, accommodating public transit, providing

methods for reducing private vehicle use, or providing facilities

for movement of people by means other than by private vehicle,

could reduce overall traffic projections. This in turn could

reduce need to improve highway facilities and thereby reduce

potential adverse impacts. This question interrelates to

Question 20-G, which discusses meeting needs and demands within

the proposed development. Transit systems, subsidies to transit

systems, bikeways, sidewalks, and car pool facilities are among

the type accommodations which could be provided. The regional













planning agency should assess the impact based on the accommoda-

tions proposed or lack thereof, and as to how these accommodations

fit into the regional transportation plans and needs, as well as

consider potential positive or negative effects on"the natural

resource systems mentioned in the general section above.


Question 32. Housing: Provision of Residential Units

This section of the DRI-ADA is to be completed if the proposed

development will contain any residential dwelling units. The

questions are designed to elicit housing characteristics from the

applicant, rather than requesting impact assessments. Housing

characteristics interrelate with many other questions in the

DRI-ADA, e.g., Natural Resources, Economy, Public Facilities and

Public Transportation Facilities. Because many standards and

assumptions will be developed from housing characteristics,

densities and ultimate population, the applicant should carefully

consider all potential interrelationships when preparing the

DRI-ADA. The regional planning agency should also consider

these interrelationships when determining whether the development

meets the housing needs of the region. Even if no residential

dwelling units are proposed, the regional planning agency should

consider whether or not the proposed development will favorably

or adversely affect the ability of people to findadequate housing,

reasonably accessible to their place of employment.













The entire Housing Section is to be reported within the

phasing framework as defined by Map H (Master Development Plan)

and discussed in Question 12-A. This reporting by phase provides

a basis for interrelating information within the Housing Section

(Question 32), as well as with other Questions in the DRI-ADA.

Information reported at the end of each phase is to be an aggre-

gate of information for all previous phases. This method of

reporting will provide an understanding of the rate of change and

will be helpful in evaluating the progression of impacts.

32-A. It is the intent of this question that the applicant

provide an overall picture of the types and quantities of

residential units that will ultimately be built within the proposed

development. The applicant will provide a separate chart for

each phase of development, in accordance with the methods and

for the reasons discussed in the general section above, and will

separate owner-occupied units from rental units. If the applicant's

program is land sales oriented, he is required to provide an

estimate of the types and quantities of residential units that

will ultimately be available within the proposed development.

The charts included in the DRI-ADA are self-explanatory, but

basically will show the price range, type, number of bedrooms,

and total number of units by phase. The rental unit chart will

provide the same information except it will be by rental range.

The ranges for both types of units are compatible to, and derived













from, the 1970 Census User's Guide and the information can there-

fore be compared to a broad range of census data. The regional

planning agency will compare this information to other data such

as: ultimate population, rate of change, progression of impact,

phasing of various public facilities, economic considerations

and transportation facilities. They will also use this informa-

tion in assessing the impacts on all natural resource systems.

The applicant should be continuously considering, revising, and

checking this information during the entire planning process.

The original development objectives, goals and parameters may be

directly affected by the original data developed for this ques-

tion, but as the applicant proceeds with planning, the DRI-ADA

process may reveal factors that render the original ideas unfeasi-

ble and would therefore indicate a need to review and modify.

32-B. The intent of this subsection is to determine if the

applicant's program is primarily oriented to land sales, and if

so, what will be the extent of improvements made prior to sales.

This question relates to Public Facilities sections of the

DRI-ADA and also with Question 20-K which discusses public facility

costs to the local government.

32-C. Market strategies must be flexible; however, when

they exist they can give insight into housing needs, particularly

as related to employment. An educated marketing prediction will

provide support to the development plan and will be valuable to

the regional planning agency in referring back to Questions 20-B,



63

J












20-C, and 20-E (regarding employment), 20-J (regarding taxes),

27 (Recreation and Open Space), 28 (Health Care), 31 (Transpor-

tation), and others.

32-D. This educated marketing prediction will again be

valuable to the regional planning agency in referring back to

Questions 20-B and 20-C (regarding employment), 20-E (regarding

in-migration), 20-J (regarding taxes), 20-D and 26 (regarding

education), 31 (Transportation), 32 (Housing) and other matters

of regional significance.

32-E. This question interrelates with Questions 32-C and

32-D above and provides further background on the type and scope

of the marketing program and the type of improvements planned.

If offering statements have been prepared, they may be submitted

with the DRI-ADA. The regional planning agency will use this

information primarily for comparisons and cross-references.

Information for contacting the Division of Florida Land Sales

and the HUD Office of Interstate Land Sales Registration is

attached to this Guidebook in Appendix J and it is suggested that

contact be made with them at an early point in the planning

process.

32-F. This information is basically a summarization of

information from Map H (Master Development Plan) and the chart

information reported in Question 32-A. It provides a convenient

method by which the applicant and the reviewing agencies can




i 64













interrelate density with various other areas of development by

phase. This is the only place in the ADA where density is

requested, and it is important that this conversion factor be

available since most local zoning and subdivision ordinances

relate to density.








































65












APPENDICES







APPENDIX A


FLORIDA DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION


SROSA rCip-ey
Chipley


* State Office U

* District Office


DISTRICT ONE BARTOW

Post Office Box 1249
801 N. Broadway Street
Bartow, Florida 33830

DISTRICT TWO LAKE CITY

Post Office Box 1089
South Marion Street
Lake City, Florida 32055

DISTRICT THREE CHIPLEY

Post Office Box 607
U.S. Highway 90
Chipley, Florida 32428

DISTRICT FOUR FT. LAUDERDALE


Post Office Box 22838
780 S.W. 24th Street
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

DISTRICT FIVE DELAND

719 South Boulevard
Post Office Box 47
Deland, Florida 32720

TALLAHASSEE OFFICE


605 S. Suwannee Street
Tallahassee, Florida


33315


../B


32304


A-1


1









APPENDIX B


Aerial photography is available for purchase through the
following offices:

1) State Topographic Office
Florida Department of Transportation
Haydon Burns Building
605 South Suwannee Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32304

(contact prints only)

2) National Cartographic Information Center
U. S. Geological Survey
12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
Reston, Virginia 22092

(coverage for portions of state various scales)

3) Eastern Aerial Photography Laboratory
Administrative Services Division
ASCS USDA
45 South French Broad Avenue
Ashville, North Carolina 28801

(coverage for most of state various scales)


B-i






APPENDIX C



Topographic information can be obtained from the following

mapswhich are available through the sources listed:


1. Quadrangle Maps (a state index is available free)

Branch of Distribution
U. S. Geological Survey
1200 South Eads Street
Arlington, Virginia 22202


2. U.S.G.S. Flood Prone Area Maps
U.S. Geological Survey
District Headquarters
325 John Knox Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32303


3. HUD Flood Hazard Boundary Maps
and Flood Insurance Rate Maps

Flood Insurance Division
Travelers Indemnity Company
1516 East Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32803
(305) 896-2001


C-l








APPENDIX D


This appendix is Section II of:
The Florida Land Use and Cover Classification System: A Technical Report
A copy of the full report may be obtained by writing:
Division of State Planning
Bureau of Comprehensive Planning
660 Apalachee Parkway
Tallahassee, Florida 32304

The land use and cover classification system was developed by a working
committee composed of representatives of state agencies. The system, organ-
ized by hierarchical levels of increasing specificity, is heavily based on
U.S. Geological Survey publications.l,2 Levels I and 11,3 the major concern
of this report, have been endorsed by state agency users. The outline for
Level III, primarily included because it aids in the understanding of Levels
I and II, has not been unequivocally endorsed but has proven to be of sub-
stantial value. While the system has been carefully designed to allow flexi-
bility for users, it will require some modification as user experience is
obtained.

The complete classification system for Levels I, II and III is outlined
in the following pages. Thereafter follow definitions for Levels I and II.



Important Note: All appendices cited
in the footnotes of the following 6
pages (D-2 through D-7), refer to the
Technical Report appendices and not to
those contained in this Guidebook.














1James R. Anderson, Ernest E. Hardy, and John T. Roach, A Land-Use
Classification System for Use with Remote-Sensor Data, Washington: U.S.
Department of Interior, 1972.

2James R. Anderson, Ernest E. Hardy, John T. Roach, and Richard E. Wit-
mer, A Land and Land Cover Classification System for Use with Remote-Sensor
Data, Reston, U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 964 (in press)

3See Section I for a discussion of levels of classification.





D-1









FLORIDA LAND USE AND COVER CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM


Level II


Level III


100 Urban or Built-up


110 Residential


120 Commercial and
Services


111 Single Unit, Low Density (less than 2 DUPA*)
112 Single Unit, Medium Density (2 up to 6 DUPA)
113 Single Unit, High Density (6 and over DUPA)
114 Mobile Homes, Medium Density (less than 6 DUPA)
115 Mobile Homes, High Density (6 and over DUPA)
116 Multiple Dwelling, Low-rise (2 stories or less) DUPA
may be designated by user
117 Multiple Dwelling, High-rise (3 stories or more) DUPA
may be designated by user
118 Mixed Residential
119 Residential Under Construction

121 Retail Sales and Services
122 Wholesale Sales and Services, Including Trucking and
Warehousing (except warehousing associated with indus-
trial use)
123 Offices and Professional Services
124 Hotels and Motels
125 Cultural and Entertainment
126 Oil & Gas Storage Facilities (except where associated
with industrial use)
127 Mixed Commercial and Services
128 Commercial Under Construction


* DUPA Gross Dwelling Units Per Acre

NOTE: 1. At Level II, low, medium, high residential density may be designated as in Level III, based upon
visual impact assessment from stereo viewing, and the resolution of the Level II imagery.

2. Numbers shown may be used for computer programming and maDping designations.

3. This system is similar to, but does not duplicate, the classification system used by USGS in pre-
paring the Florida Land Use Inventory. Differences can be determined by a comparison of the
above system with the one described in Appendix IV.


Level I


III







Level III


100 Urban or Built-up
(cont.)


130 Industrial


131 Light Industrial
132 Heavy Industrial
133 Industrial Under Construction


140 Transportation










150 Communications
and Utilities







160 Institutional


141 Airports, Including Runways, Parking Areas, Hangars,
and Terminals
142 Railroads, Including Yards and Terminals
143 Bus and Truck Terminals
144 Major Roads and Highways
145 Port Facilities
146 Navigable Waterways
147 Auto Parking Facilities (When not directly related to
another land use)
148 Oil & Gas Long Distance Transmission Pipelines
149 Transportation Facilities Under Construction

151 Electrical Power Facilities
152 Major Long Distance Transmission Lines
153 Broadcasting or Transmission Towers
154 Water Supply Plants (Including Pumping Stations)
155 Sewage Treatment Facilities
156 Solid Waste Disposal Sites
157 Other Communication Facilities
158 Other Utility Facilities
159 Communication and Utilities under Construction

161 Educational Facilities, Including Colleges, Universities,
High Schools, and Elementary Schools
162 Religious Facilities, Excluding Schools
163 Medical and Health Care Facilities
164 Correctional Facilities
165 Military Facilities
166 Governmental, Administrative, and Service Facilities
167 Cemeteries
168 Institutional Facilities Under Construction
169 Other


Level I


Level II










Level III


100 Urban or Built-up
(cont.)


170 Recreational


Swimming Beaches & Shores
Golf Courses
Parks, Zoos
Marinas
Stadiums
Fairgrounds
Community Recreational Facilities
Racing Tracks
Other Recreational


180 Mixed--Any mixture
of Urban or Built-
up where no single
use predominates


190 Open Land and
Other


191 Undeveloped Land Within Urban Areas
192 Inactive Land With Street Patterns but Without Structures
193 Land Undergoing Active Development Without Indication of
Intended Use


200 Agriculture


210 Cropland and
Pastureland


220 Orchards, Groves,
(Except Citrus)
Vineyards, Nur-
series & Ornamen-
tal Horticultural
Areas

230 Citrus Groves


211 Row Crops
212 Field Crops
213 Improved Pasture

221 Tropical Fruit Orchards
222 Deciduous Fruit Orchards
223 Nurseries
224 Ornamental Horticultural
225 Vineyards


231 Orange
232 Grapefruit
233 Other Citrus


laual TT Iaual TTT


Level I


Level I I


a"v I awl T





Level I

200 Agriculture
(cont.)


Level II

240 Confined Feeding
Operations


250 Specialty Farms



260 Other Agriculture


Level III


Cattle
Poultry
Hogs
Other


251
252
253
254


Horse Farms
Kennels
Mariculture
Other


261 Inactive Agricultural Lands
252 Other


300 Rangeland


310 Grassland


400 Forested Uplands


320 Shrub and Brush-
land


330 Mixed Rangeland

410 Coniferous Forest


321 Palmetto Prairies
322 Coastal Scrub
323 Other Scrub and Brush


411
412
413
414


Pine Flatwoods*
Longleaf Pine*
Sand Pine Scrub*
Other*


420 Hardwood Forest


430 Mixed Forest

440 Planted Forest


450 Clearcut Areas


421 Xeric Oak*
422 Other Hardwood*

431 Mixed Forest*

441 Coniferous*
442 Hardwood*

451 Clearcut*


* See Appendix I for additional descriptive information.


- J ..._ _. __ ____ _._ ~_~_~_~___ ~_










Level II


511
512
513
514


510 Streams and
Canals**


520 Lakes**


530 Reservoirs**


540 Bays and
Estuaries**


Streams
Streams With Grass Beds
Canals
Canals With Grass Beds


521 Lakes
522 Lakes With Grass Beds

531 Reservoirs
532 Reservoirs With Grass Beds


541
542
543
544
545
546


Bays
Bays With
Bays With
Estuaries
Estuaries
Estuaries


Marine Grass Beds
Oyster Bars

With Marine Grass Beds
With Oyster Bars


550 Open Marine
Waters


560 Other Water Areas


551 Open Marine Waters
552 Open Marine Waters With
553 Open Marine Waters With
554 Open Marine Waters With

561 Ponds
562 Ponds With Grass Beds
563 Other Water Areas


Marine Grass Beds
Oyster Bars
Coral Reefs


600 Wetlands


610 Wetland-
Coniferous Forest


611 Cypress***
612 Pond Pine***


620 Wetland-Hardwood
Forest

** See method for hydrologically ordering streams,
grass beds, coral reefs, and oyster beds may be


621 Freshwater Swamp***
622 Saltwater Swamp (Mangroves)***

bays and basins in Appendix II. Features such as marine
identifiable with Level II imagery.


*** See Appendix III for additional descriptive information.


500 Water


_I I Il I


1~1--1.-^11-11_ __^_1.1_1~-~- II__^^1_ ._IY1~-l--L~-Li --L^-~IPI.-l;.i_-..I-PIDII~.---^l


Level I


Level III







Level I

600 Wetlands
(cont.)


Level III


630 Wetland-Mixed
Forest


631 Mixed Forest***


640 Wetland-Vegetated
Non-Forested

650 Non-Vegetated Wet-
land


641 Freshwater Marsh***
642 Saltwater Marsh***

651 Tidal Flats
652 Other Non-Vegetated Wetlands


700 Barren Land


710 Beaches


720 Sand Other Than
Beaches

730 Exposed Rock

740 Altered Lands


741 Scraped Areas
742 Dredge and Fill
743 Spoil Banks


750 Extractive


Mineral Extraction
Stone Quarries
Sand, Gravel, Clay
Oil and Gas Wells
Abandoned Mining Operations


760 Other Barren Lands


*** See Appendix III for additional descriptive information ,


r -~-~~-~- ~" ~- -1


Level I I







APPENDIX E


SCS ORGANIZATION MAP


SMarianna
L~-SS -



T r ,' 'Lake City" i.ci,--
I Tm
AI I O?. TUT

Gainesville ,-*

.,



* State Office avaresO.-

* Area Office and Field Office

STATE OFFICE ..c.-

U.S. Department of Agriculture tNELLA
Soil Conservation Service
P. O. Box 1208 Pa lmas ,soT
Gainesville, Florida 32601 Palmtto
(904) 377-8732 .\ 0 r -,

AREA OFFICES
.LU .E5 Lake Worth
1) Soil Conservation Service
P. 0. Box 668 MUM
Marianna, Florida 32446 ;. ... .
(904) 482-2002

2) 313 Burk Street
Lake City, Florida 32055
(904) 752-0660

3) 1016 East Alfred Street
Tavares, Florida 32778
(904) 343-2161 W

4) 619 Sixth Street West .
Palmetto, Florida 33561
(813) 722-8121

5) 521 Lake Avenue
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
(305) 588-2929


E-1









APPENDIX G


WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS





Mr. Clint Shultz, Executive Director
St. Johns River Water Management District
1101 Highway 19 Route 2, Box 695
Palatka, Florida 32077
Phone: (904) 325-5384

Mr. Don Morgan, Executive Director
Suwannee River Water Management District
Bridge Street
Post Office Drawer K
White Springs, Florida 32096
Phone: (904) 396-5051

Mr. William McCartney, Executive Director
Northwest Florida Water Management District
325 John Knox Road, Suite C 135
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
Phone: (904) 487-1770

Mr. Jack Maloy, Executive Director
Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District
Post Office Box V
West Palm Beach, Florida 33402
Phone: (305) 686-8800

Mr. Donald Feaster, Executive Director
Southwest Florida Water Management District
Post Office Box 457
Brooksville, Florida 33512
Phone: (904) 796-7211


G-l









APPENDIX H



THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF


ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION


i' | -' j [

L^ I "-
Z( .......


JOHNS RIVER SUBDISTRICT
LLIAM R. OPP, manager
26 BILLS ROAD
CKSONVILLE,FL 32207
4.396-6985


NORTHWEST DISTRICT
ROBERT B. DILLARD, JR.. district manager
1391 SHORELINE DRIVE
P.O. BOX 838
GULF BREEZE, FL 32561
904-932-5323
(SUNCOM 221-2395)


ST. JOHNS RIVER DISTRICT -",i.
ALEX SENKEVICH, district manager .
3319 MAGUIRE BLVD., SUITE 232
ORLANDO, FL 32803
305-894-7114
(SUNCOM 352-7862)



CENTRAL SUBDISTRICT
WARREN G.STRAHM,manager
500 E. CENTRAL AVE. SUITE 238
P.O. BOX 9205
WINTER HAVEN. FL 33880
813-299-1134
(SUNCOM 352-7152/7153)



SOUTHWEST DISTRICT
BANKS B. VEST, JR., district manager
9721 EXECUTIVE CENTER DR. N.
SUITE 200
ST. PETERSBURG. FL 33742
813-576-6420
(SUNCOM 326-1111)


:::: li i Subdistricts Having

i^:2:. Area Offices


SOUTHWEST SUBDISTRIC
PHILIP R. EDWARDS, manager
2180 WEST FIRST STREET
SUITE 401
FORT MYERS, FL 33901
813-332-2667
(SUNCOM 352-7900)


CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN DISTRICT -
ACTING DISTRICT MANAGER
PHILIP R. EDWARDS
3301 GUN CLUB ROAD
P.O. BOX 3858
WEST PALM BEACH, FL 33460
305-689-5800
(SUNCOM 451-5005)1

F0 -


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION
2562 EXECUTIVE CENTER CIRCLE, EAST
MONTGOMERY BUILDING
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32301
904-4884807


H-1








APPENDIX I


The following is taken from Appendix three of:
The Florida Land Use and Cover Classification System: A Technical Report
A copy of the full report may be obtained by writing:
Division of State Planning
Bureau of Comprehensive Planning
660 Apalachee Parkway
Tallahassee, Florida 32304


Forested wetlands are areas which are subject to permanent or prolonged
periods of inundation or saturation and/or exhibit vegetative communities
characteristic of this hydro-period.

610 WETLAND-CONIFEROUS FOREST (Level II)

611 Cypress (Level III)

These forested areas are dominated by a crown closure in either
bald cypress or pond cypress. Principle associates are tupelo
gum and maple.

612 Pond Pine (Level III)

These are forested areas dominated by a crown closure in pond
pine. Pond pine dominates wetter flats with low pH, often
associated with the inland reaches of marshes or muck swamps.

620 WETLAND-HARDWOOD FOREST (Level II)

621 Freshwater Swamps (Level III)

River, Creek and Lake overflow areas. These communities will
have predominantly one or more of the following species:

Pond cypress Taxodium ascendens
River cypress Taxodium distichum
Red Maple Acer rubrum
River birch Betula nigra
Black willow Salix nigra
Coastal plain willow Salix caroliniana
Blackgum Nyssa biflora
Okeechee tupelo Nyssa ogeeche
Water hickory Carya aquatica
Water ash Fraxinus caroliniana
Buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis

Bogs and Bayheads. These communities will have predominantly
one or more of the following species:

Pond pine Pinus serotina
Loblolly bay Gordonia lasianthus
Sweet bay Magnolia virginiana
Swampbay Persea palustris









Bogs and Bayheads. (cont.)

Titi Cyrilla racemiflora
Sphagnum moss Sphagnum sp.

Inland Ponds and Sloughs. These communities will have pre-
dominantly one or more of the following species:

Pond cypress Taxodium ascendens
Black gum Nyssa biflora
Water tupelo Nyssa aquatica
Titi Cyrilla racemiflora, C. parviflora
Black titi Cliftonia monophylla
Willow Salix sp.
Primrose willow Ludwigia peruviana
Pond apple Annona glabra

622 Saltwater Swamps (Level III)

Mangrove Forests. These communities will have predominantly
one or more of the following species:

Red mangrove Rhizophora mangle
Black mangrove Avicennia nitida
White mangrove Laguncularia racemosa
Saltwort Batis maritima
Glasswort Salicornia sp.
Buttonwood Conocarpus erectus

630 WETLAND-MIXED FOREST (Level II)

631. Mixed Forest (Level III)

These forested areas are a mixture of coniferous and hardwood
wetlands where neither tree type dominates. When more than 1/3
intermixture occurs, the mixed classification should apply.


VEGETATIVE COMMUNITIES FOR VEGETATIVE
NON-FORESTED WETLANDS

640 WETLAND-VEGETATED NON-FORESTED (Level II)

Areas (fresh and saltwater marshes) which are subjected to permanent or
prolonged periods of inundation or saturation and/or exhibit vegetative
communities characteristic of this hydroperiod.

641 Freshwater Marsh (Level III)

These communities will have predominantly one or more of the
following species:








Sawgrass Marsh


Sawgrass Cladium jamaicensis
Arrowhead Sagittaria sp.
Maidencane Panicum hemitomon
Cattail Typha domingensis, T. latifolia, T. angustifolia
Pickerel weed Pontederia lanceolata, P. cordata
Buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis
Spartina Spartina.bakeri
Switchgrass Panicum virgatum

Cattail Bulrush Maidencane Marsh. These communities have
predominantly one or more of the following species:

Cattail Typha latifolia, T. domingensis, T. angustifolia
Bulrush Scirpus americanus, S. validus, S. robustus
Maidencane Panicum hemitomon
Spartina Spartina bakeri
Pickerel weed Pontederia lanceolata, P. cordata
Water Lily Nymphea sp.
Spatterdock Nuphar sp.
Buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis
Bladderwort Utricularia sp.
Needlerush Juncus effusus
Common reed Phragmites communis australiss)

Wet Prairies. These communities will have predominantly one or
more of the following species:

Maidencane Panicum hemitomon
Cordgrasses Spartina bakeri, S. patens
Spikerushes Eleocharis sp.
Beack rushes Rhynchospora sp.
St. Johns wort Hypericum sp.
Spiderlily Hymenocallis palmeri
Swamplily Crinum americanum
Yellow-eyed grass Xeris ambigua
Whitetop sedge Dichromena colorata

642 Saltwater Marsh (Level III)

Spartina and Needlerush Marshes. These communities will have
predominantly one or more of the following species:

Cordgrasses Spartina alterniflora, S. cynosuroides,
S. patens, S. spartinae
Needlerush Juncus roemerianus
Seashore saltgrass Distichlis spicata
Saltwort Batis maritima
Glassworts Salicornia sp.
Fringerush Fimbristylis castanea
Salt dropseed Sporobolus virginicus
Seaside daisy Borrichia frutescens
Salt jointgrass Paspalum vaginatum









SOIL WETNESS CLASSES AND ASSOCIATED SOIL SERIES FOR
FORESTED AND NON-FORESTED WETLANDS


Soil wetness classes and associated soil series as delineated by the
Soil Conservation Service may be used for identifying wetlands.


Wetlands normally occur:


If
and one
exist.


water is at or on the soil surface for 12 months, 7 out of 10 years
or more of the following soil series2 or miscellaneous land types


Brighton
Canova
Dorovan
Everglades
Freshwater Marsh
Freshwater Swamp
Gandy
Loxahatchee
Lauderhill
Micco
Montverde
Ocoee
Ocoee, thermic variant
Okeechobee
Okeelanta


1. Water is at the soil surface if the
if the capillary fringe reaches the
is the zone just above the water tat
almost saturated.

2. Typical soil series and other units
Taxonomy recognized by the National
and updated as soil survey progress


Oklawaha
Pahokee
Pamlico
Pamlico, hyperthermic variant
Perrine, tidal marsh variant
Ponzer
Terra Ceia
Terra Ceia, shallow variant
Tidal Marsh
Shallow Ponds with Grass
Tidal Swamps
Tomoka


soil is saturated at the surface, or
soil surface. The capillary fringe
ble (zero gauge pressure) that remains


mapped and classified under the Soil
Cooperative Survey. (List is revised
in the State.)








If water is at or on the soil surface for 7 to 12 months, 7 out of 10
years, and one or more of the following soil series or miscellaneous land
types exist.


Alluvial land
Anclote
Anclote, thermic variant
Arzell, ponded
Astor
Basinger, ponded
Bayboro
Bayboro, hyperthermic
variant
Bayboro, ponded
Bibb
Bibb, overflow
Charlotte, ponded
Chobee
Chobee, thermic variant
Copeland
Copeland, shallow variant
Copeland, thermic variant
Copeland, shallow thermic
variant
Coxville
Floridana
Grady
Delray
Eau Gallie, ponded
Ellabelle
Rutlege, shallow, hyper-
thermic variant
St. Johns, ponded
Sandy Local Alluvium

If water is at or on the soi
years, and one or more of the fol
types exist.

Arzell
Bassinger
Bladen
Bladen, thick surface
variant
Bladen, ponded
Charlote
Charlote, thermic variant
Felda
Felda, thermic variant
Holopaw


Grady, ponded
Hialeah
Iberia
Immokalee, ponded
Manatee
Manatee, thermic variant
Manatchee, overflow
Meggett, ponded
Myakka, ponded
Mixed Alluvial Land
Ochopee
Ochopee, shallow variant
Osier
Pantego, ponded
Pelham, ponded
Perrine
Perrine, shallow variant
Placid
Plantation
Plummer
Plummer, ponded
Pompano, ponded
Portsmouth, thermic variant
Rutlege, thermic variant
Sandy Alluvial Land
Sellers-Surrency
Surrency


1 surface for 2 to 7 months, 7 out of 10
lowing soil series or miscellaneous land


Malabar
Panteqo
Pantego, hyperthermic variant
Pelham
Pelham, hyperthermic variant
Pineda
Pompano
Riviera
Valkaria
Valkaria, ponded


I-5








APPENDIX J


The following agency addresses are supplied for contacts as needed:

1) (The Bureau of Geology has information available regarding geologic and
hydrologic conditions throughout the state and they can also advise as
to information which may be available through the U.S.G.S.)
Department of Natural Resources
Division of Resource Management
Bureau of Geology
903 W. Tennessee Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32304

2) (For information within areas designated as coastal zones the Bureau of
Coastal Zone Planning has information regarding wetlands and other
elements of the biophysical environment, as well as information on the
economy, support services, land ownership, and land use within Florida's
coastal zone.)
Department of Natural Resources
Division of Resources Management
Bureau of Coastal Zone Planning
309 Office Plaza Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

3) (For information regarding fish, wildlife and special management steps
in fresh water and salt water wetlands contact the appropriate office
as designated by region below.)

For Regional Planning Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 contact:
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Bureau of Environmental Protection
620 South Meridian Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32304

For Regional Planning Districts 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 contact:
Florida Game and Fresh Water-Fish Commission
Bureau of Environmental Protection
P. O. Box 1840
Vero Beach, Florida 32960

4) Mr. Robert Williams, Director
Division of Archives, History,and Records Management
Florida Department of State
The Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida 32304
Atten: Dr. George Percy

5) Division of Florida Land Sales 6) Office of Interstate Land Sales
Department of Business Regulation Registration
P. O. Box 4448 HUD Building, Room 9254
Tampa, Florida 33607 Washington, D.C. 20410


J-1


1









APPENDIX K


Information regarding the Federal Flood Insurance program
can be obtained through:

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Federal Insurance Administration
Washington, D. C. 20010

Travelers Indemnity Co. is the U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development's authorized representative for the program
in the State of Florida. Additional information, Flood Hazard
Boundary Maps, and Flood Insurance Rate Maps can be obtained by
contacting them as follows:

Flood Insurance Division
Travelers Indemnity Co.
1516 E. Colonial Drive
Orlando, Florida 32803

(305) 896-2001


K-1







APPENDIX L


Endangered, Threatened or Rare Species


1. At the present time the State of Florida's list of
endangered or threatened species includes only animals,
specifically vertebrates, i.e., mammals, fishes, birds,
reptiles and amphibians. The list which has been adopted
by the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission as a
part of the Wildlife Code of the State of Florida is
printed on the following pages. The following address is
provided for contact as needed:


Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
Game Management Division
620 South Meridian Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32304


2. The Federal list of endangered or threatened species also
includes only animals and can be obtained through the
following agency:


Office of Endangered Species
Fish and Wildlife Services
U. S. Department of Interior
Washington, D. C. 20240


3. The most comprehensive list of endangered, threatened or
rare species has been prepared by the Florida Committee on
Rare and Endangered Plants and Animals. The committee is
made up of many scientists and environmentalists throughout
the state and is sponsored by the Florida Audubon Society
and the Florida Defenders of the Environment. Their list
includes plants and animals (both vertebrate and invertebrate)
and includes the following categories: endangered, threat-
ened; rare; species of special concern; status undetermined;
recently extirpated; and recently extinct. This list does
not enjoy official status; however, it has been relied on
heavily by the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
in adopting their list of endangered and threatened animals.
The Audubon list can be purchased from:


The Florida Audubon Society
Post Office Drawer 7
Maitland, Florida 32751


L-l


C








ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES INCLUDED IN WILDLIFE CODE
FLORIDA GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION
Effective July 1975


ENDANGERED SPECIES A species which is in danger of extinction through-
out all or a significant portion of its range in the State due to (1) destruction,
drastic modification or severe curtailment of habitat, or (2) its over-utilization
for commercial or sporting purposes, or, (3) effects of disease or pollution, or
(4) other natural or man-made factors:

Pine Barrens Tree Frog (Hyla andersoni)

Atlantic Green Turtle (Chel onia mydas mydas)

Atlantic Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata imbricatA)

Atlantic Ridley Turtle (Lepidochelys kempi)

Atlantic Salt Marsh Snake (Natrix fasciata taeniata)

Short-tailed Snake (Stilosoma extenuatum) (all sub-species)

Crocodile _Crocodylus acutus)

Wood Stork (Mycteria americana)

Florida EvergladesKite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus)

Cuban Snowy Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus tenuirostris)

Ivory-billed Woodpecker (Campephilus principalis)

American Peregine Falcon (Falco peregrinus)

Redcockaded Woodpecker (Dendrocopus borealis hylonomus)

Bachman's Warbler (Vermivora bachmanii)

Kirtland's Warbler(Dendroica kirtlandii)

Florida Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum floridanus)

Dusky Seaside Sparrow (Ammospiza maritima nigrescens)

Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow (Ammospiza maritima mirabilis)

Gray Bat (Myotis grisescens)

Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis)

Mangrove Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger avicennia)

Goff's Pocket Gopher (Geomys pinetis goffi)

Cudjoe Key Rice Rat (Oryzomys_ssp)
L-2 .





Page 2


Pallid Beach Mouse (Peromyscus polionotus decoloratus)

Key Largo Cotton Mouse (Peromyscus gossypinus allapaticola)

Key Largo Wood Rat (Neotoma floridana small)

Florida Panther (Felis concolor coryi)

Key Deer (Odocoileus virginianus clavium)

THREATENED SPECIES A species which may become an endangered species
within the foreseeable future i-n all or a signjfi~ant portion of its range in
the State due to (1) destruction, drastic modification or severe curtailment of
habitat, or, (2) its over-utilization for commercial or sporting purposes,
or, (3) effects of disease or pollution, or (4) other natural or man-made factors:

Okaloosa Darter (Etheostoma okaloosae)

Shortnose Sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum)

Suwannee Bass (Micropterus notius)

Florida Gopher Frog (Rana areolata aesopus)

Key Mud Turtle (Kinosternon bauri bauri)

Suwannee Cooter Turtle (Chrysenys concinna suwanniensis)

Atlantic Loggerhead Turtle (Caretta caretta caretta)

Gopher Turtle (Gopherus polyphemus)

Key Mole Skink (Eumeces egregius egregius)

Blue-tailed Mole Skink (Eumeces egregius lividus)

Sand Skink (Neoseps reynoldsi)

Big Pine Key Ringneck Snake (Diadophis punctatus acricus)

Red Rat Snake (Elaphe guttata guttata) (Lower Fla. Keys populations)

Miami Black-headed Snake (Tantilla oolitica)

Eastern Indigo Snake (Drymarchon corais couperi)

Florida Brown Snake (Storeria dekayi victa) (Lower Keys only)

Florida Ribbon Snake (Thamnophis sauritus sackeni) (Lower Keys only)

American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

Magnificent Frigate Bird (Fregata magnificens rothschildi)

Osprey (Pandion haliaetus carolinensis)

Southeastern American Kestrel (Falco sparverius paulus)

American Oystercatcher (Ilaemotopus palliatus) L-3







Page 3 Threatened Species -cont.


Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii)

Least Tern (Sterna albifrons)

White-crowned Pigeon (Columba leucocephala)

Florida Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens coerulescens)

Louisiana Seaside Sparrow (Ammospiza maritima fisher)

Southern Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus leucocephalus)

Brown Pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis)

Audubon's Caracara (Caracara cheriway audubonii)

Arctic Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus tundrius)

Florida Sandhill Crane (Grus canadensis pratensis)

Sherman's Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger shermani)

Choctowhatchee Beach Mouse (Peromyscus polionotus allophrys)

Peridio Bay Beach Mouse (Peromyscus polionotus trissyllepsis)

Florida Mouse (Peromyscus floridanus)

Keys Cotton Rat (Sigmodon hispidus exsputus)

Key Vaca Raccoon (Procyon lotor auspicatus)

Manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

EvergladesMink (Mustela vison evergladensis)

Florida Black Bear (Ursus americanus floridanus)







Revised February 1976
Wildlife Management Division




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