Title: Letter to Mike Zellars Dated Sept 27, 1977, Re: Consumptive Use Permit Application No. 27703739 Swift Agricultural Chemicals, Manatee Mine
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00004107/00001
 Material Information
Title: Letter to Mike Zellars Dated Sept 27, 1977, Re: Consumptive Use Permit Application No. 27703739 Swift Agricultural Chemicals, Manatee Mine
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Jake Varn Collection - Letter to Mike Zellars Dated Sept 27, 1977, Re: Consumptive Use Permit Application No. 27703739 Swift Agricultural Chemicals, Manatee Mine (JDV Box 54)
General Note: Box 17, Folder 3 ( WaterTransbasin Transfers - 1970s ), Item 8
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00004107
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text






..
- 1961


i uthwest Flc 'ida

Water Manragementt District
5060 U.S. HIGHWAY 41, SOUTH BROOKSVILLE, FLORIDA 33512
PHONE (904) 796-7211


DERRILL McATEER, Chairman, Brooksville
ROBERT MARTINEZ, Vice Chairman, Tampa
THOMAS VAN DER VEER, Secretary, Yankeetown
S. C. BEXLEY, Treasurer, Land O'Lakes


N. BROOKS JOHNS, Lakeland
RONALD B. LAMBERT, Wauchula
NICK TENDER, Tampa
GEORGE RUPPEL, Clearwater


HELEN THOMPSON, St. Petersburg
LATIMER TURNER. Sarasota
Donald R. Feaster, Executive Director


September 27, 1977



Mr. Mike Zellars
Zellars Williams, Inc.
4222 S. Florida Avenue
Lakeland, Florida 33603

Re: Consumptive Use Permit Application No. 27703739
Swift Agricultural Chemicals, Manatee Mine

Dear Mike:

As per your request at our September 13, 1977, meeting in Bradenton,
enclosed is a copy of Beker Phosphate Corporation's water balance and
consumptive use calculations for Beker's proposed Manatee County Mine.
Also enclosed is a list of average annual withdrawals and tonnages for
those phosphate companies which have requested consumptive use permits
for new water use.

If further information is needed, please contact me.

Very truly yours,



Barbara A.. Boatwright
Hydrologist
Regulatory Division

BAB:dmr


Enclosure:


As stated


cc: Joseph Davis, Swift Agricultural Chemicals












Company Name--Mine
W.R. Grace--Hookers (Polk)
Brewster--Ft. Lonesome (Hills.)
Borden--Big Four (Hills.)
C.F. Mining (Hardee)
Mississippi Chem. Corp. (Hardee)
Bartow Mineral Corp. (Polk)
Asmac Minerals (Polk)


Benefield Mine (Hills)
T.A. Minerals (Polk)

Total


Company Name--Mine
W.R. Grace--Four Corners (Hills.
-Manatee)
Swift1 (Manatee)
Beker (Manatee)
Phillips (DeSoto-Manatee)

Total


NEW USES GRANTED

Average-Annual
Withdrawal
5.7 mgd
7.3 mgd
6.4 mgd
15.7 mgd V
16.9 mgd
522 mgd
.72 mgd


.455 mgd
999 mgd

54.70 mgd


NEW USES PENDING

Average-Annual
Withdrawal
10.8 mgd


12.96 mgd
8 mgd
15 mgd

46.7 mgd


Life of Mine
17 years
18 years
15 years
25 years
31.5 years


3 years


8-10 years


Life of Mine
15 years


years
years
years


Tonnage
2.8 mti
2.75 mtl
1.2 mtj
4 mtj
3 mtj


.050-.121
mtpy


.500 mt


Tonnage
5 mt


3
3
4


NEW USES COORDINATION UNDERWAY


Company Name--Mine
Farmland (Hardee)
U.S.S. Agrichemicals (Polk-Hardee)
Noranda (DeSoto)


1 Awaiting adoption of rules and regulations


5/24/77











ATTACHMENT "B" 71 AUG 26 AIO : 30'


BEKER PHOSPHATE CORPORATIONATI.; -.; ; ?J1'
DISTFIC r
Consumptive Use and Water Balance



Beker Phosphate Corporation is applying for a Consumptive Use Permit to

obtain water for the separation by flotation of phosphate concentrate from

its ore. This water will be used in the amine flotation stage of the bene-

ficiation process. After being used in this stage of the process the water

will enter the water recirculation system for recycling and reuse. No dis-

charge of water is anticipated during the dry months of the year. Surplus

waters that build up during the rainy months will be stored, whenever pos-

sible, and then reused in the agricultural areas in replacement of deep well

irrigation waters.

S -" -

Beker applied for and received a waste water discharge permit from the D.E.R.

That permit was approved with a maximum possible discharge limit. It is an-

ticipated that operational practice will allow these surplus waters to be

diverted to the irrigation areas, but until actual field conditions are em-

ployed it is impossible to accurately forecast the extent of this reuse.



The maximum amount of water that will be withdrawn for processing use in a

year is 2,920 million gallons and the maximum withdrawn during any single day

will be 10.46 million gallons. For agricultural use the maximum withdrawal

in a year will be 195.5 million gallons with the maximum during any single

day being 2.88 million gallons.









The water balance indicates an actual water requirement, exclusive of matrix water,

of 5,555 gals./min., which is equal to 8 million gallons/day. The numbers are

shown in gallons per minute and they exclude irrigation water. They are average

numbers based on 365 days/yr., 24 hrs./day and 60 min./hr.


Sand-clay mixing will concentrate the waste clays to an anticipated 30% solids con-

tent. Water released from the clays during the sand-clay mixing process is consid-

ered 50% non-recoverable, as it reaches the ground surface and is lost through run-

off or other means. Since sand-clay mixing will be involved in essentially 21 of

the 23 operating years (1st two years use above ground settling pond) the consump-

tive water use from the reconstituted land can be calculated as follows:

Clay entrained water at 18% solids 4934 gpm
Clay entrained water at 30% solids 2528 gpq<
Water released 2406 gpm
50% consumptive 1203 gpm
50% non-consumptive 1203 gp

The system consumptive use balance for 21 of the 23 operating years is shown in

Table I.



Water use during the two initial operating years when the above ground settling area

is employed is shown in Table II.


CONSUMPTIVE USE TABLE I (YEARS 3 THROUGH 23)
Gallons/minute
CONSUMPTIVE


Product moisture
Open water additional evaporation
Shallow aquifer recharge
Clay absorbed water
Reconstituted land (sand-clay) water*
Tailings and secondary clays
Product void
Surplus

Less matrix water water returns to
reconstituted land.2.
Well water use
*25Z of 1,000 gal./acre/day water crop
2.


243
618

S7_


/ !
1,967dLi84'" 13-5
1,928 A/v*t5.'Z


1,928*(35%)


-/

1,203

2,528--
1,146
507

5,384

1,757
3,627 (65%)








CONSUMPTIVE USE TABLE II (YEARS 1 AND 2)
Gallons/minute
CONSUMPTIVE
Product moisture 4L 9?' -' 243
Open water additional evaporation 618
Shallow aquifer recharge (min.)~OfQ
Clay absorbed water (settling pond) 2,528
Reconstituted land (sand-clay water)
Tailings and secondary clays
Product void
Surplus (to fill system, add. seepage, -2,215 '-/
irrigation or discharge)


Less matrix water. Water will return
to dredge pond (supply zone).
Well water use

xx 50% of 1,000 gal./acre/day water crop


5,604

1,757

3,847xx(69%)


NON-CONSUMPTIVE
-
-
55


1,146
507 "-


1,708




1,708 (31%)


Notes: 1. 100% of the land will be reclaimed with the clays and sands being re-
charged to the below ground mined out areas (starting in about 3rd year
when mined out areas become available.

2. Consumptive use is "any use which reduces the supply from which it is
withdrawn or diverted.



The water is proposed to be withdrawn from the Avon Park aquifer from wells drilled

1,200 to 1,250 feet deep and cased approximately 500 feet deep into the Suwannee form-

ation. The 3,115.6 million gallons of water will be withdrawn from the 10,971 acres

of land owned by Beker Phosphate Corporation in northeastern Manatee County. This

proposed withdrawal amounts to 283,985 gallons per year per acre.



Beker Phosphate Corporation in its mining operations will follow a program of care-

ful water management and maximum water conservation. Numerous programs are projected

to achieve these golas. These include the maximum reuse of process water, use of

surplus water for agricultural irrigation, reclamation of the mined-out land with re-

sulting greater than present recharge capacity, and contouring reclaimed lands to

slow the rainfall runoff.


2-A
.e t









The overall process water balance shown in Table III, is in terms of gallons per min-

ute (average) quantities. Because of weather and mining variations, the instant-

aneous values may vary somewhat from these figures.


SOURCE

Overburden

Matrix


Well water


GPM2.

2,792

.1,757


5,555


WATER BALANCE AFTER PLANT STARTUP1*

PROCESS STEP DISPOSITION

SMine verburden

Mine and --10 104 -Clays (primary)
washer -Tailings & secondary clays

Flotation_ -Product void
Shipped product

Reused water.
161,800 -Open water add. evaporation

-hallow aquifer recharge

Process surplus to seepage,
surficial sands, evapor-
ation, irrigation or dis-
charge


10,104


Notes: 1.


2.

3.


GPM

2,792

2,528
1,146

507
243


618

55

2,215




10,104


Mining and Beneficiation Plant only. Excludes citrus use of well water
(372 gpm).

Based on 365 days/yr., 24 hr./day, 60 min./hr.

Reused water
(a) water reused "in plant" 67,530 gpm
(b) water recycled through waste disposal reclamation areas 94,270 gpm
(c) total reuse of water 161,800 gpm


The 5,555 gpm of well water is only a small portion of the total water entering the

beneficiation plant. The majority of the water for the operation comes from recycling,

the mining pits and the clay settling ponds. More than twenty-five gallons of water

are recycled for every gallon of well water used.


~









As a result of metallurgical studies and careful flow sheet analysis, it has been

possible to reduce the use of well water to 5,555 gpm. All of this will be used in

the second stage (amine) flotation which is very sensitive to micron size particles

in the water. Beker's projected use of well water per ton of phosphate concentrate

is as low or lower than any other producer in the field.



Currently existing on the Beker property there are 840 acres of row crops, 600 acres

of orange grove plus improved pasture. The existing use average annualized irrigation

rate is 9.2 MGD (6,389 gpm). The withdrawal of water for this purpose will be greatly

reduced when Beker commences mining. However, any surplus water from the mining op-

eration will be used to irrigate crops, when practical. Because of the water hold-

ing capacity of Beker's dredge mine, water can be stored and efficiently used as

required.



The clay percentage of the phosphate matrix in this deposit is much lower than that

inherent-in current producing mines and by using the latest techniques in sand-clay

mixing for land reclamation, a well mixed soil with interspersed clays, is expected.

This will not only result in quicker land reclamation, but will reconstitute the

land to a composition similar to native conditions. Previously, water that was tied

up with clays stored in above ground settling areas was categorized as consumptive

since it did not return to the supply source and was not considered recoverable. The

proposed Beker process of land reconstitution will replace the water below ground

in the surficial aquifer in a placement similar to that which existed prior to mining.

Water that is released during this land reconstituting process will enter the recy-

cling-storagK. system and will be available for process reuse and irrigation. From tests

that have been run in existing phosphate mines the percent water in the clay fraction

when using these land reconstruction techniques is approximately 70 percent after one

year instead of 80 to 85 percent as experienced with current methods. It should be










emphasized for clarity that the 70 percent is in the clay fraction and the Beker re-

constituted land could be in the order of 80 percent sand and 20 percent clay.













































s




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs