Title: Twelth Annual Conference on Water Management in Florida -Program of October 29-30, 1987 Tallahassee
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00002979/00001
 Material Information
Title: Twelth Annual Conference on Water Management in Florida -Program of October 29-30, 1987 Tallahassee
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: NWFWMD
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: NWFWMD Collection - Twelth Annual Conference on Water Management in Florida -
General Note: Box 13, Folder 16 ( Twelth Annual Conference on Water Management in Florida - - 1987 ), Item 1
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00002979
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text







.








i1 141



Ietl4w el'




*-~r~.. 4-





.&irU .. -&


-2'*'--* -








AGENDA


Thursday, October 29


8:00-8:30 a.m.

8:30-9.00 a.m.
Lillie Langtry's

9:15-10:30 a.m.
Ballroom


10.45-12:00 noon
Ballroom


12:00-1:15 p.m.
Ballroom


1:30-2:45 p.m.
Florida Room East
2nd Floor
Leon East and West
2nd Floor

Salon B
Main Level
Florida Room Center
and West 2nd Floor

3:00-4:15 p.m.
Ballroom


6:30-7:30 p.m.
Lillie Langtry's

7:30-8:30 p.m.
Ballroom


Friday, October 30

8:30-9:15 a.m.
Lillie Langtry's

9:15-10:30 a.m.

Florida Room East
2nd Floor
Salon A
Main Level

Salon B
Main Level

Florida Room Center
and West 2nd Floor

10:45-12:00 noon
Ballroom


REGISTRATION

GOVERNOR'S COFFEE
Governor Martinez has been invited to speak.

PANEL DISCUSSION
The Water Supply Puzzle: Fitting the Pieces Together for Florida's Future
(Sponsor South Florida Water Management District)

PANEL DISCUSSION
Water Resources Information and Education: Exploring New Partnerships
(Sponsor: Northwest Florida Water Management District)

KEYNOTE LUNCHEON
Address by: The Honorable Peter Wallace, Florida House of Representatives
(Host: St. Johns River Water Management District)

CONCURRENT INFORMATION SESSIONS
A. Regional Utility Authority: An Institutional Response to Water Resource Needs and Planning
(NWFWMD)

B. Where the Rubber Meets the Road: Alternative Approaches to Legislative Mandates
(SRWMD)

C. Environmental Education Through Art
(SWFWMD)


D. Computerized Aides to Decision Making: GIS and Artificial Intelligence
(SFWMD)

PANEL DISCUSSION
Alternatives to Traditional Water Supply
(Sponsor: Suwannee River Water Management District)

HOSPITALITY HOUR, CASH BAR

BANQUET
Address By: The Honorable John W. Vogt, President, Florida Senate
(Host: Southwest Florida Water Management District)



COFFEE


CONCURRENT INFORMATION SESSIONS

A. Into Marine Environments: Our New Challenge
(NWFWMD)

B. Flood Forecasting on a Shoestring
(SR WMD)

C. Tampa Bay: Meeting the Challenge of SWIM
(SWFWMD)

D. Xeriscape: Water Conservation Through Creative Landscaping
(SFWMD)

PANEL DISCUSSION
One-Stop Permitting: The Wave of the Future?
(Sponsor: St. Johns River Water Management District)


I______~______^_~__~_~__







PANEL DISCUSSION


THE WATER SUPPLY PUZZLE: FITTING PIECES TOGETHER FOR
FLORIDA'S FUTURE


South Florida Water Management District
Thursday, October 29, 9:15-10:30 am.


MODERATOR: John R. Wodraska, Executive Director,
South Florida Water Management District

THE PANELISTS:
The Honorable John Vogt, President, Florida Senate
Mr. Arsenio Milian, Governing Board Member, SFWMD
Mr. James Chisholm, City Manager, St. Cloud, Florida
Mr. Howard Osterman, DUS Consultants


PANEL CHARGE
Florida is a water rich state. Dotted with lakes and wetlands and laced by rivers, it is also home to
some of the nation's most productive aquifer systems which are regularly recharged by an average
annual rainfall of 55-60 inches. Yet, despite our abundant water resources, we are faced with local
communities that experience water supply problems, usually owing to either insufficient reserves
of high quality water, or periodic water shortages.
Supplying potable water to Florida's growing population has traditionally been the responsibility
of local government or private utilities. Altogether there are over 532 water utilities that pump an
estimated 1.360 billion gallons a day to Florida residents.** To improve the efficiency of such a
vast water supply system and correct local inequities of supply and demand, we must find better
methods for managing not only the resource, but also for institutionally managing our water sup-
ply.
Florida's water management districts command an arsenal of resource management technology
and information. As a result, we have recently been called upon to resolve site-specific water supply
problems. But even as we respond to new responsibilities, we must search for ways to maximize our
effectiveness as a regional water management district in addressing local problems. Questions to be
considered include:

* How can water management districts effectively adjust to new water supply service delivery
roles?

* What is the best process for developing cooperative working relationships with other regional and
local governments?

* What financial, management and planning controls must be in place as we pursue solutions to
water supply problems?


** Water Resources Atlas of Florida, 1980 statistics.


r 1 111 1






PANEL DISCUSSION


WATER RESOURCES INFORMATION AND EDUCATION:
EXPLORING NEW PARTNERSHIPS
Northwest Florida Water Management District
Thursday, October 29, 10:45-12:00 noon

MODERATOR: Mr. Jacob Varn, Attorney

THE PANELISTS:
Mr. Steve Metz, State Chamber of Commerce
Ms. Sue Dudley, Florida League of Women Voters
Ms. Deborah Dugger, Junior Leagues of Florida
Ms. Jean Villareal, Florida Federation of Garden Clubs
Ms, Ellen Fournier, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Florida Department of Commerce
Mr. Doug Mann, Florida Farm Bureau Federation
INTRODUCTION
Most Floridians are aware that our state is experiencing unprecedented growth and it is generally
recognized that the abundance of water is a main factor. Florida's fishing, seafood, beaches, water
sports and natural beauty enchant residents and tourists alike. Today more than 11 million people
in our state use water to bathe, cook, launder, treat sewage and irrigate, in addition to using it for
industrial, entertainment and recreational purposes.
With the rapid increase in population, there has been a corresponding increase in concern about
water management. An ongoing effort to balance the need for economic development with the wise
use of our water resources has resulted in the proliferation of laws that affect the lives of all.
Floridians.
In response to the increasing number of demands and challenges, Florida's five regional water
management districts employ many of the finest technical professionals in the country and spend
some $200 million a year to manage water. While water management districts continue to play a
significant role in the development of technical knowledge and understanding of the nature of
Florida's water resources, we have found that the general public is falling further and further
behind in its understanding of water resource issues, the water management structure, and water
management programs.
In Florida, the water belongs to all the people. Many millions of tax dollars are spent on manag-
ing it and our economic well-being and quality of life depend on it. Thus, understanding our state's
"water story" is in everyone's best interest. The districts are therefore actively seeking ways to
broaden communications and involvement with a greater number of groups. Together, we can
generate more interest and greater understanding in all segments of our society.

PANEL CHARGE
How can water managers do a better job of informing and involving the citizens of Florida in the
management of our most valuable natural resource?
What avenues need to be established for better communication/participation between organiza-
tions such as yours and the water management district?
What are the major goals of your organization as they relate to water resource management?
How do decisions about water resources impact your organization or its members?
What kinds of information, programs or services would be most valuable to your group? What are
the most appropriate delivery systems for these activities?
What opportunities exist for water management districts to work with your organization in ways
that are reciprocally beneficial? How can the districts assist your organization in accomplishing its
mission? How can the districts' visibility and mission Be enhanced through greater involvement
with your organization?
,,=fi. i1






PANEL DISCUSSION


ALTERNATIVES TO TRADITIONAL WATER SUPPLY


Suwannee River Water Management District
Thursday, October 29, 3:00-4:15p.m.


MODERATOR: Dr. Earl Starnes, Chairman, SRWMD Governing Board


THE PANELISTS:
Mr. Jeff Schussler, President, Syfo Water Company, Inc.
Mr. Jack Teague, Environmental Specialist, Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services
Mr. David Pyne, Director of Water Resources, CH2M Hill
Mr. Howard Rhodes, Director, Environmental Programs Division, DER

PANEL CHARGE

Demand for bottled water is escalating. What is driving this demand?

Some regard the bottling and sale of water to be an interbasin transfer. Other than the mode of
transfer, how does the interbasin transfer of bottled water differ from a transfer by pipeline?

Do you feel that bottled water is adequately tested? Is it safe for human consumption? Do you
feel existing enforcement programs are adequate?

What role should the water management districts play in protecting the recharge areas supplying
waters to springs? Are the consumptive use regulations, as they relate to bottled water, too strin-
gent, too lenient or acceptable? Why or why not? Is the monitoring of water use adequate?

Since many of the springs from which bottled water is obtained are located in sovereign lands
along the state's rivers, is the bottling industry taking and selling water which rightfully belongs to
the citizens of the state?

Not only does the future of water use in Florida seem tied to the increasing use of bottled water, it
also appears that reuse of wastewater will play an important role. Is this wastewater safe and how
can it be reused? Should larger urban areas be required to reuse as much water as possible before
asking for interbasin transfers of water?
The marketing of reused water requires a reliable source and a stable user base. Several cities
have excess wastewater which they treat to the level of quality which would allow it to be reused.
How can the supplier and potential user be brought together?







CONCURRENT INFORMATION SESSIONS



Regional Utility Authority: An Institutional Response to Water Resource Needs and Planning
Florida Room East 2nd Floor Northwest Florida Water Mangement Disrict
Mr. Doug Barr, Director, Water Resources Division, NWFWMD
Ms. Pat Blackshear, Intergovernmental Coordinator, NWFWMD
Mr. Richebourg McWilliams, Director, Program Development Division, NWFWMD

Where the Rubber Meets the Road: Alternative Approaches to Legislative Mandates
Suwannee River Water Management District
Leon East and West, 2nd Floor
Mr. Nolan Col, Program Administrator, SRWMD
Mr. Bob Heeke, Land Manager, SRWMD

Environmental Education Through Art
Southwest Florida Water Management District
Salon B, Main Level
Ms. Susan Kessel, SWFWMD
Mr. Robert Butler, SWFWMD
Mr. Tom Freeman, SWFWMD
Mr. Jim Miklaucic, SWFWMD

Computerized Aides to Decision Making: GIS and Artificial Intelligence
South Florida Water Management District
Florida Room Center and West, 2nd Floor
Mr. Steve Reel, SFWMD
Mr. Gary Goforth, SFWMD
Mr. Brent Moll, SFWMD

Friday, 9:15-10:30 a.m.

Into Marine Environments: Our New Challenge
Northwest Florida Water Management District
Florida Room East, 2nd Floor
Mr. Pete Hubbell, Assistant Executive Director, SWFWMD
Mr. Pete Rhoads, Director of Resource Planning, SFWMD
Mr. Doug Barr, Director, Water Resources Division, NWFWMD
Mr. Henry Dean, Executive Director, SJRWMD

Flood Forecasting on a Shoestring
Suwannee River Water Management District
Salon A, Main Level
Mr. Hank Ruppertsberger, Water Resource Planner, SRWMD
Mr. Donald Monroe, Water Resource Specialist, SRWMD
Mr. Jack Schnabel, Meteorologist-in-Charge, National Weather Service
Ms. Carolyn Mobley, Public Information Director, SRWMD

Xeriscape: Water Conservation Through Creative Landscaping
South Florida Water Management District
Florida Room Center and West, 2nd Floor
Mr. Carl Woehlcke, SFWMD
Mr. Bruce Adams, SFWMD

Tampa Bay: Meeting the Challenge of SWIM
Southwest Florida Water Management Distrit
Salon B, Main Level
Mr. Mike Perry, SWFWMD







PANEL DISCUSSION


ONESTOP PERMITTING: THE WAVE OF THE FUTURE?


St. Johns River Water Management District
Friday, October 30, 10:45-12.00 noon


MODERATOR: Mr. Robert Mandell, Greater Construction Company

THE PANELISTS:
Honorable Dale Twachtmann, Secretary of DER
Mr. Jim Swann, Governing Board Member, SJRWMD
Mr. John Wodraska, Executive Director, SFWMD
Mr. Jay Landers, Chairman, EESC


PANEL CHARGE
The 1986 Legislature created the Environmental Efficiency Study Commission (EESC) to look at the way Florida's
environmental laws and rules are administered. The Commission's charge was to come up with recommendations that
would promote the efficient enforcement and administration of environmental laws and help eliminate duplication in
permitting and enforcement. The Commission has formulated recommendations which may undergo revision before a
final report is submitted to the Legislature in January 1988.
This panel is charged with discussing possible answers to a series of questions that are based on pending recommen-
dations of the EESC. The questions follow:

By eliminating some of the duplication in Florida's water-related permitting, would we also eliminate a functioning
set of checks and balances which serve to safeguard the resource?

What are the pros and cons of an activity-based water-permitting system? (One, for example, that would have DER
responsible for point source discharges and have WMDs responsible for surface water management systems).

What are the pros and cons of placing all or most water-related regulatory activities under the jurisdiction of the
water management districts?

Should the funding mechanisms for transferred or delegated regulatory functions continue in place, or should they
be transferred or delegated along with the functions? Are there exceptions to your answer?

Given the regional hydrologic characteristics that contributed to the rationale behind the creation of regional water
management districts, would it be wise to require wider use of state water quality standards, or any other uniform
standards?

What is your feeling today concerning who should be doing what in relation to the protection, conservation and
regulation, of our total water resources?











FLORIDA'S WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS


Northwest Florida Water Management District
Route 1, Box 3100
Havana, FL 32333
904/487-1770





Suwannee River Water Management District
Route 3, Box 64
Live Oak, FL 32060
904/362-1001


1961


St. Johns River Water Management District
P.O. Box 1492
Palatka, FL 32077
904/328-8321





Southwest Florida Water Management District
2379 Broad Street
Brooksville, FL 33512-9712
904/796-7211


South Florida Water Management District
P.O. Drawer V
West Palm Beach, FL 33402
305/686-8800


][ TALLAHASSEE HILTON


SECOND FLOOR


OFFICES OFFICES




TALLAHASSEE
ROOM

FLORIDA
ROOM ELEVATORS
EAST

LEON
EAST
FLORIDA
ROOM
CENTER -


LEON
FLORIDA WEST
ROOM
WEST

REST ROOMS


L




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs