Title: The Ninth Annual Conference on Water Management in Florida Program - October 25-26, 1984
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00002973/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Ninth Annual Conference on Water Management in Florida Program - October 25-26, 1984
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: NWFWMD
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: NWFWMD Collection - The Ninth Annual Conference on Water Management in Florida
General Note: Box 13, Folder 10 ( The Ninth Annual Conference on Water Management in Florida - 1984 ), Item 1
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00002973
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
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NINTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON
WATER MANAGEMENT IN FLORIDA

Agenda


Thursday, October 25
9:30 a.m. Registration Desk Opens
10:30-11:45 a.m. Concurrent Information Sessions

Florida
WesFo at Land Management: District Policies and Priorities
West
Leon
Room Data Networking: Future Directions
Big Bend
South Funding Issues in Water Management

Florida
Eodast Organizating Your Agency to Face the Issues: Theories


12:00-1:15 p.m. Keynote Luncheon. Address by Representative Jon Mills. Hosted by the
Big Bend Northwest Florida Water Management District.
1:30-2:45 p.m. Water Issues in Florida. A special program arranged by the St. Johns River
Water Management District.

3:00-4:15 p.m. Concurrent Information Sessions

Florida Organizing Your Agency to Face the Issues: Practical Applications at the
East SFWMD

Florida
oWest How to Get the Most Out of Your Lobbyist
West
Leon
Reoom Water Management in Georgia
Room

Big Bernd
South A View of Water Managers' Role in Growth Management

6:30-7:30 p.. Hospitality Hour

7:30-8:30 p.m. Banquet Address by Representative Herb Morgan. Hosted by the Suwannee
River Water Management District.
Friday, October 26
Big Bend 9:00-10:15 a.m. The Changing Role of the Water Management Districts. Panel discussion
arranged by the Southwest Florida Water Management District.
10:30-11:45 a.m. The Need for Integrated Programs in Florida's Resource Management and
Educational Systems. Panel discussion arranged by the Northwest Florida
Water Management District.


PLEASE NOTE: The Big Bend Rooms are on the main level.
All other meeting rooms are located on the second floor.


_ __










A;-- ; AAGEMIN: DISTRICT AND PRIORITIES
Medwratd.by Jamus M. HBul r ty Diretar
South st Florida Water sMIn.m District

John Hankinson, Senior Analyst
Executive Office of the Governor

James MacFarland, Director
Division of State Lands

Jim Murley, Director
Division of Resource Planning and Management
Department of Cammanity Affairs

Armani d by Sowthet Florida. Water Managemnt District


Florida West

"^ yi -r


AT A~wkT~WmING: FimE DmbXmCTONS
Modera by IIo.. Fred Be G.v 8 BoarD d Member
Northwest Forda Water Managmnt District
Leon Room
Don McEwen, Chief Executive Officer
QUAD Data Corporation

Arranged by Northwest Florida Water Management District

P FUNDING 1rM IN WATER MANAOGEMI NT
Moderted by Hrm Ralph SimmiM ,- Tmrewer
St. Johns River Water Mauagemeat Distict


Hon. Michael Zagorac, Jr.
Southwest Florida Water Management District

Hon. John Fillaysan
Suwaonee tver'Watir anaii uzt District



Hon. Marion Tidwell
Northwest Florida Water Manaogment District

Mr. Jack Goodridge Internal Auditor
South, Felrda Water Management District

Armungd bf St. .Johns ier Water


hmiiodb-0-O Juh Woifrwmbf ftSinI8ta r
South W5.de Wus"-~~tSPiemt.
DAr. POO&A Axme P.. i -9 M 'cbm


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Big Bend
South


Florida East


-C --T- -- ~---- ---------I-------- --- X- ---------------- --- -------;-- --


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WATER ISSUES IN FLORIDA
Moderator
Hon. Idwal Owen, Chairman, St. Johns River Water Management District

PANELISTS
Hon. Ed Dunn, The Florida Senate
Mr. Carl Loop, President, Florida Farm Bureau
Mr. Tom Lawton, Member, South Brevard Water Authority
Mr. Robert M. Rhodes, Chairman, Environmental Land Management Study Committee II

PANEL CHARGE
It has been predicted that the 1985 Legislature will devote much of its time to dealing with the issue of
growth management.

How should impacts regarding the amount and quality of our water supplies be integrated into an overall
policy for growth management? Do you think it is feasible that we will be able to incorporate a growth
management policy into a statewide comprehensive plan which will be consistent with local government com-
prehensive plans?

The 1984 Florida Legislature passed a piece of legislation entitled "The Warren S. Henderson Wetlands
Protection Act."

Does this legislation go far enough, or does it go too far in seeking to protect our state's dwindling wetland
areas?

.There are several state, regional and local agencies who have assumed or have been given responsibility for
safeguarding our water supply.

Is there a "safety in numbers" factor present in the protection of our water? In other words, does having
many agencies responsible provide for checks and balances which ultimately will maximize water resource
protection? Or would we be better off with fewer regulators?

Regardless of the number of regulatory agencies, is it really possible to adequately protect our water sup-
plies? Are the regulatory schemes we have devised simply forestalling the inevitable, or are we really making
progress?

People involved with farming probably understand better than most others about the need for clean, ade-
quate water supplies Ye ste wedi say that agl.eulloal activities often work aseemt the goal of clean,
adequate water .slis.... u _s"plain toB.Cqplia ha s"had a negative efect as water quality. So
has agricultua r= a A i albs reiaires a as mp v aome dt water for frrigatia.. Yet, agriculture also
provides us with the mUmia.Wanit to sustain our lives

How would you assess tl eurrenst emotions in Plorida rehtiag o ariilture 's impact on our water supp-
ly? Is the re6tiouams# etae QgfAultre and water Teguktors imaproving or getting worse?

Ohmes MWagxrgifom'yy How do you
Afdl about as ai6li i.:tg *riU s op^ilm tf W sues o erstMe have a positive or


SIna. inmtani MWaar dmimxisi at .AI em i Weav had saltwater
intruo, W Ifro 1 ia f ar l and pasang diebarges, toaic waste
disposal and renoffM j. Bo for we've been tared to assume a posture of reaction

Are we making any progress towads the goal of hauiag or water regulators be "active" instead of "reac-
tive"? What do you see as the overr'dng water ishe of the day? Why?


CP "-Fi --------- -------- r~aul ~ .'ii


Bla Bend


1:30 2:45 p.m.








INFORMATION SESSIONS


3:00 4:15 p.m.


__U


ORGANIZING YOUR AGENCY TO FACE THE ISSUES:
PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS AT SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
Moderated by Jan Horvath, Director
Resource Coordination Department
Jeanne Hall, Project Manager
Kissimmee Project


Pete Rhoads, Director
Resource Planning Department

Arranged by South Florida Water Management District


Florida
East


HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR LOBBYIST
Moderated by Bob Grafton, Counsel to the Governing Board
South Florida Water Management District
Florida
Doug Stowell, Attorney Flor
Stowell and Mang Law Firm We t

Arranged by South Florida Water Management District



WATER MANAGEMENT IN GEORGIA
Moderated by Donald O. Morgan, Executive Director
SawRanee River Water Management District

Chris White, Branch Chief Leon
Georgia Water Resources Room

Arranged by Suwannee River Water Management District


A VIEW OF WATER MANAGERS' ROLE IN GROWTH MANAGEMENT
Moderated by John Wodrska, Executive Director
South Florida Water Management District


Dr. Warren Viessman, Chairman
Department of Environmental Engineering
University of Florida


Arranged by South Florida Water Management District


Big Bend
South







PANEL DISCUSSION Big Bend 9:00 10:15 a.m.

THE CHANGING ROLE OF THE WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS
MODERATOR
Hon. Mary Kumpe, Governing Board Member, Southwest Florida Water Management District
PANELISTS
Martha Barnett, Attorney, Holland and Knight
Glenn Robertson, Deputy Director, Office of Planning and Budgeting
Bernard Yokel, President, Florida Audubon Society
Alex Jernigan, P. E., Post. Buckley, Schuh and Jernigan
PANEL CHARGE
There is little question Florida's rapid growth is directly related to Florida's environment-not only to its
physical environment but to its economic, political and social environment. Florida's sunny, warm climate and
beaches lure tourists and new residents; economic policies and incentive lure new and relocating businesses
and encourage redevelopment, revitalization, and expansion of existing businesses; and low taxes and em-
phasis on the quality of education, health care and criminal justice also serve to attract new residents.

The state's natural, economic, political and social environments can and have an impact on one another. Yet
it has not been Florida's policy to deal with the effects of these four environments in an integrated fashion.

Given that water is one of the most important aspects of Florida's natural environment that is affected by
and affects the other three environments and that profound changes can be predicted for Florida and its peo-
ple over the next decade:

Where do the Water Management Districts fit into the "Big Picture"?

What pressures will be placed on the Water Management Districts in the next decade?

How should the Water Management Districts relate to the political considerations surrounding water issues
in years of growing demand?

How do Water Management Districts fit into planning for the environmental, economic and social health of
Florida of the 21st century?

PANEL DISCUSSION Big Bend 10:30 11:45 a.m.

THE NEED FOR INTEGRATED PROGRAMS IN
FLORIDA'S RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS


MODERATOR
Joyce Estes, Environmental Program Director, The Florida Federation of Women's Clubs


PANELISTS
Ms. Pat Gleason, Assistant Deputy Attorney General, Office of the Attorney General
Dr. Elizabeth F. Abbott, Executive Secretary, Florida Foundation for Future Scientists
Hon. Robert L. Parks, Chairman, Environmental Regulation Commission
Dr. Edward A. Fernald, Director, Florida Resources and Environmental Analysis Center
Dr. Douglas W. Crawford, Director, Division of Public Schools
Colonel Robert M. Brantly, Executive Director, Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
S


_ _








PANEL CHARGE


If current populate growth rates continue as expected, Florida will soon be the third most populous state
in the nation. This population will place unprecedted demands on the State's fragile and, in some cases,
already stressed natural resources. As this increase oaen0 it will be essential that the public becomes more
informed of the nature and extent of Florida's resomnee ies and of the adaisb tive structure and pro-
casses existing to deal with thm. Moreover,"'p is an establish adi e tial pert of near-
ly all resource management processes. To be fui8t however, public participants in the resource
management processes must be reasonably knowl e ilf beut the scientific, social and economic issues sur
rounding Florida's natural resources and their managemet.

In Florida, the Department of Natural Resources, the Department of Envronmental Regulation, the Game
and Freshwater Fish Commission, and the State's fiv water management districts spend approximately S430
million annually to implement their programs. With the eMapnditure of this vast mm, resource managers in
Florida have, in some cases, failed to communicate dir overall mission and operational procedures to the
general public Furthermore as the level of activity of these agencies increases, the disprity of ndstandig
between the general public and our State's resource managers widens. It then is becoming increasingly ap-
parent that there needs to be a greater level of communication between Florida's arcdmik and resource
management communities and for there to be a joint development of innovative educational programs if we
are to raise the overall levels of understanding of resource issues and management in our State.


What is Florida's public education system doing to prepare Floridians in general to deal with the increasing-
ly complex technical social and economic issues associated with resource management?

What else can be done to increase the level of understanding for informed public participation in resource
management decision-making?

Is it logical to develop a required Florida Natural Resources Management curriculum in our State's public
schools?

Florida's resource management agencies have a wide level of responsibility and programs to enhance, main-
tain, and protect our State's natural resources. Together, these agencies conduct a broad spectrum manage-
ment research and regulatory program. A relatively large proportion of the stds of the rmmor mma
ment agencies are ibgly trained professIoal who practice technical specisi that we mr unknown in
Florida only a few years ago. Many of these technical poosions are, by amaity, baeg SlOua by graduates
from out-S6- ate umnTaeties. Moreovwsse a ti educatia facilities fr these divkual may not be ao
cessable to the professionals who need them.

What efforts ar being made to better prepare Florida university students specificaly for partcipuon or
for employment in natural resoure management?

What role can the resource management agencies play to help make specific degree programs more im-
mediately applicable to Florida's resource management situation?

Is it-cas6 iabl that the universities in this State could wa ue their graduate programs for conuining
education i resource management by bringing to the Sa a visitUig basti, top passel Oad nSerational
scholars in om.s fields of a soe mawnageeaut In addftI. (fthis program osmU bei deulops4 would It be
aduactqaguos to the unluersites to deuelogp m- acade micf o comQmittee of. Snse frvea mangers to
recommend individuals and disciplnes for participation if iie Wiaiting, containing graduate *eu&ai pro-
gram?


_ __




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