Title: Program Highlights - Status and Objectives
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00002922/00001
 Material Information
Title: Program Highlights - Status and Objectives
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Richard Hamann's Collection - Program Highlights - Status and Objectives
General Note: Box 12, Folder 1 ( Materials and Reports on Florida's Water Resources - 1945 - 1957 ), Item 36
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00002922
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text







PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS STATUS AND OBJECTIVES


a) Cooperative Advance Planning

One of the strong points of District operation is the part
which local participation plays in advance planning. County
Flood Control and Water Conservation Committees and other
local groups are contributing greatly to the refinement of the
basic comprehensive plan, and are making it responsive to
local needs.

District policy is founded on the assumption that the pro-
ject is to serve the people of the area, and District operation
involves a maximum of consultation with the people to be
served. In the last six months alone more than 30 meetings
have been held with local committees, in addition to corres-
pondence or interviews with hundreds of individuals.

In addition to capitalizing on the knowledge and experience
of local groups, the District has cooperative and mutually use-
ful contacts with Federal and State agencies whose interests
touch those of the District. In many cases the results of
studies and research by these agencies in the area have a
direct bearing on the current development of elements of the
project plan by the Corps of Engineers. The agencies with
whom such cooperative association is active include the
following:

U. S. Department of Agriculture
Soil Conservation Service
Individual Soil Conservation Districts
within the Flood Control District
Agricultural Research Service
Federal Extension Service
U. S. Department of the Interior
Geological Survey
Fish and Wildlife Service
National Park Service
Bureau of Indian Affairs

Tennessee Valley Authority

Florida State Board of Conservation
Division of Water Survey & Research
Geological Survey
Board of Forestry









Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund

Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission

Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations

Florida State Road Department

Turnpike Authority


Other Cooperative
Arrangements







Cooperative Policy
Avoids Duplication


Planned Works and
Construction Progress








Full Authorisation
Removes
Restrictions


In addition to the foregoing agencies, arrangements are
made as may be appropriate or desirable for the cooperation
and assistance of state and private universities and other
Federal State or private agencies, organizations or individuals
in furthering the interests of the District or the project and
making it responsive to the interests of the people of the area
and of the State.

The District assumes the responsibility for leadership
and coordination of effort and for performance of tasks which
it alone can handle, but it operates on the assumption that
nothing would be gained, and much might be lost, if it set
itself up to enter into competition with other agencies which
are effectively doing needed work in the area. This policy
forms the basis for the District's broad program of cooper-
ative studies and research.


b) Construction Authorized Plan

The planned portion of the project as now authorized by
Congress, and the works on which construction is completed
or in progress are shown on the map facing page 4. Prior
to authorization of the entire project in the Flood Control
Act of 1954, design and construction by the Corps of Engineers
in cooperation with the District was restricted principally to
the lower east coast and to the agricultural area south of
Lake Okeechobee.

Full authorization lifted these restrictions and planning
is actively in progress in the Caloosahatchee, Kissimmee
and Upper St. Johns River Basins. Construction on the works
in these areas is tentatively scheduled for the near future
with additional contracts to complete the portions of the pro-
ject already giving partial protection having the highest
priority for immediate construction.

























































LEGEND

m FLOOD CONTROL DISTRII

- COOPERATIVE WORKS

4 SPILLWAY

m CANAL OR LEVEE

( CULVERT



CAL o N 5V 5S
S 0 0 15 -O '5 3.o


/ FORT MYERS








CT 1
. --1












,L--------





'T5




?$i


I I
II I"


EMERGENCY CONSTRUCTION WORKS


FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT AND COOPERATING AGENCIES


WORK

CANAL C40 CONTROL STRUCTURES

KISSIMMEE RIVER

SECONDARY CANAL (OKEECHOBEE COUNTY)
CANAL CG19
LEVEE L- STRUCTURES

STRUCTURES IN L- 4

GLADES DITCH
CANAL 1-B (MARTIN COUNTY)
LATERAL 20
CANAL C-24
CANAL 014

CANAL 023 AND STRUCTURES

CANAL C-Il
LEVEE L-21 AND LEVEE L.25

LAKE JUNE-IN-WINTER CONTROL STRUCTURES
(STEARNS CREEK)


NATURE OF WORK

INSTALLATION OF THREE SPILLWAYS

HYACINTH SPRAYING AND CHANNEL
IMPROVEMENT
EXCAVATION OF CANAL
CHANNEL CLEANOUT
INSTALLATION OF TWO CULVERTS

INSTALLATION OF FOUR CULVERTS

EXCAVATION OF CANAL
EXCAVATION OF CANAL
INSTALLATION OF TWO CULVERTS
CHANNEL CLEANOUT
INSTALLATION OF TWO SPILLWAYS

SPILLWAYS AND SALINITY BARRIER

CHANNEL CLEANDUT
LEVEE BUID.UP AND CHANNEL IN
PROVEMENT
INSTALLATION OF SPILLWAY


REASON FOR WORK

CONTROL FLOODING, YET PREVENT OVERDRAINAGE
OF ADJACENT AREAS
PROVIDE MORE RAPID REMOVAL OF FLOOD WATERS

IMPROVE DRAINAGE AND ALLEVIATE FLOODING
ALLEVIATE FLOOD CONDITIONS
EXPEDITE REMOVAL OF FLOODWATERS FROM AGRI
CULTURAL AREA
DRAIN HGH WATER INTO CONSERVATION AREA AND
PREVENT OVERDRAINAGE OF AREA E OF L-40
REMOVE FLOODWAfERS TO LAKE OKEECHOBEE
PROVIDE RELIEF FROM FLOODING
PREVENT OVERDRAINAGE
PERMIT MORE RAPID REMOVAL OF FLOODWATERS
PREVENT OVERDRAINAGE AND CONTROL SALT WATER
INTRUSION
PREVENT OVERDRAINAGE AND CONTROL SALT WATER
INTRUSION
IMPROVE FLOODWATER REMOVAL
EXPEDITES REMOVAL OF FLOODWATER FROM AGRI-
CULTURAL LANDS
EXPERIMENTAL PILOT PLANT TO DETERMINE FEASI-
BILITY OF WATER CONTROL IN AREA


MAY 1955
FLOO CONTROL OITNRICT
IOT ROLE *ElCH. FLORIOC


WEST
PALM
BEACH


MIAMI


DATE COMPLETED

JUNE 1951

SEPTEMBER 1953

OCTOBER 1953
APRIL 1954
MAY 1954

JUNE 1954

SEPTEMBER 1954
OCTOBER 1954
NOVEMBER 1954
NOVEMBER 1954
DECEMBER 1954

DECEMBER 1954

DECEMBER 1954
FEBRUARY 1955

APRIL 1955


TOTAL COST

S 34,659.00

t 40.0001,0

S 1000.

S 37,100QO

$ 81,8o.00
$ iWaoo

$ 16.000.M0)
$137.807.00
$ I8,0l0O
$ 14000.00

$342155.00

$ 30.0000

$ 719.ookO
S 19.00m00


.--Y~--


I


---- P ---- 6 --- P-










Financing Rate
Controls Progress







Accelerated
Financing
Desirable






Completion by 1965


District's
Responsibility





Nec it

i Necessity


The completion of contract drawings ready for construc-
tion is well ahead of the financing program. The actual rate
of progress on the construction of these works is therefore
dependent primarily upon Federal appropriations. This view
assumes that State appropriations will continue to be made
available in amounts required to match appropriated Federal
funds.

The financing plan recently presented to the Bureau of
the Budget and to the Congress for consideration urges the
desirability of an increase in the level of Federal appropria-
tions to $10, 000, 000 annually for fiscal year 1956 and 1957.
For fiscal years beginning with 1958 and continuing to the
completion of the project, a level of appropriation of not less
than $25, 000, 000 annually is strongly recommended.

Unless the level of financing is thus accelerated, real-
ization of the currently anticipated goal--completion by 1965--
cannot be attained and the high degree of protection which
completion would mean will move farther into the future. The
relation of the rate of financing to date of completion is shown
on the chart on page 5.

A factor inherent in the progressive construction of pro-
ject works affecting such large areas is that partial comple-
tion, in many cases, aggravates rather than relieves the
problems of water control in the area affected. To over-
come such conditions often requires emergency construc-
tion which is not always of lasting'.alue. Early completion
of the project would eliminate the need for much of this type
of emergency work.


c) Construction Emergency Works

In addition to the District's primary responsibility for
cooperating in and expediting the comprehensive plan, it
recognizes its secondary responsibility for augmenting and
making more effective use of the works now built or to be
provided under the Federal cooperative plan and for allevi-
ating and averting disaster from flood waters consistent with
the legislation governing such matters.

Emergency construction has been found necessary to
meet the threat of flooding of particularly vulnerable areas
before the Federal construction program is completed, or














Emergency Work
Classified




Preventive
Emergency
Activities







Disaster
Emergency
Activities





Emergency
Flood Reserve
Maintained






Credit for
Emergency
Expenditures


simply because the wter is rising and something has to
done about it fast.- .*.r -

Actually, the emergency work in which the District p.. ,
ticipates falls iantoitwlJmain classifications--cooperative .. .
emergency co~structi eci Avert or prevent a disaster a*:7" .
activities undertaken to overcome the result of a disaster,

Under the first- classification are the cooperative
cy activities of a preventive nature, Areas within the
are increasingly .nfronited with the threat of widespread
aster as expanding develpu*ents in the area outstrip the a bl ,.-:
at which the project work: have been financed and built. 4W 0
to prevent such disaster are initiated as requests from GwOMW*
ment agencies, landowner amd other interests for assistaus
in providing immediate and limited protection.

In the second category are those emergency works re-
quired to alleviate disaster. Although all emergency work
has been financed on the local level without Federal funds ur
participation, the Corps of Engineers have been most coopera
tive when disaster emergency work was in progress and hav
assisted in such work by providing materials and equipment,

As a measure of readiness to meet emergencies, the
District maintains an emergency flood reserve, part in cash
and part in construction materials. Since project work was
started in 1950, the District's share in the total costs for
both classes of emergency work has amounted to over
$770,000. The emergency works built since 1950 are shown
on the map facing page 16.

Certain of the emergency work is of such nature that it
can eventually be incorporated into the works of the Federal
program. In such cases, the cost is expected to be a credit
against the required State contribution of 15% of constructIamonotet
costs. In other cases emergency works may be tied intoHMW4tsri**
secondary systems. Much of the work built to prevent or ;
meet a crisis can thus be salvaged to become a part of the
major or secondary water control systems.


d) Construction Secondary Systems


Function of Federal-
State Project


The Federal-State cooperative project is only a part of
the integrated district-wide system of works required to


- I-.-*---- ----


r___1F_


y~i a I, a I %,i





a w.' 4 3 4
16 101


LA K


- LEG END
ener* rr are. [ nry ene



cooo U7 L-

, tnSI' Ma tfrqh .a* i ad ,relr M Im

- 1*lrd4 al*. CM o nr l M i twbp

I -w -I


E C


B E E


-1 r-T ----





-":---:-----;








j.I





_ : -._.. ..._.J

FEiBRUARY 19
.-.--..... REVISED -



CENTRAL -* SOUTHERN FLORIDA
FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT

PLAN OF SECONDARY CHANNEL SYSTEM
AGRICULTURAL AREA
P.br..r, 199i





















Secondary
Facilities


Map of Typical
Secondary System


produce the benefits for which the project is designed.

When completed, it will provide only the main-line
levees, canals, control structures and pump stations to pro-
tect the area against a major flood, to store surplus water
during each rainy season, and to provide for regulation of
water levels in the main lakes, channels and conservation
areas.

The secondary drainage facilities now being provided by
local interests include all through canals and accompanying
levees and structures required to remove surplus water from,
or bring irrigation water to, blocks of land of one section or
more not having direct access or connection to the works of
the Federal-State project. The secondary canals subdivide
watershed areas, speed the discharge of surplus waters into
the main canals and minimize overland flooding in the pro-
ject area. On completion of the secondary system in a par-
ticular area, the drainage sub-districts and private owners
are able to realize project benefits only when they provide
at their own expense, essential, lesser works needed to pro-
duce detailed water control on their lands.

The works of the sub-drainage districts and private own-
ers make possible full realization of the benefits for which
the project is designed. Thus it is seen that the Federal-
State project provides the arterial works to control flooding
and to conserve fresh water. The project when completed
will bring valuable benefits within reach of the land, not
upon it.

The map of the secondary system of channels and control
works for the valuable agricultural area southerly of Lake
Okeechobee shown on the map facing page 18 provides an
exceptionally good example of the relationship of secondary
systems to the works of the Federal-State project.


*) Easements and Right of Way Acquisition

Acquisition of rights of way and easements, and of lands
for water storage and conservation areas is an important
District activity. Thus far, lands have been purchased for
1, 341 square miles or 867, 300 acres of water storage area.
Providing rights of way for 723 miles of levees and canals
involved the acquisition of slightly over 10, 000 acres of land.










f) Relocation Program

Relocation of roads, bridges, utilities and improvements
on public and private property is a basic obligation under the
Federal-State agreement concerning the system of project
works.


g) Maintenance and Operation

Functions The maintenance and operation of completed works in-
cludes the repair and routine maintenance of canals, levees,
pump stations, spillways and other structures and facilities
built under the project and the repair and maintenance of
works taken over from the Everglades Drainage District by
the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District.
Operation also includes hyacinth control done with District
crews in cooperation with the State Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission.

The importance of the maintenance and operation func-
tion of the District's activities is growing at a rate propor-
tional to the rate at which new works are added to those al-
ready under District jurisdiction. In time its operations will
be spread over the entire 16, 000 square mile area of the
District and will have become its major activity.


_ ~I __




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs