Title: Industrial Development - Sept-Oct 1954
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 Material Information
Title: Industrial Development - Sept-Oct 1954
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Industrial Development - Sept. - Oct 1954 Issue
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Richard Hamann's Collection - Industrial Development - Sept-Oct 1954
General Note: Box 12, Folder 1 ( Materials and Reports on Florida's Water Resources - 1945 - 1957 ), Item 11
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: WL00002897
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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TOUR NEW PLANT WILL GROW IN THE ERIE ARI


Why the middle-sized town

pays off for industry


SOne key to improved production is
better working and living conditions.
'his has led many industries to select
'lant sites in middle-sized towns with
heir good life for all concerned.


in the Erie Area meet the require-
ments of the Government's Dispersal
Plan for industry. The Erie Rail-
road has plant sites available in all
six states.


lany of these middle-sized towns One-third of America's people live,


Erie Railroad
SERVING THE HEART OF INDUSTRIAL AMERICA


work and buy in the Erie At
heart of the nation's large
market. Industries are serve
dependable Erie Railroad, wh
nects with other railroads a
New York Harbor for export I


J For more detailed
send in the coup
Your request will
in strict confidence
out obligation.

D. M. Lynn, Assistant Vice President
Industrial Development-Room 528-D, Eri
Midland Building, Cleveland .15, Ohio
Dear Sir: We are interested. Please send us your Specifi<
on which we can list our needs.
Name
Title Company
Address
City Zone State


NJ *

















The National Magazine of Area
Analysis and Business Site Selection


Vol. I September-October No. 4


REGULAR FEATURES

I.D. Opinion --....3- ------------------ -..-- 3

Taxes .... -------------- 7

Federal Report ....--.-- ------........ ... 13

Information Sources ---- 17

New Books .......- ------------....- 19

Area Programs ----- 50

Classified Ads -- ---- 52

Index of Advertisers .....-------- 3rd Cover



EDITORIAL AND BUSINESS STAFF .


H. McKinley Conway, Jr ........--- ...


Charles Layng


Editor


Associate Editor


E. D. Graham --_ .-----. Editorial Assistant
R. K. Conway ----.---..... Business Manager
B. N. Covington ----.. ------Production Manager


L. J. Downs.... .--.
Publication Office
3846 Hillcrest Dr.
Brookhaven, Ga.


Circulation Manager
Editorial Office
5009 Peachtree Rd.
Atlanta, Ga.


REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES

EAST: Norris H. Evans Company, Upper Mont-
clair, New Jersey, Montclair 2-6951.
MIDWEST: Harley L. Ward, Inc., 360 North
Michigan Ave., Chicago, Central 6-6269.
WEST: Duncan A. Scott & Company, Penthouse,
Mills Building, San Francisco, Garfield 1-7950;
and 2978 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles.


Requests for sample copies or specific
information will receive prompt attention.
All correspondence should be addressed to
5009 Peachtree Road, Atlanta, Ga.
I.D. is published bi-monthly. The sub-
scription rate in the U.S.A. and possessions
is $3.00 for one year or $5.00 for two years.
For all other areas the rate is $4.00 for
one year or $6.00 for two years. Statements
and opinions of authors are not necessarily
those of the publisher. Copyright 1954, by
Conway Publications. Application for mail-
ing under Section 34.64 is pending at
Brookhaven, Ga.


Ample Water forour New


HIIPIAS I n A I


Ideal site at

EUFAULA, ALABAMA

* 1,500 level acres located one mile
south of Eufaula city limits.
* 11,000 foot frontage on Chatta-
hoochee River.
* Minimum flow 601,032,960 gallons
per day at site.
* Also ample underground water
supply.
* Chattahoochee River now being
deepened to nine-foot channel.
* Disposal of effluent no problem.
* Well situated for fast daily freight
service to principal cities in South-
eastern market by Central of Geor-
gia Railway. Direct connections with
15 major railroads and with Sea-
train at Port of Savannah.
* One mile frontage on U. S. High-
way 241.
* Population of 56,309 within 25-mile
radius.


Here's the site for your new chemical
plant, located in the heart of the rich
Southeast the nation's newest market
of 22-million people! This location
holds many advantages for any indus-
try requiring the use of large amounts
of water. Write, call or wire in strict
confidence to the Industrial Development
Department of Central of Georgia and
Savannah & Atlanta Railways. Detailed
information will be sent you promptly.

ASK for your copy of our 32-page
brochure showing this and other highly
desirable river sites. It features leading
industries that have hit "pay-dirt" by
locating in the Southeast.

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT
DEPARTMENT
SAVANNAH & ATLANTA RAILWAY
CENTRAL OF GEORGIA RAILWAY
501 Rhodes Haverty Building, Atlanta 3, Ga.


RAILWAY











New Pogess in a Pogressive State


WEST VIRGINIA... THE PLACE FOR YOUR PLANT


P s in POWER.
N West Virginia's electric utilities are flexing some mighty potent
muscles today electric generating capacity has been increased
850,000 kilowatts in the past two years and more to come.
"-, There's no power problem in West Virginia. Straddling the world's
richest bituminous coal fields, West Virginia is on top of a limitless
power fuel supply 132,000,000 tons of high grade bituminous
coal mined last year.
Four river giants, the Ohio, Kanawha, Monongahela and the Po-
tomac, have a combined flow in West Virginia of 725,000 gallons per
second. This means constantly adequate power for West Virginia .
a power industry delivering a main plate generation equipment rating of
2,348,000 kilowatts, and able to maintain a 15 per cent reserve power
pool over peak demands.


eiec C SPORTATIONE
West Virginia's turnpike, soonPO RTA
to be opened to traffic, is evidence w
of our State's continued lively pro-
gress .. firmly binding strategic
West Virginia with the populous centers of the East and middle West.
Designed on an heroic scale, the 87 mile turnpike, costing more
than $1,000,000 a mile, knifes through, over and under the Alle-
ghenies from Charleston, the State's capitol city, to our southern
border, providing a journey of unrivalled splendor. It is destined
to be busy, as the first link of a vast turnpike network.
North, South, East and West, the turnpike opens all gates into
West Virginia's vast areas of potential industrial wealth with their
limitless raw materials, versatile working force, ample power and
abundance of water, highway, rail and air transportation.
I
New PVogpe 9 1Ai RAW MATERIALS...SKILLED LABOR...
T oI RECREATION FACILITIES... PLANTSITES...
West Virginia is a good place to live. Pleasant com- force, who well merit a prominent industrialist's accolade,
munities with their civic enterprise, hospitality and coopera- "They have a greater variety of talent and abilities, and respond
tion offer much to management. The climate is mild, never quicker to training than any group I've ever worked with."
extreme; there are splendid recreational areas including 19 A progressive State, with young ideas, ready and able to accept
State Parks and 10 State and 2 National Forests. You will your firm, anxious to cooperate fully and offering a vital new
find in West Virginia a dependable and capable working home for industry.


WEST VIRGINIA STATE OF INDUSTRIAL PLENTY...
Large industry or small business, YOU should know about the State of Progress ... West Virginia. Confidential
information is available to Companies interested in West Virginia's industrial opportunities. Write or phone: Executive
Director, West Virginia Industrial & Publicity Commission, State Capitol Building, Room ID, Charleston 5, West Virginia.
WEST VIRGINIA INDUSTRIAL AND PUBLICITY COMMISSION
STATE CAPITOL BUILDING & CHARLESTON 5, WEST VIRGINIA









































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- h


Elections in Many Areas Will Be Influenced

By Planning, Development Records of Candidates


BROOKHAVEN, GA. A hot elec-
tion campaign being waged in this
small county in the Atlanta metro-
politan area offers an example of the
increased public interest in industrial
development activities throughout the
country this Fall. Here and in com-
munities from coast to coast develop-
ment and planning records loom as
major issues in the coming elections.
To a greater extent than ever be-
fore, voters are aware that adequate
industrial planning and promotion
go hand in hand with the capacity
of government units to provide
schools, streets, utilities, and other
needed services. Moreover, the out-
standing jobs of development that
have been done in many areas offer
a measure of comparison for neigh-
boring areas.
Thus, candidates who boast records
of effective planning will have a de-
cided edge over their opponents
whose records in this field are spotty
or unsatisfactory.
Here in DeKalb County where a
single commissioner rules as virtual
dictator, the incumbent County Com-
missioner, Scott Candler, is facing
determined opposition for the first
time in more than 10 years. And it
appears thajhis failure to establish
sound planning and development pro-
grams may lead to the election of his
top opponent.
Sharp Contrast
DeKalb County offers an excellent
study area since it includes several
privately planned areas which may be
compared with areas in which the
county commissioner has been re-
sponsible for development. In the
Northern part of the county lies the
Chamblee Industrial District devel-
oped by Atlanta realtor Robert M.
Holder. It is generally regarded as
one of the top industrial districts in
the nation, including plants of Gen-
eral Motors, Eastman Kodak, General


Electric, Allis Chalmers, and numer-
ous other "blue-chip" firms.
By contrast, the Brookhaven area
only a few miles to the South offers
a sad example of almost complete
failure of planning and development.
In Brookhaven, the county govern-
ment has made almost every mistake
in the planning book.
Political Claims
Ironically, Candidate Candler
proudly boasts of the Holder devel-
opnient as if he was responsible for it.
Holder is diplomatic enough not to
protest, but the minor role played by
Candler is well known among expert
developers in the Atlanta area.
Candler's true ability as a planner
and developer is shown by his han-
dling of the Brookhaven situation.
This unincorporated business center,
lying just north of the Atlanta city
limits, has enjoyed tremendous
growth since World War II. If prop-
erly planned, it could have become a
model city. Instead, it has become a
monument to poor planning and to-
day is an almost hopeless muddle.
Here's a run-down on some of the
more obvious failures of Commis-
sioner Candler, who has held office
for the past 15 years:
Streets
The most universally-recognized
deficiency of the county government
in the Brookhaven area is failure to
build and maintain a suitable street
system. Some streets platted as early
as 1912 are still unpaved. Mud makes
passage dangerous in winter and dust
hangs over the neighborhood in sum-
mer. A fifteen-foot tree grows in an
intersection near the I.D. headquar-
ters office.
The main street through Brook-
haven is the northern extension of
Atlanta's famed Peachtree Street. But
Peachtree in Brookhaven is a bottle-
neck rather than a landmark. In fif-


teen years during which traffic vol-
ume has increased several hundred
per cent, the county's only remedial
action has been to defray part of the
cost of installing three traffic lights.
Proposals to widen the streets or pro-
vide traffic by-passes have failed to
receive action.
Political expediency, rather than
general need, seems to be the rule in
setting priority on road projects. If
there is a master road plan for the
county, it has not been announced.
Zoning and Land-Use
Another conspicuous failure of the
Candler regime is the lack of a suit-
able land-use plan for the Brookhaven
area. Since there is no plan for the
growth of the business area, friction
occurs each time an effort is made
to re-zone property for business use.
Accepted principles of planning and
zoning have been ignored.
For example, the main line of the
Southern Railroad passes through the
middle of the community and it seems
logical to reserve for business use the
property along the right of way. In-
stead, the county has allowed en-
croachment by low cost housing.
Now, a fight is underway to extend
the business area in the direction of
the exclusive Capital City Country
Club.
The Challenge
Since I.D. was launched there has
been a strong temptation to accept
one of several invitations to relocate
the headquarters office in another
area. It is embarrassing to publish a
planning and development magazine
in an area in which such activities
are neglected.
However, it is felt that such a move
at this time would reflect on our cit-
izenship. We feel that we must stay a
while longer and exert whatever in-
fluence we may in correcting the local
situation.
There are many Scott Candlers in
the country. While they may enjoy
the support of powerful machines,
they are not unbeatable.
In the coming elections the people
can strike a blow for sound planning
and development.


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


I.D. OPINION


September-October


- 3









What's so Attractive about a

Plant Site in the

Hampton Roads Port Area?


M uch if you serve extensive domestic and
S worldwide markets.

Functioning as one port unit, the Ports of Hampton Roads
-Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth and South Norfolk
-provide direct rail-to-ship service and many modern
facilities which make for speed and economy in the assembly
of raw materials and fast and more profitable distribu-
tion of finished products to principal markets.
Nine major railroads; 273 steamship lines; nearly 300
wharves, piers and docks; 215 acres in warehouses
and transit sheds; and many other diversified and special
port features -plus the fact that the Hampton Roads Port
Area is rich in business and industrial advantages .
with plenty of dependable electricity available-make this
area at the "TOP OF THE SOUTH" an ideal location.
For a complete answer to: "What's So Attractive About
a Plant Site in the Hampton Roads Port Area?"-com-
municate with us for full, accurate and confidential
information.

AREA DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

VIRGINIA ELECTRIC AND POWER COMPANY


I.D. OPINION



LETTERS


SIRS:
I have just received my May-
August issue of INDUSTRIAL DEVELOP-
MENT and am impressed by it. If
possible, I'd like very much to find
out how I could receive 6 sample
copies of the latest edition to show
our Zoning Commission and Indus-
trial Development group, as these
people should very definitely be on
your mailing list and I would like to
interest them in the publication.
JAMES YOUNG,
Asst. to the Pres.
"Automatic" Sprinkler Corp.
of America
Youngstown 1, Ohio

SIRS:
Mr. Crawford, president of Thomp-
son Products, has passed on issues
Number 2 and 3 of INDUSTRIAL DE-
VELOPMENT to me. However, if he re-
ceived it, Number 1 has been lost and
I should like to know if it would be
possible to obtain a copy.
I would like to say that INDUSTRIAL
DEVELOPMENT is an excellently pre-
pared magazine and has been very
useful to us in a field which pre-
viously was inadequately served by
technical journals.
H. J. FOEHRINGER,
Staff Engineer
Thompson Products, Inc.
Cleveland 17, Ohio

SIRS:
Will you please send ten (10) cop-
ies of the March-April 1954 issue of
"Industrial Development" to Mr.
James Q. du Pont, Room 8076-A du
Pont Building, Wilmington 99, Dela-
-ware. Charges for these should be
billed to Mr. du Pont.
ADELAIDE C. RUSSELL,
Secy.
E. I. du Pont de Nemours
& Co.
Wilmington 98, Delaware
Ed. We are usually able to fill or-
ders for extra copies of the current
issues. However, we had a much
larger number of requests for the first
two numbers than was expected. Our
supply of the January-February issue
is completely exhausted, and we have


RICHMOND 9, VIRGINIA


r


September-October








I.D. OPINION


only a small number of copies of the
March-April issue. Our Circulation
Department henceforth will make a
record of requests for the January-
February number, and if a sufficient
number of readers are interested, we
will have reprints made.

SIRS:
We have noted the article, "New
Study Reveals Influence of Automa-
tion in Location of Industry" in your
May-August issue. Because we be-
lieve most of the people in the indus-
try might challenge some of the rat-
ings placed upon the companies men-
tioned, we are wondering who your
informant may have been for this par-
ticular piece. If you consider the mat-
ter confidential, you can ignore this
inquiry. .
W. W. LOCKWOOD,
Adv. Mgr.
Taylor Instrument Com-
panies
Rochester 1, New York

Ed. Our source for this article was
the report by Dr. Osborne mentioned
on page 16. If reader Lockwood has
additional information, we would be
pleased to hear from him.

SIRS:
We are a new subscriber and
have read the last three issues with a
great deal of interest.
This Bureau of Business Research
has as one of its tasks the develop-
ment of surveys, studies and research
for towns, cities, firms and industries
which are within the general sphere
of Industrial Development. For ex-
ample, at the present time we are car-
rying on a study for a nearby city
which has to do with capital outlay
projection as it is affected by indus-
trial and residential development of
the town.
In the May-August issue I have just
read the "I. D. Opinion" material on
page two. I noted there that you
quoted that "perhaps at a later date
the New England Council can be en-
couraged to publish a book for its
area." I would like to inform you
that the New England Council has
been preparing a book since 1935 and
that the Bureau of Business Research
here at Boston University has done
the compilation of the information
and has recently printed its 1953 edi-
tion. We here in New England have


'v2 )


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I


found it of great value and note that
purchases of the complete book have
come from various parts of the United
States and in some cases from foreign
countries. For your information and
library may I offer you with our com-
pliments a copy of the "New England
Community Statistical Abstract."
This publication, which is available
in complete book form or in separate
two-page abstracts for each of the
metropolitan areas or counties in the
New England States sells for $8.50.
The two-page abstracts sell for $10
per 100.
JAMES W. KELLEY,
Director
Bureau of Business Research
Boston University
Boston 15, Massachusetts
Ed. The New England book is most
impressive, and we are glad to learn
about it. We recommend it to busi-
ness firms making location studies in
New England.

SIRS:
We have a firm interested in a new
plant site, and have been advised by
a friend here in Pittsburgh that you
people publish a magazine dealing
with the general subject of selecting
business sites.
Would you have any sample copies
of your magazine dealing in particu-
lar with the more important consid-
erations that a firm should bear in
mind in the location of new plants?
HARRY B. SCOTT,
Traffic Consultant
Scott Building
Pittsburgh 5, Pa.
Ed. We believe the Forman report
(p. 10, January-February), the du
Pont report (p. 8, March-April), and
the Allan report (p. 12, May-August)
furnish an excellent background for
site selection.

SIRS:
Stayed up most of last night read-
ing the May-August issue of INDUS-
TRIAL DEVELOPMENT.
I can truly say that I have gained
tremendous knowledge just thru read-
ing the one issue.
KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.
HARRY R. SHERMAN,
Realtor
Professional Building
Hialeah, Florida
Ed. We'll try.


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 5


- U


I


September-October


Industry is finding that out-
with Profit! In the center of
the thriving Carolinas is Char-
lotte. At the financial hub of
Charlotte is the American
Trust Company-ready with
immediate, reliable and con-
fidential service.

When you get ready to set
your sight on a Charlotte site,
write the Customer Relations
Department ..

or better yet,
come see us!



MEMBER FEDERAL
RESERVE SYSTEM
FEDERAL DEPOSIT
INSURANCE CORP.









It's Great to be in the MIDDLE


BUFFALO 0 ROCHESTER


of the Great MIDDLE MILLIONS !


The "Middle Millions" are America's king-size mass
market -the Jane and John Does who furnish the
market that factories feed on. You can build a factory
in The Land of Plenty and be right in the middle of this
tremendous market.
At the same time, you can have high-production
manpower for your plant, dependable N & W transpor-


station, the world's finest Bituminous Coal, ample power
and industrial water, varied raw materials and other
significant industrial advantages.
Let the N &W's plant location specialists give you full
details about ideal plant sites here "in the middle of
the Middle Millions." There's no obligation, and your
confidence will be respected. Just write, wire or call:


INDUSTRIAL AND AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT
Dra'ver ID-651 (Telephone 4-1451, Ext. 474)
Norfolk and Western Railway
ROANOKE, VIRGINIA

Transportation is a major factor in choosing a plant
site and your Traffic Manager is an expert in transporta-
tion. Be sure to consult him when you're considering
ho plant locations.





RAILWAY


I








TAXES


S '




Fr- +


George G. Hagedorn, assistant director of research, National Association of Man-
ufacturers, is shown (seated) discussing a point with Erik T. H. Kjellstrom,
NAM research director, and Mrs. Jean F. Cohen, chartist and research associate.


The New Tax Law


The much-publicized depreciation allowances
and rate changes in the new tax law are expected
to promote a substantial increase in new plant con-
struction. That such expansion offers the best
stimulus for the nation's economy is expertly ex-
plained in the following report by NAM's Assistant
Director of Research, George G. Hagedorn.


NEW YORK. Practically everyone
agrees that tax reductions, insofar as
they are permitted by reductions in
government spending, can be stimula-
ting to employment and to long-term
economic growth. But there are two
schools of thought on the question of
what form of tax reduction is likely
to be most beneficial.
One school contends that tax re-
duction should be aimed at stimulat-
ing consumer demand through the
process of leaving more "purchasing
power" in the hands of consumers.
They therefore favor reductions of
personal taxes in preference to busi-
ness taxes, and reductions of rates on
middle or higher incomes. Concrete-


ly, adherents of this point of view
propose that reductions take the form
of increased exemptions and cuts in
excise rates.
The other school believes that the
margin for tax reduction should be
used primarily to stimulate business
incentives for production and invest-
ment, and to increase the supply of
capital available for these purposes.
This side favors tax reduction in the
form of reduction in the progressive
rates of personal tax, cuts in the
corporation tax rate, more liberal al-
lowances for depreciation, etc.
Tax reduction has its stimulating
effect on the economy, if any, through
its influence on people's decisions to


buy things they otherwise would not
buy. Consumers may be led to pur-
chase more automobiles, housing,
clothing, or any of the other things
consumers buy. Business may be led
to buy more tools, machinery, build-
ings or inventories.
At the outset it should be remem-
bered that such stimulation to addi-
tional buying will be ineffective if the
economy's production resources are
already in full use. Under these cir-
cumstances the added stimulus for
buying meets no added supply of
goods to be bought. The result can
only be a bidding up of prices for the
existing supply that is, inflation.
Government Spending
But when tax reduction occurs as
a concomitant to reduction in govern-
ment spending a genuine increase in
private spending can occur. The gov-
ernment buys less and therefore re-
leases manpower and other facilities
for the production of additional
goods for private purchasers. The
purpose of the present analysis is to
determine how, in this type of situa-
tion, various forms of tax reduction
will affect spending, employment and
long-term growth.
Private expenditures may be di-
vided into two broad types: consumer
spending and investment spending.
Consumer spending consists of peo-
ple's purchases of food, clothing,
housing, automobiles, furniture, and
all the other things we use in our
daily lives. Investment spending in-
cludes the purchases of industrial ma-
chinery and buildings, tools, and sim-
ilar things that are used in the pro-
ductive process.
As far as immediate effects on em-
ployment are concerned there is little
reason for preferring one type of
spending to the other. People have
to be employed to produce consumer
goods just as they have to be em-
ployed to produce industrial equip-
ment. If consumers decide to buy an
additional billion dollars worth of
automobiles, about the same number
of people will be put to work making
the automobiles as would be put to
work if manufacturers decided to buy
an additional billion dollars worth of
factory machinery.
Investment Significant
But investment spending has a
long-run stimulating effect on employ-
ment and growth that consumer
spending does not have. When con-
sumers spend an additional billion
dollars on automobiles, the stimulus


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


-p


September-October










TAXES


/


to employment is over and done with
when the automobiles are delivered.
But when investors buy an additional
billion dollars worth of plant and
equipment, the plant and equipment
is available thereafter as part of the
nation's productive facilities. People
can be put to work in the new plants
using the new equipment. The nation
is strengthened and standards of liv-
ing can be raised as a result of our
increased productive capacity. Con-
stant investment to improve and ex-
pand our productive facilities is the
historical process which has made us
the richest and most powerful nation
on earth.
Tax reduction can affect the rate
of spending-either consumer spend-
ing or investment spending in two
separate ways. First, it can stimulate
spending through leaving a greater
amount of income in the hands of
those who have earned it to spend (or
not to spend) as they will. It is rea-
sonable to suppose that if taxpayers
receive a one billion dollar cut in
taxes they will spend at least a part
of the billion dollars to buy things
they would otherwise not have
bought. This is true whether the ad-
ditional money is left in the hands of
corporations, investors, or employees.
A second way in which tax reduc-
tion can stimulate spending is by
making it more profitable to purchase
certain types of investment goods. An
investor is more likely to buy new
machinery if he knows that the in-
come he will derive from using the
machinery will be taxed at a lower
rate.
In other words, tax reduction can
stimulate spending in two distinct
ways:
1. Through its effect on the supply
of spendable private funds.
2. Through its effect on incentives.
Effects of Tax Reduction on the
Flow of Income and Expenditure
Tax reduction, no matter what
form it takes, results in a greater sup-
ply of spendable funds in somebody's
hands. But this doesn't mean that
the additional funds will necessarily
be spent. They may be, or they may
not be. Only to the extent that the
increased funds result in an actual
increase in spending--either for
consumer goods or for investment
goods- can tax reduction stimulate
employment. It is at least conceiv-
able that different forms of tax re-
duction will have different effects on


the actual rate of spending, and this
problem will require some analysis.
As already explained, although
consumer spending and investment
spending have the same immediate ef-
fects on employment, investment
spending has long-run beneficial ef-
fects that consumer spending does
not have. It is possible that the va-
rious alternative forms of tax reduc-
tion, aside from their effects on total
private spending, will have effects on
the division of that total as between
consumer goods and investment
goods. This, too, requires some
thoughtful consideration.
It is, of course, impossible to pre-
dict precisely what any person or any
corporation will do with the addi-
tional income left as a result of a tax
reduction. But it is helpful at least
to examine all the alternative possi-
bilities. This is done systematically in
the tabulation on the next page.
When a taxpayer receives a cut in
his tax liability under the individual
income tax, his tax saving may be
used in any of four ways. He may
spend more for consumer goods; he
may make a greater amount available
(through various investment chan-
nels) for investment spending; he
may pay off debts; or he may pile
up cash.* The amount saved through
The taxpayer may also use the money to
buy an existing asset. But this simply
transfers the problem, since the seller
of the asset must then choose among the
four listed alternatives.


I. Reduction in personal
income taxes

Increase in the income af-
ter taxes of individuals,
leading to either:
A. Increased expenditure
on consumer goods*
or
B. Increased saving by in-
dividuals, taking the
form of either:
1. Increased investment*
or
2. Paying off of outstand-
ing debts
or
3. Increase in holdings of
cash


II. Reduction in excise
taxes

Decrease in the gross price
of goods and services to
purchasers, leading to
either:
A. Increase in physical
quantity of goods and
services purchased by
consumers*
or
B. Increased saving by in-
viduals, taking the form
of either:
1. Increased investment*
or
2. Paying off of outstand-
ing debts
or
3. Increase in holdings of
cash


III. Reduction in corpo-
ration taxes

Increase in the net profits
after taxes of corporations,
leading to either:
A. Increased dividends,
leading to an increase
of individual'income af-
ter taxes, with the same
effects as under I*
or
B. Increased retained earn-
ings, taking the form of
either:
1. Increased investment*
or
2. Paying off of outstand.
ing debts
or
3. Increase in holdings o
cash


* Immediately stimulating to employment


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


tax reduction must show up in one,
or a combination, of these four cate-
gories.
Tax reduction which shows up in
greater consumer spending or in
greater investment is stimulating to
employment. Tax reduction which re-
sults in the paying off of debts or in
the accumulation of cash has no im-
mediate effects on employment, since
in such cases nothing is bought. How-
ever, both the paying off of debts and
the accumulation of cash places the
taxpayer in a better position to buy
in the future.
If a cut in individual income taxes
is contemplated, it might take a va-
riety of forms. To list only two of
them, it might for example take the
form of an increase in exemptions,
or it might take the form of a reduc-
tion in the progressivity of the rates
on middle and upper incomes.
A comparison of these two alter-
natives suggests that an increase in
exemptions would probably be more
stimulatin, to consumer spending,
while a reduction in the progressive
rates would probably be more stimu-
lating to investment spending. But
there seems to be no good reason for
supposing that there would be any
substantial difference between the two
alternatives in their effects on total
spending.
Either type of tax reduction might
be used by taxpayers to pay off their


FIRST-STAGE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS FORMS OF TAX
REDUCTION ON THE FLOW OF INCOME
AND EXPENDITURE


r~7


September-Octol







TAXES


Kt




1~s

-J- .'


Cr S.


debts, and in this case it would not
have any immediate effect in raising
employment. Since consumers at all
levels of income have been increasing
their indebtedness rapidly in recent
years- particularly installment debt
and mortgage debt--this might oc-
cur to some extent. But these types
of debt usually call for repayment at
a specified monthly rate, and it is
unlikely that the rate of repayment
would be accelerated as a result of
a tax reduction.

Effects Uncertain


It.


However, the tax reduction may de-
crease the need for new borrowing.
S The consumer who would buy a car
on credit might find that, as a result
of the tax reduction, he is able to pay
cash for it instead. In this case the
tax reduction has not led to any
spending that would not have oc-
curred without it, and therefore has
not stimulated employment. Such in-
stances are more likely to occur when
tax reductions are concentrated on
the lower income brackets, who cus-
tomarily use installment credit.
S Finally, the taxpayer may simply
keep the amount he saves through
tax reduction in cash or its equiva-
lent. In this case the tax reduction
does not have any immediate effect
S in stimulating employment but the
taxpayer's increased cash holdings
put him in a better position to buy
later on.
There is no reason for supposing
S that any particular form of tax re-
duction is more likely to be kept in
: cash than any other form. True, per-
sons who have surplus funds to invest
customarily keep a certain reserve in
cash for meeting unexpected emer-
gencies or opportunities. But such
persons tend to hold their cash at a
minimum, since they prefer to keep
Their assets in forms which earn in-
come for them.
iTurning to an analysis of the effect
of a reduction in corporate income
taxes, exactly the same possibilities
S exist. When a corporation is allowed
to keep a larger part of the profit it
has earned, it may, first, distribute
the increased amount in the form of
greater dividends. If this happens the
tax saving becomes increased pur-
chasing power for individuals in the
same way as a reduction in tax rates
on individuals, with exactly the same
potentialities for increased consumer
spending or increased investment.


their decisions to invest for future
production, and their decisions to
hire men for both purposes, by the
amount of profit they can expect to
earn and keep from such activities.
Any reduction in the rate of taxa-
tion on income earned from invest-
ments tends to encourage production,
investment and employment. This
stimulation of incentives is most ef-
fective for types of tax reduction
which are concentrated on incomes
derived from business enterprise and
investment.
It should be emphasized that this
effect on incentives is in addition to
the effect of tax reductions in making
greater amounts available for private
spending. A cut in taxes on incomes
derived from labor has one effect in
stimulating business it releases
spendable funds. Tax reduction which
is designed to reduce the burden on
investment income has two stimulat-
ing effects--it releases spendable
funds and it improves incentives.
Prospects for Investment
In some quarters the view is held
that under present circumstances
there is no prospect of increasing the
rate of investment through tax reduc-
tions on investment incomes. It is
argued that, since production is below
the levels attained in 1953, there is no
reason for anyone to invest in addi-
tional productive facilities. According
to this view there is insufficient de-
mand to keep present facilities occu-
pied and until this slack is taken up
there is no incentive, whatever the
tax situation, for any further invest-
ment. Therefore, adherents of this
theory conclude, the first objective in
tax reduction must be to increase the
purchasing power of consumers.
It may first be noted that if this
were a correct appraisal of the cur-
rent situation, the rate of investment
should by now have declined virtually
to zero. Businessmen should all be
marking time waiting for consumer
demand to catch up with their present
capacity. But the facts are quite dif-
ferent, as revealed in the following
tabulation:
Business Expenditures for New
Plant and Equipment
(Billions of dollars, seasonally
adjusted annual rates)
1953 First Quarter $27.8
Second Quarter 28.5
Third Quarter 28.9
Fourth Quarter 28.6
1954 First Quarter 27.5
Second Quarter 26.9*
Third Quarter 26.8*
Estimate
There has been no appreciable de-
cline in business purchases of plant


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


Typical of company executives con-
cerned with the problem of setting
aside depreciation allowances to pro-
vide for future plant expansion is
Louis Ware, President, International
Minerals and Chemicals Corporation,
Chicago. "Our business offers opptr,
tunity for continued growth and it is
estimated that during the next couple
of years we will use approximately $10
million per year for new capital addi-
tions which have been planned for a
long time," he said recently.

If the corporation decides to retain
the amount it saved through tax re-
duction, rather than passing it on to
stockholders, the retained amount
may be spent for machinery, plant,
etc.; it may be used to pay off debt;
or it may be accumulated in cash.
The last outcome is the least likely,
since corporations do not ordinarily
withhold profits from their stock-hold-
ers simply to keep them in the form of
an unproductive hoard of cash. They
retain profits when they need them to
buy the things necessary for carrying
out their business plans machinery,
buildings, etc. This type of spending
stimulates employment in the short
run, and contributes toward employ-
ment, productivity, and growth in the
longer run.
Effects of Tax Reduction
On Incentives
The economic effects of a reduction
in taxes are not necessarily limited to
the resulting increase in the spend-
able funds available to taxpayers. On
top of these effects, the taxpayers
may be stimulated to further job-
creating activities by the greater pros-
pective profitability of future opera-
tions.
Under our system businessmen are
guided in their decisions to produce,


September-October








TAXES


and equipment. Throughout 1953 and
even into the first quarter of 1954
such outlays have remained close to
an all time high. Business plans evi-
dently call for total plant and equip-
ment expenditures in 1954 only slight-
ly below the all-time record set last
year.
The main reason why investment
expenditures have held up even dur-
ing the increase in unemployment is
that business men base their invest-
ment decisions on long-term consid-
erations, rather than on the passing
picture. It takes time to build new
plant and install new equipment. Af-
ter they are installed, the normal ex-
pectation is that they will be in use
for many years. In purchasing plant
and equipment businessmen must be
guided by their expectations for the
future, rather than their observations
of the immediate present.
Even when some of the existing
capacity of an industry lies idle, there
is still an incentive for the installa-
tion of new, more modern and more
efficient, equipment. In fact, in such
a situation competition is intensified
and there is even greater incentive
for businessmen to improve their
competitive position by installing the
most efficient models. Whether busi-
nessmen actually do so depends on
their faith in the future, and their
hope of earning a profit on their in-
vestment. Reduction of taxes can in-
fluence these fundamental factors.

Where Has the
"Squeeze" Occurred?
Of course, there must always be a
balance between consumption and in-
vestment, and between consumers' in-
comes and business incomes. We
would not expect consumers to live
on nothing a year while all our re-
sources are devoted to producing
plant and equipment. If it turned out
that consumers' incomes had in recent
years fallen far behind investors' in-
comes, we might expect that any pos-
sible tax reduction should be framed
so as to redress this inequity and
thereby restore health to the econ-
omy.
The fact is that the "squeeze" has
all been the other way. Investors'
incomes have not kept pace with other
types of income. This is indicated in
the accompanying statistics on what
happened between 1950 and 1953
(money figures in billions of dol-
lars) :


If we were to accept the view that
present difficulties are due to a distor-
tion in the income pattern, and that
tax reductions should be used to cor-
rect that distortion, the facts would
force us to conclude that tax reduc-
tions should be aimed at giving spe-
cial relief to income derived from
investment.
Summary of Major Conclusions
1. Additional spending of any
character whether for consumer
goods or for industrial plant and
equipment has a stimulating effect
on production and employment. How-
ever spending for plant and equip-
ment has in addition a long-run bene-
ficial effect on economic growth that
consumer spending does not have.
2. Any form of tax reduction re-
leases funds for increased spending
either by consumers or by business.
A reduction of the tax burden on in-
vestment income has a further effect
on spending through improving the
expected profitability of investment
outlays.
3. Savings to taxpayers resulting
from tax cuts may in some instances
remain unspent and therefore have
no effect in stimulating production.
This is not likely to occur in the case
of a tax saving to investors, since in-
vestors prefer to keep their resources
in forms which can earn a return.
4. Under present circumstances
there is every reason to expect that
investment spending can be main-
tained or increased. What happens
will depend in part on the anticipated
profitability of investment as af-
fected by trends in the tax structure.
5. In recent years incomes from
investments have not kept pace with
the growth in consumer incomes in
general. Any form of tax reduction
which denies relief to investment in-
comes would intensify the distortion.


Average Plant Costs
$12,000 Per Worker,
New Survey Shows

The relationship between invest-
ment in plant facilities and employ-
ment is further illustrated by a re-
poi, "Investment for Jobs," recently
released by the Chamber of Com-
merce of the U. S. A study conducted
by Emerson P. Schmidt, Director,
Economic Research Department,
shows the approximate investment per
worker required in manufacturing in-
dustries in the post war period, as
follows:
Cost
Factor % of total
Machinery and Equipment $3,197 25.5%
Building 3,155 25.0
Inventory 2,943 23.4
Working Capital 2,868 22.8
Financing Costs 232 1.8
Land 186 1.3
Miscellaneous 24 0.2
Total $12,605 100.0%
Since the total labor force in the
nation is growing in the amount of
approximately one million workers
per year, it is evident from this study
that an annual investment of $12.6
billion is required if the country sim-
ply is to hold its own against unem-
ployment. Moreover, if nearly one
million additional workers are re-
leased due to increases in efficiency, it
will be necessary to invest other bil-
lions to provide new employment for
these workers.
In addition it is necessary to pro-
vide new opportunities for workers
displaced in industries that are de-
clining. Also, the increasing cost of
industrial construction intensifies the
severity of the problem.
It is evident, therefore, that tax
policies which encourage industrial
expansion are vital to the nation's


INCOME TRENDS, 1950-53

Percentage
1950 1953* Change


Total individual income after taxes
Total corporate income after taxes
Dividend payments (before personal taxes)
* Average of first three quarters


$205.8 $247.9 +20%
22.7 19.0 -16%
9.1 9.3 + 2%


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


September-October








t



nt


4 L I
A







'









Cr **


<.





-I
-I'
*y^- *


September-October


economy. It is a tribute to
prise of American industry
pension has occurred so r
spite of a comparatively
policy.
While the much heralded
tion plan of liberalization ii
tax law will be very helpfi
falls far short of the incent
in other countries. For ex
Western Germany corpora
allowed to write off the co!
production equipment in th
which the new investment
Sweden has a similar proviso
Britain permits about half
vestment to be written off ii
year. Canada allows abou
cent write-off in 3 years.

$250 Billion Expa
In Next Decade
Seen by Greenew

DETROIT. Tax reform
spurs the incentives to grea
trial development will lighter
for everybody, Crawford H
walt, president of the Du P
pany, said here recently.
Our industrial economy i
ly or indirectly, the source o
our tax revenues" but the p!
system raises barriers to bu
pension and improvement
would otherwise lower the b
all.
Applying the concept of
production to the tax quest
should aim for a system
low rates assessed against a
growing national output,"
gested. "The more we can
our real wealth and inc
greater will be the gross tax
Tax reform can promote
prosperity, he said, if it is
the fact that government rev
industrial progress "are b
gether in a single package'
the realization that "an e
economy means greater reve
a lower per capital burden.':
Mr. Greenewalt address
nual members luncheon m
the Economic Club of Detr
The approach should be o
couraging production and e
he said.
"Plainly, anything that
such development is a pena
all of us, including the tax


TAXES

the enter-
that ex-
apidly in
strict tax *

deprecia-
n the new
ul, it still
tive plans
ample, in
tions are
st of new
e year in
is made.
ion. Great
of the in-
n the first
it 50 per


nsion


ralt

n which
ter indus-
n the load
. Greene-
ont Com-

s "direct-
>f most of
resent tax
siness ex-
it which
urden for

industrial
ion, "We
based on
large and
he sug-
increase
ome, the
x yield."
national
based on
'enue and
ound to-
" and on
expanding
nues with

d the an-
eeting of
oit.
ne of en-
xpansion,

penalizes
lty upon C
collector,

11 OceanI d.


) KINDS




MATE*





Air conditioning in Long Beach is
done by nature! The air is fresh,
and cleared by invigorating ocean
breezes. Mechanical cooling
devices are not necessary. The
excellent working conditions result
in lower absenteeism and reduced
turn-over, as well as higher working
efficiency. Naturally the famed
climate of Long Beach makes for
happier employees.
The "industrial climate" also
offers fair weather the year 'round.
Really low-cost utilities, excellent
transportation including America's
most modern port, advantageous
tax-structure, lower costs for land
and building, and an exceptional
labor pool all add up to sunshine
on your profit ledger.

Write today for full and confi-
dential information.


RC DPRMETO INDUTR








LOCATION FACTORS


first in depriving us of consumer ben-
efits that arise from productive gains
and, second, in exaggerating the
amount of the tax burden each indi-
vidual must carry. Any tax method
that can improve our productive ca-
pacity will favor us all and will reduce
the burden on each of us."
Tax reform must enlarge opportu-
nities for industrial expansion by:
"Keeping as much purchasing pow-
er as possible in the hands of the
consumers;
"Providing sufficient financial in-
centive to preserve our pioneering
spirit; and
"Making sure that there is enough
capital available to finance new pro-
duction facilities as they are needed."
The present system hinders oppor-
tunity because of the government's
diversion of purchasing power, be-
cause high taxes limit personal incen-
tives which bring out the highest
leadership and inventive develop-
ment, and because high rates slow
down expansion by making it diffi-
cult for new business to get the money
it needs to start or grow, Mr. Greene-
walt said.
During the next 10 years, industry
must have $250 billion of new capital
if the rate of improvement in stan-
dards of living is to continue, he said.

NICB Survey Shows
Mills Plan Unpopular
NEW YORK. Accelerated income-
tax payments, as required under the
so-called Mills Plan, are having an
adverse effect upon the operations of
more than one third of the 198 manu-
facturing companies cooperating in a
survey recently conducted by the Na-
tional Industrial Conference Board.
The Board found that most large
companies, and many smaller ones,
have been able to comply with the
speed-up schedule called for by the
Revenue Act of 1950 without undue
strain. But 65 cooperators were
forced to borrow money, defer normal
outlays, reduce inventories, or take
other unusual steps to meet the March
15, 1954, tax installment. Many other
companies point out that even though
they were not seriously affected, they
were inconvenienced.
The most common complaint of co-
operating executives against the pro-
posed acceleration plan is that the
program would deplete working capi-


tal, with an attendant curtailment of
capital improvements and expansion
at a time when the economy needs
priming rather than dampening.
Some cooperators report that esti-


mates of profit required under the
plan would be difficult to make, while
others say the program would require
payment of five and one-half years'
taxes in a five-year period.


LOCATION TIP:


Be Sure Community Problems Are Licked

Before You Locate After Yov Move In,

You'll Have to Solve Them Yourself


SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. It is a lot
easier to get things done by local com-
munities before you select your site
than it is after you move in. This is
just another reason why it pays to ex-
plore every possible factor before
picking a site.
A good example is afforded by the
experience of the Basford Manufac-
turing Company which moved its tool
and die plant here from San Fran-
cisco several years ago. The story was
told at a recent Industrial Develop-
ment Workshop (I.D. May-August,
p. 33) by Archie M. Schwieso, Vice-
President of the Basford Company.
Soon after Basford moved into a
building located near the lower end
of a drainage basin here, it was dis-
covered that a serious flood control
problem existed. A railroad grade
across the end of the drainage area
acted as a dam and when rain fell for


Basford's Schwieso

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


several days the plant area was
flooded.
Prior to selection of the site
Schwieso had inspected the area in
dry weather and the possibility of a
flood was never considered. When he
discovered his predicament, he was
astonished to have natives tell him,
"Why it has always flooded over
there."
Schwieso bought a rain gauge and
before long became quite expert in
predicting the water level around the
plant. He soon learned that an inch
and half of rain in 24 hours produced
a flood 18 inches deep at the plant
gate.
Meanwhile he addressed letters to
the City Manager and City Council
urging a flume under the railroad
grade but was advised that there was
no money in the budget for it. After
attending the budget sessions of the
City Council and working with a citi-
zens' committee for many months,
Schwieso finally got approval of the
.project. In doing so he became an
expert on matters of zoning, street
improvements, and special assess-
ments.
He emphasizes, however, that he is
not bitter about his experience. Bas-
ford has found that its move from a
small plant in crowded quarters in
San Francisco to the new site in Santa
Cruz has relieved pressure on the
company and improved the labor sit-
uation. Most employees now live in
their own homes and can get to work
in 5 to 10 minutes. Moreover, Santa.
Cruz is a resort area and offers un-
usual recreational opportunities.
Schwieso concludes, "If you are
already located in a community you
have to help solve your own prob-
lems."


September-October


'F..- --















A




1'


4

'5


FEDERAL
REPORT


"Several years ago a National In-
dustrial Dispersion Policy was an-
nounced. And very little happened.
We continued building mostly in the
big target areas where it's easy to
kill us in bunches."
According to Congressman Richard
Bolling (D-Mo.), "The reason very
little happened is simple; that 'policy'
has never been really implemented by
an effective program." Moreover, he
says, "It is not yet clear how best we
can actually achieve that objective."
Arguing for a more determined na-
tional dispersion program, Bolling
says, "There are literally hundreds of
ways in which the federal government
could encourage industries and peo-
ple to move out of primary target
*" areas." Among these he lists chan-
neling government contracts for de-
fense purposes to industries located
outside primary target areas, using
the taxing power of the government
to encourage institutions to move out
of target areas, amending housing leg-
S isolation to reduce federal insurance
guarantees on units in or near target
S areas, and revising federal aids to
business so that those building new
S plants within target areas would lose
S certain advantages.

S ODM Program

SMeanwhile the Office of Defense
Mobilization has announced that it
S will authorize rapid tax amortization
benefits for companies which desire
to move critical defense production
S facilities out of target areas. The new
concessions will apply to facilities
where production transfers and other
techniques such as protective con-
struction and stockpiling cannot al-
S leviate the danger.
ODM has asked all federal agencies
to survey the critical facilities under
their jurisdiction and consult with in-
dustry representatives. Most manu-
' facturing industries are handled by
- the Business and Defense Services
Administration in the Department of
Commerce. Other agencies having im-
portant responsibilities include the
Departments of Defense, Interior, Ag-
riculture and the Defense Transport
Administration.


i


September-October


WITH


MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA
v l"'One of the South's Fastest Growing Cities
Where There is Still Time and Opportunity to
Locate Your Plant Advantageously.


I >
ASK THESE
ENTHUSIASTIC
INDUSTRIES
METAL:
Standard Forge & Axle Mfg. Co.
H. R. Silver, Gen. Mgr.
TEXTILE:
West Boylson Mfg. Co. of Ala.
0. Arthur Cook, Treat., Gen. Mgr.
FOOD PRODUCTS:
Ala-Go Syrup Co.
L. B. Whitfield, res.
FURNITURE:
Victorian Furniture Corp.
Leo Weinstein, Exec. Vice Pres.
These industries
and many others
have found locat-
ing in Montgom-
ery to be a ral
-I advantage. They
-l ~invite your inquiry.


WE WANT YOUR INDUSTRY

...and Here's What We
Have to Offer-

TRANSPORTATION
6 Major Railroads
27 Major Truck Lines
2 Major Air Lines
SURPLUS LABOR
EASILY TRAINED
High percentage of easily trained high
school graduates available
NEW AND GROWING MARKETS
Montgomery is ideally located to serve
the demanding new Southern market
OTHER FACTORS
Plentiful Power and Water Supply
Natural Gas
Temperate Climate
A New and Growing Markets
Cooperative Business and Govern-
ment Leaders


STATISTICAL DATA AVAILABLE-
ALL INQUIRIES TREATED CONFIDENTIALLY


Call or Write Today
Paul Corwin
INDUSTRIAL COMMITTEE, Montgomery, Ala.
P. 0. Box 79 Phone 4-8416


In


I







LOCATION FACTORS


Walt Disney examines an artist's conception of Disneyland with C. V. Wood, Jr.,
and Harrison A. Price of SRI's Los Angeles office. Following completion of the
site study, Wood was appointed general manager of Disneyland.


Location Survey


WALT DISNEY USES RESEARCH STUDY

TO FIND SITE FOR $9 MILLION FAIR


LOS ANGELES. Walt Disney may
be synonymous with fun with most
Americans, but when it comes to site
selection Disney is all business.
The Mickey Mouse mogul has just
completed plans for a $9 million
"combination world's fair, play-
ground, museum of living facts, and
showplace of beauty and magic." To
be located in the metropolitan area
here, the spectacular installation will
reflect a year of intensive study by
engineers, economists, and other re-
searchers.
When completed in 1955, Disney-
land will feature entertainment in
four major realms: Fantasyland,
Frontierland, True-Life Adventure-
land, and Land of Tomorrow. From
these will come subjects for Disney-
land television series beginning on
ABC-TV in October.
Ten months ago, Disney called in
Stanford Research Institute (I.D.
Jan.-Feb. page 30) to make economic


feasibility and location studies for
the big undertaking. The site search
involved dividing the Los Angeles
metropolitan area into 10 geographic-
ally homogeneous districts to which
set standards of comparison could be
applied.
Areas to be investigated were sub-
stantially reduced by disqualifying
land in which there were intensive
improvement and build-up, producing
oil fields or leases, poor topographi-
cal features, municipal parks, golf
courses, airports, and land under gov-
ernment control.
The selection of specific sites for
close consideration was made after
studying population trends, accessi-
bility, topography, environmental
characteristics, zoning, tax rates, and
available utilities. Using these cri-
teria, some 40 sites were initially
selected.
The possible sites were first nar-
rowed to four top choices; then, after


detailed weighing of location factors,
a 160-acre site near Anaheim in Or-
ange County was picked. This site
comprises 15 parcels in an unincor-
porated area adjoining the Santa Ana
Freeway about 15 minutes' driving
time from the downtown area.
Attendance Prediction
SRI's feasibility study included a
thorough survey of attendance pqt-
terns for amusement areas and the
projection of an annual rate of opera-
tions for Disneyland. This was based
on the size of the local population
reservoir, tourist activity in the area,
and attendance figures for related
enterprises. It is estimated that 5,-
000,000 visitors annually, averaging
15,000 daily, will go through Disney-
land. The study took into considera-
tion the seasonal, monthly, and daily
fluctuations of tourist volume.
SRI's report included typical rela-
tionship patterns between attendance
and total dollar sales volume in out-
door amusement enterprises. A con-
servative annual revenue was pro-
jected and revenue distribution bro-
ken down between amusement, food
and refreshment, and merchandise.
These figures were presented as a
planning guide for the Disneyland
management.
A similar breakdown was made for
projected costs. For this, the re-
searchers developed a functional or-
ganization plan to establish the op-
erating framework. By estimating the
different jobs involved in each func-
tion, a forecast of direct and indirect
labor costs was prepared. These costs
were based on a variable staff organi-
zation capable of operating Disney-
land with up to 5,000,000 visitors a
year.
Other costs estimated were insur-
ance, materials, food, and merchan-
dise. The latter two were based on as-
sumed operating profits. Profit esti-
mates for .customer spending levels
were projected and a break-even at-
tendance figure calculated.
Capacity Studies
The researchers also concerned
themselves with the problem of plan-
ning capacity in relation to expected
attendance, load factors, and sched-
ules. Data on these were gathered
and capacity estimates made- sub-
ject to a series of variables. These
capacity studies covered each of the
project's planned activities. Manage-
ment problems and policies were also


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


September-October











4.




I






1r



V-
4-- -
i^ -


Check these reasons why Greater
Vancouver offers such excellent


An abundance of low-cost
electric power
A wide network of rail,
deep-sea harbours and
highway transportation
facilities
Ready access to a vast
storehouse of raw materials
Proximity to your principal
markets
Choice of industrial sites


The Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Industrial Develop-
ment Commission was created to do one important job ...
to help representatives of industry the world over with
information and to suggest suitable industrial locations.
Your request for such information will be answered in
confidence and in detail.
To assist in providing this service, the Commission pub-
lished recently a new edition of their booklet "Amazing
British Columbia". It is designed to assist executives in
primary and secondary industries to analyze the present
picture of the tremendous industrial expansion now in full
swing in B. C.


7 GREATER VANCOUVER METROPOLITAN INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION
1 -521 Marine Building, Vancouver 1, Canada








































Local variations in climatic conditions were given careful considera-
tion in the Disneyland site survey. Stanford Research revealed sig-
nificant differences in atmospheric haze (above) and average sum-
mer minimum temperature (below). Average summer afternoon
relative humidity was also charted.


September-October


LOCATION FACTORS

taken into account, based iscus-
sions with operators of successful
amusement enterprises. SRI teams
visited half a dozen of the country's
better-known amusement centers and
evaluated the various factors in their
operations.
C. V. Wood, Jr., SRI's manager of
economics research in this area, su-
pervised the Disneyland study. At its
conclusion, Wood moved over to be-
come general manager and vice-presi-
dent of Disneyland. Harrison A.
Price, project leader, replaced Wood
in charge of economics research in
the Los Angeles area. Under Price's
direction, SRI's work for Disneyland
is continuing, with emphasis on the
merchandising aspects of the enter-
prise. Disneyland will contain twenty
or thirty fine-shops, stocking items
covering a variety of lines, including
Disney character merchandise, west-
ern goods, ceramics, toys, nuts and
candies, imports, and metalware.
Each section will be an innovation,
aimed at both entertaining and edu-
cating. Fantasyland will feature a
multitude of unique attractions, in-
cluding Pleasure Island, Merlin's
Magic Shop, the Diamond Mines of
the Seven Dwarfs, the Peter Pan Fly-
Through, the Alice in Wonderland
Ride-Through, and other amusements
based on storybook characters im-
mortalized by Disney on film.
Frontierland is designed as a
glimpse into yesterday, where Amer-
ica's historical past will come to life.
This is the realm of Davy Crockett,
Paul Bunyan, Pecos Bill, Daniel
Boone, and Johnny Appleseed. Early
American stores and buildings will
line boardwalked streets.
Look at Future
The Land of Tomorrow is con-
ceived as a venture into the future.
Many industrial organizations will
help to demonstrate the wonders of
science and what the future holds.
Other features planned are Holiday
Land (with seasonal attractions),
Recreation Park, a five-eighths-scale
railroad, a 105-foot stern-wheel river
boat, scaled-down covered-wagons
and stagecoaches, and a walled castle
surrounded by a moat.
Associated with Disney in the Dis-
neyland project are Walt Disney Pro-
ductions, American Broadcasting-
Paramount Theatres, Inc., and the
Western Printing and Lithographing
Company of Racine, Wisconsin, print-
er of Disney publications for twenty
years.














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Geographic Division


X!.


Per Cent Gain
1950-1952


West South Central 15
Pacific 15
Mountain 15
East South Central 19
South Atlantic 15
West North Central 12
East North Central 15
Middle Atlantic 11
New England 12
Cash Farm Income exceeded $31
billion during 1953, with farmers
averaging $1,290 per capital and $4,-
945 per household. This compares
with a National Effective Buying In-
come of $1,537 per capital and $5,173
per household.


OTHER SOURCES


Market researcher A. Edwin Fein is shown at his desk with his secretary, Miss Anne
Hamilton. The new marketing chart is shown on the wall in the background..

Information Sources


NEW CHART SHOWS REGIONAL MARKET

COMPARISONS IN CONVENIENT FORM


NEW YORK. With the release of
the 10th annual edition of "A Basic
Marketing Chart of the U. S." another
tool has been placed at the disposal
of the market researcher. The new
chart is a revised edition of the pre-
sentation that has been offered an-
nually by the Research Company of
America here.
The marketing chart, accompanied
by tables on U. S. income patterns by
major occupation and industry
groups, was prepared under the su-
pervision of A. Edwin Fein, Research
Company's Managing Director. Fein
has conducted market studies for
more than 50 nationally known firms
during the past 14 years.
The new chart reveals that the ci-
vilian population of the U. S. in-
creased 5.1 per cent between 1950
and 1953. The greatest gain was made
by the Pacific Division which showed
an increase of 12.1 per cent.
Life insurance sales per capital
jumped from $112 in 1950 to $146


in 1953. The Middle Atlantic States
lead with a figure of $172.
During 1953, 58 per cent of all
families in the United States owned
television sets, and 69 per cent en-
joyed home telephone service.
During 1953 more than 45 million
automobiles were privately owned in
the United States, of which approxi-
mately 40 per cent were registered in
the Middle Atlantic and East North
Central Divisions.
The chart shows an estimate of
1953 Retail Sales in excess of $172
billion for the nation as a whole, of
which 44.0 per cent was recorded by
the Middle Atlantic and East North
Central Divisions.
Income of Americans, it is noted,
jumped from $217.8 billion ($1,440
per capital) in 1950 to $255.4 billion
($1,639 per capital) in 1952, an in-
crease of 14 per cent. The nine geo-
graphic divisions show the following
gains in income:


C------------- 001000.004--
BUSINESSMEN'S CONFERENCE
ON INDUSTRIAL DEFENSE IN
THE ATOMIC AGE, Manufacture
Department, Chamber of Commerce
of the U. S., Washington 6, D. C.,
68 pp., $1.00.
NEEDED: A CIVILIAN RE-
SERVE, Planning Pamphlets No. 86,
National Planning Association, 1606
New Hampshire Ave., N. W., Wash-
ington 9, D. C. June 1954, 49 pp.,
$1.00.
FREE THE ATOM! 20 QUES-
TIONS AND ANSWERS BY NA-
TIONAL AUTHORITIES ON THE
COMING INDUSTRIAL DEVELOP-
MENT OF ATOMIC ENERGY BY
PRIVATE ENTERPRISE, National
Association of Manufacturers, 2 East
48th Street, New York 17, N. Y., Sec-
ond Printing: May, 1954, 30 pp.,
$.25.
THE COMMUNITY INDUSTRI-
AL DEVELOPMENT SURVEY, De-
partment of Manufacture, Chamber
of Commerce of the United States,
Washington 6, D. C., 500 each, 18 pp.
COMMUNITY INDUSTRIAL DE-
VELOPMENT KIT, Sales and Dis-
tribution Division, U. S. Department
of Commerce, Washington 25, D. C.,
$2.25 each.
FINDING PROSPECTS FOR
COMMUNITY INDUSTRIAL DE-
VELOPMENT, Department of Manu-
facture, Chamber of Commerce of the
United States, Washington 6, D. C.,
50 each, 27 pp.
FUNCTIONS OF A MUNICIPAL
FINANCIAL CONSULTANT, J. Ba-
sil Ramsey, Chairman, Wainwright
& Ramsey, Inc., Municipal Finance
Consultants, 70 Pine Street, New
York City, 1954, 7 pp.


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


INFORMATION SOURCES


iNFORMAtlON


SOURCES


September-October








i* INFORM






I


i











~1



,HI
i I







J
!/


NAM Report Lists
Growth By 1975
America by 1975 will have a popu-
lation of 190,000,000, according to
estimates made by the Social Security
Administration.
This will represent an increase of
about 29,000,000 over the population
of 1954. These figures reflect the po-
tentialities for this country's growth
and demonstrate that there is no fore-
seeable limit on our capacity to pro-
duce, if we have the incentives and if
we use our physical resources intel-
ligently.
An increase in population and con-
tinuance of America's traditionally
expanding economy will bring an in-
crease in the labor force to about
88,600,000. This will mean 22,100,-
-000 more persons will be at work in
1975 than were in 1954.
America by 1975 will have 15,-
600,000 more households than it had
at the end of April 1953, according


WITHIN THE CHICAGO SWITCHING


In Debt-Free Indiana ... Only 20

Miles From the Chicago Loop Yet Out of Congested
Area 300 Acres, Plus Complete Financing
... Choice of Built-to-Suit, Sale or Lease... Write
for Illustrated "Facts File."


The South Shore Industrial District
OWNED AND SPONSORED BY THE CHICAGO SOUTH SHORE AND SOUTH BEND RAILROAD
EXCLUSIVE AGENTS: J. J. HARRINGTON & CO., 22 W. MONROE ST., CHICAGO 3, ILL.


NATION SOURCES


MEASURE OF POPULATION GAIN- The U. S. population is increas-
ing at a phenomenal rate. By 1975 rising birth rates and declining death
rates are expected to add 40 to 60 million people. This is roughly equivalent
to the 52 million people living in the 22 states west of the Mississippi River.
The National Association of Manufacturers says that to provide jobs for the
estimated 22 million new people entering the work force will require an in-
vestment of at least $264 billion in plants and equipment. The estimate is
based on studies which show that today's average investment per job is
about $12,000.


_ ;_____















ct
IC


~ K




f


.i *
4







'V


Parking as a Factor in Business,
S by the Highway Research Board, Spe-
cial Report 11, containing five papers
presented at the Thirty-Second An-
nual Meeting, January 13-16, 1953,
321 pp., $6.
This book deals primarily with the
relationship of parking and retail
business. .However, some of the data
should be helpful in studying traffic
problems as they influence industrial
plant site selection. Studies of park-
ing and related conditions in Colum-
bus, Seattle, Detroit, and San Fran-
Scisco are used to develop planning
principles.
" Public Administration Organi-
S zations, Frank B. Cliffe, Editor, Pub-
lic Administration Clearing House,
1313 East 60th Street, Chicago 37,
Illinois, 1954, 150 pp., $2.50.
S Many of the organizations listed in
this volume are in a position to fur-
nish data useful in industrial plan-
ning. In one section of the book the


September-October


IS YOUR CURRENT PLANT SITE


INFORMATION

to The Report of Paley Commission,
appointed by President Eisenhower.
In April, 1953, there were 46,800,-
000 households in the U. S. By 1975
there will be an estimated 62,400,000.
This indicates 500,000 to 600,000 will
be replaced in 1975 and an additional
800,000 to 1 million will be built to
absorb the net increase in population.
Public construction, therefore, is
expected to be about 50 per cent
above the 1950 level by 1975. It is
estimated the general rise in construc-
tion will be about 30 per cent between
1950 and 1975.


NEW BOOKS


The Community Builders Hand-
book, by Community Builders' Coun-
cil of the Urban Land Institute, 1737
K Street, N. W., Washington 6, D. C.,
1954, 314 pp., $12.
While this book deals primarily
with planning residential subdivisions
and shopping centers, it should be
helpful to industrial planners who are
concerned with housing and shopping
facilities adjacent to manufacturing
areas. This new edition includes in-
formation on site selection, analysis
of market potentials, problems of
building near airports, and principles
of street layout and efficient lot use.


The Industrial Development Foundation, Inc., a
non-profit corporation extends a "HELPING HAND"
to both new and established Auburn industry. This
direct method of rendering quick and accurate
decisions eliminates the usual "red tape" in the
handling of such problems.
THE FOUNDATION CAN OFFER YOU A SOLU-
TION TO YOUR PRODUCTION AND
DISTRIBUTION PROBLEM
Auburn, New York is already established as an
ideal industrial area which is now in a position to
offer new industries a complete chain of manufac-
turing opportunities.. .just briefly state your problem
on your business letterhead, it then becomes half ours.


ITHORIZED COMMITTEE


Zaoe U7 WDE VE LO PM ENT
FOUNDATION, INC. of AUBURN, N. Y.
160 GENESEE STREET

ACENT TO N.Y. STATE THRU-WAY FINGER LAKES VACATION LAND


F


AUBURN, NEW YORK

6#e CONTINUING


I


-----








INFORMATION SOURCES


1 HR. TO PHILADELPHIA. 21/2-NYC
OFFICIAL CO-OPERATION
2000 WORKERS AVAILABLE
WILL SELL ALL OR PART OR BUILD
TO SUIT AND LEASE. ECONOMIC.
BROKERS PROTECTED.

Randall & Richards Corp., Ltd.
B27-555 E. 27 St. Paterson, N.J. LA. 3-4216
NO STATE SALES AND INCOME TAX
"At the Crossroads of the East"








1,000 to 100,000 Sq. Ft.-DON'T
GET HALF A BUILDING-GET EV-
ERYTHING COMPLETE WE ARE
TERRIFIC PLUMBERS AND BUILD-
ERS ALL INDIANS, NO CHIEFS -
GET OUR FLOOR PLAN AND LEASE
PACKAGE PLAN AND YOUR AC-
COUNTANT WILL REALLY BELIEVE
IN MIRACLES
BROKERS PROTECTED

Metuchen Industrial Center, Inc.
B27 555 E. 27 St, Paterson, N. J.
LA. 3-4216


This typical sampler grid shows the layout of test stations for measuring air
contamination in the vicinity of an industrial plant or area. The method
employs tracer techniques introduced by the Ralph H. Parsons Company of
Los Angeles., -


major organizations are classified ac-
cording to field of activity so that it
is possible to identify data sources on
specific subjects. Organizations active


LOOKING FOR INDUSTRIAL SITES?

Let "Nick Plate" send you our detailed and accurate "Along
the Line" surveys covering natural and agricultural resources,
utilities, labor and other pertinent data relating to each specific
location. Just tell us the area or type of location you are inter-
ested in. Call or write:


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT
DEPARTMENT
1406 TERMINAL TOWER CLEVELAND 1, OHIO


in the industrial development field are
included in a section, "Economics
and Business Planning."

Proceedings of the 1954 South-
ern Industrial Wastes Conference,
published by the Manufacturing
Chemists' Association, Inc., Washing-
ton, D. C., 1954, 205 pp., $2.50.
While the title would indicate that
this volume is of interest only in the
South, it actually is concerned with
industrial waste problems in general
and contains data of interest to in-
dustrial planners. One interesting sec-
tion, by W. H. Shallenberger and
E. J. Stecker of the Ralph H. Parsons
Company, describes a new tracer tech-
nique useful in air pollution studies.
The new method makes it possible to
survey an industrial area to determine
the source of annoying pollutants. The
authors set up a hypothetical situation
as follows:
1. An industrial processing plant is
located immediately adjacent to a
large residential area.
2. There are several other processing
plants of similar types located
within a one-mile radius.
3. An increasing number of com-
plaints have been received from
residents of the area which are
specifically concerned with heavy
dust fall and damage to foliage.
4. The company requesting the sur-
vey has made preliminary tests on


September-October


C)

LJi






























iL


September-October


PLANNING

their stack gasses and has an ap-
proximate idea of their charac-
teristics.
The authors then outline a method
for determining to what degree, if
any, the wastes of the plant in ques-
tion are contributing to the contami-
nation problem. It would appear that
this technique might also be appli-
cable to pre-operational site surveys
as suggested by Gill (I.D., May-
August, p. 21).

Planning Need Cited
By U. S. Chamber Head
WASHINGTON The word
"planning," much abused in recent
years, came in for a pat on the back
in a recent address by Clem D. John-
ston, president of the Chamber of
Commerce of the United States.
"The word 'planning' has been
much abused because it has been so
misused," said Mr. Johnston, in an
address before a gathering of local
Chamber of Commerce and trade as-
sociation executives. "It is an evil
thing when men mean plotting when
they talk of planning. It is an evil
thing for the socialists to say they are
planning, when they intend to plot out
a way to tell other people how to live.
But it is a good thing to make plans
so that all our people can live better.
Business organizations can plan. But
they don't plot."
Community planning today, he
said, should be in terms of at least
the 1960's, rather than in terms of
1955 or 1956. If not, he said, commu-
nity leaders are overlooking the kind
of tomorrow that science, the rising
birth rate, the decreasing death rate
and the changing economic pattern
all portend.
Street and highway projects should
be planned with an eye to 1975, said
Mr. Johnston, "for we know that to-
day's congested traffic will be more
than doubled in the next 20 years.
"Our domestic economic plans
must be tailored to the needs of 10,
20 or even 40 years ahead," said Mr.
Johnston. "If not, we shall be build-
ing and tearing down and then re-
building, at great expense and with-
out positive results. Too much of our
planning is merely for today's needs."


Detroit Erie


chicago Toledo Cleveland Bdgepor t
*Youngstown Scranton
Ft. Wayne "Afron cranton
*Piltsburgh 'Philadelphia ; '.**
.. ,, Wheeling .:
Indianapolis Columbus Baltimore
Cincinnati Huntington al r
0 Wdshin ton
Charleston P

Louisuille V 1


S' 1RGINIA


Xc0AwVIRGINIA


It's true about $105 billion of
last year's $174 billion national retail
sales were made in states represented
in the market area shown above.
You can locate your plant in Vir-
ginia, and be in the middle of this
great market. You'll be near, also, to
varied raw materials, including all-
purpose Bituminous Coal and
near to world markets through the
famous Ports of Virginia.
You can rely on Virginia for high.
production manpower, good power


and water, excellent rail, air and high-
way service, favorable tax structures
and fair real estate values. Here
the climate is fine, people are friendly,
and communities are clean and
progressive.
If you're building a new plant,
large or small, or planning to relo-
cate, let Virginia's plant location
specialists tell you about many ideal
plant sites here -in confidence and
without obligation.


Choice industrial buildings of varying sizes now available.
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Division of Planning and Economic Development
301 State Finance Building, Richmond, Va.
Telephone 3-3449


* St. Loui


-








FLORIDA ON PARADE


With true Florida showmanship, one of the state's great springs is used as a
backdrop for model Ginger Stanley. This photograph taken 50 feet under water
shows the main outlet of Silver Springs which flows at the rate of 801 million
gallons per day.


Florida On Parade:


Ed. Note: Like Ponce de Leon searching for the
Fountain of Youth, I.D. Associate Editor Charles Layng
has been exploring the trails of Florida in recent weeks,
seeking to identify the factors responsible for the rapid
growth of industry in the state. His finding- aer
sources, growing markets, and pleasant living con-
ditions top the list. But many other aspects of Florida
development presented in the following pages deserve
the attention of the site-seeking executive. Mr. Layng's
report is first in a series of studies of growth regions
throughout the nation. Our November-December issue
will describe opportunities in a booming Midwestern


area.


GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA. Flor-
ida probably has the greatest unde-
veloped water resources of any state
in the union. And, with industrial
water shortages becoming acute in
many areas, process industries
throughout the country are giving the
state a second look.
"Florida's natural water resources
are exceeded by those of no other
area of equal size on the American
continent," according to Dr. A. P.
Black, nationally-known authority on
water resources. For example, some
sixty-six major springs in the state


have a combined average daily flow
greater than the estimated usage of
all American cities which derive their
supplies from wells. These particular
springs, largely undeveloped, produce
the equivalent of seventeen per cent
of the total daily water requirement
of all American industries.
Moreover, Florida possesses vast
underground water resources. In fact,
most large industrial plants and mu-
nicipalities obtain their supplies from
wells.
"A brief consideration of the to-
pography, geology, and hydrology of


the state will explain why water re-
sources are so great," according to
Black. The state is underlain by a
series of limestones of Tertiary age
that form an extensive ground-water
reservoir several hundred feet in
thickness. Due to the prevailing flat
topography of the state, and the por-
ous and often cavernous natures of
these formations, conditions for re-
charge are favorable, and it is esti-
mated that perhaps 25 per cent of the
state's annual rainfall of 52.7 inches
may find its way into these subter-
ranean aquifers.
If observations are made of the
height to which waters will rise in
cased wells penetrating these lime-
stone formations, and lines drawn on
a map through the points where these
values are the same, there is obtained
a map showing with considerable ac-
curacy the piezometric water surface
in these formations. (See cover pho-
to).
There are other lines of evidence
which serve to confirm the existence
of vast underground water reserves.
One of these is the large yields which
may be obtained from both deep and
shallow wells in many parts of the
state. A well drilled in Jacksonville in
1942 had a flow of 6,500 gallons per
minute or about 9.5 million gallons a
day.
A well in Polk County has been
pumped at the rate of 7,500 gallons
per minute about 10.5 million gal-
lons a day with a drawdown of
only nine feet. Wells less than 100
feet in depth in the new southwest
field of the city of Miami are being
pumped at the rate of from 7,000,000
to 10,000,000 gallons per day.
Perhaps the best evidence is a con-
sideration of the measured flows of
the state's extensive system of springs.
Of the 75 first magnitude springs in
the United States, Florida possesses
17. A "first magnitude spring" is de-
fined by the United States Geological
Survey as one having a flow of 100
second-feet or more.
In addition, Florida has 49 springs
flowing between ten and one hundred
second-feet or more. The combined
average daily flow of the two largest
springs, Silver Springs Run and Rain-
bow Springs, is 974,000,000 gallons.
The average daily flow of the 17 first
magnitude springs is 2,555,000,000
gallons. The average daily flow of the
49 second magnitude springs is 1,-
052,000,000 gallons.
The combined average daily flow


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


- -


September-October







FLORIDA ON PARADE


K:






r

i
,






i'







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ir:


It is more than ten times greater
than the state's entire municipal pro.
S duction and more than ten times
greater than the estimated total of all
industrial use in Florida.
Industrial Water Use


C LEVATED0 L
ESERVOIR PUMPING STATION TANK

PLEISTOCENE

2001-.
LREN MA RL-
300ft-f -s HAWTHORN


,0s.0 DAK SANDY CLAY -
HARD SHELL ROCKS
-0oon LIGHT COLORED LIMESTONE


o HARD BROWNISH LIMESTONE EOCENE

oo SOFT LIMESTONE


This schematic diagram shows the
geology of water-producing structures
in the Jacksonville area.

of these 66 springs is therefore 3,607,
000,000 gallons. This is greater than
the estimated 3,000,000,000 gallons
of water used daily by all American
cities which derive their supplies
from wells. It is 72 per cent of the
estimated 5,000,000,000 gallons of
well water used daily by all American
industries, and 17 per cent of the
total daily usage of water by all
American industry.


phosphate industry, The Florida Geo-
logical Survey estimates the water
usage by the phosphate companies in
Polk County as 75,000,000 gallons
per day. All of this water, as well as
most of the water used by the pulp
and paper mills, is derived from wells.
It is evident, therefore, that these two
industries alone are using approxi-
mately 225,000,000 gallons of water
daily, with perhaps 75,000,000 addi-
tional gallons to be used within the
near future.
Surface Supplies
While Florida's surface supplies
are not as extensive as her under-
ground supplies, they are still sub-
stantial. The state is made up of some
twelve river basins totally or substan-
tially enclosed within its borders, and
seven whose drainage area outside
the state is as large or larger than
the corresponding area within it. The
largest of the state's river basins is
the Kissimmee River basin which in-
cludes 4,375 square miles. At flood
stage the Kissimmee River discharges
into Lake Okeechobee at the rate of
25,000 cubic feet per second.
Due to the fact that the peninsula
of Florida is in general an area of
low relief, it does not lend itself read-
ily to the construction of large sur-
face reservoirs, and to date little use
has been made of such storage. The
proposed "conservation area" to be
constructed as part of the Central and
Southern Florida Flood Control Pro-
ject will have an area of approxi-
mately 1,500 square miles and in area
will be the largest man-made lake in
the world.


In the state of Florida there are at
present eight pulp and paper mills,
one of which produces wood pulp
only; six, wood pulp and paper; and
S one which produces paper from waste-
paper pulp. Of the seven mills pro-
S during wood pulp, six utilize the kraft
or sulfate process. A conservative es-
timate of the amount of water used
13 daily by these eight mills is 150,000,-
000 gallons.
A new kraft mill currently under
construction will use approximately
25,000,000 gallons per day, and an
additional mill now in the planning
stage will use 40,000,000 to 50,000,-
000 gallons per day.
The other Florida industry requir-
ing large volumes of water is the


Water Is His Business: \
(See Front Cover)

Dr. A. P. Black is one of the nation's
leading experts on industrial water re-
sources. He is past president of the
American Water Works Association
and of the Southern Association of
Science and Industry.
Dr. Black has served as a member
of numerous national research and
consulting groups active in the fields
of water supply and industrial wastes
handling. Recently he was named to
organize and direct a new Bureau of
Water Research to be established at the
University of Florida.


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


As would be expected, therefore,
municipalities, industries, and agri-
culture have for the most part devel-
oped underground sources of supply.
Of the state's 353 public water sup-
plies, 327, or 92.6 per cent, are de-
rived from wells, and only 26 from
surface sources.
Industrial Water Quality
Florida waters vary widely in phys-
ical and chemical quality. As a rule,
lakes receiving the discharge of riv-
ers or springs draining swampy areas
contain water which is quite soft and
high in organic color; lakes which
do not receive such surface drainage
usually have water low in color. The
water of Lake Okeechobee, low in
dissolved solids and high in organic
color along its northern shore, is
much higher in dissolved solids and
lower in organic color along the
southern shore.
Because of the limestone aquifers
which are present throughout the state,
ground water for the most part is
quite hard, the hardness as a rule in-
creasing with the depth of the well.
The exceptions to this rule are found
in extreme Northwest Florida in the
area around Pensacola, where well
waters are quite low in total hardness
and- dissolved solids.
Most artesian water contains vary-
ing amounts of hydrogen sulfide
which imparts an unpleasant odor
and taste to the water, but which may
be readily removed by aeration. Wa-
ter from flowing springs is usually
quite similar to water derived from
wells in the respective areas.


September-October








FLORIDA ON PARADE


Source: Florida Power and Light Co.


Markets


2,000 NEW CONSUMERS EACH WEEK

BOOST FLORIDA'S APPEAL TO INDUSTRY


TALLAHASSEE. While most sta-
tistics make dull reading, the data
showing the growth of Florida mar-
kets in recent years is downright ex-
citing to the experienced industrial
developer. Few areas in the country
have experienced such remarkable
growth.
Almost 2,000 persons each week
come to make their permanent homes
in Florida. The average in-migration
rate over the past 13 years has been
about 1,600 per week, and Florida's
growth rate is currently the fastest
east of the Rockies. (Arizona and Ne-
vada are ahead on a percentage
basis.)
The United States Department of


Commerce estimates that Florida has
enjoyed a population increase of
about 500,000 since the 1950 census
- a gain of 17.9 per cent. By com-
parison, during the same period Cali-
fornia has had an increase of 14.2
per cent; Texas, 8.9 per cent; Michi-
gan, 7.5 per cent; Ohio, 6.7 per cent;
and New York, 2.9 per cent.
Since 1950, Florida has moved
from 20th to 16th in population rank
among all the states. It has passed
Kentucky, Alabama, Minnesota and
Tennessee, and at its present growth
rate is expected to compete with In-
diana for 11th place before 1960.
Florida's estimated population for
1954 is 3,313,700. Significantly, this


population is enjoying a rapid in-
crease in disposable income. Thus,
the Florida market has both depth
and strength.
And, not to be overlooked is the
fact that the state entertains an esti-
mated 5,000,000 tourists per year,
and enjoys an income of nearly $1
billion from these visitors. The effec-
tive buying population, thus, is much
greater than that shown in the census
figures.
Bank Deposits High
Proof of the fact that Florida has
extensive buying power is seen in
data released earlier this year by the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corpora-
tion. A report on bank deposits in the
7 Southeastern states showed an in-
crease of more than $400 million be-
tween June 30, 1952 and June 30,
1953. Of this increase, Florida ac-
counted for $188,662,000, or 46.2 per
cent of the total for the 7 states.
It is significant that the comparison
was made for June 30, and, thus re-
flects the income of permanent Flor-
ida residents rather than temporary
winter visitors.
In virtually every statistical meas-
ure of growth, 1940-1952, Florida is
outstripping the United States aver-
age by a considerable margin. For
example, total income to individuals
shows Florida with an increase of 354
per cent as compared with the United
States average of 237 per cent, bank
resources, Florida increase, 398 per
cent, United States average, 206 per
cent; life insurance in force, Florida,
307 per cent increase, United States
average, 139 per cent; passenger car
registrations, Florida increase, 135
per cent, United States average, 60
per cent; electric power production,
Florida, plus 462 per cent, United
States average, 219 per cent; value
added by manufacture, Florida, plus
391 per cent, United States average,
317 per cent; manufacturing payrolls,
Florida, plus 403 per cent, United
States average, 307 per cent.
Per Capita Income
Among the Southeastern states,
Florida is battling with Virginia for
top ranking in per capital income. In
1952, Virginia showed a per capital
figure of $1,322, with Florida at
$1,319. Estimates for 1953 placed
Florida slightly ahead with $1,348 to
Virginia's $1,327.
Significantly, all of the states in the
Florida trading area have shown very
impressive income gains in the past


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


September-October














,-J





I'
r

Si;



I,

Si -

r,
i


Find out

about the


OPPORTUNITIES





offers you!




Write today for one or all of Florida's
ten new folders which set forth in
plain,unvarnished form the basic facts
about Florida's opportunities for new
industry. These folders have been pre-
pared in convenient individual file-size
form for ready reference.
Address: State of Florida, Industrial
Development Division, 3413A Caldwell
Building, Tallahassee, Florida.


Research
Power
Education
and Culture
Government
and Taxes
Water


Plan national sales conventions, sales confer-
ences and state and regional meetings for Florida.
Exceptional facilities for any type of meeting. Get
double value...successful meetings in delightful
surroundings plus colorful recreational activities.

you'll always

do better in




Florid


Market
Labor
Health and
Climate
Transportation
Natural
Resources


FOLDERS AVAILABLE








CHOOSE FLORIM








check

PLUS

advantages




Food Processors :



Plastics .


Light Metal .
Fabrication


Electronics



Textiles



Chemical manufacture



Synthetics




::::::::::::: : i::::::::: :::::::::::::: :: :': Ji ii
Pharmaceuticals




YES, Orlando, business hub of Central Flor-
ida's lich market area of 250,000 progres-
sive people offers many distinct advantages
ample supply of capable labor, happy
living conditions, all types of modern trans-
portation facilities PLUS a cooperative
City Administration.
Move in the right direction see
ORLANDO first!
WRITE FOR
FACTUAL INFORMATION
MILTON D. BLACK, MOR.
ORLANDO INDUSTRIAL BOARD
CITY HALL, ORLANDO, FLORIDA


FLORIDA ON PARADE


ALA.
FLA. iiiiiiiiiiiiiii i
GA.
MISS.


S.C. .' iliiiilii
TENN. ..,.,^
NO. OF FIRMS 100 200 300


i'" i :; ::;v.';':::::::: 7 i7i:i'ii:2 -'i~ii ::::: : :::: :::::::::


Is oR. '5 i
53


Is' R 54 -
i I


As shown in this chart issued by the University of Georgia, Florida led the
Southeast in number of new business incorporations during the first quarters
of 1953 and 1954.


5 years. The Southeast has experi-
enced an increase of 31.7 per cent,
compared with the national average
of 36.8 per cent. Gains in disposable
income are even more impressive.
Specific Opportunities
While information on the general
expansion of Florida population and
buying power provides an interesting
background, the most attractive op-
portunities are revealed by study of
market possibilities for specific prod-
ucts. An example is lime used in water
treatment, paper manufacturing, and
in a variety of agricultural, indus-
trial, and chemical applications. It is
common knowledge that Florida pos-
sesses some of the purest and most
easily mined high-calcium limestone
in the nation. Yet, Florida's local lime
production is sufficient to satisfy only
about one seventh of the demand. A
survey made in 1948 showed that the
state was consuming about 104,000
tons, of which 14,000 tons was manu-
factured locally.
Floridans pay much more than the
national average mill price, princi-
pally because transportation charges
add to the cost of lime placed in Flor-
ida. Present demands for lime must
be met by Alabama or more distant
states, as Georgia is not self-sufficient
in lime production. It is reported that
some of the lime supplies for Florida

175
150

100

50

0


come from as far as Missouri, Ten-
nessee, and Ohio. This importation
of lime from distant states adds
greatly to its cost. For example, the
freight charges on bagged lime hy-
drate in carload lots (30,000 lb.
min.) from North Birmingham, Ala-
bama, to Tampa are $8.44 per ton
plus Federal tax. Many Florida cities
report paying up to $15-$20 per ton
for water treatment lime.


FLORIDA BRIEFS


Florida developers are anxious to
point out that the right-to-work pro-
vision affecting labor in the state is
not merely a law passed by the leg-
islation, but a constitutional amend-
ment voted upon by the people.
The Singer Sewing Machine branch
in Miami services some 6,000 power-
driven machines in the South Florida
area. The local garment industry is
that big.
One of Florida's most unusual in-
dustries is the canning of rattlesnake
meat. Current production is said to
be about 15,000 cans per year.
The small city of Hialeah, near Mi-
ami, is said to have more punch press
shops than a typical Southern city of
300,000.


ALA. FLA. GA. MISS. N. r fr -rin.
Florida also led the Southeast in estimated cash receipts from farm marketing.


26 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200


" -- .- ~.I .___


400


September-October


:;: ::










ri


it
.4


TV-


* a strategic position to both domestic and
foreign markets (particularly Central and
South America, Cuba and Puerto Rico.)

* an equable climate which means lower
construction costs, unhampered transpor-
tation and less employee absenteeism.

* a large and highly-skilled native labor
supply.

* an abundant water supply-pumping a


maximum of 9.56 million gallons per
day and a tremendous new water res-
ervoir with a 5 million gallon a day
capacity.

* deep seaport facilities and direct con-
nections with the intracoastal waterway.

* there is NO State income tax nor inheri-
tance tax there IS a $5,000 home-
stead tax exemption and $500 widows'
exemption.


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONCERNING YOUR OWN
PERSONAL REQUIREMENTS, WRITE TO:

Tom Moore
Manager


PANAMA CITY AND BAY COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA


- I


INDUSTRY PICKS PANAMA CITY

Panama City's industrial growth began with sound recognition of its vast possi-
bilities by farsighted business men less than 25 years ago. Recently it was chosen
as one of America's Cities of the Future by one of the Nation's leading industrial
forecasters. It is a young city with a thriving industry and tourist business already
established, a city of comfortable homes, active civic and church groups and
expanding school and hospital facilities.


Here's what Panama City can offer you ... the Industrialist:








FLORIDA ON PARADE


A Satisfied Customer Is Best Ad


And Florida Makes the Most of It:


W. H. Austill is well pleased with the progress of his waxed paper manufacturing
plant in Jacksonville (above), but he also admits that opportunities for piloting
his yacht through surrounding waters (below) constitute a potent site selection
factor.


Florida's most effective salesmen
are manufacturers who have recently
located in the state and who are now
operating successfully.
A good example is W. H. Austill,
President of Austill Waxed Paper
Company, now of Jacksonville. Aus-
till has become a Florida booster by
way of Montreal, where he started
work in a paper mill, and Toronto,
where he opened his first paper spe-
cialty house.
Reflecting on the factors which in-
fluenced him to move to Florida, Aus-
till says, "Our first interest was to find
a trading area where we could ren-
der a real service without duplicating
established manufacturing activities."
The growing Florida market for
waxed paper products in the food
packing industries impressed him as
one in which he could expect to enjoy
steady expansion.
And Austill has not been disap-
pointed. "The new operation has far
exceeded our original outline of its
possibilities," he says. "We are now
constructing a new building of about
20,000 square feet for occupancy next
year," he reports, adding, "We expect
to grow and contribute to the growth
of the food packaging industry in the
Southeast."
Second to markets in influencing
Austill's site choice was transporta-
tion, followed by labor and services.
Austill also admits a "certain weak-
ness" for yachting and other such op-
portunities presented locally.
Tupperware Office
Another happy newcomer is Tup-
perware Home Parties, Inc., now lo-
cated in a modern 60,000 square foot
office building near Orlando on Flor-
ida's famous Orange Blossom Trail in
a setting of lakes, palms, cypress, and
flowers. Under the direction of Brown-
ie H. Wise, feminine Vice-President
and General Manager, nationwide
sales for the plastic products are be-
ing carried on through an unusual
Home Party Plan.
When Tupperware moved to Flor-
ida in 1952, Mrs. Wise said. "We


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


September-October







FLORIDA ON PARADE


sought a location that would lend it-
self best to national publicity, and
we felt that many of our people would
like to visit us, especially with the
wonderland of Florida to add warmth
to the invitation. We believe that
many of our distributors (with the
possible exception of the stalwart
souls from California who cannot be
S traitors to their own sunshine!) will
be happy to combine business with
pleasure in visiting us in Florida -
especially when a trip to the Sunshine
State can be classified as legitimate
business expense."
If last year's sales of $25 million
are any indication, Florida has not
S failed Tupperware. In fact, plans call
for addition of manufacturing facili-


- i g I


Utilizing to maximum advantage the beauty of a typical site on the Orange
Blossom Trail near Orlando is this National Headquarters of Tupperware Home
Parties, Inc.


JACKSONVILLE


Follow the Crowd

that's where the Money is


U.MLB
COw~UNTY


LOOK AT THIS RECORD OF GROWTH
1920 PERCENTAGE INCREASE OVER 1920 *1954 % INCREASE
Population 1930 1940 1950 Population OVER 1920
Dade County...... 42,753 234% 526% 1058% 680,000 1491%
Broward County. .... 5,135 291% 675% 1535% 131,600 2463%
Palm Beach County.. 18,654 178% 329% 515% 143,000 667%
State of Florida..... 968,470 52% 96% 186% 3,384,000 249%
United States..... 105,710,620 16% 25% 43% 160,019,700 51%


Source:-United States Census Bureau figures. *Estimated.
Finest transportation world's best climate
... concentration of wealth ... no state income
or inheritance taxes are major reasons for South
Florida's continuing phenomenal growth, and
make this the logical place for warehousing and
industrial investment.


Florida East Coast Railway owns most desirably
located property in Greater Miami (Dade County)
for industrial use, laid out for fast switching and
time-saving terminal service. For detailed in-
formation contact: F. P. Oldfather, Asst. Freight
Traffic Manager, Ingraham Building, Miami 32,
Fla.


Route Your Freight as well as Yourself

FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY
at Jacksonville





















we love it here in


JACKSONVILLE!


~rii
----~-
...:i:. .:`:. I.. ,-----u~-~,.-----
-- I~~lL
-r
-
~Ln ~lr~illiYIYIEllIPC0: :~


At a recent luncheon meeting of the Committee of One Hundred, Jack-
sonville Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Merrill Grafton, formerly of Bloom-
ington, III., and manager of State Farm's new million-dollar regional office,
spoke for the 150 State Farm employees who have just become residents
of Jacksonville.

"Gentlemen," Mr. Grafton -told the committee, "we love it here in
Jacksonville. Like State Farm Mutual, Jacksonville is progressive. It is
ideally situated. Communications and transportation facilities are su-
perb. It is a friendly city, full of Southern hospitality. The climate is
wonderful. Already, we feel healthier and happier and we know that
we're giving better service to our 250,000 policyholders in this area."

Mr. Grafton's remarks are typical of unsolicited testimonials received from
executives and employees of more than a score of new industries that have
established headquarters in Jacksonville during the past year.

So if you are thinking in terms of a new plant site, or regional headquar-
ters, investigate Jacksonville, Florida.

The City of Jacksonville, Florida

ELECTRIC AND WATER UTILITIES

Wire- Write or Phone

TH CO MTE OF ONE HU DE


Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


227-B West Forsyth Street
Phone 3-6161


FLORIDA


Mrs. Brownie H. Wise is the dynamic
General Manager of the Tupperware
Company.

ties at the Florida site in the near
future.
Rex Bassett, Inc.
Typical of many dynamic young
technologists who have contributed
much to Florida's current industrial
upsurge is Rex Bassett, now located
at Fort Lauderdale.
In 1935, Bassett invented a home
appliance which was licensed to Ben-
dix Aviation Corporation and distrib-
uted throughout the world as the
"Bendix Home Laundry." In 1937,
he formed his own company at Niles,
Michigan, and specialized in the man-
ufacture of two-way police emergency
radiotelephone equipment. Bassett
has subsequently negotiated a patent
license agreement with the American
Telephone and Telegraph Company
and Western Electric Company, en-
abling him to manufacture a wide va-
riety of equipment in the field of ra-
diotelephony.
At the outset of World War II, la-
bor shortages in the Michigan area
prompted Bassett to seek a new loca-
tion. After considering locations
throughout the country, the Florida
site was chosen and operations have
steadily expanded during the past
decade.
During World War II, Bassett em-
ployed approximately 175 people, and
during a.four-year period maintained
a staff that trained more than 1,000
local people in methods of crystal fin-
ishing, wiring and soldering, reading
schematics, mechanical assembly, and
other phases of electronic manufac-
turing. Today, the company can call
on more than 500 trained people for


September-October


~~.~ I-~1----- --r-r-------~--~~=- .. ,-, I_


~F~ii~C~~"!








ON PARADE

production and assembly work.
Laboratory and production facili-
ties are available at Fort Lauderdale
for the design, development, and pro-
duction of quartz crystals, electronic
and communication equipment and
sub-assemblies. Bassett believes that
the local operation could easily be ex-
panded to handle "any size contract."

Fry Roofing
Another endorsement of Florida as
a plant location comes from C. E.
Stearns, Manager of the Lloyd A. Fry
Roofing Company. "We established
our plant in Jacksonville because we
considered it to be the center of a
rapidly growing area where our prod-
uct was needed," he explained. "Jack-
sonville's excellent transportation fa-
cilities by air, rail, water and high-
way also had an important part in
our decision," he says.
"We moved our plant from Chi-
cago to Florida in 1945, and it has
been both pleasant and advantageous
from every viewpoint," states O. Hal-
vorsen, President of the Halvorfold
Kwikprint Company. "The labor sit-
uation has been particularly pleasing,
and I might say that, being a man
who is getting along in years, I came
down here also to enjoy a pleasanter
climate."
Bryant Furniture
In 1949, when plastic draperies
made their debut in the household
market, they started a chain of events
which resulted in another new indus-
try for Florida. For the quick success
of plastic draperies was a knockout
blow to paper draperies invented by
Paul Bryant and sold to stores
throughout the nation.
His business wiped out overnight,
and with no inclination to start up
again in the same venture, Bryant
decided to make a fresh start in some-
thing entirely different. Just what?
Well, he wasn't sure.
But, Bryant was certain of this: His
next venture would be out of the fro-
zen North, perhaps somewhere in
Florida. Looking backwards at 60, he
wanted no more furnace tending or
snow shoveling.
Bryant spent weeks traveling the
South, along the Gulf and up the At-
lantic before finding what he wanted
at Daytona Beach. He liked the size
of the town (30,000), its three de-
lightful seasons (spring, summer and


September-October


Here are quotes from others who joined the modern trend and
chose Jacksonville:


". We chose Jacksonville for our new 22-story South-Central
Home Office because we were greatly impressed with the eco-
nomic, educational and cultural advantages of this beautiful city
in which several hundred Prudential families would be glad to
make their home.". Charles W. Campbell, Vice President,
Prudential Insurance Company of America.


".. We moved our plant from Chicago in 1945. It has been
pleasant and advantageous from every standpoint. I came down
here to enjoy a more pleasant climate. Had I known what I
know today, I would have made the move much sooner." .
O. Halvorsen, President, Halvorford Kwikprint Company.


And Wives Love Jacksonville, Too!


". We live at the Beach and it seems like a constant vacation.
The children have never had so much freedom and, of course,
they've been much healthier, too.". Mrs. K. S. Bayless, wife
of President of Aluminum Tubing Company.


". We've never felt like strangers here. The hospitality of
the South is not over-rated. And besides, there's the golf
Imagine -52 weeks of it here against the 26 weeks at most we
had up north."... Mrs. O. Halvorsen, wife of the President of
Halvorfold Kwikprint Company.

The City of Jacksonville, Florida

ELECTRIC AND WATER UTILITIES
Wire- Write or Phone



Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce 227-B West Forsyth Street
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA Phone 3-6161










FLORIDA ON PARADE


fall), a large, year-'round tourist
economy, and a substantial untapped
labor pool.
Bryant was particularly impressed
with labor possibilities thousands
of small retirement homes, hundreds
of tourist rooms and trailer courts


filled with older people, and sun-seek-
ers enjoying good health but deplor-
ing the lack of opportunity to aug-
ment their pensions or retirement
funds. He also saw boredom of in-
activity as another stimulus.
Bryant's decision was to locate in


i

i


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


-r

=I~?-~?rC~sC~lsL~,~ ~~ ~i*jlr~
.rl -IL;L


Paul Bryant (standing) displays a custom built coffee table for a visitor to his
Daytona Beach furniture plant which utilizes retired people living in the resort
city. In the photograph below, a group of youthful visitors are shown inspecting
the new Minute Maid plant in Leesburg.


Daytona Beach a plant to manufac-
ture custom-made furniture, with a
special appeal to tourists. From a
small start in 1952, he has already de-
veloped a business volume that will
soon require major expansion of his
facilities. Today, he envisions a handi-
craft center similar to but somewhat
more modest than the Colonial Wil-
liamsburg, Virginia, community.
In talks around the country, Bryant
inevitably concludes by declaring:
"Florida with its natural resources
and available retirement manpower
supply to my mind is an unexplored
industrial frontier for the whole na-
tion. This state is rich in possibilities
for small industries to give work to
these people who can still produce
with wrinkled hands just waiting to
be used."
Minute Maid
Excellent schools, churches, and
recreational facilities are listed among
the factors which influenced Minute
Maid Corporation to locate a new
plant at Leesburg in 1948. Today,
visitors entering this Central Florida
city are greeted by a large sign ex-
claiming, "Welcome to Leesburg,
Home of Minute Maid Fresh Frozen
Fruit Juices," indicating the mu-
tual respect shared by the city and
its largest industry.
Commenting on the choice of Lees-
burg, H. R. Cloud, Vice-President in
charge of Production for Minute
Maid, says that availability of a good
site was important, and access to cit-
rus from Polk County was important.
Other factors included a large new
cold-storage warehouse, rail facilities,
and low city and county taxes.
"This alliance between a growing
city and a rapidly expanding indus-
try has proved advantageous for all
concerned and is expected to continue
with the same feeling of good will on
both sides for a long time to come,"
Mr. Cloud says.
The history of Radiation, Inc., pro-
vides another outstanding Florida
success story. Launched on a very
modest scale in Melbourne during
1950, Radiation began the manufac-
ture of electronic equipment for air-
craft. In April of 1951, the firm had
only 23 employees, but phenomenal
success followed, and the monthly
business volume was increased ten-
fold in two years.
Recently Radiation undertook a
major expansion, and after surveying
possible locations, selected a 10,000

September-October







FLORIDA ON PARADE
square foot building in Orlando. This meaning of true southern hospitality. supply, reasonable wage scales, and
-. new facility initially employed about Not only was everything possible buildings for rent or purchase at the
100 workers, but has already been done to facilitate my move, but I 'right' price. In addition, we are con-
expanded to 200, and has a payroll found Tampa to have everything a fident that Florida's year 'round, mild
of about $1.5 million. garment manufacturer needs. That in- climate will assure lower operating
Another such unit, Johnson Elec- cludes an abundant, productive labor and maintenance costs."
Another such unit, Johnson Elec-
tronics; has been established in Or-
lando by E. S. Johnson, a former em-
ployee of the Motorola Corporation.
S This company now employs about
100 workers with an annual payroll
of more than $250,000. "

Harris Standard Paint
Another contented manufacturer -
recently relocated in Florida is Harris : '
Standard Paint Company in Tampa.
The company previously had plants
in Ohio and New York.
Commenting on the establishment
of the plant in Tampa, John E. Harris,
Jr., President, recently said, "For
some years we made it our business
to investigate the possible advantages
of manufacturing in the South. These
investigations convinced us that we
could manufacture in Florida, not on-
ly more efficiently, but with the added
advantage of better serving both our
Southern and Northern customers."
Harris notes that the climatic con- Florida's industrial boosters represent a variety of industries, both large and
editions in Florida are ideal for the small. Rex Bassett (above) has pioneered in the electronics field. A. D. Davis
manufacture of products of a viscous (below) is a vital cog in development of industry throughout the state, serving
nature requiring constant temperature as Chairman of the State Council for Industry and Commerce.
V control. "In addition," he added,
"shading, tinting and other opera-
tions necessary to maintain true color
standards are vastly simplified where
bright sunlight is prevalent most days
of the year."
"After seven years of full capacity
production in Tampa," Harris said,
"we have proved the value of these
advantages. We have manufactured
and shipped to our customers more
than 15 million cans of our paint
products, and have not had one com-
plaint due to off-standard viscosity
color or drying time."

Other "Testimonials"
Another businessman enthusiastic --
about Florida is Sam Klein, President
of Tampa Togs. Klein has this to say
about the area:
"When I moved my plant from
Montreal to Tampa, I learned the


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


September-October



















CENTER

OF

POWER


FLORIDA'S

CENTER

OF \


ACTIVE


TY


More of everything
that is Florida lies within a
100-mile mile radius of Tampa.
More permanent citizens ... more
tourists... more citrus growing
production and processing ...
more mining ... more shipping ..
more distribution. If you want
Florida with the stability of a
balanced economy ... look to
Tampa with its versatile and
prolific back country.






TAMPA deF


FLORIDA ON PARADE


Emphasis on pleasant working conditions is carried into the plant itself in many
Florida industries. This unit of the John H. Swisher Company, manufacturers
of King Edward Cigars, includes a nursery and playground for the children
of working mothers.

Taxes

TAX LOAD ON INDUSTRY IS LIGHT
AS RESULT OF TOURIST INCOME


When industrialists are told that
their tax. bill in any state will be un-
usually low, or non-existent, they
view the situation with mixed feel-
ings. Obviously, they are gratified
at not being made to pay through
the nose. Experience, though, has
taught them to search about for a
gimmick.
"Does this mean," one can hear
the experienced site-seekers asking,
"that the normal state and civic ser-
vices are substandard, that the schools
are crowded and poor, that the roads
are under-maintained, because of lack
of tax money?"
Florida developers hurry to answer
with an unqualified "No!" Here's
why:
On a national average, business
and industry pay in 23 cents of every
dollar of the tax take. In Florida,
they pay 10.9 cents of each dollar of
tax levy.
Florida's annual tax receipts on
alcoholic drinks amount to $8.73 per
capital, as compared with the national
average of $2.71; the tobacco take is
$5.74 per person in Florida, com-
pared with $2.82 nationally; and
pari-mutuel taxes bring in $5.89 per
head in Florida, compared with 88
cents nationally. There's the answer.
Be it said that these figures do not
indicate that native Floridians are


topers, nicotine fiends and inveterate
gamblers. As a matter of fact, there
are many Florida counties which are
completely dry under local option,
and many more which do not permit
horse or greyhound racing. It is the
annual influx of millions of tourists
on pleasure bent that accounts for
most of this tax money.
Florida does have a state sales and
use tax, but there is no state income
tax. In fact, the Constitution of the
state expressly forbids such a tax and
it could not possibly be levied except
in the unlikely contingency that the
people of the state should vote for a
constitutional amendment to permit
such a tax. Although there is a light
tax on intangibles, there is no state
ad valorem tax as such.
Of interest to officers and em-
ployees moving to Florida along with
their industries is the fact that, in
general, real property is assessed at
pre-war value rather than current
prices. In addition, the first $5,000 of
the valuation of an owner-occupied
homestead is exempt from all taxa-
tion. Because elaborate heating sys-
tems are unnecessary in Florida, the
cost of homes of similar quality aver-
ages less there than in the North.
Corporate Taxes
Domestic corporations pay initial


34 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


A; --- --- --- --


September-October








organization taxes on the authorized
capital stock at these rates:
Authorized capital stock with par
value -
Up to and including $125,000 --$2
for each $1,000 of par value stock.
Over $125,000, but not over $1,-
000,000- $250 (as above) plus 50
cents per $1,000 of par value stock
over $125,000.
Over $1,000,000, but not over
$2,000,000 -- $687.50 plus $.25 per
$1,000 of par value.
Over $2,000,000 $937.50 (as
above) plus 10 cents per $1,000 of
par value stock over $2,000,000.
No-par value stock is taxed as if
each share had a par value of $100.
Domestic corporations must also
pay fees for any increase in author-
ized capital stock by amendment or
consolidation at the same rate as the
initial fees.
Foreign corporations pay qualify-
ing fees at the same rates as shown,
but the tax is based upon the total
amount of capital employed in Flor-
ida only.
Most corporations are subject to a


Florida bankers have made vital con-
tributions to the recent industrial
growth of the state. G. G. Ware, Chair-
man of the Board of the First National
Bank of Leesburg (above) serves as
Florida Vice President of the Southern
Association of Science and Industry.

franchise tax. This does not include
the following: bankrupt or dissolved
corporations, railway or sleeping car


FLORIDA ON PARADE

companies, telephone and telegraph
companies, building and loan associa-
tions, insurance companies, coopera-
tive marketing associations and corp-
orations not for profit. This tax is
collected on the basis of invested cap-
ital by shares of stock outstanding.
The rates are as follows:

Outstanding Capital Stock
Not over $10,000 ._---- $ 10
Over $10,000 and not over
$25,000 -2------- 25
Over $25,000 and not over
$50,000 ----- 50
Over $50,000 and not over
$100,000 .. ----. 75
Over $100,000 and not over
$200,000 --- ---- 100
Over $200,000 and not over
$500,000 -. ----- 200
Over $500,000 and not over
$1,000,000 -------- 500
Over $1,000,000 and not over
$2,000,000 --- 750
Over $2,000,000 --- 1,000
The minimum fee is $10 and the
maximum $1,000.


Mr. Manufacturer ...

INVESTIGATE THE ADVANTAGES

OF LOCATING IN CENTRAL FLORIDA!






2-MAJOR RAILROADS
5-MAJOR TRUCK LINES
POPULATION 9500
AMPLE LABOR AVAILABLE
m. CITY RECREATION DEPARTMENT

9b 1400 NAMED LAKES IN COUNTY
5sl^t EXCELLENT SCHOOLS and CHURCHES


LEESBURG CHAMBER of COmmERCE
Leesburg, "WHERE THE BIG BASS BITE" Florida


1 --









KEEP UP-TO-DATE

ON FLORIDA

ALL YEAR ROUND

thru the authoritative
SFLORIDA
BUSINESS LETTER

- A specialized service of First
Research Corporation which
provides you twice-a-month
with vital news, facts, analyses
of the fast-changing Florida
economy thru the nationally
recognized Florida Business
Letter. Also includes special
maps, news flashes, answers to
specific questions all for
only $2 a month, $24 for the
entire year.
FREE SAMPLE Clip this ad to
your letterhead and we'll send
you a sample copy of the letter
and complete details free of
charge.
FIRST
RESEARCH CORPORATION
OF FLORIDA
First National Bank Building, Miami



WORK and PLAY

do MIX


SANFORD
SEMINOLE COUNTY,

FLORIDA

PLEASANT WORK-
ING conditions and
cheerful surround-
ings have proved
to be important to
and better person-
nel relations.

SANFORD extends a warm wel-
come to industry and various busi-
ness operations. Here in hospi-
table Seminole County are ample
supplies of cooperative labor,
available factory sites, budget-
priced home sites and friendly
City and County administrators.
Write for factual information.
In the heart of Florida
SEMINOLE COUNTY
CHAMBER of COMMERCE
BOX 1581 SANFORD, FLORIDA


FLORIDA ON PARADE


Florida's largest industrial plant is this $85 million unit of the Chemstrand
Corporation at Pensacola. It employs more than 3,000 workers.

Labor


5,000 NEW WORKERS PER MONTH

AVAILABLE TO INDUSTRIES IN FLORIDA


Florida's labor supply is somewhat
like quicksand in the everglades -
it's a lot deeper than it appears to be
on the surface.
For the labor reservoir in the state
includes not only the normal percent-
age of unemployed, but also a heavy
influx of new residents, young addi-
tions to the working force, and retired
or pensioned residents who want to
return to work. The result is that al-
most every local survey reveals more
available workers than anticipated.
William E. Culbreath, Assistant Di-
rector of the Florida State Employ-
ment Service, estimates the present
civilian labor force at 1,310,000, or
about 38.5 per cent of the population.
Since the 1950 census, the state has
gained a total of 252,521 workers at
the rate of approximately 5,000 new
workers per month. This is a gain of
almost 24 per cent, and according to
Culbreath, "it is unparalleled in any
other Southeastern state."
Experience Tells
Without doubt, the most convincing
evidence of Florida's excellent labor
supply is the experience of numerous
manufacturers who have located in
the state in recent years. Almost with-
out exception, the newcomers have
found their labor needs supplied
promptly and effectively. Here are a
few examples:
In Lake City, the FSES, in coopera-
tion with the local Chamber of Com-
merce, recently conducted a survey


for a firm considering locating a cigar
plant there. Within four days, more
than 1,800 white women were regis-
tered. In the same small city another
survey for a manufacturer of metal
products registered 2,200 male and
female workers.
During a recent study for the Sper-
ry Corporation of New York, FSES
conducted surveys in seven Florida
cities. The final decision was to locate
the $600,000 plant in Gainesville,
where the labor supply appeared to
be particularly well-suited to furnish-
ing 600 workers, many with technical
skills.
Follow-ups by FSES personnel in-
dicate also that firms locating in Flor-
ida have no difficulty in obtaining ad-
ditional personnel for expansion. Cul-
breath cites the case of the Crest
Leather Manufacturing Corporation,
which was located recently in St. Pe-
tersburg. FSES has conducted two
surveys for this company, both at-
tracting more than 300 applicants.
Another survey in St. Petersburg,
conducted more than a year ago, led
to the establishment of a plant by
Futuronics Manufacturing Company
of St. Louis. This firm now employs
about 120 workers at St. Petersburg
in the manufacture of communication
devices.
Technical Personnel
Babcock and Wilcox Company, of
Philadelphia, also located a plant in
St. Petersburg primarily as a result


36 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


September-October







FLORIDA ON PARADE


S........
-


They look happy! A cross section of Florida workers is shown in this photograph of a group at the plant of Rex Bassett,
Inc., electronics manufacturers.


of a visit which indicated an adequate
supply of trained engineering drafts-
men in Florida. The company has
now added its own building and is
employing 160 engineering drafts-
men, all of whom were recruited in
the area.


A number of labor surveys in Or-
lando have revealed equally favorable
conditions. Florida Fashions, a mail-
order concern selling ladies' garments
throughout the world, now employs
some 500 workers recruited in the


Orlando area. The Tupper Corpora-
tion, manufacturers of "Tupperware,"
recently located a unit between Or-
lando and Kissimmee, and have had
no difficulty in completely staffing the
operation.


GOOD REASONS

FOR LOCATING YOUR PLANT


. in NORTHWEST FLORIDA


1 EXPANDING LOCAL MAR-
KETS Population has increased
27% retail sales, 170% since
1945.
2 MILD ALL-YEAR CLIMATE
contributes to lower construction
and operating costs; happier,
healthier living.


3 -RICH IN NATURAL RE-
SOURCES Large supplies of cot-
ton, lumber, paper, chemicals and
natural gas right in the area with
easy access to other basic raw ma-
terials. Abundant water pure
and soft.
4 PLENTY OF WILLING WORK-
ERS intelligent, cooperative
and easily trained.


5 EXCELLENT TRANSPORTA-
TION by rail, water and high-
way to the nation's major mar-
kets.
6 DEPENDABLE ELECTRIC
POWER supplied by Gulf
Power Company at reasonable
rates.


For specific information about favorable industrial sites in many small cities of Northwest Florida,
we invite you to call on our Industrial Development Department at Pensacola, Fla.


GULF POWER COMPANY
Serving 65 Fast-Growing Communities of Northwest Florida







FLORIDA ON PARADE


THINKING OF
EXPANDING YOUR PLANT?

BE SURE TO CONSIDER THE


DAYTONA BEACH

AREA

Check a few of the outstanding advantages
available here:

W1 Abundant labor supply
W Proximity to domestic and
international markets
J/ Fast, dependable transportation
1 Superb year-round climate
WI Ample power and water
t0 Choice industrial sites
1/ Buildings available through com-
munity industrial corporation

Write for free 56-page industrial brochure

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT
Room 2A, Chamber of Commerce
DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA


Labor Harmony
According to FSES, more than half
a million people were employed in
manufacturing in the three largest
population areas of Florida during
November, 1953. Few other areas can
equal the Florida record for the three
fall months of 1953, and certainly
none can better it- for it was per-
fect. During that quarter, not one of
these half-million workers was con-
cerned in any way with a labor-man-
agement dispute. The only dispute of
any magnitude in Florida in several
years was the reflection of a national
dispute of considerable magnitude,
but even this did not affect all the
plants in Florida in this particular
industry.
Figures compiled by FSES showing
the average weekly earnings of work-
ers in various industries need no elab-
orate analysis or comment, other than
to call attention to the fact that the
annual average wage rate in Florida
manufacturing in 1953 was $1.26 per
hour, compared with the nation-wide
figure of $1.67. Here's the commis-
sion's findings:


VIP



You won't find it in books about electric power. But it's a mighty
important factor here at the Industrial Development Department.
To us it means Very Important Power. It means individualized
information not only on our power rates but other pertinent
facts that will prove most convincing on why you should locate
YOUR plant in our territory. A request from you will bring YOU


W. B. Shenk, Director
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
ST. PETERSBURG


AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS:
ALL MANUFACTURING $55.36
DURABLE GOODS 52.65
Lumber and Wood Products 43.96
Furniture and Fixtures 52.87
Stone, Clay and Glass 53.72
Fabricated Metal Products 63.50
Transportation Equipment 68.56
Other Durable Goods 52.55
NON-DURABLE GOODS 57.47
Food and Kindred Products 53.48
Tobacco Manufacturers 40.64
Apparel 40.97
Paper and Allied Products 72.45
Printing and Publishing 78.15
Chemicals and Allied Products 65.74
Other Nondurable Goods 47.74
NON-METALLIC MINING AND
QUARRYING 66.72
Phosphate Rock 69.58
UTILITIES: Electric and Gas 78.53


As a matter of fact, there is a
"mother lode" of just such experi-
enced technicians now in the state,
engaged perhaps in other occupa-
tions. The Florida State Employment
Service, Tallahassee, has been able
on frequent occasions to locate work-
ers with specialized skills unrelated
to existing industry in Florida com-
munities.


all the facts ... pronto.


I I I II I II I


I _







FLORIDA ON PARADE


Electronics equipment developed in University of Florida laboratories for the
U. S. Navy is shown to Admiral Ralph Davidson by Dean Joseph Weil.

Research


FLORIDA-BOUND FIRMS OFFERED USE

OF EXTENSIVE SCIENTIFIC FACILITIES


GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA. There
are new forces at work in Florida to-
day. New resources are being tapped,
new talents discovered, and new enter-
prises created. Applied scientific re-
search has become one of the major
factors in the growth of industry in
the state.
To technological industries consid-
ering Florida locations, it is impor-
tant to note the existence of a wide
variety of research laboratory facili-
ties. Of primary interest are the con-
sulting laboratories which are avail-
able to assist industries in solution of
their technical problems. Other lab-
oratories are significant in that they
contribute to the establishment of a
reservoir of scientific personnel and
stimulate professional activity in the
state.
Today, there are several dozen in-


dustrial laboratories throughout the
state, a major research center at the
University of Florida here, important
units at other universities, and a num-
ber of vital defense laboratories op-
erated by federal agencies.
Industrial research activities at the
University of Florida are centered in
the Engineering and Industrial Ex-
periment Station here, which comes
under the jurisdiction of Dean Joseph
Weil, head of the college of engineer-
ing. The station now handles more
than a million dollars in research pro-
jects annually for private industry,
the federal government, the state of
Florida, and other groups.
As a result of steady growth over
the past decade, the station is impres-
sively equipped with a wide variety
of research apparatus. These facili-
ties are available to industries moving


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 39


The Choice Is


Panama City

Why have nationally known in-
dustries chosen Panama City as
a working base? Simply be-
cause in this thriving commun-
ity there is found an abundance
of the ingredients that make
for industrial success. Here you
have a deep-water port offering
access to world markets plus
the modern well-kept rail facil-
ities of The Bay Line with its
important connections for fast
domestic distribution. Climate,
power and labor considerations
are all uniformly favorable.
Why not get the whole story?
Write W. B. Ellard, Traffic
Manager, Atlanta & Saint An-
drews Bay Railway Company,
Dothan, Alabama.




City of


HIALEAH

Florida's

9th Largest City

Invites Industry

Estimated 38,000 population
Third largest city in Dade Co.
Adjacent to Miami Interna-
tional Airport
And less than two miles from
proposed new passenger
terminal

This Ad paid for by
Three Public Spirited Citizens
JAY MORTON
Publisher, Home News, Hialeah
MRS. EVELYN HARVEY
Civic Citizen
HARRY R. SHERMAN
Hialeah's Only 100% Industrial Realtor


September-October







FLORIDA ON PARADE


into Florida, and offer a means for
minimizing initial capital expendi-
tures.
Apparatus Available
Dean Weil points out that, "We
have shops and mechanics who can, if
necessary, construct a watch or on the
other hand, a freight-car axle. We
have glass blowers, electronic tech-
nicians, aeronautical mechanics,
chemical and biological technicians
-in addition to our regular profes-
sional personnel.
"We have testing instruments so
delicate that they can test the tensile
strength of a small cotton fiber and
others that can test the large concrete
beam such as is used in a bridge or a
large office building. While it is not
within our province to do routine
testing, if a specialized test is required
that cannot be performed in the ordi-
nary testing laboratory, we stand
ready to determine if we can conduct
that test. In some cases, after test re-
sults are available, it may be found
that changes in the product are neces-


*0


The combination of climate, loc
makes Lee County one of the finest
WHILE EARNING A LIVING. Othe
Good transportation, excellent w
power, no cold weather problems,
labor situation. We invite you to
area now.
FOR INFORMATION AS TO H
FIT INTO YOUR PRC

Industrial Commission Chamber of I


sary. If so, research may then be con-
ducted by the Station, if it is for a
particular individual or corporation;
the Station being paid for the ex-
pense involved. On the other hand, if
such research is of a nature as to be
advantageous to the state as a whole,
funds may frequently be available for
carrying on the necessary experimen-
tal programs.
"The diversity of the staff person-
nel is quite important. It consists not
only of the engineering group, but
also of scientists in many specialized
areas. Some of the industries which
we can help are: Foods and drugs;
textiles and fibers; aeronautical and
automobiles; chemicals; synthetic
materials; construction; processing;
non-metallic minerals; metals; furni-
ture; instruments; cameras; toys;
electronic equipment; paper and
pulp; sporting goods; housing."
In addition to the Engineering and
Industrial Experiment Station, the fa-
cilities of the University include a
bureau of economic and business re-
search in the College of Business Ad-


.. AND THERE'S

THIS ABOUT








MIRS

and LEE COUNTY

FLORIDA

ation and natural resources
t communities in which to live
rs are making the move now.
ater supply, plant locations,
lower maintenance and good
make a critical survey of this

OW LEE COUNTY WILL
)GRAM, Write:

Commerce Fort Myers, Florida


ministration. The Florida Agricultur-
al Experiment Station also has its
headquarters here, from which are
directed 14 branch stations through-
out the state.

University of Miami
Another major consulting facility
available to serve Florida industries is
the Division of Research and Industry
at the University of Miami. This di-
vision was established in 1951, and
has enjoyed a very rapid growth. It
has earned distinction in the fields of
food processing and fisheries.
An example of current research at
the University of Miami is a project
directed at the cultivation and proces-
ing of rare tropical and sub-tropical
fruits. Analyses for ascorbic acid or
vitamin C have revealed some aston-
ishing information. For example, a
good juicy Florida orange justly
recommended as a health-building
fruit has an average ascorbic acid
content of about 47 milligrams per
100 grams of juice, but the Barbados
cherry, grown in South.lFlorida and
in Caribbean areas, has an average of
4,465 milligrams of acid per 100
grams when unripe and 2,145 when
ripe.
Among other recent findings of Mi-
ami researchers is a method for pro-
longing the ripe health of fresh fruits
for shipment to distant markets. One
development involves the use of Latex
VL-600, a synthetic plastic, as a sur-
face coating for tomatoes. Another
project has led to a new method for
packaging green beans to extend mar-
ketable life.
Investigations are also underway at
Miami to determine the adaptability
to freezing of tropical and sub-tropi-
cal fruits, such as the mango, avo-
cado, lychee, barbados cherry, guava,
pineapple, and banana. Before long,
bananas may be kept in the refrig-
erator, despite the advice of disc
jockeys.
USDA Laboratories
Two important research facilities
operated in Florida by the U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture are the Naval
Stores Station at Olustee and the Cit-
rus Products Station at Winter Ha-
ven. Both have made important con-
tributions to the economy of the state.


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


_ .___j_


September-October























...that Florida's world-famed natural climate is matched by
an equally warm and inviting "Business Climate" in which
new ventures and private enterprise grow and prosper


... the people of Miami, Florida's largest community, united to provide over-


'whel,


ming proof that sound private enterprise is favored by all elements:


ORGANIZED LABOR
Both CIO and AFL
groups not only en-
dorsed but worked
actively to get out a
strong favorable fran-
chise vote. Labor lead-
ers stated publicly that
they favored private
operation over any
form of municipal
operation or socialistic
schemes... that invest-
ment capital should be
treated fairly.


MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT
Miami's City Commis-
sion unanimously en-
dorsed the franchise and
publicly commended
the company's record.
Not a voice was raised
in support of municipal
ownership ... nor did
any group at any time
come forward to advo-
cate socialized elec-
tricity, government
operation or subsidies.


BUSINESS LEADERS
The Chamber of
Commerce formally
"resolved" in favor of
renewing the private
utility's franchise as
did a long list of sub-
stantial and represent-
ative Civic and Business-
men's Clubs. News-
papers, Radio and TV
stations gave 100%
support.


PUBUC OPINION
Old timers, former city
officials,churchmen and
women's group leaders
were among the many
who volunteered to
help. The overall effect
was a mass outpouring
of favorable public
opinion clear evi-
dence that the people
welcome and support
sound business
enterprise.


THERE'S GOLD FOR YOU IN FLORIDA SUNSHINE!


FM enome manrsm


TAEMS ARE FAVOUM E... HIGH BU Ti LWIMU CTMITM WORRS DEFENDLE
coaninm I CKAM E Ia InGHi RiSTmC
FNMIEDLY PRODUCTmi~iy M ORM


Florida not only wants industries, it has great
advantages to offer them: three of the world's
fastest growing markets, and high-speed car-
riers to serve them; friendly, stable govern-
ment and a favorable tax situation; ideal
living and working conditions, healthful


foods, happy families, highest worker
morale; easy recruiting for needed skills ...
and a modern interconnected electric system
to deliver power in ample supply to any site
which fits individual manufacturing,
requirements.


WE'LL GLADLY HELP Florida's full advantages for relocation or entirely new
ventures can be fully realized only through extensive on-the-ground study. If you are
interested, we will advise you as to the area we serve, assist in securing information
from local sources and hel you, in other ways, get comfortably located. Address
your inquiry to Industrial development Service, P.O. Box 3100, Miami 32, Florida.



FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 8)



























































I i


University Enrollment
That the future supply of technical-
ly-trained personnel will be much
greater is indicated by the truly sen-
sational rise in enrollment at the Uni-
versity of Florida. From an enroll-
ment of 755 students in 1944, the
University mushroomed to a figure
of 10,342 last year.
This is a fantastic growth for an
educational institution, yet conserva-
tive estimates indicate a continuance
of this boom. A total enrollment of
25,000 is seen no later than 1969.
Many of the University's students
come from other regions and remain
in Florida after graduation. This is
but one of the reasons why firms lo-
cating research laboratories and other
technological facilities in the state
have experienced no difficulty in se-
curing necessary personnel.


Guy W. Luke, official of J. C. Penney and Company, exhibits two garments typi-
cal of those made in Florida and distributed throughout the nation by his firm.

Transportation


TOURISTS AND FOOD PACKERS HAVE GIVEN

FLORIDA EXCELLENT TRANSPORT SYSTEM


To serve Florida's surface trans-
portation needs, there are 4,913 miles
of railway and more than 11,000
miles of state-maintained paved high-
ways within the state. Florida also
has 17 deep-water ports, of which
seven are on the Gulf of Mexico and
eight on the Atlantic Ocean. The In-
ternational Airport at Miami is the
busiest in the world.
The railway mileage was largely
the outgrowth of two factors--the
vision and enterprise of two or three


millionaires, and the growth of Flor-
ida's agriculture. The men in question
pushed their railways through the
jungles and the piney woods, buoyed
up by their hopes for Florida's future.
They were hard-headed business men
by training and experience and the
development of the state since theii
day has proved them to be right. On
the other hand, they were incurable
romanticists, as well, since they mus
have known that the fruits of theii


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


FLORIDA ON PARADE

Technical Manpower
Gains Importance

With the increasing accent on
science at all levels of industrial man-
agement, it is natural for alert corn-
panies moving into new areas to want --
to know "what about technical man-
power." --
Companies relying heavily on tech-
nology are concerned about their
ability to find new scientists and tech-
nicians and, more important, to keep
them after they get them on the pay-
roll. In both respects, Florida earns
a favorable report.
A survey made two years ago by
the Southern Association of Science
and Industry identified 458 profes-
sional chemists employed in the state.
These included 112 in educational in-
stitutions, 71 with government agen-
cies, 51 in chemical manufacturing,
38 with consulting and research or-
ganizations, 36 in fertilizer manufac-
turing, and the balance in a wide va-
riety of industries.
A conservative estimate today
might place the number of active
chemists in the state at closer to 600.
Moreover, there is a high level of ac-
tivity in other scientific fields, such as
electronics. It has been estimated
there are approximately 1,500 engi-
neers of various types employed in the a e


September-Octobe








FLORIDA ON PARADE


-W


t' labors and huge expenditures could
not possibly be garnered in their own
I f lifetimes.
Some of the short lines operating
i in North Florida are extremely pros-
1 perous, going concerns. The Atlanta
& St. Andrews' Bay, for instance, al-
though less than a hundred miles
S long, is listed as a Class I carrier
(based on earnings) by the Inter-
state Commerce Commission. It serves
S a huge paper mill and other industries
in the rapidly growing port of Pana-
ma City.
The Apalachicola Northern serves
and is owned by the St. Joe Paper
Co., which operates an immense pa-
per mill at Port St. Joe. The Live
Oak, Perry & Gulf, built to serve lum-
ber mills, now has diversified industry
along its line, headed by the multi-
million dollar cellulose plant just
completed at Foley.

S Three Main Lines
i With the Florida East Coast Ry.,
the Seaboard and the A. C. L. now
S operate some 80 per cent of the rail-
way mileage in the state. In fact,
while there are numerous railways
that penetrate into the northern sec-
tion of the state, these three are the
only ones operating in its central and
southern sections. Importantly, all
three of the lines are geared to han-
dling all sorts of emergency traffic or
S mass movements concentrated into a
small space of time. They are accus-
tomed to varied problems, from the
handling of high-priced, exotic tropi-
cal fruits by express to hauling train-
S loads of phosphate rock. Too, all of
Them have excellent industrial sites
Available at many points, offering a
tremendous variety of choice to the
~^ industrialist with special needs.
S The main line of the Florida East
Coast is double-tracked between Jack-
sonville and Miami, 366 miles,
through the populous and productive
East Coast area. This railway, never
leaving the Coast for more than a
few miles, is virtually without grades.
Except for short stretches, this is the
only double-track in Florida, although
S both the Seaboard and the A. C. L.
have alternate routes between Tampa
and Jacksonville which serve, in a
sense, as double-track lines.

Water Transportation
Beginning at Jacksonville a ma-
jor world port-Florida is ringed
with a series of deep-water harbors,
affording the facilities for coastwise
and export shipping. Because of the


RECENT ADDITIONS TO FLORIDA'S INDUSTRIAL FAMILY
Here are some typical plant additions already announced dur-
ing 1954 by the State Industrial Development Division:


Firm and Location Product
BARTOW
Armour and Co. Phosphate
International Minerals and Chemical Corp. Phosphate
F. S. Royster Guano Co. Phosphate Fertilizer
BELLE GLADE
American Kenaf Fiber Corp. Kenaf
Glades Rice Growers Rice
BOCA RATON
Russell Reinforces Plastics Corp. Fiberglass, Plastic Pr
BOYNTON BEACH
Broward Grain and Supply Co. Feed Mill
BRADENTON
Sugar Rose Canning Co. Canning Plant
BRANFORD
Suwannee Limerock Co. Limerock Aggregate
CLEARWATER
The Ankr Trim Corp. Aluminum tackles c


The E. E. Jacob Co.
CLERMONT
Palm Shoe Co.
COCOA
Northrup Aircraft, Inc.
CORAL GABLES
Aeronautical Radio Communication Co.
Artisticage Furniture Co.
Digital Instrument Corp.
Gooles Engineer Corp.
International Petroleum Co.
Kimball and Fuller
Southeastern Research and Developmen
Company
DANIA
Collot Supply Co., Inc.
Florida Gas & Chemical Co.
Universal Concrete Pipe Co.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS
Pennshear Hosiery Co.
DeLAND
DeLand Package Co.
Eckinroth Mfg. Co.
Roehr Products Co.
EUSTIS
Golden Gist, Inc.
Valley Fruit & Vegetable Co.
FLAGLER BEACH
Lehigh Portland Cement Co.
FOLEY
Buckeye Cellulose Corp.
FORT LAUDERDALE
Apex Products
Armor-Flex Products, Inc.
Cleveland Hobbing Machine Co.
Enterprise Mfg. Co.
Fry Roofing Co.
Hollywood Mfg. Co.
International Richwood Corp.
Jewelry by Julius
Metal Craft, Inc.
Radiation Research Corp.
Southeastern Instrument Co.
Stewart-Wilson Machinery Corp.
Telephonics
FORT MEADE
Sasson-King
FORT MYERS
Gallagher Co., Inc.
Richards Associates
The Shell Factory
GAINESVILLE
Shadrick's
Sperry Corp.
GLENDALE
Walton Brick & Tile Co.
GREENSBORO
S. Frieden & Sons Co.
HIALEAH
Christmas Iron Co.
North American Milk Industry
HOLLYWOOD
Merit Coil & Transformer Corp.
Superior Electrical Co.
Trimedge, Inc.
JACKSONVILLE
Aluminum Tubing Co.
Buffalo Tank Corp.
Flamingo Products, Inc.
General Motors Corp.


oducts





arpet


Ancnorng devices 14-0
Wood & Fiber Furniture 10
Shoes 10
Guided Missiles Test 300
Transmitters & Receivers 100
Furniture
Electronics Counters and
Computers 15
Specialized Equipment 25
Gas 55
High Fidelity Radio Systems
& Custom TV Sets 6
t Service Work on Electronics
Equipment 15
Lawnmower Parts 11
Gas & Chemicals 23
Concrete Pipe 140
Hosiery
Cellophane Bags & Packages -
Aluminum Boats 100
Hypodermic Needles &
Pharmaceutical Supplies -
Concentrators 50
Citrus 75
Cement 200
Cellulose 500
Advertising Novelties 45
Fireplace Units -
Hobbing Machines 45
Garter Belts 45
Roll & Shingle Roofing 80
Brassieres 70
Plastic Counter Tops
Costume Jewelry 12
"Club Car" for Golf Clubs 25
Radiation Detecting Devices 20
Electronic Equipment for
Aircraft 30
Precision Parts 35
Communication Equipment 15
Citrus Juice
Surgical Masks 40
Plastic Articles 120
Costume Jewelry -
Candy Products 4-6
Klystron Tubes 300
Brick 10
Cigars 138
Ornamental Iron 6
Canned Milk 25
Radio Frequency Transmitters
& Coils 70
Electronic Equipment 200
Aluminum Extrusions and
Moldings 100-150


Aluminum Tubing
Industrial Tanks
Ice Cream Cones
Diesel Repair Plant


25-35
25


(Continued on next page)


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


No. Employees


September-October









FLORIDA ON PARADE


Kieckhefer Container Co.
MacMeith Co.
Reichhold Chemicals, Inc.
St. Regis Paper Co. (Eastport)
Simplex Paper Corp.
Sinclair & Valentine Co.
Ivy H. Smith Co.
Southern Lustrus
Standard Television Tube Corp.
Tenn. Products & Chemical Corp.
Terminal Paper Bag Co.
Wilson Plastics of Fla., Inc.
KISSIMMEE
Herbert H. Smith & Son
LAKE ALFRED
Cantrell & Cochrane Corp.
LAKE CITY
Metal Products Division
of Thompson Industries
LAKELAND
Central Florida Citrus Growers
Cooperative
Florida Ceramic Industries
LAKE WALES
Flamingo Tile Corp.
Curt G. Joa, Inc.
LAWTEY
E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co.
MARIANNA
Bruce Veneer Co.
Hodges Veneer Co.
Malone Veneer Co.
MELBOURNE
Soroban Engineering, Inc.
MERRITT ISLAND
Beachcomber Mfg. Co.
Merritt Island Pottery
MIAMI
Aircraft Radio Marine Corp.
Airlift, Inc.
Air Vus Awning Windows, Inc.
American Screw & Bolt Co.
Approved Awning Co.
Arnold Cellophane Corp.
Barfield Instrument Corp.
Brito Sports
Butler-Wilson Paper Co.
Cohan & Co.
I. Cohen
Cora Mae Sportswear
Coronet Kitchens
Essay Corporation
Fiber Glass Plastic Co.
Flexible Carbon Products, Inc.
Florida Pipe & Nipple Mfg. Co.
Froham Mfg. Co.
Hewes Boat Co.
Hoffman Products, Inc.
K. D. Jalousie Co.
Kiesel Transport Shade Co.
Lawn-Tite Co.
Mi-Ame Canned Beverages, Inc.
Palm Container Corp.
Production Facilities, Inc.
Serbin, Inc.
G. V. Southard & Co.
Southern Bias Binding
Sumaj
Tropic Modern
Two Smart Girls
U. S. Mengel Plywoods, Inc.
Vacationland
Varney Scale Models
Ted Williams Co.
MONTICELLO
Craftwood Co.
Jefferson Braiding Co.
OCALA
Central Bedding Co.
OJUS
Adams Engineering Co.
Patent Tile Co.
OKAHUMPKA
Collar Furniture Mfg. Co.
OPA LOCKA
Neway Towel & Supply Co.
ORLANDO
American Can Co.
Becopa Glove Mills, Inc.
Blake Paint Corp.
Boone Bait Co., Inc.
Continental Can Co.
Electronic Devices Corp.
Florida Knitting Mills, Inc.
Florida Made Door Co.
Johnson Electronics Co.


Paper Containers 75
Ticket Punches 14
Warehouse only (expanding to
manufacture synthetic resin) 6
Cardboard, Multiwall Bags 450
Laminated Paper Board -
Printing Inks 4
Wire Mesh 50
Plastic Webbing for Chair &
Seat Covers -
Repair & Remake TV Picture
Tubes 10-15
Lightweight Aggregate 12
Paper Bags 300
Plastic Wall Tile 15
Citrus
Soft Drink Mfg.
Stainless Steel TV Parts &
Auto Parts 150

Citrus Canning 260
Ceramic Tile 23
Ceramic Tile 25
Special Machines
Titanium Ore 200
Veneer Mfg. 25
Lumber 35
Veneer Mfg. 45
Electronics 12
Sports Clothes 10
Pottery
Transmitters & Receivers 50
Cargo Planes 3000
Windows 10
Screws & Bolts -
Aluminum Awnings 2
Cellophane Bags 10
Instrument Repair 40
Dresses 6
Paper Containers -
Jewelry, Diamond Setters -
Children's Wear 30
Apparel 30
Kitchen Cabinets 40
Precision Instruments -
Corrugated Fiber Glass -
Insect Repellants -
Pipes & Fittings 5
Precision Parts 55
Boats
Plastic Products 7
Jalousies 40
Store Front Shades -
Lawn Furniture -
Canned Fruit Juices 20
Containers
Electronic Devices 100
Garments 220
Fishing Boxes 2
Trimmings 4
Women's Sportswear 3
Furniture 30
Dresses 7
Plywood
*Stamped Art Goods 7
Model Train Kits 30
Fishing Rods 18
Wooden Bowls 5
Rugs 4
Mattresses 10
Jalousies
Tile
Furniture 10
Towels
Tin Cans 300
Knit Gloves 30
Paint & Lacquer 12
Fish Lures 12
Tin Cans 150
Electronic Equipment 10
Nylon Mesh Gloves 225
Plywood Doors 7
Radio Frequency Transformers
& Coils 60


(Continued on next page)


4 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


(Continued from preceding page)


September-October


geographical shape of the state, no
place within its boundaries is more
than a hundred miles or so from a
major port; most Florida inland
cities are very much closer to deep
water navigation than that. In addi-
tion to these listed ports, there are a
great many other cities on the coast
where, for example, shrimp and oys-
ter boats may put in for safe anchor-
age between fishing voyages, and
there are literally hundreds of safe
piers and harbors for yachts and
smaller craft.
There are a large number of loca-
tions on the Florida coast where more
or less heavy industry can find ideal
sites, transportation-wise. The huge
paper mills, for example, have all
found perfect sites across northern
Florida for their transportation needs.

Air Service

Florida is served locally by the
Eastern Air Lines and the National
Air Lines. Because of the heavy tour-
ist travel by air, the smaller cities of
Florida are unusually well supplied
with frequent air schedules. The in-
land city of Orlando, for example,
with a population of some 65,000, is
served by 24 scheduled flights daily.
Miami and Jacksonville are served by
Delta Air Lines, while a very large
number of Pan American-Grace Air-
ways flights fan out from Miami to
all parts of the world and particularly
to South America.




WIVES JOIN IN

SELLING STATE


Newcomers Push

Site Selection


It has long been recognized that
the most scientific site selection sur-
vey can be tossed in the waste basket
if the wife of the company president
prefers an area other than the one
indicated. Expert developers are
aware that the wife's opinion ulti-
mately must be considered before a
final choice is made.
Knowing this the industrial pro-
moters of Jacksonville have placed
special emphasis on the advantages
enjoyed in Florida by the distaff side.
Moreover, they have recruited the
wives of industrialists recently lo-










FLORIDA ON PARADE


t~
:;
-
f E~i~L


!




Like her husband, Mrs. W. H. Austill
S is sold on their new Florida location.


cated in Florida to help sell the area
to new prospects.
And they have some pertinent ar-
guments.
For example, Mrs. William H. Aus-
till, wife of the president and owner
I of Austill Wax Paper Company, says,
"This warm weather has been won-
derful for our health. We both feel
S years younger. We hope we never
have to go back to the cold country
again. Life is delightfully relaxed and
the people are genuinely friendly."
Mrs. Charles R. Wilson, wife of the
president of Wilson Plastics of Flor-
ida, Inc., says, "Of course we've been
; happy here. It's so healthful fewer
colds and less sinus trouble. How the
children love the out-door living -
S picnics and such! And people are so
friendly."
Mrs. George A. Berry, wife of Vice
President and General Manager of
Axle Service, Inc., says, "We enjoy
all the obvious things climate,
sports the year around, and all that,
but don't overlook this. In Jackson-
ville you'll see your friends from all
over the country. Sooner or later
every one you've ever known seems
to come to Jacksonville and you get
a chance to see them."
Mrs. Thomas Allsopp, wife of the
Executive General Manager of the
South Central Home Office of Pruden-
tial Insurance Company of America,
says, "Moving to Jacksonville has
been one of the finest things ever to
happen to this family. This is a really
friendly town, and the weather per-
mits all of us to enjoy out-of-door
living as we have never been able to
do before."

September-October

I,


(Continued from preceding page)


Lawrence Boat Co.
Lee Mfg. Co.
Metal Mfg. Co.
Morgan-Rhein Co., Inc.
John Pierro
Radiation, Inc.
Ray-Claw Laboratories, Inc.
Southern Fruit Distributors, Inc.
Suran Architectural Woodwork Co.
Tupper Corp.
PALATKA
Central States Paper & Bag Co.
PANAMA CITY
Industrial Air Production
Seaboard Machinery Co.
PENSACOLA
Atlas Cement Co.
Cnemstrand Corp.
Pensacola Bahia Mar
PLANT CITY
Orange Crystals, Inc.
PLYMOUTH
American Can Co.
PORT EVERGLADES
Florida Petrochemical Corp.
Lloyd A. Fry Roofing Co.
QUINCY
Dailey Veneer Co.
RIVIERA BEACH
Florida Canning Fruit Co.
SAINT AUGUSTINE
Nuclear Magnetic Mining Co.
SAINT PETERSBURG
Air & Lite Jalousies
American Communications
Crest Leather Mfg. Corp.
Florida Art Printers
Futuronics Mfg. Co.
Mason & Zuhars
Oravisual Co.
Pan Laminates
Pinellas Industries, Inc.
St. Petersburg Mfg. Co.
Thompson Machine & Tool Co.
Universal Concrete Pipe Co.
SANFORD
Aerojet Machine Products Co.
Brookfield Mills
SARASOTA
Automatic Windows Mfg. Co.
B & C Machine Co.
Buckley Mfg. Co.
Claudeloes
Gray's Furniture Co.
G. Gunzco Mfg. Co.
Plastic Industries, Inc.
Sarasota Blinds Mfg. Co.
Stainless Steel Wire Co.
Stillco Laboratories
Sunshine Chrome, Inc.
SEBRING
M. L. Baker
Ed Kolisek
Sebring Welding & Tank Co.
Triangle Iron Works
Tuffy Coach Co.
Webster Corp.
H. N. Webster
Yellowstone Coach Co.
STARKE
Draw-Tite Co.
TALLAHASSEE
Brik-Crete Products Co.
L. C. Packing Co.
Pyrofax Gas Co.
TAMPA
American Lacquer & Solvent Co.
Samuel Bingham's Son Mfg. Co.
Chem-Ice Corp.
F & F Industries
Frayn Sportswear Mfg. Co.
Girone & Sons
F. H. Hartman & Co.
Hasselo Cigar Box Co.
Sinclair & Valentine Co.
Southern Sportswear
Standard Cigar Co.
Tampa Togs
Thompson Venetian Blinds
TARPON SPRINGS
Courtney Amusement
Gallagher Cotton Mills
UMATILLA
Carl A. Vossberg Laboratories
WEST PALM BEACH
Hi-Fidelity Mfg. Corp.
Tilt-A-Door Corp.
West Palm Mills, Inc.
Worth Chemical & Paint Co.


Pleasure Boats
Household Flour
Furniture
Specialized Ppwer Supplies
Apparel Mfg.
Electronics
Insecticides
Concentrates
Millwork
Plastic Products


Paper Bags
Oxygen
Hatcn Covers
Concrete Mfg. Plant
Nylon, Nylon Thread
Shipbuilding, Repair
Orange Crystals
Tin Cans


Oil Cracking
Asphalt Roofing Paper
Veneer Materials
Canned Pineapple
Rare Minerals
Jalousies
Tools & Dies
Watch Bands
Wallpaper Printing Plant
Toys
Furniture
Folding Aluminum Easels
Plastic Products
Concrete Pipe
Aluminum Doors, Etc.
Tools & Dies
Concrete Pipe
Precision Machine Parts
Garment Factory
Windows
Tools & Dies
Art Displays
Bookends
Furniture
Trailers, Cabanas
Plastic Products
Venetian Blinds
Stainless Steel Products
Drugs
Replating Plant


75
8
500

3000-4000
25


50
80


12
150
200
300
15
25
150
100
10
15
25

10
2
6
10-12
4
4
40
6
25
6-10
10-20


Concrete Products
Pyrotechnics
Cattle Chutes, Metal Tanks
Farm Equipment
Trailer Homes
Portable Irrigation Pipe
Precision Scales
Trailer Homes
Trailer Hitches
Concrete Brick
Meat Packing
Bottled Gas
Paint & Lacquer
Printers Rollers
Dry Ice
Metal Fabrication
Garments
Ladies' Garments
Crab Meat Packers
Boxes
Printing Inks
Clothing
Cigars
Children's Clothing
Venetian Blinds
Amusement Rides
Textiles
Control Equipment
TV Chassis
Aluminum Doors, Windows
Garments
Paints, Antiseptic Soaps


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT














































i
i i
'



,?



i
;i
il-
1









a
I


FLORIDA ON PARADE


This ultra-modern building in a beautifully landscaped setting near Bartow
houses one of the technological facilities of International Minerals and Chemicals
Corporation.

Natural Resources


TITANIUM ORE STRIKES INTENSIFY

SEARCH FOR FLORIDA MINERALS


A small-scale repetition of the Cali-
fornia gold rush is taking place in
several parts of Florida as new de-
velopments in industry throughout
the nation increase the demand for
rare minerals. Florida has become in
the past several years an important
producer of ilmenite and rutile, the
ores from which titanium is made.
In recent months Du Pont has an-
nounced a new $3 million ilmenite
mine and processing plant near Law-
tey in North Central Florida. This
facility is somewhat similar to Du
Pont's existing Trail Range Ilmenite
Plant near Starke.
But perhaps the greatest ilmenite
discovery in state is being explored
near Panama City. Beach sands there
are said to contain as much as 25 per
cent heavy minerals with an ilmenite
content of 40 per cent of this fraction.
Since the deposits being mined by
Du Pont at Lawtey run about 2 per
cent total ilmenite, the Panama City
deposits bearing as much as 10 per
cent if proven promise to be ex-
tremely valuable.
Evidence of the importance of the
Panama City discovery is seen in the
fact that the Crane Company of Chi-


cago has leased more than 700 acres
near Phillips Inlet. W. R. Stead,
Crane's Assistant Treasurer, and W.
M. Zilbersher, Geologist and Field
Engineer, have made extensive on-
the-spot studies.
The Panama City deposits are eyed
by Crane as a primary source of raw
materials for their titanium plant
which is under construction at Chat-
tanooga. Direct rail service between
the Panama City area and Chatta-
nooga is an important locational ad-
vantage.
Processing Unit
But Crane is not the only company
interested in the Florida ores. Bear
Creek Mining Company, a subsidiary
of Kennecott Copper, has had a ge-
ologist in the area and several other
chemical process firms are said to be
interested. Other companies actively
engaged in producing titanium con-
centrates in Florida include Florida
Ore Producing Company, Mel-
bourne; Rutile Mining Company of
Florida, Jacksonville; and Humph-
reys Gold Corporation, Jacksonville.
Recently the Nuclear Magnetic Min-
ing Company has invested $250,000.


L 1~X- ,.::-:.- ..~:
.t,...


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


7


September-October


in a pilot plant and process unit near
St. Augustine.
With national requirements for
titanium and other rare metals such
as zirconium, observers believe that
the Florida "gold rush" is only begin-
ning. More comprehensive surveys
including airborne electronic and
magnetic studies are likely to reveal
additional resources of industrial im-
portance.
Petroleum Exploration
One of the fond hopes of Florida
developers is that the state will even-
tually join Texas and Louisiana as a
major oil producer. Some support
for this hope has come from geology
experts although drilling tests as yet
have been relatively unsuccessful.
By 1950, state geologist Herman
Gunter reported a total of 250 wells
drilled for oil and gas throughout
the state. Many additional wells have
been drilled since and only a few
small producers have been found.
Sunniland Field in Collier County
in Southwest Florida has yielded a
dozen or more producing wells, some
with a production rate initially of
more than 500 barrels a day. More
recently the 40-Mile Bend field west
of Miami off the Tamiami Trail has
yielded two producing wells, one of
which is being pumped at around
one hundred barrels per day.
Of course, these figures are not im-
pressive to those familiar with pro-
duction statistics in the oil-rich states.
However, expert geologists feel that
further extensive exploration is well
justified.
It is estimated that the statewide
search for oil now involves some 600
persons and costs some $10 million
per year. Among the companies en-
gaged in research are Humble, Gulf,
Coastal Petroleum, and Coastal Carib-
bean Oils.
Phosphate Rock
By far the most important Florida
mineral in terms of present income
is phosphate rock. In 1952, the state
produced 8,781,100 long tons valued
at $51.5 million.
Approximately 90 per cent of Flor-
ida phosphate production is used in
the manufacture of super-phosphate
for fertilizer and feeds. The balance
goes into industrial chemicals, ex-
plosives, medicines, ceramics, iron
and steel, and various intermediates.
Phosphate processing operations
are concentrated primarily in Polk
County, east of Tampa, with lesser








FLORIDA
operations in Hillsborough and Mar-
ion Counties. Among the major firms
active in the area are American Ag-
ricultural Chemicals, American Cy-
anamid, Coronet Phosphate, Davison
Chemical, International Minerals and
Chemicals, Swift, and Virginia-Caro-
lina Chemicals.
The Atomic Energy Commission in
recent years has become very much
interested in the removal of uranium
as a by-product in the phosphate min-
ing industry in Florida and has estab-
lished an office at Plant City. A new
$15 million plant of International
Minerals and Chemicals is built for
uranium recovery.
Other Minerals
Clay is an important Florida re-
source with an annual production of
112,000 short tons valued at $2 mil-
lion in 1952. In the same year the
state produced 23.7 million short tons
of peat valued at $54,000; 4.15 mil-
lion short tons of sand and gravel
valued at $3.85 million; and 7.56
million short tons of stone valued at
$9.26 million.
One of the leading producers of
Fullers earth in the country is Atta-
pulgus Minerals and Chemicals Cor-
poration which has research and en-
gineering laboratories at Lakeland.
This company manufactures mate-
rials used as refining mediums in the
petroleum industry, as industrial and
automotive grease absorbents, as car-
riers and diluents for insecticide dust;
S and for other industrial products.
It has also been suggested that
Florida silica sand deposits between
West Palm Beach and Miami are
worthy of exploration. One plant
manufactures glass bottles in Jack-
sonville, using sand brought in from
the area of Deland and Kissimmee.
Further development of this industry
is expected in view of markets for
glass containers in the Florida can-
ning industry.
Minerals from Shells
The new plant of the Lehigh Port-
land Cement Company at Bunnell
utilizes as raw material the small
coquina shells found in great abun-
dance in the area. The plant dredges
up some 7,500 tons of shells and sand
per day, and test borings indicate a
hundred-year supply.


September-October


Copies Free
On Request...

New


ECONOMIC


STUDY

of



MIAMI

Miami's 1954 Economic Report is ready.
Subjects covered include:
1. Economic History of the Metropolitan
Miami Area.
2. Analysis of Population Growth.
3. Statistical Evidence of Growth.
4. Employment Trends, Business Patterns.
5. Manufacturing in Greater Miami.
6. Metropolitan Miami Market.
7. The Future of the Greater Miami Area.


For copy of Miami's new Economic Report, write

Industrial Development and Research Division

City of Miami, ROOM 300, COURTHOUSE

MIAMI, FLORIDA








FLORIDA ON PARADE


Utilities Spark

Florida Growth

The growth of electric utilities in
Florida in the past decade is a "grew
some" story, according to McGregor
Smith, Chairman of the Board of
Florida Power and Light in Miami.
Citing the record of his own com-
pany, Smith points to an increase in
plant capacity from 243,000 kilowatts
in 1945 to 740,000 this year. More-
over, Smith says, "At the present rate
of growth, we're preparing for 1.5
million kilowatts in 1961."
Speaking recently before the New
York Society of Security Analysts,
Smith pointed out that Florida utili-
ties are growing not only because of
the expansion of the region's industry
and population, but because the en-
ergy load is becoming more stable. As
an example, he reports, "The differ-
ence between the average monthly
kilowatt hour sales for the Miami area
during four winter months once
called the 'tourist season' and the
average monthly sales for the other
eight months is less than four per
cent."
Florida is served by four major
private power firms. Florida Power
and Light's service area extends from
Miami north along the East Coast;
Tampa Electric covers several coun-
ties in the Tampa area; Florida Pow-
er Corporation serves the area north
of Tampa to the "Panhandle;" and
Gulf Power serves the Pensacola-
Panama City region. All have remark-
able growth records.

Fastest in South
Florida Power Corporation, with
headquarters in St. Petersburg, is said
to be the fastest-growing electric
utility in the Southeast and second-
fastest in the country. Capacity has
increased from 87,500 kilowatts in
1944 to more than 400,000 kilowatts
last year. A $75 million expansion
program is now underway.
Gulf Power's growth has been sim-
ilarly impressive. In the period 1945-
53, Gulf kilowatt hour sales increased
232 per cent as compared with a 98
per cent increase for the electric util-
ity industry nationally. In the same
period, number of customers in-
creased 114 per cent and revenue
went up 186 per cent.


Key figures in publication of information about development opportunities in
Florida are Stanmore Cawthon (left), who heads the Industrial Development
Division of the State Advertising Commission, and Allen Morris (right), Secre-
tary of the State Council for Industry and Commerce.

Data Service

FLORIDA INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER

VITAL AID TO SITE-SEEKING FIRMS


TALLAHASSEE. The industrialist
considering a Florida location will
find a variety of offices and service
organizations anxious to supply in-
formation. Floridians, like Texans
and Californians, are good tub-
thumpers, but they are also quick to
supply factual data of value to the
business analyst.
The Industrial Development Divi-
sion of the State Advertising Commis-
sion here probably is the key informa-
tion center. Headed by alert and per-
sonable Stanmore Cawthon, the Di-
vision works under the general juris-
diction of Director A. J. Dwyer.
Cawthon's unit issues a regular In-
dustrial Newsletter as well as variety
of special studies on opportunities in
the state. The development group also
serves as a point of contact with other
state agencies producing data of value
in site surveys.
Another key information source is
the Florida Engineering and Indus-
trial Experiment Station in Gaines-
ville. The Station has issued more


than 100 publications on such sub-
jects as process-industries engineer-
ing, pine seed planters, coquina as-
phalt, lime production, turkey oak
barking, alkaline pulping, phosphate
slimes utilization, solar heating and
subsurface sewage disposal.
Nearly 8,000 literature requests
were filled by the Station in 1953.
This service was in addition to sup-
plying a mailing list of 1,200 names
with regular issues of Engineering
Progress at the University of Florida.
In addition to publications by these
two sources, I. D. has identified the
following reports which contain va-
ried and useful information about the
state:
General References
PROCEEDINGS OF THE GULF AND
CARIBBEAN FISHERIES INSTITUTE,
University of Miami, Marine Laboratory,
Coral Gables, June 1951, 152 pp.
INDIVIDUAL INCOME PAYMENTS IN
FLORIDA COUNTIES: 1950, Economic
Leaflets, Volume 8 (5), April, 1954, Bureau
of Economic and Business Research, Col-
lege of Business Administration, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville, 4 pp.


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


FLRDAO PRD


September-October









FLORIDA ON PARADE


NEW INDUSTRIAL PAYROLLS: THE
FIRST HARVEST, Council for Industry
and Commerce, State Capitol, Tallahassee,
7 pp.
DIRECTORY OF FLORIDA INDUS-
TRIES, 1951-1952, The Florida State Cham-
ber of Commerce, 510-520 Hildebrandt
Building, Jacksonville, 224 pp.
INDUSTRIAL FLORIDA, Florida State
Department of Agriculture, Tallahassee,
1954, 62 pp.
AVERAGE HOURS AND EARNINGS IN
MANUFACTURING AND SELECTED
NON-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
IN FLORIDA, 1948-1953, Florida Employ-
ment Statistics, Florida Industrial Com-
mission, Bull. 69(1), Tallahassee, 12 pp.
* MANUFACTURING IN FLORIDA
COUNTIES AND CITIES, State Economic
Studies, No. 1, Bureau of Economic and
Business Research, College of Business Ad-
ministration, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville. May 1951, 96 pp.
MANUFACTURING IN FLORIDA, State
Economic Studies No. 2, Bureau of Eco-
nomic and Business Research, College of
Business Administration, University of
Florida, Gainesville. June 1952, 177 pp.
FLORIDA'S FAST GROWING MAR-
KETS, State of Florida, 700 Commission
Building, Tallahassee, 23 pp.
POPULATION TRENDS: PRINCIPAL
CITIES OF THE SOUTH, First Research
Corporation, First National Bank Building,
Miami, 1953, 2 pp.
FLORIDA'S OLDER PEOPLE, Bureau of
Economic and Business Research, College
of Business Administration, University of
Florida, Gainesville, December 1953, 81
pp., $.50.
FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF
THE FLORIDA RAILROAD & PUBLIC
UTILITIES COMMISSION, Florida Rail-
road & Public Utilities Commission, Tal-
lahassee, 1951, 150 pp.
FLORIDA'S ELECTRIC POWER INDUS-
TRY, Economic Leaflets 8(8), Bureau of
Economic and Business Research, College
of Business Administration, University of
Florida, Gainesville, July 1954, 4 pp.
SPRINGS OF FLORIDA, Geological Bul-
letin No. 31, State of Florida Department
of Conservation, Tallahassee, 1947.
JOURNAL FLORIDA ENGINEERING
SOCIETY, bi-monthly publication, Edward
R. Lampp, Editor, 111 N. E. Second Ave.,
Miami.
POPULATION CHANGES
CERTAIN PRINCIPAL CITIES OF THE SOUTH
1940-1953


1940 1953
SOURCE. *UEE*U OTIECB4SS,
US. DIPT OF COMWESCE,


Florida cities are growing more rapidly
than others in the surrounding region
as shown in this chart published by
First Research Corporation.


Glimpse Ahead

FLORIDA STUDY REFLECTS 10,000 MILE
JAUNT BY I.D. ASSOCIATE EDITOR

By Charles Layng


Not everybody looking for a plant
site would travel more than 10,000
miles by car in Florida, as I did, these
past few months. Nor would it be
desirable or necessary for them to
do so. If they did, though, they would
certainly acquire the impression that
Floridians may well be optimistic as
to their industrial future.
The state is imbued with a pioneer-
ing and frontier spirit which is lead-
ing to agricultural and industrial de-
velopment in vast areas of Florida
that the tourist never sees. On a little-
travelled road through the heart of
the Everglades, for example, one may
come across a $2 million plant for
converting ramie fiber or, on a back-
road along an inlet, a multi-million
dollar cement plant may be encoun-
tered.
Under the leadership of A. D. Da-
vis, President of Winn & Lovett Gro-
cery Company, the Council for In-
dustry and Commerce for Florida has
been lining up Florida's business lead-
ers into searchers for new industry for
the state. Mr. Davis is also keenly in-
terested in the further use of research
as an aid to manufacturing expansion.
He says, "There is no state in the
nation which owes more to scientific
research and the men and women who
perform it. Until these researchers be-
gan to find new uses for the products
of our farms, forests and mines, Flor-
ida made. very little progress indus-
trially."
S. Kendrick Guernsey, President of
Gulf Life Insurance Company, Jack-
sonville, who is the former President
of Rotary International, is a keen stu-
dent of Florida's industry. He says:
"It is 7:00 o'clock in the morning in
Florida in relation to industry. The
day is before us, and it is filled with
promise. Already the number of in-
dustrial plants operating successfully
in our state exceeds the imagination of
old-time Floridians who used to claim
that 'we live on sweet 'taters in sum-
mer and Yankees in winter.' Our tre-
mendous natural advantages which in-
sure more hours of sunlight each day,
less need for heating in winter, and
a plentiful labor market, together with
our favorable tax laws, promise that


more and more industrial plants of all
types will find it profitable to industry
to make Florida their home."
Philip W. Moore, President, First
Research Corporation of Florida, as
an economic and management con-
sultant, believes that few people even
in Florida recognize the degree of in-
dustrial development and manufac-
turing that has taken place in the state
in recent years. He makes the follow-
ing forecast, "The next advance in
the state could very well be in the
manufacturing field of automobile
assembly or accessories, in the air-
plane or airplane parts field, or in
electronics.
"All along, Florida's industrial de-
velopment pattern has been a chang-
ing one, and one which rapidly tends
to bring to the state a growing repu-
tation for being a well balanced,
pleasant and favorable climate in
which to raise a manufacturing busi-
ness. One advantage Florida has is
its relative youth, and in this frontier
state, industrial planning has splendid
opportunities. Such planning is both
possible and needed in an economical-
ly 'first generation' state; with it,
industrial development throughout
the peninsula should be both rapid
and well-balanced over the next five
years.




1.1
'


Philip Moore of First Research.


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


_ _


1940


September-October

























* NEW CUSTOMERS are waiting for
you in the booming South. More than
600 new multi-million dollar plants
have been added during the past 3
years.

1952 SURVEY lists some 3,000 plants
valued at $1 million or more, indexed
alphabetically, geographically, and by prod-
uct. Names key executive.

1953 SURVEY lists some 12,500 manu-
facturers employing 50 or more. Classified
by product. Gives approximate number of
employees.

THE SET of two directories provides un-
beatable data on industries in the Southern
states.

-- ORDER FORM---

To: Southern Industrial Directory I
S 5009 Peachtree Road
Atlanta, Ga.

Send _.-------- sets at $10 each.
I
I Payment as follows:
( ) check enclosed
( ) bill company
I I
Signed--- --------------
-I
Position ____-----------I-----
Firm -----------.. ----.---- I
I I
Address ..----.... ---- --..---- .









SOUTHERN INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORY
5009 PIACHTRIE RD., ATLANTA, OA.
5009 PIACHTRLl IRD. AtLANTA, OA.


AREA PROGRAMS


In charge of planning for the Western Area Development Conference is Charles
Hamman (right) of Stanford Research Institute. He is shown with an assistant
in the Economic Research Division.
November Session

SAN FRANCISCO MEETING TO PROBE BASIC
WESTERN DEVELOPMENT TRENDS, PROBLEMS


What makes a region tick?
Industrialists and researchers from
11 western states are going to gather
in San Francisco on November 17
at the Mark Hopkins Hotel to try to
find an answer to that question and
thereby to accelerate the economic
progress of their region. Designed to
probe fundamental questions of area
development, the sessions are being
planned by Stanford Research Insti-
tute with the aid of an 11-man Tech-
nical Advisory Committee working
under the auspices of 6 cooperating
organizations.
In addition to SRI, the sponsors
include the American Railway De-
velopment Association, California
Manufacturers Association, Chambers
of Commerce of Hawaii, National
Association of Manufacturers, Pa-
cific Northwest Trade Association,
and the Society of Industrial Realtors.
Program planning is under the di-
rection of Charles L. Hamman, As-
sistant Director, Economic Research
Division, Stanford Research Insti-
tute. The Advisory Committee in-
cludes A. V. K. Babcock, Industrial
Development Manager, Arizona Pub-
lic Service, Phoenix; Miner Baker,
Vice President, Seattle First National
Bank; H. M. Conway, Jr., Editor,
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, Atlanta;
Harold Furst, Economist, Bank of


America, San Francisco; Thomas K.
Hitch, Director of Research, Hawaii
Employers Council, Honolulu; Con-
rad Jamison, Vice President, Security
First National Bank, Los Angeles;
L. Victor Riches, Director of Busi-
ness Research, University of Utah;
Victor Roterus, Director, Area De-
velopment Division, U. S. Department
of Commerce, Washington, D. C.;
F. B. Stratton, Director of Indus-
trial Development, Western Pacific
Railroad, San Francisco; Stuart P.
Walsh, Director, Industrial Survey
Associates, San Francisco; and John
Watt, Jr., Director, Oregon Develop-
ment Commission.
Program Plan
The one-day program will include
a morning session devoted to papers
o- basic studies of energy, resources,
and development. The keynote lunch-
eon address, to be delivered by Walter
R. Bimson, Chairman of the Board
of the Valley National Bank, Phoenix,
will deal with "Opportunities for In-
dustrial Leadership in Area Develop-
ment."
The afternoon program will con-
sist of four meetings, two running
concurrently. Inquiries concerning
the program and conference registra-
tion should be directed to Mr. Ham-
man at Stanford Research Institute,
Palo Alto, California.


50 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


September-October














WHAT


MAKES


A PLANT SITE






GREAT?




k


TRANSPORTATION.. Deep Water:
Ocean going vessels serving Atlantic
and Pacific Seaboards and foreign
countries from 2 large ports, Long-
view and Kalama. Barge transportation
400 miles inland.
Railroads: Transcontinental lines .
Great Northern, Northern Pacific.
Union Pacific, and Milwaukee.
Air: International Airport 50
minutes away.
Highways: East and West,US No. 30
and US No. 830 North and
South,US No. 99.

POWER Dependable, low cost
Columbia River firm hydropower, sup-
plemented by steam power available
through negotiated contract with lo-
cally owned Public Utility.

LABOR highly intelligent labor
supply available. May be drawn from
a 50 mile area with a population in
excess of 600,000.

WATER ... Strategic site locations for
underground, surface and impounded
waters great quantities for indus-
trial use.

INDUSTRY Home of world's
largest lumber mills Aluminum
reduction plant Several Nation-
ally known Pulp, Paper and Plywood
Plants.


Cowlitz County, situated on the great Columbia
River in Southwest Washington, contains over
2,000 acres of the Nation's choice, natural indus-
trial sites.
We cordially invite you to investigate our land
of gracious living, where there is over 68% Home
Ownership (above State average for entire nation),
with ample housing and adequate schools built with
an eye towards new industry and the future!

For Complete Information, write to .
Julius R. Jensen, Manager
COWLITZ INDUSTRIAL BUREAU
1563 Olympia Way Longview, Washington
(Member American Industrial Development Council,
Associate Member Society of Industrial Realtors)


0 SEATTLE




COUNTY
Z.."




0 Ik

PeatLAND O


I
























AVAILABLE SITES
Wildwood welcomes any industry that is
bona fide. We have two U. S. highways.
Three main lines of the Seaboard Railway
meet in a huge yard here. We serve a
prosperous ranch and farm area. Plenty
of native-born labor. Excellent water for
industries in large quantities. No conflict
with tourists here. Write: A. M. Barlow,
Realtor, Wildwood, Florida.
East Tennessee Dayton 194 acres I mile
frontage, Sou. Ry. mainline Cincinnati-
Miami, New Orleans. Tennessee River
transportation, New Orleans and Pitts-
burgh. Adjacent South's fastest growing
markets; Chattanooga 38 miles, Knoxville
85, Atlanta 158. Ample labor, TVA power,
5 yr. waiver taxes; contacts confidential.
Booklet on request Dayton Chamber of
Commerce, Box 9, Dayton, Tennessee.
Phone 80.
Jersey City, N. J., Tax Exempt, Industrial
Sites, RR Sidings, for Lease. L. N. Rosen-
baum & Son, 565 Fifth Ave., New York.


AVAILABLE SITES
New Smyrna Beach, Fla. (Daytona area).
We invite you to investigate possibilities
of small businesses and manufacturing.
Good living conditions, unexcelled climate,
and skilled workers. Write Chamber of
Commerce.
Oakdale, California- 2 to 300 acres indus-
trial land, good power, labor supply, water,
railroad, highways, airport facilities. 80
miles from San Francisco, 30 miles, ocean
port of Stockton. Excellent climate, near
top recreational areas. Earl Blankinship,
Oakdale District Chamber of Commerce,
238 N. Yosemite, phone 5941, Oakdale,
California.
Scranton, Pennsylvania Sites, 5 acres to 150
acres, on rail sidings. Take advantage of
the largest labor pool in Eastern United
States. Contact Industrial Department,
Scranton Chamber of Commerce, for fur-
ther information.


INFORMATION ABOUT CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

RATES: $2 per line or fraction thereof. Estimate about five words
per line, allowing for box number. Minimum order $4. No discounts.

BOX NUMBERS: Publisher will assign box and relay correspondence
on a confidential basis if desired.

PROOFS: Not furnished on classified ads.

GUARANTEE: Guaranteed minimum circulation is 10,000 copies, sent
primarily to heads of large manufacturing concerns.

LARGER ADS: Advertisers desiring more -pace should request the
display rate card. Minimum display unit is 1/6 page or 1/2 column.



r-----------------------------------

(Mail to Industrial Development, 5009 Peachtree Rd., Atlanta, Ga.






( ) For two years $5 ( ) For one year $3


PAYMENT: ( ) Enclosed ( ) Bill firm



FIRM -... .. ........ ..... ...... ----------------- ----------- ------------------------------------.I.


NAME .- --........ --- .---------.-...------------------------.TITLE ............TI --- .--


STREET -----.. -----......... --....------------ ------------------------ ----- -- ----- ---------..


CITY .........--------.--- .---- -------------------- ZONE--.------- STATE .-........---
----------------------------------------------


SITES OR BLDGS. WANTED
Nationally known merchandising firm re-
quires 100/ to 125,000 square feet for ware-
house and distribution operation in Middle
West. I.D., Box 54-7.
Top rate Chicago manufacturer needs up to
100,000 square feet in Northern Illinois
community with ample male labor supply.
I.D., Box 54-8.
Top rated Ohio firm needs from 100/ to
250,000 square feet for heavy industrial use,
located in Middle West. I.D., Box 54-9.

Prominent metal products manufacturer re-
quires up to 100,000 square feet in Western
Wisconsin. I.D., Box 54-10.

Large Eastern firm interested in obtaining
building about 100,000 square feet in West
Central Ohio or East Central Indiana. I.D.,
Box 54-11.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
New York manufacturing company with com-
plete engineering, manufacturing and re-
search facilities is interested in buying
small growth company in the electronics
field. I.D.,.Box 54-4.

Financing $500,000.00 Upwards for Estab-
lished Industrial Concerns. L. N. Rosen-
bauim & Sons, 565 Fifth Avenue, New York
17.

LOCATION SERVICES

Pennsylvania -Clarion can solve your dis-
persal problem with a bonus of a remark-
able labor record. For report on an alert
small community contact Chamber of Com-
merce. Atten.: fH. Flick, Clarion, Pa.

PERSONNEL PLACEMENT

Position desired in industrial development
work. Over 3 years with area development-
foundation. Particularly interested in Flor-
ida location. Address I.D., Box 54-5.

Executive secretary for regional develop-
ment organization located in South. Out-
standing opportunity for capable and am-
bitious young man. I.D., Box 54-6.

Industrial Promotion and Development Di-
rector. Want experienced man to solicit
new industries and manage community in-
dustrial development campaign in progres-
sive city of 35,000 people. Send letters of
application giving complete qualifications
and personal data to Clinton Development
Company, Tucker Building, Clinton, Iowa.

VACANT BUILDINGS

Los Angeles--Heavy duty building; 131,000
sq. ft. under roof; 69,000 sq. ft. main build-
ing; 3 bridge cranes; spur; parking. For
sale. Terms. Austin Securities Co., 777
E. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles 21, Calif.

Jennings, Louisiana- 20,000 sq. ft., 1 story,
plant and office bldg. RR., cycloned fenced,
built 1938, lease or sell. Owner. Box 544,
Allwood, Clinton, N. J.

Omaha, Nebraska- 50,000 sq. ft., I floor,
factory or warehouse. 5 years old, auto-
matic heat, air conditioned office. 9 car
tracks, 8 loading docks. For sale or rent.
Write William Kirkman, c/o E. C. Morin,
49th & Leavenworth, Omaha, Nebraska.


INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT


September-October









VACANT BUILDINGS
Harry R. Sherman, 100% Industrial Realtor.
1000 Flamingo Way, Hialeah, Fla., 10 blocks
south of race track.

Scranton, Pennsylvania New, never occu-
pied, 60,000 sq. ft. building on 24 acre tract.
One floor, sprinklered, all utilities, rail
siding. Lease purchase, straight lease, or
sale. Contact Industrial Department. Scran-
S ton Chamber of Commerce for full details.

Oelwein, Iowa 47,760 square feet. One
story vacant. 12 truck loading docks. Rail-
road siding available. Zoned industrial.
Good labor situation. Immediate posses-
sion. J. J. Harrington & Co., 22 W. Monroe
St., Chicago 3, Illinois.

South Bend, Indiana 130,000 square feet.
One story beautiful fireproof building on
20 acres. Truck loading and railroad fa-
cilities. All utilities. Possession at once.
J. J. Harrington & Co., 22 W. Monroe St.,
Chicago 3, Illinois.

Battle Creek, Michigan- 223,921 square foot
building, about 185,000 of which is one
story. Sprinklered. Two elevators. Oil and
gas fired boilers. Splendid loading facilities
for truck and rail. Ideal for heavy indus-
trial. Priced for quick sale. J. J. Harring-
ton & Co., 22 W. Monroe St., Chicago 3, Ill.

Central Illinois -87,000 square feet, one
story, acreage for expansion. Sprinklered.
Ideal switch and trucking. Possession at
once. Attractive terms on sale at bargain
price, or will rent. Strategically located in
Illinois community of 75,000 fine people.
J. J. Harrington & Co., 22 W. Monroe St.,
Chicago 3, Illinois.

WILL BUILD FOR TENANT

Greater Miami, Fla. Available or will build
to suit for lease or sale. Any size. Excel-
lent financing. Harry R. Sherman, Indus-
trial Realtor, Professional Bldg., Hialeah,
Fla.

Southeastern Locations Atlanta and other
Ga. Cities. Clients we represent will build
5M to 500M sq. ft. We also have vacant
properties available for immediate occu-
pancv. Lease or sale. Advise us of your
needs. Sam Massell, Jr., Allan-Grayson
Realty Co., 30 N. Pryor St., Atlanta, Ga.

Pennsylvania Join the new industrial trend
to Scranton, Pennsylvania. Will build mod-
ern one-story manufacturing buildings for
industry on a lease purchase, straight lease
or outright sale. Contact Industrial Depart-
ment. Scranton Chamber of Commerce for
detailed information.

Harry R. Sherman, 100% Industrial Realtor.
1000 Flamingo Way, Hialeah, Fla., 10 blocks
south of race track.

Florida, Ft. Lauderdale Modern all-concrete
industrial buildings in complete industrial
center. Low insurance rates excellent
lease terms. All utilities. Good labor pool.
Rail and highway access. Climate unsur-
passed. Write Broward Warehouse & Man-
ufacturing Center, Inc., P. O. Box 1539, for
detailed brochure.



COMING NEXT ISSUE:

The November-December issue of
I.D. will include, along with the
regular features:

A report on a firm which has
located nearly 100 new plants
throughout the United States.

A comprehensive report on new
industrial districts.

A survey of industrial locational
opportunities in a booming Mid-
western state.


GUIDE TO BUILDINGS, SITES, AND SERVICES


II I


INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

September-October, 1954

For prompt assistance with your site selection problems
consult these alert advertisers who are represented in this
issue of I.D.:

AMERICAN TRUST COMPANY -- --___------- 5
Agency: Cox, Chandlee & Jackson
ATLANTA & SAINT ANDREWS BAY RAILWAY CO. _--- 39
Direct
AUBURN N. Y. INDUSTRIAL DEV. FOUNDATION -- ---- 19
Agency: Huguenin Co., Inc.
CENTRAL OF GEORGIA .--...--_._. ___.___ _---... .. .- -_---- 1
Agency: Tucker Wayne & Company
COWLITZ INDUSTRIAL BUREAU -__- 51
Agency: West Pacific
DAYTONA BEACH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ----- 38
Agency: Charles Corsi Advertising
ERIE RAILROAD --- ----------___- Inside Front Cover
Agency: Griswold-Eshleman Co.
FIRST RESEARCH CORPORATION ____~_----- 36
Agency: August Dorr Advertising
FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY ___- -- -- ---- 29
Direct
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY -__ ---- 41
Agency: Bevis & Tyler, Inc.
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION -__-___ --- 38
Direct
FLORIDA STATE ADVERTISING COMMISSION __ --- 25
Agency: Newman, Lynde & Associates, Inc.
FORT MYERS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE .--__--- 40
Agency: Griffith-McCarthy, Inc.
GREATER VANCOUVER METROPOLITAN IND. DEV. COM .. ....- 15
Agency: Cockfield, Brown & Company Limited
GULF POWER COMPANY -----___---- 37
Direct
J. J. HARRINGTON & COMPANY -__ -...-.-.........----- --- 18
Agency: Marsteller, Gebhardt & Reed, Inc.
CITY OF HIALEAH ---. --------__-- 39
Direct
JACKSONVILLE COMMITTEE OF 100 ___-__ 30 & 31
Agency: Newman, Lynde & Associates, Inc.
LEESBURG CHAMBER OF COMMERCE __-_-. __._..-- ..- 35
Direct
LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA ------___- ------ 11
Agency: Patch & Curtis
METUCHEN INDUSTRIAL CENTER, INC. ____--- 20
Agency: Bennett-Edwards
CITY OF MIAMI ------- -- 47
Agency: Bevis & Tyler, Inc.
MONTGOMERY INDUSTRIAL COMMITTEE ___--_---_--------------- 13
Agency: Lynn Advertising
NICKEL PLATE ROAD .-- ---.....---.-- ----_---- ....---- 20
Agency: Fuller, Smith & Ross, Inc.
NORFOLK & WESTERN RAILWAY 6---_--_--_._---..-- .--------.- 6
Agency: Houck & Company
N. C. DEPT. OF CONSERVATION & DEVELOPMENT ..__---- 4th Cover
Agency: Bennett Advertising, Inc.
ORLANDO INDUSTRIAL BOARD --_..-- ___.------ -26
Agency: Hammond-Botts
PANAMA CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ..._-_-_._ _--....-- 27
Agency: Bacon, Hartman & Volbrecht, Inc.
SEMINOLE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE _- -- 36
Agency: Hammond-Botts, Inc.
SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL __ _-- 16
Agency: Cowan Advertising
TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY -------- ------_ 34
Agency: Jack Lacey Advertising
VA. DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION & DEVELOPMENT .--_..--- 21
Agency: Houck & Company Advertising
VA. ELECTRIC & POWER COMPANY .------------ ------- 4
Agency: Advertising, Inc.
WEST VA. INDUSTRIAL & PUBLICITY COMMITTEE -_--2--- 2
Agency: Advertising, Inc.


~----- '















i p basic indus- -

Sspeed-p in as program o s ulnerable to
tries and iviian bomb threats i
|,, hydrogen "'. ScientistS-
Thenet1 o the Atonic Sce ratis screen giving

e Bulletin said a along-range radar planes plus a
evhe Bulletin waring of approac- ities could
Wserehea rsed plan for evacu' o gaon two or three
offer substantial Protection
r years hence. i p



Important Reminders Like This

Emphasize the Advantages

of North Carolina Locations

With a well-dispersed population (10th in the nation
in ize yet only one city is over the 100,000 mark),
North Carolina offers ideal plant dispersal opportunities.

A welcome distance from areas have already attracted some o
vulnerable to enemy attack is com- the country's foremost companies
bined with desirable nearnessto Additional information, with
major markets over half the popu- data about desirable rural or urban
lationofthe United Stateiswithn sites and building in munta
500 miles o North Carlina. iedmont and oatal area, wil
Fast and economical access to be furnished speedilN upon request
cities in all directions is provided to Ben E. Douglas, Director
by well-rounded transportation Department of Conservantion an<
facilities which include a 70.000- Development, Raleigh. N. C.
mile State highway system. 1
Intelligent and cooperative Friendly C 01i
native-born labor, with a record r P pe
of proven productivity, is another Industry Prospei
of the important advantages which1 ;; ML't e


-I


t




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