Title: The Voice of Business Speaks
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00002797/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Voice of Business Speaks
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: AIF
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: The Voice of Business Speaks, 2/2/1976
General Note: Box 11, Folder 3 ( Final Report: Environmental Efficiency Study Commission - 1987-88 ), Item 8
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00002797
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text






K23


- r 'c u< ~ 1 1'~t ~?(3 .1 ri5-.It ~ ~ rr$r


CTES


(.


VOICE OF BUSINESS

BEIVED SPEAKS
=, ~ 7"7


Tpbe (p0) 14-7173 P. O. Bo 784 Tlaham. FlorWda


No. 76-3

FLORIPA TO
CONGRESSIO
SEATS


POLICE UNI
.SEEKS "MIN
BLOWING" B
FITS




NATIONAL U
MAKING HEA
PUSH IN FL
FOR PUBLIC
EMPLOYEES


if-a- w"


February 2, 1976


GAIN Florida's population growth predictions indicate she will gain five
MAL congressional seats after the 1980 census, largest jump in the country, giving
the state 20 House members, seventh largest delegation in the nation. State
Economist Jay Yelton said Florida's population, now estimated at 8.4 million
compared to 6.8 million in the 1970 census, is projected at 9.94 million by
1980, an increase of 45 percent during the current decade. This compares with
a 10 to 15 percent growth increase estimated for the nation as a whole during
the 10 years ending with 1980. The figures are based on two computer studies,
one by Wichita State University, the other by The New York Times. House seat
gains indicated for other states include two for Texas and one each for Tennes-."-
see, Arizona, Arkansas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah,.California, and Oregon.
The study shows New York will drop four seats; Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois
two each; and Michigan, Indiana, Missouri, Kansas, and South Dakota, one each.
ON The Police Benevolent Association, first union to bargain collectively
P with the state, is asking for 25 percent pay hikes and other "mind blowing"
ENE- demands, chief negotiator Dean Miekle reported. The PBA represents Highway
Patrol, Marine Patrol, Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission officers,.beverage
agents, and state university police. Miekle said he didn't envision this group
getting more than anybody else in state government. A Senate Ways and Means
subcommittee is considering a proposal to give all state employees a flat $360
a year increase plus a three percent salary hike.
NION The American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, which
VV hopes to become the major union for Florida's 90,000 state workers, has reached
ORIDA tentative agreement on a collective bargaining unit for 15,000 "human services"
workers, including prison guards. The union has begun a public pitch for higher
pay, cost of living adjustments, and fully paid life and health insurance. AFSCME
is making a major push in Florida, first Southern state to give public employees
S collective bargaining rights, and shortly is expected to petition to represent
some 9,000 professional workers in all state agencies.


UNIONS GET HELP
SIN BSI TO VESTROV
"RIGHT TO WORK".
COMMITTEE

VOTERS TO DECIDE
O N WATER MANAGE-
S ENT VILLAGE


BAa PRESIDENT
WITS FINANCIAL
r4SCLOSURE AMEND-
( NT


On the national scene, organized labor saw a major victory in U.S. District
Judge Charles Richey's ruling that the legal aid arm of the National Right to Work
Committee operates as a front for employers who are trying to weaken unions. He
set February 20 for a show cause hearing on why he should not enjoin the group
from accepting contributions from interested employers.
Emerging as a strong issue in the March 9 primary is a proposed constitu-
tional amendment which calls on voters to decide whether they want water manage-
ment and if they favor property taxes to support it. Governor Reubin Askew,
Lieutenant Governor Jim Williams, Agriculture Commissioner Doyle Conner, Attorney
General Robert Shevin, and legislative environmental committee leaders favor it.
Art Marshall of Gainesville, former Chairman of the St. Johns Water Management
District and semi-retired biologist Johnny Jones, Executive Director of the Florida
Wildlife Federation, and Senator Kenneth MacKay (D-Ocala) oppose it. Jones con-
tends water management districts should be state agencies under the Department
of Natural Resources with direct appeal to the Cabinet. Marshall says users of
the water should pay for its management, not general property owners.
The proposed financial disclosure amendment, pushed hard by Governor Askew,
would take lawyers out of the Legislature, Rex Farrior, Jr., President of the
Florida Bar, told the Jacksonville Bar Association. Lawyers, once dominant in the
Legislature, now make up 22 percent of the Senate and 23 percent of the House, but
would be forced completely out by restrictions imposed in partnerships and other
aspects of legal practice by the amendment which would require top state officials,
legislators, and candidates to file copies of their income tax returns and annual
net worth statements, according to Farrior.
(more)


--




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs