Title: Northern Tampa Bay WUCA Draft Management Plan-May 21, 1990
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 Material Information
Title: Northern Tampa Bay WUCA Draft Management Plan-May 21, 1990
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Northern Tampa Bay WUCA Draft Management Plan-May 21, 1990
General Note: Box 10, Folder 15 ( SF Water Use Caution Rule - 1990-1991 ), Item 10
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: WL00002369
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text


I --


SSVU- (Jodc'tj (LSa



NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990









NORTHERN TAMPA BAY

WATER USE CAUTION AREA

MANAGEMENT PLAN






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NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990


Table of Contents


Chapter I Introduction . . . .

Chanter 2 Work Group Rcomoendations . .


* S *


Chapter 3 Public aunplv Water Conservation ..
Introduction . . . .
I. Work Greou Recommendations . . .

on ....


S gthoal Stated Ist . . ...

Ch r Obiectialv Jutification. Implementationer
pc. Other Relelated Issues . . . .

Chantar 5 Induatrial. Mning and Recraational Water Use


Introduction . . .
Work Groun Recommendations . .
Goal Statement ........
Objectives Justification. Implementation


Chapter 6 Alternativea 8oura . .
&. Introduction . * *
I. Work Grou Recommendations . ....
Goal Statement ..............
.. .-ObAentive Justification. Implementation .
EL Other Related Issues . ....

Chapter 7 Lake Withdrawals


Introduction .
Work Group Recommendations
Goal Statement .
lh4,r wva .usmti~fcaftin..


Ernimnra a laethetia k~armenttiom of


introduction . .
Work Groua Recommendations
Goal Stateent . .
nlaeti- -vaa *.Tir i iaHn-n


Tmnlementation


surface Water Bodies


mplemen stationn . .
Implementation


* S S
* S S *
* S S S *
* .
Implementation


WI


Chapter 9 valuation of Water Use .
A. Introduction . .
IL Work Groua Recommendation.
2. Goal Statement ...
D. Ohimetives Justification.


-u------------ ----------------------------


anf' ---A&V A ------ -


I -- ------ ----I -


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I


Figure 1

Figure 2


Figure 3

Figure 4


Figure 5S




Table 1

Table 2


Delineation of Northern Tampa Bay Water Use
Caution Area . . ....... 3
Historical, current and projected (with and without
conservation measures) public supply water nee in the
NorthemaL fp&a. ay, Water Use Ca*tion Area . 12
Generalized location agriultural land use in the
Northern Tampa Bay Wter Use Caution Area . 24
Estimated citrus acreage and estimated percent acreage
irrigated in the ;rorthiir tpaa any Water Use Caution
*Ae 'frOm 1a9fetSs r. *e, .. . 26
Estimated stra erry acreage .an estiLpted percent
acreage irrigated in the Northern Tampa Bay Water Use
Caution Area from 1960-1968. .vr. .. .r 27

TABLES

Utilities in the Northern Tampa Bay Water Use
Caution area.. ..... ........ 11

Estimatedpermitted agricultural acreage and estimated
average daily permitted agricultural water se by
c iodity In t Nort'hern Ta-pe ay Water Use.Caution
Area, as of-anuary -, 1990~ ,, ,.. . 23


Table 3 Effidienires ft Florida agricultural irrigation systems
modified from Smajatria et al., I9s . 30

Table 4 Application efficiencies of site audited cb the Soil
Conseravatln SerVWic s Mobile Irrgation- abs- between
1987-B.. ... * ....*** .* **. . . 31

Table 5 Annual AirAgation requisnts for citrus and straw-
berries for selected major soil types in Northern
Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Atea .. . .3 35

Table 6 Lakes with established management levels in the
Northern Tampa ray Water Use Caution Area including
whether the lai is 9 lassiie4. as stressed or other,
a ofm ay 1990....... .. .. 46













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TAY UCAN Nay 21, 1990

ILLUSTRATIONS






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NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MNAMAE4T PLAN May 21, 1990


Chapter I1 Introduation Q

Since the id-1940s, grouwwtsr .wi4ra .als in -ibrthern
Hillsborough, southwestern Pasib, .m.Wd Pt 'la m Counties have been
increasing. These wvifhdzvals ah r Ve4aultd. in localizei. Lowering
of lake levels, localized destruction of VWtlands, reduction in
strea.flow, and th, .abanda It, 0-of oastal, vils because of salt
water intrusion. The true severity of these problems is currently
being studio; howviver, thte potential for serious. reg urce
degradation, and impacts to existing legal users, is clearly
present. This is especially true in light of projections that
population will continue to substantially increase.

In response to continued declines, th Southwest Florida Water
Management District's (Distrcty GoVMrnig Soard directed sa: ff to
initiate a coapreheosive w ater r c t of the area.
This investigation, the -Northern Tamp&. Bay -Water Resource
Assessment Project, was initiated 4, spring of 1988. The
primary goals of the project ae to 'evop a better understanding
of why aquifer levels iave continued to decline, to expand the data
network, and to recofend specific aUt*n .to manage the water
resources of the area. Detailed information on surface- and
ground-water levels, auibturfaae geologic information, aznd water
use data are being collectes to provide inffoioation needed to meet
thi goal.

Preliminary findings indicate that increased withdrawals have
resulted in localized lowering of lake levels, localized
destruction of wetlands, reduction in streatflow, and the
abandonment of coastal wells. Based on these findings, the
District's Governing Board declared the area a Water Use Caution
Area (WUCA) in June of 1989. This precedent-setting action
represented the first time the WUCA provision of the District's
water use rule had been enacted, and allows for the development and
implementation of special management practices to address the water


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NORTHERN TAMPA BAY UCA DRAUT MANAGEMENT PLAN May s, 1990

.: resource concerns of the area. Figure 1 depicts the boundaries of
the area.

The Governing Board implemented a strategy to develop these
management practices. The strategy consisted of developing and
implementing short, aid, and long-term solutions. The short-term
solutions are measures that were implemented within 1 to 2 months
that immediately began problem resolution (i.e., abandoning direct
withdrawals from stressed lakes). Mid-term solutions were
developed during the past 9 to 8 anths and will be implemented
through this plan. These solutions ae comprehensive in nature,
essentially solving the resource concerns in the area, based upon
the current best available informatlop. The long-tera solutions
will be a refineaet of the short ald mid-ters measures based on
the findings of a comprehensive water resource assessment of the
area to determine the area's "safe yield." 'afe yield is defined
as the quantity of water availabi for use in an area without
Causing unacceptable adverse impacts to the water resources and
associated natural systems.

A key short-term measure was to form a citizen's work group to
assist District staff in the development of proposed mid-tera
measures for Governing Bard approval. Tth Northern Tampa Bay Work
Group, which is comprised of apiroxately 20 representatives from
local government, the agricultural industry, eavirontmetal groups,
public utility companies, sand other interested parties, set on a
monthly basis throughout the later half of X989 and early 1990 to
address the many issues of the area.

Developing recommendations required answering sme hard questions:
What measures can be taken when water demand emceds water supply?
What conservation measures are most appropriate for present and
future water use? And how can we keep track of water withdrawals
in the area? In answering these questions, it became clear that
water is not private property but a pUblic resource that mast be
managed for the benefit of everyone.

1 'a-*2'





















GMco
"0!Y
IVlc


Tampa
Bay


Isp'


0


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Figure 1. Delineation of Northern Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Area.


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NORTERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT ANAIAGEENT PLAN May 21, 1990

The Work Grup developed a set of final recommendations, which are
included as Chapter 2. However, ,the Work Group discussed many
other issues and concepts for which specific recommendations were
not developed. Many, of these measuress have been embedded in this
"management plan." The intent of the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA
Management Plan (Plan) is to function as a guidance document for
the development of appropriate regulations and iplementation of
other anag aen measures to address the resource concerns in the
area.

Tho proposed Plan addresses four major elements: 1) reducing
projected water use needs; 2) increasing available watar sources;
3) intensifying resource protection measures; and 4) further
refining our -nderstanding of the hydrologic system of the region.

The first element, reducing. projected water needs, relies on
continuing conservation by all water users and distributors to
stabilize or actually reduce total Water use in the area. Public
supply conservation measures include the implementation of
conservation oriented rate structures, landscape code and ultra-
low volume pumbing ordinaances -nd utility water audits.
Agricultural conservation focuses on increasing system irrigation
efficiencies through proper system design and management.
Conservation, measures applicable to industrial, mining and
recreational water users rely on recycling, reuse, and minimizing
water use through optimum water use management practices.

The second element, increasing availbl. water sources, relies on
effluent reuse, desalinization, tailwatar and storavatar recovery,
and utilization of the shallow aquifer. Presently, there are 68
permitted vastewvater facilities in the WUCA that meet state design
capacity requirements for public access areas, residential
irrigation and edible crop reuse. These facilities have a total
design capacity of approximately 279, 000,000 gallons per day (gpd).
However, only, 24 of these facilities are dedicated to a direct
irrigation reuse program. Opportunities must be investigated to
ensure that the remaining 44 existing facilities, as well as future
4


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NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WTCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN Mal 21, 1990

facilities meeting reuse standards, are dedicated to" a direct
irrigation reuse program. Emphasis will be placed o re se through
declaring the region a WateF Supply critical Area pursuant to
Chapter 17-40, Florida Administrative Code. r

In addition to reuse facilities within the WUCA, the feasibility
of desalination, tailater and stormwater recovery, nd utilization
of the shallow aquifer should be investigated and implemented,
where feasible.

The third element is to implement resource measures designed to
lessen impacts to the water resources and associated natural
systems in the area. These measures include increased enforcement
to ensure unauthorized withdrawals are brought into compliance, and
a thorough evaluation of new permits or permit modifications to
ensure that they do not cause"ifuther decline in water levels.

The final element, to-.efine our understanding of the area's
hydrology, will be all lished by completing the detailed
comprehensive water resource assedimflt or the area t determine
the "safe yield" of the WUCA.

A key provision of the Plan is hit it eiablished four management
periods over which implementation is, to occur,; with each
consecutive period requiring iore rigorous water conservation and
management measures. Te first period extends to July 31, 1992,
the second to July 31, 1996, the third to July 31, 2000, and the
final through July 31, 2010.

The advantages of implementing the Plan in consecutive management
periods are numerous. It allows water users atd distributors to
plan for successive conservation requirements, it allows appro-
priate fiscal planning for governmental entities that are required
to undertake capital improvement projects or investigative studies,
and most importantly, it allto for revisiting and refining the
Plan based on experience gained during the existing period prior
to the implementation of the nhet management lan.
5







NORTHERN TAMPA BAY MUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

When the Plan is approved by the Governing Board, the specific
recommendations requiring' Are revisions will- be implemented
through the rulemaking process. All existing water use permits
within the WiCA will "b devised through the- addition of new
conditions designed to achieve the goals of the Management Plan,
and new applications ii be subject to the elements of the plan.
Non-regulation action ites willi be implemented as described in the
Plan.

The remaining sections of the Plan are organized into- major
topics. They include public supply conservation; agricultural
conservation; industrial, mining and recreational conservation;
alternative sources; lake Vithdrawals? augmentation -i eValuation
of water use permits. Additionally, Chapter' 2 lists the specific
Work Group reo-mmendations.'"

A seprate section is dedicated to eahs major topid. Bach section
begins with background information on the- topiL.* 'et, the
specific Work Group recommendations relative to the topic are
repeated. Third, the overall management goal relative to the
subject topic is :iven. Next, the objectives identified to .ensure
the goal is met are given and include a discussion of the
justification o the objective, and hai the objective will be
implemented. Finally, any related matters are discussed.

Both regulatory and non-regulatory measures are identified in the
Plan. Discussions of regulatory measures include proposed permit
condition lqguage, wncft;i i emphasized by belig printed in
italics. '

The content of the Plan is the result of a combined effort by the
Work Group, District, and other interested citizens. The spirit
of cooperation exhibited 4thie Work Group, although at times
emotional, was outstanding. Thaink to this cooperation, the
overall goal of minimizing isacts to the water resources and
associated natural systems while still meeting the water use
demands in the area is within reach.
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NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

chanter a Work ro auP 2eaommna. tin 2s

As a part of the program to address water~ resource concerns within
the.,Northern Tampa Bay JWUCA, he District established the Northern
Tampa Bay Work Group. The Work Group was formed to assist District
staff in -valuating resource concerns in the area, and developing
appropriate measures to address these concerns. These measures,
which are included in this Plan, will be submitted to the Governing
Board for their approval.

The Work Group met a total of 6 times frop August 19 through
March lbfeO. Te deliberations of the Ork Group are documented in
a separate report entitled Northern Tampa Bay WUCA Work Group
Report. The Work Group adopted 9 specific recommendations, which
are listed below. Each of these recommendations, along with the
vast amount of input that n4ve became a part of the formal adopted
recommendations, have been invaluable in the development of the
Plan. ,

, oe ..... e, 4 is a.iportant to note that District staff and the Work
Group did not fully agree on.every recommendation. Therefore, some
recosmencations included within te Plan differ either slightly or
entirely froa those proposed y the Work Group. Additionally, the
Plan includes recommendations covering subjects for which the Work
Group made, no rec-mmendat ion.

The recomeadations have be grouped by subject area and are
reiterated at the beginning of each appropriate chapter.

PUBLIC SUPPLY WATER USE CONSERVATION MEASURES

1. The District should require uniform per capital reduction
throughout .the District with th assumption that the District
is going to give exempons.ons

2. The District should irK with local governments to develop
landscape ordinances that require new developments to use
7
39







NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN Nay 21, 1990

efficient landscape practices; for existing developments
drought tolerant landscaping should be encouraged; seek, on
a statewide level, requcstemets for low-volume plumbing
fixtures; and require utilities to practice leak detection.

3. The District should work with utilities, municipalities and
counties in each of the areas mentioned in number five (in
Chapter 2), with emphasis on rate structure and the District
establish a per capital reduction be required within a time
frame and the District would decide what the appropriate
amount of decrease should be.

AGRICULTURAL WATER USE CONSERVATION MEASURES

1. The District should encourage low-volume irrigation and
reclaimed water reuse where appropriate.

2. The District should require all users with a cumulative
withdrawal of 100,000 gpd or greater to be metered.
Additionally, the District should pay for the agricultural
*eters.

ALTERNATIVE SOURCES

1. The District should require the use of effluent by the
phosphate industry, utility companies, public works and/or
agriculture as well as residential reuse, when available.

LAKE WITHDRAWALS

1. The District should not allow any new withdrawals from
stressed lakes; existing withdrawals from stressed lakes
should cease within three years; all new wells should be
located and constructed to limit impacts to lakes; and
conservation plans should be required to be developed during
application process for all applicants who exceed an average
quantity of 100,000 gpd.
8






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NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990


2. The District should rema* existing aqu4fe l~r vels on existing
permits; limit wellfields to historic ,se; and monitor lakes
and wetlands where appropriate.

EVALUATION OF WATER USE

1. The District should per it water use in the WCA utilizing
cumulative impact analysis without a production limit.

































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NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

Chapter 3 Ublia Smnl WIatu Conservation

A. Introduction
Public supply water use represents approximately 69 percent of the
permitted ground-water use, and 75 percent of the total permitted
water use in the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA. As ot January 1, 1990,
there were 127 activet) water use permits that were associated with
a public supply use, with a total average permitted quantity of
250,763,290 gpd. Of this, about 82,081,000 gpd wer: from surface-
water sources and 168,682,290 gpd were from ground-water sources.

Average daily permitted quantities ranged from less than 1,000 gpd
to 62,000,000 gpd and averaged approximately 1,975,000 gpd.
Permitted water use for the median water s' permit was about
68,000 gpd. Of the 127 public supply water use permits, 72 had
average permitted quantities less than 106,000 gpd, .34 had average
permitted quantities from 100,000 and 500,006 gpd, and 21 had
average permitted quantities of 500,000 gpd or greater. It should
be noted that same public supply systems do not require a permit
because quantities or withdrawal capacities are below District
permitting thresholds., A listing of the active" water use permits
in the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA is included as Appendix 1.

Water use data indicate that actual public supply water use is
slightly less than permitted use. Table 1 lists the major
utilities in the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA. These 57 utilities
supply essentially all of the public supply water use in the area.
As indicated in Table 1, these utilities provided approximately
233,000,000 gpd to an estimated population of 1,671,000 in 1987.

A key component of public supply water use in the Northern Tampa
Bay WUCA is that it has the potential to be the fastest growing
water use category in the area. Figure 2 graphs the estimated


(1) Incuds 13 pubic supply permits that re in the application process. These permits represent about
101,502,500 gpd.
(3) Includes apprmmtety 62 permits that are in the application process. Thee perito represent about
110,497,500 spd.
10
42.


- 1.













Table 1. Utilities n Th Northern T a Bay Water U Caution Area

nILLSORUOHu cOUNTY


UTLIzTY


COUNTRY IMADOW ESTATES
EAGLES UTILITY CO., THE
EASTfIZUD SLOPES CONDO.
FrAYHEcsC 10au.gwi e. .,
FLORIDA CITIES SAtER CO.
HILLAB.CS.UTIL./SC : ,
HII8LS. CO. W.9 W. UT./CRYSTAL TS
HASU ,AllAN; MILpRT
N.W.HILLS3B.SERVIC AREA/ICRSA
Paa,J 8s y/PnIa VL o. ,
PBBLE CREEK SEVI CORP.
PINCITY. C ....
SPANISH MAIN R.Y.
TAhPM, CITY OF
TEMPLE TkAAbCE, CITY OW
U.S.A. UT$P..INC /EASTSIpE WATER
WILDER CORP./SOtna AX RV
TOTAL


At*& UTILITIES


CREST IH GES uTIL.
CRZIPIos Cop. /T=U=L LJPS W
DIXuIE GOvEf ESTATtS'


HACIEpi& VILL.
HOLIDAY d(ADEMi U1L.
HOLIOAY4th 2UT
HUDSON WORb S
JA3S1 WI EVICE
L. W.v. uitD.I; INC.
OLINDR SawICE CORP.
JUDlrm DTILITIES
aNouAn.vgtUva r qanrcs co.
nE raft ItCHRY, CTT Om
ORtitpOO LOP HER
PASCO W=M/AidlS XtE
PASCO CO.UTZL./OUIS vEST
PASCO.CO.UTL./A/LMa-m KOO
PASCO.cO. Tii./mSLvASTE
PASQQ.Cp.UTIL.1M. MIhN&V. ACRES
PORT *ItiEY, CITT O
PPw/PWAR QUAIL hOaWirmfiL. CO.
S.H. UTUL./wg0opo qTRs.

SOUTH ERN -I C.L. T. E U7L.
UTIL. Ime. oC .omb REM
VIamM A cm, IHC.
nAT.6hESw.Dir.A./ L.PAOGll Ear. ;
TOTAL



c L WuWdum ~ cz. ,


ST. PXTRHRUG, CITY OW
TARPON SPRINGS, cm Or
TOTAL


POPATIO


1,088
54
244
,931
4,000
48,731
1,187
1-103-
84,303

1,247
,27,807
sit
452,598
19,843
2.9224
,335
648,324


1,S03
S37



6o0
1,005
1,020
4,800
1.484
750



27, i65

1,;346
50
1,000


540
6,239


,49;
166
690

176,4

176,463


wrl o ft S ouies


205,920 GW
9,965 o
37,380 4P
107.814 ,, Q
746,721- G '
1132.0 44 -
154,391 OG
1,04,775 W,
11,132r023 OW

"109 32 'tit
4.167,348 tW/S
1 18,2071 "
6f.079.113 9W
S3,407,875 1W
.314,745 W'

95,994,859


S504,953
1,165,429
136,584
-119,9<
73,427
35,6'


o60,,s1 .
105,528



33,941
70S,339
120.,126

3,03.74, 5
109,326
122,496
4,145
361,276
8.123.900
33.M i
286,471
947: 60


44.200
8,547
107,795
1S4.,4g3
44 300

19,057,610


315,000 39,123,350
16.,34 3,608,297
846,348 118,328,585


oGo

GW

oW




OW





GM



GF

ON
OW
OW
OW







GN





GW





GO
GW
Gil


m


189
. 185
153
116
187
181
130
95
132
166
ISO
150
35
146
172
106
55
148


72
'109
,48

137

108


os
105"

88
265
-45
134
157

13
36
91
83
361


53

105
46
90
79
156
77,
61

108





......147 .
124
2114
....140... ..


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Northern Tanpa Bay WUCA
Estimated Public Supply Water Use

1970-2010


z
0 soo.0




0 2.ooo.c
2.000.C
A.


D


1970 1900 1908b 990 192 1099 2000 2010


.-~~~. .! .* .* .~ .


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. ; .--. .
66 68r i
'1 .... .. t......:


1:
* 6


-* -- ---------
3


S...........-. I


a .' .---- ".
.a-"t S


2010


300 .-.................. .- -- -




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li



is a vaeo o r4e06 19POe aboo 1600- .


I Actual Esiaed Wreate
Wit P er pita uction
i.. Wliost Per Capita Reaction


Figure 2. Historical current and projected (with and without conservation measures) public supply water use in
the Northern Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Area.


0
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0
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NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990



historical, current, and projected (with and without conservation
measures) public supply water use in the area. As shown in this
figure, if per capital use remains unchanged public supply use could
substantially increase by 2010. -Therefore, it is critical to
develop and implement public supply conservation measures.

B. W Jork oaeundations
The folloWiit 'ork Group recommendations address public supply
water use ad cservation options:

i. The DImrift should require uni ora per capital reduction
throog(pWt theistrict with the assumption that the District
is ag to* give exemptions.

2. The Distzict should work with local governments to develop
l ain ppm o41ein ces that require new developments to use
eftcienft 'Iandscape practices; for existing developments
drought tolerant landscaping should be discouraged; seek, on
a statewide level, requirements for lw-volume plumbing
ixturosr .jand Prequire utilities to practice leak detection.

3. TbI2st -iact should work with utilities, municipalities and
acwuO i each of the areas mentioned inf number five, with
eqin" pnu rate structure and -th District establish a per
caqit# xpIl*ctaion be required within a tie frame and the
Di4~~jl. ld decide what the appropriate.'amount of decrease

.' -

The __.. *
The ogement goal for public supply conservation is to
stabilize public supply water use through per capital k oedctions to
deter further adverse impacts caused by withdrawals for public
supply water use.




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NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

D, Obia tivsm Jumtifitcation. Ianlemantation
objetLwve 1 Sae Distriot phall woxk with public supply permittees
in the aO= to deaxease their average p capita watar use rates
for each a aement period, as .ollows.

a. By July 31, 1992, the maximum average par capita water
use shall be 140 gpd;
b.. By July 92. 1996, the maxism average par capita watar
use shall 13e 30 gpdi
-o.." u ly 981 2000 tthe ma-xim average par capita watar
use shall be 120 gpd a and
d. my July 31, 2010, the maximum average per capita watar
se shall be, 10 gpd.

A water use permit holder with average par capita water use in
ezrxess b tbSii 14atitfld above must justify why a greater per
capita use is pezmittable.

Reduction of per capital water use is paramount to achieving the
overall goal of stabilizing public uppSly water use growth through
2010., Figure 2 illustrates the type of reductions required to
meet this overall goal. Based o current per capital water use
within and outside the area, as well as anticipated savings from
potential conservation measures that can be implemented, these per
capital rates appear obtainable.

Table 1 includes the 1987 estimated average per capital rates for
the major utilities in the Norther Tanps Bay .WUCA. The rates
range froa 35 gpd to 361 gpd, and average 141 gpd. Of these
utilities, 2; prently have per capital rates ises than 110 gpd,
the most stringent proposed reuction, 4 utilities have rates
between 110 and 120 gpd, 2 have rates between 120 and 130 gpd, 5
between 130 and 40 gpd, 2 between 140 and 150 gpd, nd 16 have
rates equal to or in excess of 150 gpd. The median per capital rate
for all 57 utilities in 1987 was 110 gpd.



14




5.


NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PIAN May 21, 1990

Variations in per capital use can be due to a variety of factors,
including how the val-e is calculated (i.e., what a or_is. not
included),, differing characteristics -o a utility's. acusabt : base
and variations in the actual utility's etldesicies. .Iwever, many
of the existing utilities currently hadv per capital ratc;ar below
those proposed in the Plan. Therefore, these rate reductions
appear reasonable.

To implement the per capital water ui objective'" the District will
adopt by rule a new standard perzit *onditiiowI.h4eh shall modify
all existing public supply water use- permits within the-WUCA with
the following condition:

The permitted shall achieve the following averg per capital rate Ithr appropriate conservation
initiatives:

a. By July 31, 1992. per capital wuwruse dU bfe *qiW tay s tIhan YfQd:
b. By July 31, 1996, per capital water use sh4LJbe equal to or less /fm Ipd;
c. By July 31, 2000, per capital water use shall be equal to or less than 120 gpd; and.
d. --, By July 31. 2010. per capit water use shall be epal to or Lss than 110 gpd

These per capital rates shl superse anl established 'wthi existing water
copsertion pI~as un(es such other go ls result in lower per capital rates. Per capital 'rwes must be
Estimated using District approved methodogy.

The permittee shel submit a report detailing the populiaw served. deducted ams, tWd total
withdrawals by February 15 of each yer. If the permittedoes miwhlmve ther per caitr rates. the
report shall document why the per capital rates were not achievabe, measures taken to attempt meeting
the per capit rates ad prWide a plan to bre the permi iitWe mDWpima. Thi report is subject to
Governing Bard apprlol. If Ousapprowed. the peraiee is imWj~fan tihe the Wte.r Ut~permit.

This condition as approprJtely, odified will be applied to all new
public sugnpy wvter use pexgs in the W Ch.

Objective a The Distriat ze.1 r eize al utilities to adopt
watex o sezv.ur j erieted rate str ntuzVr y July 31, 1992.


IXLI(~--I ---- ~--~IPY-II*~L4YIl~li~li~I~IL~-









NORTHERN TAMPA BAY MUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

Regardless of a utility*' per capital use, whether it is above or
below the stated per capital reduction, all permitted- utilities will
be required to adopt water conservation oriented.~rat structures.
Properly implemented conservation oriented rat& structures are
probably the most effective means of reducing poe capital water use.
In addition, conservation oriented rata structures are effective
at curtailing peak water demands which inimizse the impact of
seasonal water shortages. Currently, most of the utilities in the
Northern Tampa Bay area have a uniform rate structure which means
that the price per unit of water remains the same 4s the amount of
water used increases.

To implement water conservation oriented rate structures the
District will dopt by rule a new permit condition which shall
modify all existing utility water use permits within the WUCA with
the following conditions

The Permitte shall adgpt a water onervrtios oriented rate streswre no later thai JWly 31, 1992.
This ratr stnw hall s base wat euaser clhares upn metered se. Pr (eg.. per thousand
gallons) charges shall increase, w.feI same minimum guastity of water. er billing period, to
discourage wasteful ases. The miidamum axmme shall be basod Wan ef/icjie indoor and outdoor
reqdeuiments of th-cwastwer base. If zhe PsnisMue already he a water conservation oriented rate
structure, a debPitaki of the w~ate.w asy suppornr dossentati.e, and a report on the
effectiveness of the rao structure shall be saitted by SepeAmber 30, 1990.

Future public supply permits shall receive the following permit
conditions: f

The Perittee shall adopt a woerr rtserarien oriented rate structure laser the two years from
the date of permit isanuac. Thsiwte simrcktrshaUbmes water ustemer oarges upn metered use.
Per unit (e.g.. per thousand gallo) charges shall increase, above some minimum quantity of water
oer biling perWi, to discorage idastWl ueS. Th- maidim amount shallO be sed upon efficient
indoor and ourtdr ieqirwmnts of h customer base.

Objective 3 The Distript shall require all utilities to implement
water audit ppogrmam and, where appropriate, leak detection and
repair programs by July 31, 1992.


16






0 0
NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

Again, regardless of a utility's existing per capital use, whether
it is above or below the stated objective, all permitted utilities
shall be required to implement water audit programs. Utilities
often hasve- significant amounts of unaccounted water. This
unaccounted water can be attributable, to a variety of causes,
including unauthorized uses, authorized unmetered uses, under-
registration of meters, fire flows, and leaks. A thorough water
audit can identify where the unaccounted water is being used and
alert the utility to the possibility of significant eaks in the
distribution system. Naddaus 1-7, demonstrated how water savings
as a result of an aggressive water audit program can Axceed a 5
percent reduction of per capital water use.

To implement water audit programs for all utilities in the WUCA,
the District will adopt by ,rule new standard, permit conditions
which shallf modify all existing utility water use permits within
the WUCA with the following conditiona:

The permitted shall conduct afterr adits of the entire water supply system during eqc management
period. The initial audit ms be conducted me later Athn July 31. 1992. Water audits which identify
.a grater than 12 percent accounted water sha lr followed by appropriate reewdial actions,
including meter testing and repair, identification of unauthorized ues, greater quantification of
authorized umaccwuted for uses, and eak detection and repair programs. Auditsshall be completed
and reports submitted as an ement of the plan required in the per capital condition to the District by
the following dates: October 31. 1992; October 31, 199f Oc4ober 31, 2040; and October 31, 2010.
Water audit reports shall include a schedule for remedial action if needed.

Large, complex water supply systems may conduct the audit in
phases, with prior approval by the District. A modified version
shall be applied to new permits, replacing thapinit4al audit date
with a date 2 years forward from theperit issuance date.

Objective 4 The Distriot shall seek statewide legislation
requiring ultra-low volume plumbing fixtures tfo ar w development
and major modifications to existing facilities. The legislation
should also eanour;= b existing development to: onvert to ultra-
low voilu plumbing through an aggressive education program.

17








NolrrTiEr TAMMP 5h& JC& bBiJIJT -,)AEHt -May 21# 2990


Plumbing codes can hq strengthened to require new development to
be ore fftticient in inapor yter use. specifically, the standards
for toilets, shower -heads and faucets can be improved beyond
current standard. These increasedd standards are sometimes
referred to as ultra-lowy volume plumbing.

A number of. states and local governments across the country have
implemented these new standards. These more efficient plumbing
fixtures have been proven to be an offectivy way in reducing the
water demands of a growing population, while at the same time
having the added. benefit of reduced wastewater generation. There
is also national legislation presently being considered which would
implement the imapove4d standards. The ppst effective way to
implement the revised standards will be at either the state or
national level. In thi wyay, dean4 for plumbing products will
shift t wthe a e efticientaodels and, because the more efficient
dmdels will dominate the maet place, enforcement problems will
be miniaized. Brown and qCa ell, ~984,. demonstrated how water
savings as a result of pluaWing codes requiring ultra-low volume
plumbing fixtures can exceed 10 percent reduction of per capital
uses

To implement ultra-low yvol plumbing codes the District will
work with local governments In ,. cooperative approach to develop
andu implment revised plumbing code .to require ultra-low volume
plumbing fixtures ,in new developments. ad major developmental or
commercial renovations. Additionally, the District will initiate
a legislative effort t, promote the revision of the State Water
Conservation Act, which set the cu t requirements for certain
plumbing fixtures. The State requirements should track the
proposed national legislation. This effort should include
documentation of the water use trends in those select areas where
the revised standards are adopted. Finally, the District will go
on record as supporting the national legislation currently being
proposed.


18






0 0
NORTHERN'TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN 1ay 21, 1990

Objective 5 The District shall coordinate with local governments
to develop landscape ordinasoe' that require ner developments to
landscape using best Vater conse fttio.a management practices. The
ordinances should aiio require aj or' reovations to implement best
water man meant praotiaes and abbuld encourage bt- water
management practices of existing development through an aggressive
education program.

Similar to the way ini which plumbing caes can improve the
efficiency of indoor vater use of new growth, revised landscape
code ca-n improve the outdoor water use efficiency. Outdoor water
use, comprised mostly of' lawn and' landscape irrigation, can
represent more than 0 'percent of the total demand on a water
utility, and during dry times of th: year, this percpnFag can
increase substantially. By iiprovinrg the efficiency of. lawn and
landscape irrigation associated with new development and major
renovations, th'e ijact oidf grovAi on water demands can be
substantially offset. Maddaus 1987, demonstrates how water S vings
as a result of implementation f a1 landscape ordinance can exceed
20 percent reduction of per capital water use.

To implement outdoor water use conservation the District will work
with local governments on a cooperative approach to develop and
implement water conservation oriented landscape codqs for new
developments and major re` novatios. This will aciclv the
development of a "odel landscape -bode (currentlyF under
development). Additionaify, the District will: initiate a
legislative effort which Would i*eult in modifications to the Local
Government Comprehensive Planning and Land Development Regulation.
Act, such that writer conservation oriented landscape policies and
programs would be required.

Objective 4 he Distriot shall increase educaticaal efforts to
encourage water cnsrvatia, including aws educational effort
within the school' systems.



19








NORTHERN TAMPA BAY UCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

For any water conservation program to be effective, residents and
water users must be informed and knowledgeable about the limited
availability of water resources.. Uven with rthe. current water
shortage, with heightened news coverage of water use restrictions,
there is an apparent lack of understanding of the resource and the
current restrictions. The seriMusar ss and urgency of this issue
must be comunicated to the public as well as information on how
to make a difference. Before a person changes behavior -the person
must know how to make the change and why the change should be made.
The task of an education and public awareness prqgram is to
communicate how and why.

Public awareness is heightened in many ways. The most effective
way to reach the public in general is mass pdia, Ads.,- the radio,
television and newspaper. Specific groups ca be targeted through
clubs and organizations. These groups can be reached through a
speakers bureau or articles An magazines and newsletters. In-
school education is another way to reach e- large audience. Long
range conservation depends on today students unerstanding the
water resource and reasons and ways to conserve.. School programs
can also reach Varents through-theird children.

Costs and benefits from public awareness and education programs
are hard to assess. f.e costs vary depending upon the components
and intensity of the program and include the ost -for materials
(posters, pamphlets, bumper stickers, etoe cost for radio or
television spots, an'd labor and administration for running the
program, providing speakers, etc. The benefits are mJch harder to
quantify. An informed and eda ated public enhances all other
conservation programs,- resulting in increased compliance and
increased savings. The MetopoUitan Water Distriot of Southern
California studied after savings attributable 5t their public
information program in 1988 and estimated the savings at 8 percent.
Other literature suggests that these programs can lead to savings
of 4 to 5 percent. However, it is usually very hard to isolate the
impact from public awareness since it is usually combined with
other conservation programs.
20


I






0 0


NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990



Public awareness campaigns. can be initiated at .any levels
including the District, counties, cities and utilities. In-school
education programs must -designed with the cooperation of the
local school district. The District will Qcotinue and improve upon
its water conservation educational programs, including, the in-
school program. An educational program must accompany the
implementation of water consePvation oriented rate structures so
that people will have the knowledge of how tp conserve when they
receive the price incentive to conserve.

objective 7 The District shall establish a standard methodology
for olalulatig per-capita water use vhish wilL be used by all
public stppl# permittees.

Currently, there ir a :great deaL of inconsistency in the methods
which utilities calculate per capital oaterupo. Because per capital
use is: such a key eleen~ t in the, overall strategy to address
resource concerns in the Northern Ta.pa Bay WUCA, the District has
-developed -a standardized Jmthodology to calculate per capital use,
as follows:

Per capital Aaily water use isefined, population-related
withdrawals associated with residential, business,
institutional, industrial,: miscellaneous aeted, and
unaccounted uses. Per capital. daily water use which is skewed
buy the eaands of significant industrial or regional water
uses can deduct these uses provided that these uses are
separately accounted. Generally, tAe formula used for
determining gallons gir.day per capital is as follows: total
withdrawal minus significant usee divided by the population
served. ,

A significant use, which nay be 4d edted, is defined as an
individual non-residential customerr using 25,009 gaAons per
day or greater on an annual average basis, or an individual


21
53


"~~III-III~I~P^YLX-YIY--lln*~~~U~







NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990


S" non-residential customer whose use represents greater than
five percent of t.h Utilitym' annual water use.

Any uses which are deducted from the per capital daily water
use based on the abbve guidelines aust be supported with
documentation demonstrating that they- are significant or
regional uses, -and must include documentation of usage
quantities.


















C-"



















22

54






0 0

NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

Chapter 4 A1mriamu te a r Uo Conervation..

A. Introduction
Agricultural irrigation requirements represent about 20 percent of
the permitted ground-water ase, and aboqt 15 percent of all
permitted use in the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA. : of January 1,
1990, there were 917(1) agricultural uses associated with at least
617(2) water use permits in the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA. The total
permitted agricultural water use was 51,878,670 gpd. These uses
allow for the irrigation of approximately 33,391 acres.

Figure 3 shows the general areas of agricultural land use in the
Northern Tampa Bay WUCA. The estimated number of permitted acres
and estimated permitted quantities by commodity are given in Table
2. Permitted agricultural water uses range from less than 1,000
gpd to greater than 1,700,000 gpd and average about 84,100 gpd.
Permitted water use for the median permit is about 38,000 gpd. of
the 617 active agricultural water use permits, 517 have average
permitted quantities less than 100,000 gpd, 85 have average
permitted -quantities from 100,000 to 500,000 gpd, and 15 have
average permitted quantities of 500,000 gpd or greater.

Table 2. Estimated permitted agricultural acreage and estimated
average daily permitted agricultural water use by
commodity in th Northern Tampa Bay CA, as of
January 1, 1990.
PERMITTED PERMITTED PERCENT
COMMODITY ACREAGE USE USE
Vegetables & Tomatoes 1,775 2,631,107 5.1%
Citrus 14,824 16,082,886 31.0%
Pasture 8,239 7,713,520 14.9%
Sod/Turf 910 1,343,000 2.6%
Nursery 1,562 8,835,718 17.0%
Melons/Cucumbers 1,495 2,279,700 4.4%
Other 941 2,071,839 4.0%
Strawberries 3.645 10L20.900 21.0
33,391 51,878,670 100%
() Inludms iaprm atly 45 pemt that are in the eapieattl pre and list agriculturt water use in
the permit. Thew permits represt about ,95,200 gpd.
(2) Includes appritely 62 permits that re in te application preee. These permits represent about
110,497,500 gpd.


23















A4~.O


Agrictural Arm


Figure 3. Generalized ocain of agricultural lahd use in the
Northern Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Area.






0 0

NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

Citrus is the predominate permitted agricultural commodity in terms
of water use in the area. As shown in Table 2, 16,082,886 gpd were
permitted for citrus irrigation, which represents 31 percent of
the permitted agricultural water use in the area. The second
largest permitted agricultural use is for strawberries which
totaled approximately 10,920,900 gpd (21 percent). Other
commodities with substantial permitted quantities are nurseries (17
percent), pasture (14.9 percent), and vegetable and tomatoes (5.1
percent).

Actual agricultural water use and irrigated acreage differs
substantially from permitted use and acreage for several
commodities in the area. The major differences are in the citrus
and pasture commodities. Figure 4 is a graph of estimated
irrigated citrus acreage and water use in the WUCA for the period
1966-1988. As depicted in this graph, citrus acreage has
substantially decreased during the past two decades'. This decrease
is due to several factors; however, the two major factors appear
to be numerous freezes during the past two decades and increasing
development in the area. Current estimated citrus irrigated
acreage in the WUCA is approximately 7,500 acres, which is nearly
half of the 14,824 acres permitted. If this citrus acreage was
irrigated at a rate of 18 inches per acre in 1988, the actual water
use would have been approximately 10,000,000 gpd, substantially
less than the 16,082,886 gpd permitted. Additionally, preliminary
agricultural irrigation monitoring (AIM) data indicates that
irrigation application rates for citrus in this area is
substantially less than 18 inches per acre per year.

Although actual water use is substantially less than permitted use
tor ^1tiE w:ttualw use far iar. majoor commodities is
disi.la.r t Figur .s5 a graph of estimated
irrigated strawberry acreage and water use in the WUCA for the
period 1960-1988. Current estimated irrigated acreage is
approximately 3,600 acres, which compares favorably to 3,645
permitted acres. If the strawberry acreage was irrigated at a rate
of 37 inches per acre in 1988, the actual water use would have been
25


_II _





3";I


# =.- A- P! on. a ,
Cities Ae e&EsdIaatcd frripaed Acreage
Nertber Tapa ay W)A
4(I) rtI, t A.
(3) Ilmall198 8

40" O '


ITa lntuAecd


* Soare of dt- foidt AhraUald Slili Smivic
i:m AIais n 2S ad Mofda cfau in
IgIt aud PwW F m eim ih


(3) er w "M (wrw us arI.=Ts
() I plw am waterr um .M.
() W-r aog m (wHaterougb PooCoun
(8) crsesgw In 9#11sbeaough and Poem Counm estimated


Figure 4. Estimated citrus acreage and estimated percent acreage irrigated in the Northern Tampa Bay Water
Use Caution Area from 1966-88.


7,


35,000-

0-
30,000"

20,000"
15,000-
10O.W0
5,000-
0-


'6 '88


_ ____ ,___ ~










Strawberry Acreage*
Norhemr Tampa Bay WUCA
4,000


11 ia7 101


- A6 94 6.8

- 82 80 7.6


(IY
- A o9 a? f

,5S S3 &0

- 41 4038

S27 26 25


- 1.4 1.4 13

- 0 0 0


* our of da- Flori Acultul SW s SOMe ce
NO T Assumes 90 of srawbery aeage
in llsbrough County is estimated to be in
the Nothem Tampa Bay WUCA


37"pr acre (Water Use Ef.=75%)
36"pwr acre (Water Us E.=BO%)
34"pe acr (Water Use Et.=85%)


Figure 5. Estimated strawberry acreage and estimated percent acreage irrigated in the
Northern Tampa Bay Water Use Caution Area, 1960-1988.
0


I

:I


0


S


-a


I-- ,, I II I _I ; I III I II IL -$


I


;Q:


Il








NORTHERN TAMPA PAY WmUCA DMAF ANLAGEMT P mAN ay 21, 1990

aprproximatly 10,000,000 gpd, which is .lightly oes than the
10,920, 90 gpd permitted. ThL strawberry production in.usiry has
been converting to mor efficient supplemental irrigation methods
ind recent years, whih should regalt in,. reduced overall
withdrawals. iHowever,: opportunities, tor aitaopal conservation
dxist in the areas of bed preparation, crop establishment, and
frost/freese protection.

Because there continues to be substantial agricultural water use
in the area approximatelyy 30,000,000 gpd), as well as other water
use dmarndz, meaaures *uptbe taken to maxiizze the development of
th- resource while maintainiag adequate resource protection.

a. Work Groan Recomapaorw
The following work Group ro-oendations address agricultural water
use and conservation options:

1. The District should .ncouraga low-volume irrigation and
reclaimed water reuse where appropriate.

2. The District shopld require all users vWt a cumulatve
withdrawal of 10',000 gpd or greater to be as ered.
additionally, the District to,pay for th agricultural meters.

C,.,
C.. T eal gmaferent
The management goal for agricultural watr use conservation is to
mintiisa agrictural. water uas through increased system
efficiencies.

D. Objectives Justification. I lamentation

1. the Distriot sall permit agricultural water uqe based on
increased assigae4 irrigation effoietaotes.

The cornerstone of agricultural water use conservation efforts in
the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA is the continuation of increased
irrigation efficiencies. These increased efficiencies will be
28


__






0 0

NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

implemented through the water use permitting program, which will
result in fewer permitted inches per "acre per seasonn (per year
where appropriate) .. Coupled -with a- continued reduction in
irrigated 'acreage *'b ground-water sources, the -,increased
efficiencies should mae athidvable the overall goal of minimizing
agricultural '+'water use throughout the Planw's implementation
horizons.

Increased system efficiencies are achievable by two major means,
system type and system management. Numerous investigators have
documented the variation inf irrigation efficiencies of different
types of irrigation systems. Table 3 is an excerpt from Smajstrla
et al., 1988, "Efficiencies of Florida Agricultural Irrigation
Systems." This table illustrates that there is a wide range of
application efficiency ratings- for eaci irrigation system type.
Additionally, it indicates that higher efficiencies can be expected
for low-volume systems. Therefore, one means of increasing system
eficincy i conversion to a low-volume system.

The second way to increase system efficiencies is through proper
system management. Data Trom over 250 farms that +the District
funded goil Conservation' Service (CSe) Mobil Irrigation
Laboratories visited durfin g the period 1987-89 documents a wide
variation in system application efficiencies for the same system
type (Table 4). Although factors such as soil type, local.climatic
conditions, and land topography affect application efficiencies,
data indicates that the "rajdor caush- tor the variation in
efficiencies appear to be system uniformity and system irrigation
scheduling.

Although properly managed low-volume systems are more efficient
than sialarly managed conventional sysrtea, it was not uncommon
for well managed conventional systems to be bftr efficient than
poorly managed low-volume systems. This documents that proper
system management is critical. This finding is the basis for
focusing on increased system efficiencies as a component of the
overall management strategy..
29







IRRIGATION SYSTEM APPLICATION EFFICIENCIES. EA(%)
Sprinter Irrigation Systems


System Tvye
Solid Set (Overhea) Systems
For Cntainer urfires
Guns

Center Pivot Mnd
Lateral Move Systems
Period Move Lterals
nMovor Portable Laterals
Side-Ro System
Side Mov Syto m


Ran





70-85
65-75


Mlco Irriation Systems
Drip or Un. Source Systems
ce 75-95

Spray Systems 70-85
Bubbler Systems 70-85
~Subir~ititon (Seense Sstms


1818


Semi- d Coveyance Systems
TFlow4rT yce 40-IS
Subsurface Conduit Systems 40-80
Surface (Flood) Systems

ti$ jShdPTalddy) Systems 1


Average
75
20

15


80
80




s

60

50
50


- ,- -- a --- -d -- - -
Sn tem e fences for well-designed
a pl systems atan 16Floori.da
** From Sm et ml t o. 247 1988.

Table 3. Efficiencies of Florida agricultural irrigation systems modified
from Smajstria et al., 1988.












II


NUMB
CROP TYP' IRRIGION SI


CITRUS DRIP


CITRUS LOW VOLUME 1


CITRUS OVERHEAD


CITRUS VOLUME GUl


NURSERY OVERHEAD


NURSERY iOW VOLUME


NURSERY OViERHEAD


STRAWBEI Y DrIP


STRAWBERRY OVERHEAD


VEGETABLE DRIP


VEGETABLE SEEPAGE

"AVERAGE ATTAINABLE EFFICIENCY

Table 4 Application efficiencies
Labs between 1987-89


IRRIGATION


ER OF
TES


24


26


24


2


5


5
-)






11


23


12


SYSTEM EVALUATION


'FFICIENCIES (IN PERCENT)
MIN. MAX. MEAN


0 93 73.5


32 98 : 84.4


3 91 57.6


68 71 69%5


55 89 700.4


50 92 74


57I. 94 76.5


45 -94 84.5


-41 74 58.7


42 "98 76.4


43 74 60.08


of sites audited


by th"il


STD.DEV


21.1


10.4


20.4


2.1


13.7


17 14


11.4

S- 14,.2


11.7


16.0


10.0


Conservation Services Mobile Irrigation


IPAS"


85


80


15


65-70


75


80


`75


S 85


75


85


50


A "














: i
*. .
*"


S


-L1II II I I I








WORTHERW TAMPA IBA WCA UDRAlT MAWTAC MT PAN May 21, 1990

Fruit and vegetable producers can. withdraw sigfiptant quantities
for bkd preparation, crop establishment, and, in some cases,
frost/freeze protection. For example, it is estimated that in the
1985 freeze, pumpage for protection of strawberries was
approximately 300 million gallons per day, an amount that exceeds
the total ground water pumpage for all uses 'in the area, on
average. Therefore, additional water conservation can be achieved
by increasing the efficiency of bed preparation and crop
establishapnt irrigation, and by developing alternative methods of
frost/freeze protection.,

To implement increased system efCi4ienqies, the District will adopt
by rule the following ~er, permit conditions. Thhes conditions
shall modify all existing agricultural water Use permits and be
placed on all new agricultural water use permits within the WUCA:

For each individual crop type, the permittrt shall not excei the Iitu per acre per season (per year
where appropriate) basd the Assiped irrigation effleifiCnles 1dbelow

1. Existing Permits:
a. Citrus Acreage
(1) By July 3. 1992, the mninaimm rrigation efficiency shail be 75 percent
(2) By July 31,1990. the minimum irigaton effiiery shalll be 80 percent
(3) By Jiy i. 2000 the minaimain Irrfatio efficiency shall be 85 percent
b. Other Acreage
For crops requiring water for crop stablishmet and/or bed preparation, the minimum
irrigation eff iclecy for these activilies saill be 6'perCmnt. For crop supplemental
irrigation, tje fldfi"hng effici~ll es ae requread:
(1) By Ady 31. t99t, 'the Wninm irrigation efficiency sharll k 60 percent
(2) By July 31, 1996, the minimum irrigtion effliey shall be 65 percent
(3) By July 31. 2000, the minimum irrigation efficiency shall be 70 percent
(4) By J y.3iJ. 2010. the minimum irrigastw efficency shall be 80 percent

2. New Acreae (acres m ass ited with a vlid permit as of August 1, 199) Permitted after
July 31. 1990
a. Citrus acreage: the minimum irrigation efficiency shall be 85 percent.



32


__




i.


0 0
NORTHERNN TAMPA BAT MUC A DAFT mZANGEMlT PLAN May 21, 1990

b. Other Acreage: the minimum cropestablimsh t/bed preparation irrigation efficiency
shaltlo 60 percent; the minimum supplemental crop irrigation efficiency shall be 70
percent.

. Arll Permittges whose average daily permitted use is, eq to or exceeds 100,000 gpd shall
record the following information o.a monthly basis for all seasonal crops (example:
.vegetables): Cirp te acres rriated per crop: irrigation methodss; and monthly'water use.
Irrigation for crop establishment/bed prepaaton and freeze protection shall be documented
separately by voting the beginning and eig dates for these acttitlies. This information
shall be submitted io the District Withn 60 days following the crop season. Ifthe Permittee
does not achieve the required irrigation efficiettces. the Permitee shall report why the
irrigation efficiencies were not achievable, measures taken to attempt meeting the required
irrigation efficiencies, and a plan to bring the prmit into compliance. This rqort is subject
to Governing Board approevai If 1e report isnt approved, thf Permitteei is i4ioltion of the
Water Use Permit.

4. All Permittees whose average daily permitted use is equal to or exceeds 100,000 gpd shall
record the following information on an annual basis for all perennial crops (example:
citrus): cropitype: a4rs irrigated per crop: irrigation methodss; and tly water use.
Irrigation for frost and freeze protection shall be documented separately by noting the
beginning and ending dates for this activity. The information for the preceding calendar year
shall be submitted to the District by March I of each year. If the P ee does not achieve
the required, igation efficiencies, the Perm e hall reprt why heirrigation efficiencies
were not achievble. easurys taken to attempt s ing the required irrigation efficiencies, and
a plan to ri he permit into popliace. Tis report is subject to Governing Board
approval. If the report is not approved, the Permittee is in violation of the Water Use Permit.

Compliance with assigned efficiencies shall be determined by
comparing actual ase to t-,b supplement al and other irrigation
requirements based on the assigned irrigation efficiencies listed
above on a per acre basis.

Table 5 lists annual irrigation requireents for citrus and
strawberries for selected major soil types in the Northern Tampa
Bay WOCA based on the assigned application efficiencies listed
above.

E. Other Related Issuea


33








NORTHERN TWAMPABAY WA DRAT MANAGsENT PLAN May 21, 1990


In order to assist the agricultural community, the District will
continue to fund the SCS Mobile Irrigation Laboratory(s), which
determines application efficienciess through system audits at no
cost. A second key element to continue advances in agricultural
water use conservation is the District's continued financial
support to IFAS to conduct agricultural conservation research and
development. As research into alternative methods of frost/freeze









































34


r__T





0 0
NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN -.MsY 21, 1990

Insert Table 5.


To 3. PROVIDEM


M


4.








NORTHMRT TAMPA BAM WUCA DRAIT MANAGEMENT PLAN Nay 21, 1990


protection produces viable alternatives to ground yater pumping,
the District will promote and require the use of feasible measures.
















































36

68




~~rr~~ai W1-A --*h ~ ~


0 0

NORTHERN TAMPA BAY UNCA DRAFT MANAM OT PLAN May 21, 1990

Chanter a.str mia.. n and RecIaatMial Water Use

A. Introduction
As of January 1, 1990, there were 245 permitted industrial, mining,
and recreational water uses within the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA,
representing a total average annual permitted quantity of
35,640,039 gpd. There are 30 golf courses permitted within the
WUCA, for a total of 8,570,000 gpd average annual use. Landscaping
is accounted for on about 128 permitted uses, totalling 7,908,340
gpd average annual use. Sand and gravel mining use is accounted
for on 1 permit, with an average annual use of 210,000 gpd.
Limestone mining use is accounted for on 1 permit, with an average
annual use of 1,130,000 gpd. Agricultural processing and packing
plants are accounted for on 11 permits, with a permitted average
annual use of 3,233,500 gpd. There are 17 cemetery permits
totalling 1,463,500 gpd and 21 permits for augmentation totalling
3,178,004 gpd. Finally, there are about 36 miscellaneous
industrial/
commercial uses, representing 9,946,695 gpd average annual use.
Of the 174 industrial, mining, and recreational water use permits,
116 have average permitted quantities less than -100 ,000 gpd, -42
have average permitted quantities from 100,000 to 500,000 gpd, and
16 have permitted quantities of 500,000 gpd or greater.

B. Work Group Recommendations
None

C. Goal Statement
The overall goal for recreational, mining, and industrial uses in
the WUCA is to prevent further adverse impacts by stabilizing
permitted quantities withdrawn for these uses within the WUCA.

D. Obiectives Justification. Ialementation

objective 1 The Distriot shall require recreational, mining, and
industrial uses to conserve water by focusing on reuse, recycling,
and irrigation efficiency.
37
69









NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMTi PLAN khy 21, 1990



Industrial, mining and recreational entities have a great potential
for replacement of ground-water withdrawals by reuse sources.
Mining and industrial uses, in particular, can reuse water
internally, such as through recycling process water for use in
cooling. Reuse of water from external sources, such as treated
wastewater, has potential applications with all of these use types.
Golf courses and landscaping water use can be reduced through
increased efficiency of water use and alterations in irrigation
practices. Any water use where a portion of the quantities
withdrawn are for landscaping can decrease water withdrawals
through the use of drought tolerant landscaping.

To implement this objective, the District shall require that all
recreational, mining, and industrial uses in the WUCA address
reuse, recycling, and irrigation efficiency in a conservation plan
to be submitted by July 31, 1992. The following permit condition
will be placed upon all recreational, mining, and industrial use
permits at Rule adoption:


The permitted shall submit to the District a conservation plan at time of application, or by July 31,
1992 whichever comes first. This plan shall include documntation and assessment of current and
potential internal reuse, as well as external reuse sarces. This pln shall also address reducing
irrigation withdrawals through evaluation of the use of drought tolerant landscaping for landscaped
areas, where present.

In addition, the following condition will be placed upon all golf-
course permits at Rule adoption:

The permitted shall submit a report to the District, at time of application, or by July 31. 1992.
whichever comes first. This report shall detail how and when the following items will be
implemented, and the expected reduction in withdrawals to be achieved through implementation:

1) Increasing efficiency of water application through conversion to low-volume irrigation
methods and the use of devices such as tensiometers to determine application frequency and
duration.

2) Limiting high-frequency irrigation to water-critical areas, such as tees and greens.

38







0 0

NORTHERN TAPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990
i 1* ..*;. .- ; i i A y ^ *' t i-- *" .. -


Reducing the frequency of irrigation for fairways.


Elimination of irrigation of roughs.


39

71


"~U""a~-N~-%i~~4~Prr~P~1~9-~~~


Ati^<^a^i)i-^Wt^rr^.?tti<^wt..*^.*a^w^*a^hJi.4jK..4^.tl^^


E.
''


-.,.... ii. L:i! ,.(




"" .,Z








NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

Chanter tAlfmative sources

A. Introduction
Development and use of alternate water supply sources is critical
in areas where demand is approaching or exceeding the availability
of the resources. Many possible major alternative sources have
been identified for the Northern Tampa Bay WUCA. These include
effluent reuse projects from wastewater treatment plants within the
WUCA, utilizing tailvater or runoff recovery systems, use of
shallow wells for residential- and landscape irrigation, and
desalination.

B. Work Groun Re mdations
The following Work Group recommendation addresses alternative
sources:

1. The District should require the use of effluent by the
phosphate industry, utility companies, public works and/or
agriculture as well as residential reuse, when available.

C. Goal Statement
The overall goal relative to alternative sources is to reduce the
demand for conventional sources in the area.

D. O.bletive JIIstifoation. al1mentation
objective 1 By July 31, t1e3, all waste-atez plats 1 the WnCA
with design capacity greater than or equal to 50s,00egpa shall
initiate implemeatatioa of a reuse program.

The use of treated effluent to supplement conventional sources has
long been recognized as an effective water maagn ent strategy.
The importance of reuse is especially critical in areas where
demand is approaching or exceeding n areaL* sate yield.
Presently, there are 68 permitted wastewater treatment plants in
the WUCA, that meet the Florida Department of Environmental
Regulation (FDER) design capacity requirements for public access
areas, residential irrigation, and edible crop reuse. Each of
40






0 0

NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

these treatment plants has a design capacity greater than or equal
to 100,000 gallons per day. The combined capacity for these plants
is approximately 279,000,000 gallons per day. The reported 1989
average, daily flows for. these plants was approximately 191, 0,000
gallons per day.

Twenty-ur ,of the treatment plants are currently reusing a portion
of the etfluent. Approximately 33,500,000 gallons per day of
reclaimed water is reused from these 24 plants. This is 17.5
percent of the average flow from all 68 wastewater treatment
plants. The reclaimed water is used for a variety of purposes.
These include lawn irrigation,, spray fields, golf courses, and
process water.

To implement this objective, the District will coordinate with
local governments who have wastewater facilities that meet reuse
standards to implement reuse programs.

Objective 2 The District shall require tailvater recovery in the
Northern Tampa Bay WCA where feasible.

Another possible alternative source for the WUCA is to utilize
tailwater or runoff recovery systems to reduce irrigation demands
on conventional sources. These systePs have been used effectively
in several areas throughout the state to reduce conventional water
demand ,.

To pursue this alternative source, the District will adopt by rule
. a new permit condition AF appropriate water use permits in the
area. This condition shal read:

The permit tee shall inverigate the feasibility f constructing and utilizing a tailwater/runoff
recovery system to offset water emand on conventional sources. The report shall contain analysis
of possible pond locations, the quaugity of water recoverable, limitations on the use of recovered water,
the costs associated with developing a recovery system, and an implementation schedule. A
determination of infeasibility must be supported with a detaed explanation. This report shall be
submitted to the District at

41


-ail^ "*w* u glW?* .r*lr^i^^^









NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21 1990



Additionally, applicants for new or increased withdrawals will be
required to address the feasibility of reuse at time of
application.

Objective 3 oThe Distriot should desigalte the WUCA as a water
suMy crittoal rea u der Chapter 17-40, Florida Aministrative
Cod4

The Northern Tempa Bay Water Use Caution Area should be declared
a Water Supply Critical Area pursuant to Chapter 17-40, Florida
Administrative Code.. This designate will allow the
implementation of various measures concerning reuse, thereby
alleviating some of the demand on the water resources of the area.

ObjOetive 4 -' The ist4ot should require all uses to investigate
the feasibility oft reuse.

Investigation of the feasibility of reuse should be required for
all appropriate uses. Reuse of treated wastewater as-aa alternate,
replc~&m t, 'or supplemental water source. ,for, irrigation,
industrial process, cleaning, or other non-potable use should be
investigated by all appropriate applicants or permittees. This
ites will be Implemnted through inclusion of the following
condition on all applicable permits with agricultural irrigation,
recreationl/aesthetic irrigation, industrial/camercial, or
mining/de4atering uses:

The Permitt~ shallt nestfate the feasibiity of using rMUose a water sowre and submit a report
desxrblg the /easibirty O M Di eri by (det specified). The repot shall crnain e analysis of
rease smrces for h area. ienludif thi reaIwe loaden of tAee searces to the Permitte's property,
the qunity 6Pf reuse watr aulable. 0ass uasiatd we6 tkaiNifag the reuse water, and an
implemenatwle schedade. A deerminatie of infeasibility must be supported with a detailed
explanation.





42
74






0 o

NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN Nay 21, 1990

Objective 5 The District should require reporting of reuse
quantities so that an accurate assessment of area reuse can be
made. .

All permitted uses which utilize reuse should be required to record
and submit reuse quantities and sources on a monthly basis.
Existing connection' to" reuse sources must be reported to the
District, as shall new connections within 30 days of connection.
Such quantity and source changes require permit modification, and
may be accomplished through a letter modification without permit
application fee. This its wil be implemented through the
addition of the following condition to applicable existing permits
upon Rule adoption, and, slightly modified, upon applicable new
permits as they are issued:

The Permittee shall report existing reuse connections to the District by (30 days following Rule
adoption). New connections shall be reported:t the Distict within 30 days of caewaon to the reuse
source. The Permittee shall list the source name. location, and quantities obaed in galjows per day,
annual average, for each source.

Objective n ohe District should require periit aplicants to
investigate desalinatie a aea alternative to withdrawal of fresh
water., ... .

Appropriate' water users who can treat non-potable water so that it
becomes acceptable ftor their -us, apShou investigate this
alternative. la- particular, both ppublcspply and industrial
users have the potential to utilize this option. Teohnologic
advances in desalination have reduced the costs of this process
tremendously4 When factored against the developmental costs of
inand vwellfields and the associated pipelines, desalnation can
prove to be an attractive alternative.. .The najor stumbling block
to expansion of desalination as an alternative seuce is the
problem of disposal of e*t bribe by-products. Deep-well disposal
of this waste material is the most likely method- possible, and
there are several such sites located south of the WUCA. To
implement this objective, the District will require all public

43


a-rr~~sr~~UP~~rF,r,~*rhr








NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

supply and industrial users to provide at evaluation of the
feasibility of desalination with any applications for new or
increased use. This evaluation shall include an assessment of the
total economics of desalination, including disposal, compared to
the total economics of :developing newv fresh water sources,
including development and tranhission o6t ater.

E. Other Related Issues
Other innovative options should be further explored, such as
promoting the use of private irrigation vills for luan watering,
which would decrease demand froa the stressed aquifer by shifting
demean and impact to the lodl area of use.































44






0 o

NOpTHERN TAMPA BAY CA DRAFT MANAGEMENT P1AN May 21, 1990

ChaPter 7 Lake.l ithdawa

A. Introduction
A number of: l)" within the Northern Tap Bay WUCA are stressed
to the extent ,that their utility to the public and their
environmental functions are diminished. A stressed condition is
defined to be chronic fluctuation below the normal range of lake
level fluctuations, or lakes that are currently augmented. For
lakes with District-estqblished management levels, a stressed
condition is a chrnApC fluctuation below the applicable mini mu low
management level. Table A lists the lakes in the WoCA that are
classified as stressed as ,o, Na 1990. Of the. 126 lakes with
established levels, 18 fall into this category. For those lakes
without established management levels, stressed conditions will be
determined on a case-by-case basis through site investigation by
District staff during the permit evaluation process.

This stress can be reduced by removing direct withdrawals from
these lakes, and by allowing no new withdrawals from them. Short-
term measures on abandonment of surface-water withdrawals were
discussed with the Work Group, approved by the Board, and "have
already been implemented. These measures allow no new withdrawals
from stressed lakes and require existing withdrawals from stressed
lakes to cease within 3 years of permit renewal.

B. Work Group Recommendations

The following Work Group recommendations address lake withdrawals:

1. The District should not allow any new withdrawals from
stressed lakes; existing withdrawals from stressed lakes
should cease within three years; all new wells should be
located and constructed to limit impacts to lakes; and
conservation plans should be required to be developed during
application process for all applicants who exceed an average
quantity of 100,000 gpd.


45


-CiL~~~UU~I~~~"(~"~~~~~~~.pZMI~











C);


Alke
*Bird
Buck
*Chapman
*Charld


*Fran
*Gerden
*Gomto
*Hobbs
*Horse
*Jackson

*Starvaon
*Turkey Ford

AllHRS

Artflory
Avis
ow (East)
.eat
BrookerLake
Bumw
Calm
Carron
Church

Daw
Cosntea


Edlr
Eco


U-I
eby (-erne


NORTJ4ERN TAMPA BAY WUCA

contod)
Gaus
George
Graci (Pearl)
Gooseneck
Hamrnoon

.ie rt -
Harvey
Hiawatha


Kathy
HIxon

Hooker
Island Ford



Lan1a






Mmd (WaMea)
PhUtt


Pretty
Rainbow



Talarh

lhdarcC
Tayor


OTHERS (continued)
HOr~f&.( corrt'd)
~aYi
(lsu.Ssesn)
Vifricol

Virginia
WWh9qTrout,
OTIERS
Papsu CounjX

Bl Vienne
x; uird~

Cow (Eat)
Royd~


GoUrdon~





Myrtl

Parker fAnne)
w~bey






T~i
UemmedJ #26

W.-. a s


I -umiM ,II- .*
Table 6. Lalm h ith astabbhd manageunnt klev in the Norther Tamps
Bay Water Use Caution Are icudK g whether the lake is
dclMs d as atresseud r w ther. "' of May 19W.


' iLl ,1 I I i 1


**






0 0

NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

2. The Distribt should remove existing aquifer levels on existing
S.permits; limit wellfields to historic use; and monitor lakes
and wetlands where appropriate.

C. Goal Statement
The management goal relative t ,.direct withCrpa from lakes is
to stabilize lake levels though implementing measures to
discontinue direct withdrawals t- om stressed lakes.

D. Obiectives Justification. Implementation

objective 1 The District s6441 implement azmsures .to discontinue
withdrawals from stressed lases.

Direct lake withdrawals have ad immediate eafteot on he level of
the lake. Even if the watit withdrawn is used for irrigation of
crops adjacent to the lake and this water is directed back to the
water table, losses to evaporation and plant evapotranspiration
result in a net lIos of water. Direct withdrawals from lakes,
combined with the effects ofe ground-water withdrawals and other
factors, reduce ake levels -to the extent that -they-can--beeme
stressed.

To implement this objective, pr tits for withdra was from stressed
lakes wiU not be issued, ap enforcement activities on stressed
lakes will be increased. I. ,withdrawal is proposed from a lake
which does not have esta 1 u I e levels, District staff will visit
the lake and use natural andman-made indicators, tp establish the
normal range of fluctuation the lakthe lak. he lake is currently
fluctuating below normal "le s, or if the proposed withdrawals
would cause this to happen, new, surface-water withdrawals would
not be permitted.

Any new withdrawals will be required to..us aurficial or Floridan
aquifer wells, or reuse sources, if available. Additionally, all
existing permitted surface-water withdrawals from stressed lakes
will be required to be replaced with a surficial or Floridan
47
79


~---~--~-' "-`-'~_--------'~":` ---~-----"Y~'~`~~IY~~~iU~*Xl(lllliY~~~C







lORTHIsE TAMPAW BAY WCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PIM May 21, 1990

aquifer well or reuse source within three years of WUCA Rule
implementation. These rules also apply to any future-designated
stressed lakes, with cessation required within three years of that
designation by the District. Applicable water use permits will be
issued with the following condition:

All rstinagsurface-uwaer withdruns from stressed lakes shall be abandoned and replaced with a
swaficial or FlWridW, a.dfer aoPrd-water source, a reuse source, by [date( years from rule
adoption) J. Suck replacement s4U require a modificatio of this permit.

The following condition will be applied at Rule adoption to all
surface withdrawals from non-stressed lakes:

Should the District determine that the lake from which you are withdrawing is stressed, all existing
surface-waer withdrawals shall be abandoned and replaced with a surficial or Floridan aquifer
ground-water source, or a reuse source, by [date( years from designation of stressed lake)]. Such
replacement shall require a modification of this permit.

Permittees with existing surface withdrawals on stressed lakes will
be allowed greater i#tga oai the lake -tra the proposed replacement
well than would n application f a.. new well. which is not
replacing a surface-water source. .awr,, the well construction
limitations within the tWCA shall still apply.



















48
840






0 0
NORTHERN TAMPA BAY 4UCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN -'Ua 21, 1990

Chapter 8 .esthetia ueameatatiomn of SuaMae Water dii..

A. Introduction
Some lakes within the WUCA have been augmented from ground-water
sources for aesthetic purposes. Water use permits for lake
augmentation are currently in effect for 21 permitted surface water
bodies including ponds and lakes, with a total average annual
quantity of 3, 178,000 gallons per day permitted.i Augmentation wells
may exist that are unpermitted either because they are operating
illegally or because the quantities withdrawn are below District
permitting thresholds.

B. Work Group Recomuandations

None

C. Goal Statement

The management goal for aesthetic augmentation is to reduce the
impacts to the groundawater resources of the area, caused by
withdrawals for -aestbetic augmentatin.

D. Objectives Justification. Implementation

Objective 1 The Distriot shall not allow withdrawals for
aesthetic augmentation to be permitted.

Augmentation means using one source of water to supplement another.
Typically, augmentation involves using ground water to supplement
the surface water levels of lakes, ponds and wetlands.
Augmentation may be required by the District to mitigate the
impacts of withdrawals, or it may be requested by an applicant who
wishes to raise surface-water levels. Augmentation is permittable
provided that the benefits outweigh any adverse impacts to ground-
or surface-water resources, depending on the specific situation.



49


~"-Sa*~U~~~


~-Y"L~~~iY~~~








NORTHERN TAMPA BAT WMUCA DRAFT MA"NAGEI MT PLAN ay 21, 1990

Augmentation for maintenaLnc ofa lake and wetland natural habitat
can be permitted as long as no significant adverse impacts result
froa the withdrawal. Augmentation may be allae4w provided that (1)
alternative solutions have bewn addrossd, (2) the need for such
augmentation -hae been established, (3) withdrawals for
augmentation do not cause significant adverse iapac t, and (4)
Aeasures are taken to allow the surface water *vel ~eto fluctuate
seasonally as described in Section 4#12.2.d. o h e Basis of
Review. Augmentation above a District-establiaishd applicable
minimum water level is prohibited.

Augmentation for purely aesthetic purposes, such, a fr creating
and maintaining water levels in constructed ponds,, or for
subsequent irrigation withdrawal, such as that practiced by some
golf courses, shall not be permitted. Existing permits_ which
include aesthetic a qgdtation may be renewed only i the criteria
of Section 4.12.2.c. through i.: are implemented. Ue se of water
through tail-water recovery ponds in efficiently managed systems
is encouraged and Is not considered augmentation.























50






0 0

nORTHEm I TAMP BAY WUCA DRAlT MANAOERENT PLAN Mly 21, 1990

Chapter -m-lluatie of Water U se

A. Introd etion
Ground-water use within the Northie, Tqppa Bay, WUCA has
substantially increased during the past .three decades. Total
permitted groiamdwater withdrawal is 245,3,A40,0f g4d' This
includes 168, 682,290 gpd, fore public supply, 47 ,,7 1~41 gpd for
agriculture 12,833,365 gpd for industrial/mining and;46t125,,166 gpd
for recreation and attractions (incJuding glf courses). The
District manages water use through the. water se peiriitting
process, which seeks to optimize utilization of the water resource,
while protecting the resurce, existing .legal users, and.,fish and
wildlife.*'

B. Work Groun Recounamdation
The" work group recommendations reIlatblt t9, approving additional
request for quantities are:-

1. The District should puimit water use in the WUCA utilizing
cumulative impact analysis without a production limit.

2. The District should not allow any new withdrawals from
stressed lakes; existing withdrawals from stressed lakes
should cease within three years; all new wells should be
located and constructed to limit impacts to lakes; and
conservation plans should be required to be developed during
application process for all applicants who exceed an average
quantity of 100,000 gpd.

3. The District should remove existing aquifer levels on existing
permits; limit wellfields to historic use; and monitor lakes
and wetlands where appropriate.

C. Goal Statement
The goal relative to evaluating request for new or additional
quantities from ground-water sources is to stabilize or reverse
ground-water declines in areas of concern.
51


DR""~""PL*~'WsUUr~~iU~I~~~~~~~IWII*IUX








MORTHNaO TMlPA Bny KMCA DRAFT MANAGEItBT PLAN MNay 21, 1990

D. Objectives Justitflatiom. Ialemantakion

objective I Water Use Monitoring

The purpose of monitoring water use is to obtain data that is
critical to managing the. vater resources and associated natural
systea Additionally, vater use monitoring provides a means to
document effectiveness conservation Aeasures and an applicant s
compliance with permitted quantities. In order to develop and
obtain this data, all water uses which equal or exceed 100,000 gpd
on the average *ill be required to ieter water use, and report that
data to the District.

All permitted wihdrawal points on perits at or above 100,000
gallons per day annul average daily withdrawal shall be metered,
and the Permittee shall be required to record and submit withdrawal
information. -Withdrawal points ~ permits existing as of July 31,
1990, shall be tered at the perittea's eaxpens by July 31, 2000,
unless the meters are provided by the District.

The folle ing permit condition srUs be applied to all active
permits with quantities at -or above 500,006 gpdj for withdrawal
points existing prior to October 1, 19689

At such time as the District complete installatm of mer(s) en aUl applicale withdrawal points, the
Permittee shall record the torldh wWal fwr each emed with drswa pit. Withdrawal points
constructed after Septeemer 30. 199 shall be metered within 90 days of construction, at Permittee's
expense. Total ,wthdrawlis shall W rept o rthe Distric (using District format) on or before the
tenk day of the fIllewing nmowh.

Existing permits granted for quantities at or above 100,000 gpd,
shall receive theb, following condition:

The following withdrawal poins.(Distri c ID nmbers)shall h eqdpped with totalizing flow meters
or other measurin devices as appromv in writing by the Director. eserewc Regulation Department.
Such devices shall haw and maintain n accuracy within five percent of the actual flow. Those


52






0 0

NORTHWi TAPA aY VC~L RUAFT MMA#El ~I.-PL. My 21, 1990

designated withdrawal pobis nor equiwpd whif.auch 4I d s outh date f. permit.ssuance shall be
equipped by July 31, 1995.

Total withdrawal from each metered withdrawal point shall be recorded on a monthly basis and
reported to the Distriqt (uing District format) on or b or the tenth day of the following month.

Permits granted tor quantities t o, above 100, 00000 pd, which have
withdrawal points constructed .at ._ y 1; 1990, shall receive the
following condition:

The following withdrawal poOnFs (District D wm 4er shall be equipped with totalizing flow meters
or other measuring devices as approved in writing by the Director. Resource Aulation Department.
Such devices shall have and maintain an accuracy within fi percent of the actual flow. Those
designated withdrawal points not equipped with such devices on the date of permit issuance shall be
equipped within 90 days of conpitmio of construction of the withdrAwal facility, less an extension
is granted by the Director. Resource Regulation.

Total withdrawal from each metered wikdr*IW pmuAt :hal be ridorded on tamnthy: basis and
reported to the District (using Diktri format) on or before the teth day of the following month.

1. Recreational. Industrial. and Mining Conservation Plan
-Reoreational./uasthetic, ... ..jndustr.a /coea racial and
nining/dewatering uses are required to suag.it a water
conservation plan by July 41, 1992, specifically addressing
recycling, reuse and landscaping. This provision will be
implemented by applying the following permit condition to all
applicable permits at rule adoptions .,

The Permiuee shall submit a water conservati ptaw by July 31,1992. This plan shall
specifically address: recycling of water within the 'peradion; reuse of treated
wastewater from outside sources: and use of low water-use landscaping. The plan
shall report quantities of water cur'e^ty a4d proposed' to be recycled, with
implementation dates for prbpised recycienr activities; an assessment ef reuse sources
in the surrounding area, including quantiies available, distance from the Permit
location, conmctiw, costs, and. itplemeation dat.s for connection, if feasible. The
-plan shall als address current Jamdscaping wrmr requirement and an implementation
schedule fr conversion to low water use ladscaping for areas not already using
drought-tolerant landscaping.

53


~_____ II








NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990


2. Golf Courses Conservation Plan
In addition to the requirements Listed above for
recreational/aethetic uses, the following permit condition
will' be applied to all existing golf course permits at Rule
adoption, and the elements to bi addressed last be addressed
in new golf course permit applications:

The Permittee shall submit a report to the District. at time of application, or by July 31, 1992,
whichever comes first. This report shall detail how and when the following items will be
implemented, and the expected redhctio in withdrawals to br achieved through
implementation.

a. Iigcreasing efficesrry of watoe agplation ithW#ir onwirsie toe iow-volume irrigation
n ethds asd the we of temsometers to deermin application frequency and duration.

b. Limiting high-frequrecy irrigation to water-critical areas, such as tees and greens.

c. Redsuing the frequemcy of irrigation for fairways.

d. Elimination of irrigation of roughs.

3. Wellfield RagulatorYv Lavls
Within the Northern Tapa Bay MUCA, four wellfields are
regulated in part *, regulatory levels. The four vellfields
are Cosme-Odesas, Section 21, South Pasco; uah BLdridge Wilde.
The aquiter levels are monitoted in various soaiter wells, and
the wellfields must operate so that aquifer dilwdown does not
exceed certain specifications. While the concept of using
aquifer levels as a guide to withdrawals i a good one, these
particular levels are based on an outmoded concept called the
"water crop3 (Rule 16J-0.15, Florida Administrative Code,
Repealedd.

Under water crop theory, a permitted could withdraw no more
quantity than would be naturally replenished by recharge,
which was determined to be about 13.4 inches per year (Guyton,


54


~I __






0 0


NORTHERN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN May 21, 1990

1975). If a permitted's capture zone fqr this quantity
extended beyond the property boundary, the. atity associated
with the off-site capture sone as ning "borrowed, and would
need to be reduced if the adjacent property owner desired to
produce water. -Therefore, the "water crop" and "borrowing"
concepts had the effect of linking water to land, a concept
which no longer remains based on Florida water law.
currently, although ownership or control of the property on
which the withdrawal points are located is required, the
capture zone for withdrawal may extend off-site so long as
it presents no adverse impacts. A property oer has no legal
right to withdraw water based solely on land ownership or
control.' Therefore, the wellfield regulatory levels were
developed to limit wellfield withdrawals and to require
wellfield pumpage cutbacks when adjacent property owners
needed withdrawals, but such a system is contrary to current
water law. In fact, the regulatory levels are now being used
in reverse, to limit other water uses in th area, a use for
which the levels were never intended.

Since the current regulatory levels were developed based on
these outmoded concepts their relevance is questionable, and
they should be replaced. Experience with wellfield impacts
has been gained by the District and wellfield operators such
as, the West Coast R ona Water supply Authority. Since the
limiting factors to withdrawals generally include demand,
impacts to wetlands, lake levels, other users, and aquifer
water quality, limiting withdrawals should be based on these
factors.

Therefore, it is proposed that the existing regulatory levels
be removed at time of permit expiration for these four
wellfields, and. that permitted quantities be modified to
reflect historical pumpage. The existing regulatory levels
would be replaced with updated rguatory mechanisms such as
wetland impacts, lake levels, water quality parameters, water
table levels, and Floridan aquifer levels. District staff
55
87


9~~~~WUI*III~~Clli








NORTHIN TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN M3y 21, 1990

will work with the wellfield operators in the intervening tine
to develop these mechanism. Additionally, the permit
condition requiring Cosne Odessa, Section 21, and South Pasco
to balance pumpage among the wellfields would be removed, as
this requirement would be obviated by the new regulatory
aechanisms. Wellfield quantities are proposed to be modified
to the highest quantity used on a calendar year basis for the
period 1980-89, however, E, h pernittee/applicant may provide
information supporting different quantities. A summary of
death permit and the proposed quantity is presented below:

Wellfield Existing Avg. Proposed Avg. Expiration
Name Annual Withdr. Annual Withdr. Date

Come-Odessa 13 MGD 12.1 MGD Sept. 1, 1992

Section 21 13 MD 11.2 MGD Sept. 1, 1992

South Pasco 16.9 MGD 12.4 MGD Sept. 1, 1992

Eldridge-Wilde 35.24 MGD 34.4 MGD Feb. 24, 1998

























56
88


I ___






0


NORTHERN


0


TAMPA BAY WUCA DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN
'; ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ "-.; "- '** '"V *(*** *** 7


APPENDIX 1





































56
89


- ay


21, 1990


'-II~-"- ~rcr~~






0


cr.wa n.I., *ut*aenawv & 4an. 4 An t


lU m &g-l a .Ta aa nPa n a a u a oi_. -- a..-... --* n-- V -I-I ---.- w


SO ... i t ~p r usipurit data January l 1990
----.... --- ---------- *----,6 ----. It#TTPi County bescription-PINELLAS ------. --------- --- ---"""


0OI County *escriptlon CUP iebber


UM"OTr :rud lg.?face Permitted Pr:rtttd VtbH of
a Utr Average Mllawa W
I I atdr.rL


Latitude Longitude


* I PINELLAS 0141001 300 300 .000 1 280619 824557
ii ____MOHL16LINUOUGN ___ _______
I OS County *micriptlic CUP Number UdtW ured Surface Permitted Perltted r;e of* Latitude Lenoitude
ater Motor Avrerage RWse In!

z au~~ nls~umull A. tj *MOff


a &
* .

," L,...








&



go j ,'
g 1


*' O 9a 2
a a_ I_
(~0 P.-. --aiO


ILTULSAL 700 907 1 0 ;? 3i7
LT0O .700 9 0 a

ILTUAL 10,000 1000 0 06
*1 ~ .- .,,fr s irk e blatsr athnra. -ac----- ------.


-Ii".


i
0-
41
42
'3
45
4---I'-
46


.' # ,


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~


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Le Oss Co. F.

2 J47x-y c r i P

77



53





6 H






NIL



90 LL
0 N


N :LLL
0 N



37 NILBOOS
9? R LI 6 0
3 2 HILL 00X::

970 HILLSBORO 6M


-------------.fflq!"~tICULTWArL CountY DescriptionzHI LLSBOBIQUGH ---------- ----------------------------

L~o ~ PuLr.'~or a to Itted Nuit d rpbo Y rbr of Latitude Lonn)itud
r. rrrr~*us
? ~ 3 11 PlltW~iilr~fCI~IIIX .~I ~ w droo ibt


N L 0 9i rY1I I'


A Ass 13
Ar


~~00






AL






AL 4)A
A T~!~? i
A.1I 2
AIViRL' 1:l
A11 2


All a 0 L09
OLl A UCILLTUIL 1ff 500 (00 1 2016 00


I I_- I M o on j


i


i







i

'1



;;
1






2?'


----- -- NormasLta -ur tc--e-Adr found -Cter- ithdra -A-h UCA- a4-THUS AT -NAV--1 99--5-
FYMM Ylateor Me pe0ramt dta* January 1 0
------------------------------------- USTT IPIsAItULTUBAL Ceo4ay Descr ipt onmHILLUSOUH -------------------------------------
a s County *Decriptiea CgC lumber IETYPE t*Mamd lurface Permetted Perritted NMehr ef Latitude Leagitude
Ser Mater Average Mial um E!s tlAg .
-0 Elm- ------~ lbcuI __ _


. --- .~- --: r.-- ~r~c-~-- ::2~.~r~- ~.. r~.rTe ~'.I ~-.' ~~~
..~~- ~~.! \i; ';~ L '
`



PliiL~i'r


3


IIY____YYIL__LLILL__IL _.__ -...II_~1~L.-_ _^____. ~I.~L _.__l^i
























- l:;t a3nound -r-u thdr :-ET8MUCA.---94-T.HURSoAV-NAT-1 -tO-19O0-0-----
- urLTUAAL ut scrptIomILLD ------------- -----
*- 11j----i irPAGRcLTU6AL C. oundlty lcriptriontlLLOi-OU6H ---------------- ,- --------------
t.7 I


CUP MN S(CETY


Ground
Water


Surface Peralited Peritted Nu ber of
Mater Average Na. lmu Exlt sg
tithdriuot


Latitude Longitude w-


L. -3-
_. _59 |








.
I ,





I
-12-







'AI I E





A L I 18 < ,




S" i A :ULTURAL P t-

Al t8 L A0 .
1 1 IIIE _____ _____ : :T





1 AGR OLTURAL 1 .8 a ll
A rUL URALM o ae 8r
SAGXCULTUUAL 26.00 0 46000 1
, ----- ULAL---,0-- .00 0. .


19-

i9



14

I0
204
205


wg V


.0i CSitry bescripttri


S*AGR ULIURAL r,0uu UU 1U. 00 1 71 I 0
07 0 AGRICULTURAL 2,800 26,00 360,000 1 2180940 I
SAGICULTURAL Z SO 00. 26.300 80 000 2 27S31 '011
2- 100 4A0RIC0ULTURAL 26,,00 -. 00,OOit-0 A At
00 A~ RICULTURAL 267300 ,. 2 900 ,000 1 275636
632301 AGRICULTURAL 2.7, QlI 27,00 567, 00 1 2802 I O21 5f,
t4I n


......... .. i J iHi I i T I


n--s
;_I_.--I I


4_=-u ak i ont-marka s------


L-I






I)


I


S.... .---.--.-.... .. ---..--- Neta 4 -ur.tae ate d-ground utter uitkdraudsl in-I.te-ETdUCA- -. 9:34-THUISBDAT, NAY-10,-1990-Z- --.- ,
SI uIIf Ulter uel permit data January 1, 1990
--------- ------------------------ USETVPCAGICULTUIIAL County Descr Ipton=HILLt3iOROUGH ----------------- -------------
SI OS CAunty Descriptlon CUP Number NITYPE Caund Surface Permitted Peruitted Number of Latitude Longitude
later Mater Averaqe man I ue E is ing
S' Ltith dreuat
S K 2 UH I9 A AL s 00 1 0613 4 0
S 0 N 1044 A UVAL 9 1 0 1 35






--. 2HLLS OIOU CH I-I *00 AiCiLTI AL 4 300 3 1si 12
2 6.a
a IL 0 0 A 4 21 21
----- 1---





H -







L 25 i jC EAL 3. 16 SO 1 I d
I3 00 1 2 4 4


SHILL 0 A ICULTUIAL 400I 1
*E* ---- IA -- -4 1.A r kr .bra



O : 259 1.0 A U AL 0 I
g I-L N a1 -01 A 10 AUL L 3,50 1 -,-0 46,000 11 1
,. ILL 8a it .MO910 -100800 0


NoO' 310 .' rr r800 3021 11 .
MOM 089101 A L AL 470 -00-1 0000 00 10



~)':----------------------F I~ --- urlrlsf~lurl.a rLh~r hrr.c*,


'0


'C

IO

















a1 f ua 1. 1


-------- -- ----------- ------r- USiITTleGIICULTUand-L Crunt ecriidrollnaO U------9:--HUSDA--------------------------
------.. ...."..... ....------_---- USETTrP S GiIICULTURAL County Beacription MILLSDOROUGH .....-------------------------


085 county Aescri r


UsIIlIT


Ground Surface Permitted Perlitted Number of
Mater Mater Average Hasfaum Existing
Wlthdraua


Latitude Longitude


-___ L_ _a


i~,L- 1 S---::G


-- im wi


1


8 AL I00I
g lab 2 i 6:il : _
_- -----_ I--
q'672 1 0 ;



I3. C L l4, 1 7



SI UIAL 4. 0 0 ;-
S AI L IIAL 1" ,o



------ U, 0




AGE UL C AL 41. 0 000 27 9 2 s --
II V 91







AI CULTURAL 0 4 355t- i|
1_ ALt! f 1 21



A ItCCULTURAL 4 0 4 00 1 1'31
,0 CULTURAL -41, 0 ---- .---- 00 1 00 1 20568 -83 1


I A RUICULIUIrL 3QuQ 43000 1010000
f 10 AGICULTUIAL 43 800 : 1300 42i0000
1969 AGRICULTURAL 43,100 43100 46 000
-----01t2 ----AGACULTURAL--43,100 i---(-4 3100.52000--
0 31801 AGRICULTURAL 44,000 44000 6 2600
S2 A6RICULTURAL 44,600 44,600 1,020,000


280204 820457
280600 8 02640
-- --- 517-- 03
80542 82 32 34
250803 823 424


",



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i
i

t
I


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nm


n ..lu ..] J ~ iJ bLr __ iJJ


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:3* )







--*.ral~l(iarWlj:da.;I-.l l ..9tjCf1M r-O: J4TMf UISbAV. r ll 01oa9
otr us* Vria data-J8444*ryi, 99
USETYMENA4aiEULTUIAL County Descriatgiu.n.NLLSIOAoUS -------------------------------------
J -
GAS County moscrtilon CUP Oblaft USEITPE Gr Surfac Pe.tfls Pee F itted u eNx of Latitude Le tud
NW Motor A a Mae mag lu tb om

N 1 -











-41 A 45Ok1kokeeb.Ip.a




1111111 iiS II~, j dO~ 1
N1 A




N A
i Plf1~1 ~ M~~EF as6aGO







6 Ar





"^ MttV^^^ Yl::- '. ,. "
$ r; .b I

.. ------ -Nca ied. .-rf ce -ad-ground-uager-M uhdrawaLs-In-he- ETauUCA -- -9:3J4 THURSDATo MAY 10- 1990--1 -
SUflWN Mater usi permit data January I. 1990
-------------. -------------------- USETTPeaAlICULTUIIAL County bescrptinHLLS UGH------------------------


IS County Blneription CUP NMmber


* SETPTe


Groend Surface Permitted Periltted Nuober of
MUter Mater Average Nasr lu Ex ting
Mithdrawal


I-


Latitude Longitude


S


i


i


a


I I I ; I p


R
~t:1Pgl
,If










-------------------- ----------------N
a OBS County description CUP Number





1*
0,















00



4 T a


1-


a


~..---- rL~---l- rL- LI~UII~I


l r--n--rown- r- -- --- --r- ---- ... .-- .--SOO
uSFMHa waterr use pertit -ate January 1* 1 -
USETyPESAIRICULTURAL County DescriptionNHILLSBOIOU --- ---------


IS VE tt


aroundd urface Permltted CPritted Nuber of Latitude Longitude *;
ter ater Average Iawtnn ES ttn .
US tllat,


, : 11: I

a 1'& 4
SI i ,I





4U 1 -1 11 QI 1 ';
40@6000












t
V






I
i

50,311




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-*


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1 1f11 -


-I


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~


I
r


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i
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- *tw-ruwflfltuurmwuurK-Ds WE UUWrrU


................ .... ....~-...~...._. __LI_;....~_~........1. .ll.^~m~Yx~--~-.~..~.~-.II~--~----------


frl. sua t w- a>IL _l't n saast...........


IT


"J ....LJJ L- r ----I -t LI -


raw


-


. I_--W l


g







V.AII_1


S-- --- .----ormalt-l zd-ur f ace-and -qround-water-wi thdraat n-the-ETBWUCA---- 9: 4-1THURSDAY,. MAY 10, 1990-12----.0
SUFHDb Water use Perait data January i1 1990
..................------ USETVPEAGRICULTURAL County DescriptionNHILLSBOROUGH ---- ----- --- ------------
I S OiS County Description CUP Number USETYPE Ground Surface Permitted Per fitted Nu.ber of Latitude Longitude


'I


AGRICUL URAL 108.000 1 9 822
S A ICUL UAL 109o0 2, O,3 0 14

lt
A 2 L jj I ,ltWIPP


11ift9 8,000
S 125,000
12S506


A 9,000 .
A
A I o 3
A 2 3I

A f- -

A R;if 6
nrsrr ruuar~A


'79



A
















1









41-


[AA 0.i 20 h301i lihI 2


L 21 2 -1
L It q 7
R AtIL 3t 222,7272


2 A
2
2


- --54L Ikz-orkd~leh#Cuor,rmab3~+r~hb.tHb,,,m-.&


Water Water Average Rax IU Existing
WithdrawaL


A AL .-
A I At.L 82,006


II
I




31
1







33
2
II



i)1



y41


----~aMnar I~PP ~~ils~ liF 1


-WfRi~UIC~ ILka~YL----


i~~l~ZYT


C~iPIO----Z-~-~ ~"P~~


'"""


- 8 O O-j


,.....~~~:.







* .... .. -. NormaLied4 surface -and-;round acter-uithdrawals in-th.-E.TMUCA .9:34 THUASDOAY MAY 10. 1990-1-
SUFW.D9 Jater use permit data January 1, 1990
---- .---------------------------- USETYPE=AGRICULTUPAL County Descript onsNILLSaOROUGH ----------------------------_.
l 03S County Description CUP Number USETYPE Sround Surface Peritted Permtted Number of Latitude Longitude
water Mater Average Naimum Eaistinq a
l. thdrau a

53 SS HILLSIOROUGH O 01 AGS|CUL URAL 2,7 3ISz24 26 3 0, 5 275912 I 1 59
S5 H LL 4UGH 4 1 AG0 CL TUAL 2 ,3 ______ -___, i 5g. _____ Z -
L- WILL- 43#399 a -- 4y
____5 HILL a "1 ___z-





*- *------- -----------------------1 : --k~----Atr-Hi- --- -Eirt-------i--- i
S545 LI A S

549 .g z'.5 III
4 HILL i AL 6 o_ _
I0 A rLfla
H LL VISOL1A1 7 5 PJ 0
551 N LL 0O S | _I L UII L SUPAL. 9i34,74 a a '
CNTIVDSC 355N49,171 2#704.954 38,254.125
------- --------------------------------- USIVPIAACULTUIAL County DescriptePACt0- ------------------------------------------
O8S County Descriotion CUP Number UIETVPE round Surface Pe ittled "Peritted u ber of Latitude Longit"4de
C : MIthdramaL

6 P400
S-- ._- -56_ ---PA ---


61 PA A .

1) 3A 00 .-1 28
61 1 ,, 8
AJ 8
57 06. 2'
PAo 0034 A A 46, 46, 1,0 0llI
O' *, --:-X4-i-a--uo r kdi- k .oCuki k--b] e t bpr.a-

IIiI II II1











S r u it data January I
'.7- ; '- :- : '. **** i




-. SMFWN6 Water use permit data January l, 190U
----.......--------------------- USETYPE=4 RICULTURAL County Description=PASCO --------- -- -------
S 08S County 6scrtptton CUP Number U-SEiP round Surface Permitted Perditted Nubr of Latitude Longitude o
i Water Water Average Max au Existtg gg
., "lWithdrawal


Witdrwa


-i 577 PAs CO 7l1 g jULTURAL 297, 00 1 28 322 2900
Sii .,o oUA eo i
-. 578 PASCO 09740 GA tlCULTURAL 6, 0 00 1 44,000 211
CO TURAL 0 23 8
50- 1 UR-- s.0 UAL t o. o I I t















--U S-E. .... _, -- USCTTP$*AGI6CULTU 5AL County escrptlptinPINELLAS -------------------------
31-----M--.eC-ter-cpt-lon-CU--Nuaber----US *.-Pl----- -.ro-n:---fu-ese--Peral-ft*Meniie4-Nvebehf--Ltl tude-Leongitude--
.Ulthdraual
3 ---AL 0 1---i----

iA AL O 1 | t a | 50t 3
____ 16 7 1AL11 4 RI 00




CNT5 CR 697 4 9551 R70 1 00
A.. di t )
is 1 i l- A f 0 a "




A L A"0- t -A




to, I"- 0 2" ,0



t---t 100 -I

'DSCR 10472jcI,4,, 694j,4 9,51 1 O?,lO0
70- -------- --- ----- -- --- ----.---. "S" lTrrlE .-- iorkd/L is Cork.urntyb 3 tbpr. I-l -- --- -------I-
-r u- 6 pa r4 60 -4 = 8p +i i
-of-Laitud~ogit de


S


I -









S.......-- Normatized surface and around water-..ithdrajals in the ET5UUCA 9:34-THURSDAY-. AY 10, 1990--1S--- -
SWFWUHO after use permit data January 1, 1990
---------------------------------------- USETYPE=AGRICULTUaAL County DescriptionaPINELLAS --------------------- ----------
a OSS County Description CUP Nuber USETYPE Ground Surface Permitted Peritted Number of Latitude Longitude
iFi Water Water Average Has Tnu Existing
W- Ulthdraw 3 L


! USTYPE 47,71i,9 5,018,90o 53073isa025

S- .1....------.-- ,-,---- -.-K-......-- IUST-E-lN-UST IAL--County-escr ipl ionil-LLl30ROU -'---- -- --,..
'.1 O8 County ioeription CUP Mumber IETTVE Groumd Surface Permitted Perlitted Number of Latitude
Uate' Water Average Han Isu Ex sting


Longitude-


' s66 H LL N




-67
0. t, H L H



64 HILL SI 0H 01
CNTYTOSCR

S- s County Desi------ ----n CP Numer
08S County Description CUP Nuober


, 649 PASC.


AL -o 2


I 7

I- SS I





AI L : 9 0 9 0 1I



___,.__ _____ I:--o+ +


121,302165 16,1J45 1l,41,flG

.US TYPElINDUSTIlALM.Countyc. escripctonPnaASCj ---------------
USETVPE Ground Surface Permitted Permitted Number of Latitude Longitude
mater; V lte Averag Iaste4ua Ellsting
U A


0443300 IIUITAIAL 10,000


10000O


200400


2&1127


* ------ --- ----.----- -- .-.----------. -File-.r-uorkdisk.:Cuorkmarbb tbprm.aas.--I---.... _..~_


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


~L~I~L_ _p_ _I~


3 ~


- --- i '"


' -"" ..... -- I--- W- I- ---


-------I--- I----'-i"--------t~------- __












Normalized surface and gr und Mater vithdrauaLs-in-th -.ETMUCA--- 9:34THURSDAY. NAY-l0s 1990-1.
S.FW. Water use permit data January 1, o 99
------------- ----------------------------- -- USETYPESIMOUSTRIAL: Countw DescrtptionuPIMELLAS ---*--*


r.--- ---,
05 County et.criptton CUP Number USETYPE 6 found Surface Permitted Peritted of Ltitude Longitude
Warterr r Average Man aul ltng


'1

I



S






4-


)


P ,E fLLS 19 WS*I L S ,;: 8 1 8 I 02 I,1,


--------------------------------------- USTEtE INI unty Description-HILLSaOJ-U-6H ------ .........-... -.
'' a U t draIt f
1 6 10 HILL 0 N USMT' 0909100 M 210000 0 43000 3 27O5 ) $6440
---- P- L-.-A-.-m -m.-m- ne-USTEI2 Luntg *l-- nty- crilptoin>ALLS IO ..-..---
I 005 Count y rescription CU P Number USEfl PE Ground Surface Permitted Per'tLed Nube of Latitude Longitude
Water tAr Aver laga "R lmue lu st g .l
.ltldraial
65 6 C-ILLS o932B0 0 MIN ..10 000 30000 13000. 4400 2802 1 8023 0



.* U--------_. ... Nai-lB-b-1-------- o---- ------
S.--------- ------ .. --w----I---- ..---. USETYiP(I, IUPPL country escription-MILLBOOUIIILG ---------- -------------
O lS County Description CUP Nll umr USITfPE Gr eioad Surface Perlmtted Pert tt d Number of Latitude Longitude
a o, dte water Average" Nas I E ng
S* Mthdraat t
ni 665 HIL I 16 AP aat 1 I n g


6 LOFL S L,3 1 1 2 a
6 5 063200 NP : -U 1-,130.000 LLl 1 285114 82 400
,t---,,----- 8-- --- -- ----- !:11414---2



11 HILL 0 N 7S PUBL C SUPPL66 I 1 1 2 7551
61 HILLS Oa *GN PUNLC SU0PPLTY ,000 1 20 3 2 l
I ---- 61 ----H ILLS IO ----- -- -SETPUBL CSUPPLY-- unt script----o-----nuI- -------------- S-----2 6-

S 7 LLS U 87 PUBLC SUPPLY 0 1 4 0 21 0755 8 2 0 0
S 6 H LLSOOUH 0 PUBLIC SUPPLY00 8,100 6,00 1 5652 8210
t I' i ----- fie--=--uor kd | g k ;- uo a r _-k.- NIL -


f
.7
i


I


!


9 I I 99 I lCC I


i








_onmaiU ed-surftace-nd-ground- atrp itthdra us-in-uithe-eTgaUCA--9 34-"URSDAY --AV-- 010--1t9-n
SSMFMD Water use permit data January l, 1990
--------------- ----------------- USETYPEPUSLIC SUPPLY County Descriplton=HILLS60rOUGH ------ """""""""" ""--
OBS County Description CUP Number USETVPE Ground "Surface Perltted Per tted Numbe of Latitude Longitude ,
Water water Average Itaxlsul Exlstlng
u lthdraet "
675 HILL OIIOUGH 0 -0 PU1 I PPLV 0 0 9. 3 2 0509 82199

*I-----6 ----------------- 5--.- -----0-- -
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S:.NA.M ot' r use permit data January 1* 1990
S ------------------------------------ USETYPE=PUBLIC SIPPLY County Description=PASCO --------------------------------------
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t water Water Average Naxaua Existing
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S---------------------- ----- USETYPE-?U3LIC SUPPLY County DescriptionsPASCO "-------------------------------"------ I
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SWFv.D Water use perit data January 1, 1990
--------- USETYPE2RECAEATIONAL County DescriptionmHILLSOOROUGH -------------------------------
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--- --------------------------------------- USETYPERECRIATIONAL County bescription*PASCO ------ ------------------


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