Title: Consumptive Use Permitting and Water Resource Allocation/Information Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00002347/00001
 Material Information
Title: Consumptive Use Permitting and Water Resource Allocation/Information Report
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Language: English
Publisher: SWFWMD
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Consumptive Use Permitting and Water Resource Allocation/Information Report, April 1993
General Note: Box 10, Folder 14 ( SF-Water Use Caution Areas-SWFWMD - 1993-1994 ), Item 62
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: WL00002347
Volume ID: VID00001
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Full Text
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CONSUMPTIVE USE PERMITTING AND WATER
RESOURCE ALLOCATION


Buddy Blain
Blain & Cone
202 Madison Street
Tampa, FL 33602
(813) 223-3888

Pat Gleason
Montgomery Watson
2328 10th Avenue N.
5th Floor
Lake Worth, FL 33461
(407) 586-8830

Gordon Kennedy
ViroGroup Missimer Division
428 Pine Island Road
Cape Coral, FL 33991
(813) 574-1919

Pete Hubbell
Executive Director
Southwest Florida Water
Management District
2379 Broad Street
Brooksville, FL 34609
(904) 796-7211





S^-\J s^U/r'&AJV'y SciJ'ool




I. Ii d i 1


INFORMATION REPORT

Southern Basin

Water Use Caution Area





















Southwest Florida Water Management District

April 1993




l I 1 : ;i : I. II


SOUTHERN BASIN WATER USE CAUTION AREA
INFORMATION REPORT


1.0 INTRODUCTION


In October 1992, the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) established
the Southern Basin Water Use Caution Area (WUCA) due primarily to concerns about over-
pumping and saltwater intrusion. The WUCA includes all of DeSoto, Hardee, Manatee, and
Sarasota Counties and part of Charlotte, Highlands, Hillsborough, and Polk Counties (Figure
1). The WUCA boundaries overlie the Southern Ground Water Basin which represents a
hydrologically distinct flow system within the Upper Floridan aquifer system, the most highly
developed and productive limestone reservoir in west-central Florida. It encompasses an area
within the SWFWMD of approximately 5,100 square miles. The area lies south of Interstate
4 in Polk County and State Road 60 in Hillsborough County (Figure 1). The WUCA overlaps
two previously declared water use caution areas within the SWFWMD: the Eastern Tampa Bay
WUCA and the Highlands Ridge WUCA.


In conjunction with the Southern WUCA declaration, the SWFWMD Governing Board
authorized the formation of a Southern Basin WUCA Work Group so that affected water users
can work with the District to help solve problems in the area. The Work Group will develop
short- and mid-term recommendations to the Governing Board that will include management
options on water use within the WUCA. The first Work Group met on January 20, 1993. Final
recommendations from the Work Group are expected within six to nine months.


The creation of the new WUCA was based primarily upon the results of the Eastern Tampa Bay
Water Resource Assessment Project (WRAP). The WRAP, a four year study of the water
resources in portions of Hillsborough, Manatee, and Sarasota Counties, indicated that pumpage
outside the stressed area can adversely affect groundwater levels and saltwater intrusion in the
coastal region of the basin.




[ I I i I I


Long-term recommendations on management of the water resources within the Southern Basin
will be based upon the results of two ongoing water resource assessment projects (WRAPs).
The Highlands Ridge WRAP includes the area along the eastern boundary of the basin where
declining lake levels prompted the declaration of the Highlands Ridge WUCA in 1988. Results
from this project are expected in January 1994. The remainder of the basin will be addressed
with the conclusion of the Southern District WRAP. This project will focus on the water
resources in the southern part of the basin and is anticipated to be complete in January 1996.


At the conclusion of the Southern District WRAP, recommendations regarding the safe yield of
the entire basin will be presented to the District Governing Board for their action. As an interim
measure prior to completion of the WRAPs in the Southern Basin, staff will now recommend
denial on a case-by-case basis of new or increased withdrawals that further affect groundwater
levels or saltwater intrusion rates within the Most Impacted Area (MIA), a severely stressed area
in the western part of the basin.


2.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE AREA AND STATEMENT OF PROBLEM


2.1 Physiography


The WUCA is characterized by relatively flat, generally swampy low lands in the coastal areas,
with land surface elevations gradually increasing to the east, where a series of north-northwest
trending ridges interrupt the landscape in Polk and Highlands Counties (SWFWMD, 1988). The
area lies within the mid-peninsular physiographic zone that is characterized by a system of near-
shore barrier lagoons and spits, and a gently sloping marine plain that gradually rises to near 100
feet above sea level in northern Hardee County. North of Hardee County stands the broad,
slightly dissected Polk upland, usually at altitudes greater than 100 feet. The eastern and
northeastern portions of the basin contain a series of subparallel, eroded sandy ridges and
intervening valleys that contain numerous lakes (Wilson and Gerhart, 1980).


The dominant river basins, ranked in descending stream flow order are the Peace, Alafia, Shell
Creek, Myakka, Horse Creek, and Manatee Rivers. All of these rivers have an average flow




IL 1i II


greater than 100 cubic feet per second. The major rivers begin in the Polk Upland and flow
west or southwest to the Gulf of Mexico. Large wetland areas include the Green Swamp located
in northern Polk County and the Myakka River drainage basin in Sarasota County.


A few major springs exist in the SGWB; they are Lithia Spring, Buckhorn Spring, and Warm
Mineral Springs. Average annual flows from these springs are about 27, 2, and 6 MGD
respectively. Recent investigation of Lithia and Buckhorn Springs indicates that the majority of
springflow is derived locally from a shallow flow system that reflects karst activity (SWFWMD,
1992; and SDI, 1992). Kissengen Springs, located a few miles south of Bartow, Florida, was
a major spring that ceased flowing in the early 1950s. Long-term flow from the spring averaged
approximately 10 MGD. The cessation of flow from Kissengen Springs was attributed to
declining ground-water levels due to pumping (Peek, 1951).


2.2 Hvdrogeology


Three ground water basins exist within the SWFWMD: the Northern, Central, and Southern
(Figure 2). Each basin represents a hydrologically distinct flow system of the Upper Floridan
aquifer. No significant ground water flow crosses the basin boundaries. Upper Floridan aquifer
flow in the SGWB is derived principally from rainfall recharge that infiltrates into the Green
Swamp and Lake Wales Ridge area, located along the northern and eastern edges of the basin,
respectively. Downgradient of these areas, ground water flows west and southwest toward the
Gulf of Mexico, except in southern Hillsborough and western Manatee Counties, where flow has
reversed and is now inland.


2.2.1 Aquifer Systems


The ground water system, in descending order, is divided into three main aquifers: the surficial,
intermediate, and Upper Floridan. Each aquifer is separated by a confining layer of variable
thickness and areal extent. In the northern portion of the WUCA, the intermediate aquifer thins
and eventually "pinches out". Figure 3 depicts a northwest to southeast hydrogeologic section
across the basin.




i'Ui i .: ,i 1 iiI


The uppermost aquifer, the surficial aquifer, is largely undeveloped due to its small thickness
and low permeability, except near the coast and in Charlotte County where ground-water from
deeper aquifers is too mineralized for potable use. Underlying the surficial aquifer is the
intermediate or the secondary artesian aquifer system.


The intermediate aquifer system is a highly developed source of water and is widely used for
domestic and public supplies south of Polk County. It is also a major source of irrigation water
in eastern Charlotte and southern DeSoto Counties. The intermediate aquifer averages 700 feet
in thickness in southern Charlotte County but thins toward the north and becomes a confining
layer in Polk County (Duerr, 1988).


The bottom and most productive aquifer is the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan
aquifer is a major source of water for agriculture, industry, and public supply except in
Charlotte County and the coastal area of Sarasota County. The Lower Floridan aquifer lies even
deeper, but is comprised of seawater brine and is not used except for injection of wastes. A
middle confining layer composed of dense, crystalline dolomite interbedded with gypsum and
anhydrite separates the overlying freshwater portion of the Upper Floridan aquifer from the
saline Lower Floridan aquifer. Since the Lower Floridan aquifer is neither extensively used or
monitored, it is not discussed in this report.


The Upper Floridan aquifer consists primarily of two porous limestone units, the Suwannee
Limestone and the Avon Park Formation. The two units are separated by the relatively low
permeability Ocala Limestone. The Upper Floridan aquifer, like the intermediate aquifer
system, thickens and dips toward the south ranging in thickness from 1,000 feet in northern Polk
County to over 2,000 feet in southeastern DeSoto County (Wolansky and Garben, 1981).


2.2.2 Water Levels


Ground water levels in the Upper Floridan aquifer have continued to decline since
redevelopment. The Sarasota No. 9 well, located in northern Sarasota County, is one of the
few wells with a long-term record of water levels within the Upper Floridan aquifer. Since the




i. 11 i. 18 1 II


1940's, the annual average water level in this well has declined more than 15 feet while rainfall
at the Bradenton station has remained rather constant (Figure 4). The amplitude of seasonal
water level variations has also increased dramatically since the late 1960's. Sharp declines in
yearly water levels are short-term, usually occurring during the spring season, and are due to
the increase in irrigated row crop acreage in the area.


In 1980, Johnston and others (USGS) published a redevelopment potentiometric surface map
of the Upper Floridan aquifer. By subtracting the 1991 average potentiometric surface of the
Upper Floridan aquifer from the redevelopment surface, the total water level decline since the
1930's can be determined. Figure 5 indicates the decline in the Upper Floridan aquifer water
levels from redevelopment to 1991. Up to 50 feet of decline has occurred in central Manatee
County and portions of east-central Hillsborough and central Polk Counties. As a result of this
decline, some lake levels have decreased and coastal discharge to the Gulf of Mexico has
diminished significantly since redevelopment.


In addition to declining aquifer levels, several lakes along the Highlands Ridge are becoming
severely stressed due to lowered water levels (Figure 6). Lake levels have been in a general
state of decline since the 1960's due to below normal rainfall, ground water pumping, and
alterations to surface water drainage. Crooked Lake, one of the most severely impacted lakes,
has declined in elevation from 124 feet above sea level to less than 110 feet above sea level in
the last thirty years. The lowered lake level has reduced its size from 7,500 acres to 4,500
acres.


2.2.3 Water Quality


As a result of declining ground water levels, water quality degradation is occurring along the
coast and interior portions of the WUCA. Along the coast, seawater is moving inland from the
Gulf of Mexico in the Eastern Tampa Bay region. Figure 7 is a schematic diagram showing the
estimated position of the salt water interface in the Eastern Tampa Bay region. The base of the
interface or "toe" is located furthest inland in the highly permeable zone of the Avon Park
Formation, in the deepest part of the Upper Floridan aquifer. The lateral movement of seawater




il, Iil


is due to the decreased amount of ground water discharge occurring along the coast. This
decrease in discharge is due to heavy pumping in the basin. During 1989, annual average water
levels within the Upper Floridan aquifer were below sea level in southern Hillsborough and
central Manatee Counties. This situation reverses the flow direction in the aquifer and results
in seawater moving inland toward the center of the water level depression. The dominant anion
that signifies the presence of seawater intruding in the aquifer is chloride. Figure 8 indicates
the chloride trend from two Avon Park Formation monitor wells located in southwest
Hillsborough County and northwest Sarasota County, respectively.


Withdrawal of water from wells above zones of poor quality water can cause a phenomenon
termed upcomingg". Vertical movement of poor quality ground water can occur when artesian
pressure drops due to pumping and poor quality water moves upward from deeper zones. In the
inland areas, large head declines in the Upper Floridan aquifer may be contributing to upward
migration of poor quality, highly mineralized ground water across the basal confining unit of the
Upper Floridan aquifer. The dominant anion that indicates the presence of mineralized water
moving upward in the aquifer is sulfate. Figure 9 shows two wells in the Eastern Tampa Bay
area where increasing sulfate trends are evident.


The regional extent of water quality degradation in the Southern WUCA was examined by
analyzing the water quality trends from permitted wells in the basin. Figure 10 is a map of the
Southern WUCA that indicates increasing trends in chloride, sulfate, or total dissolved solids
from water use permitted wells in the basin. A total of 1,132 wells were analyzed across the
basin with increasing trends in over 270 wells. Figure 11 shows three selected WUP wells along
th southwest coast of the basin that illustrate increasing chloride trends.


3.0 WATER USE


Water use in the Southern WUCA is classified as agricultural, industrial, mining, public supply,
and recreational. Other than public supply, more than 98 percent of water use is derived from
ground water. Currently, all water users that hold water use permits for 0.5 mgd or greater are
required to submit metered pumpage to the SWFWMD. However, prior to October, 1990




S. .. I I ... III


agricultural operations were exempt from metering requirements. Therefore, agricultural water
use has been determined by utilizing crop application rates generated from the Agricultural
Irrigation Monitoring (AIM) program and estimates of crop acreage provided by the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) at the University of Florida. Where metered data was
unavailable for non-agricultural water use, permitted quantities were included to determine total
water use in the basin.


In 1989, total ground water use in the Southern WUCA was estimated at 839 mgd (Table 1A).
Agriculture accounted for 536 mgd or 63 percent of total ground water withdrawn in the basin.
Public supply withdrew about 123 mgd or 15 percent. Mining and industrial users utilized
approximately 168 mgd or 20 percent of the total ground water withdrawn in the basin. Table
1A lists the estimated ground water withdrawn by County for the major classifications of use
in the Southern WUCA.


In 1990, total ground water withdrawn in the Southern WUCA was estimated at 806 mgd, a
decline in use of four percent basin-wide (Table 1B). Agricultural water use represented the
most significant decline in water use from 1989-1990. This decrease is mostly attributed to a
decrease in citrus acreage in Polk County of about 8,000 acres due to the December 1989 freeze
and the continued decline in tomato acreage in the Eastern Tampa Bay area primarily due to
economic conditions.


Public supply water use has increased from about 60 mgd in 1970 to about 165 mgd in 1990
(Figure 12). Surface water represented 46 mgd or 28 percent of public supply water use during
1990. Currently, there are 40 public supply utilities that are permitted for 0.5 mgd or greater
in the WUCA that provide potable water to a population of 1,073,480 residents (SWFWMD,
1992).


Agricultural water use includes irrigation quantities associated with agronomics, aquaculture,
citrus, nurseries, improved pasture, sod, strawberries, tomatoes, and other vegetables. Citrus,
tomato, and other vegetable crops comprise the largest irrigated acreage in the Southern WUCA.
Total citrus acreage has remained fairly constant at about 260,000 acres in the WUCA since the




I 1I1


mid-1960s. However, the percentage of citrus acreage irrigated has increased from 45% in.1966
to over 90% in 1990. Water use for citrus irrigation has correspondingly increased from 150
mgd to 330 mgd during the last 25 years (Figure 13). Tomato acreage, principally located in
Hillsborough and Manatee Counties, has increased from less than 5,000 acres in 1965 to more
than 20,000 acres in the late 1980's (Figure 14). In the last few years, tomato acreage has
declined primarily due to economic conditions. This may be a temporary condition and it is
unknown at this time if this trend will continue.


Industrial and mining water use has actually declined from 233 mgd in 1977 to 162 mgd in
1990. The historical reduction in water use is due mainly to the increased recycling of water
implemented by the phosphate mines during the late 1970s and reduced phosphate mining
activity during the late 1980s due to economic conditions.


In 1989, total permitted quantities for all ground water users in the Southern WUCA was
approximately 1,250 mgd (Table 2A). Actual estimated use for the WUCA in 1989 was 839
mgd. In 1990, total permitted quantities for all ground water users increased to 1,266 mgd
(Table 2B). Actual estimated use for the WUCA in 1990 was 806 mgd. The nearly three to
two ratio of permitted to actual use is due to a variety of factors. First, all water use permits
are granted for either six or ten year terms and do not reflect what is actually used at the time
of issuance. The permits reflect the maximum amount of water to be used in any one year
period during the term of the permit, usually the last year prior to the expiration date. Second,
agricultural quantities are calculated for the maximum amount of acreage expected to be planted
during the six or ten year term of the permit. Typically, due to economic conditions and crop
rotation, all acreage is not planted and irrigated during any one year. Third, agricultural
irrigation quantities are determined for two-in-ten year drought conditions and therefore do not
reflect actual use during normal rainfall years.


4.0 IMPACTS ON WATER RESOURCES


The SWFWMD Needs and Sources Plan outlined water use trends for the next thirty years for
all major users in the District. Based upon the results of this study, total ground water use in
the Southern WUCA is projected to increase to 1,580 mgd by the year 2020. The almost




l., 1, 11iI


doubling of water use will further accelerate water level decline in the Upper Floridan aquifer
across the entire Southern WUCA.


Historical trends in the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer are evident by
comparison of the redevelopment potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer with
existing conditions. During redevelopment, water levels near the Gulf coast of Hillsborough
and Manatee Counties were 20 to 30 feet above sea level (Figure 15). Under existing
conditions, water levels in southern Hillsborough and central Manatee Counties are below sea
level during annual average conditions (Figure 16). This decline in water levels causes the flow
direction in the Upper Floridan aquifer to reverse toward the center of the area below sea level.
This increases the potential for saltwater intrusion in the coastal area of Eastern Tampa Bay.


As part of the Eastern Tampa Bay WRAP study, District staff developed a computer flow model
of the SGWB. Using 2020 Needs and Sources water use projections, the flow model was used
to predict the future potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer (Figure 17). This
simulation projects that water levels in the Upper Floridan aquifer will decline to several tens
of feet below sea level in the most severely impacted areas of the basin. Under this scenario,
saltwater would ultimately intrude tens of miles inland.


Upon review of current and projected potentiometric surfaces of the Upper Floridan aquifer,
solute transport models were utilized to predict the movement of the saltwater interface under
existing and 2020 pumping scenarios (Figure 18). In the Eastern Tampa Bay area, the saltwater
interface could move inland as much as three miles under existing pumping conditions during
the next fifty years. If pumpage continues to increase as projected by the Needs and Sources
Plan, the saltwater interface could move inland as much as seven miles from its current position
during the next fifty years.


5.0 SOUTHERN WUCA ACTION PLAN


One of the conclusions from the Eastern Tampa Bay WRAP study was that pumpage outside the
area significantly contributed to the decline in water levels and coastal discharge in southwestern
Hillsborough, western Manatee, and northwest Sarasota Counties. Computer flow modeling




I l, i Ii I II


conducted for the Eastern Tampa Bay project indicates that 10 to 50 percent of water level
decline in the Upper Floridan aquifer since redevelopment in the Eastern Tampa Bay area is
due to pumpage from the remainder of the basin (Figure 19). Historical water level decline and
coastal water quality degradation is well documented throughout much of the Southern Ground
Water Basin. Water demand in the basin is projected to almost double in the next thirty years.
This accumulation of scientific data warrants a basin-wide approach toward management of the
ground water resources in the area. In one of the first steps toward approaching that goal, the
SWFWMD Governing Board approved an action plan with the following major provisions:


* Establish the Southern Ground Water Basin Water Use Caution Area (WUCA)
* Form the Southern Basin WUCA work group
* Reaffirm the Governing Board's priority to develop alternative sources for the area
* Initiate rulemaking that prevents significant new impacts to the MIA
* Combine rulemaking for the long-term WUCA rules and Needs and Sources plan
into one comprehensive management strategy


This report has been prepared for members of the Southern WUCA work group. The
composition of the work group will include a cross section of affected water users and interested
parties. Its major responsibilities will be to develop short- and mid-term recommendations on
water management in the WUCA in an advisory role to the SWFWMD Governing Board.
Development of recommendations from the work group are expected within six to nine months.
Thereafter, rule adoption by the Governing Board is scheduled to be completed within three
months.









Table 1A. Actual* ground-water use in the Southern WUCA (1989).
"_' 989 GROUND-WATER USEIN 1THE SOUTHERN WUCA (MOD) BY COUNTY
Watg UM Type. DI. Crbeb DoS* I Had. Ilhmhlda Iti"dra.he Mm. Polk Saroam TOTAL
Cirus 10.5 58.7 53.2 48.9 17.4 19.2 138.3 1.4 342.8
Nursery 0.7 0.3 0.9 1.1 3.3 6.5 4.5 0.8 18.1
Pasture 7.7 8.4 0.5 5.1 0.6 3.3 0.7 2.5 28.8
Sod 0 2.7 1.5 0 3.9 9.0 8.8 1.9 27.8
Vcgeabics 4.7 6.0 5.8 0 31.5 46.9 1.0 3.6 99.5
Strawberries 0 0 0.5 0 3.2 1.0 0.1 0 4.8
Other 0.1 1.4 1.0 0.6 3.3 1.2 1.4 0.5 9.5
Agriculture (Total) 23.7 77.5 63.4 55.7 63.2 87.1 154 .8 10.7 536.1
Phospha 0 0 0.2 0 6.9 9.3 120.4 0 141.6
Sand 0.2 0 0 <.1 0 0.2 17.1 0 17.6
Mining (Total) 0.2 0 0.2 <.1 6.9 9.5 137.5 0 154.4
Chemical 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 0 0.1
Food 0 0 1.0 0.4 0 0.3 6.5 0.1 8.3
Power 0 0 0 0 0.5 0.2 2.3 0 3.0
Other <.1 0. .0 0.2 <.1 <.t 1.9 0.1 2.5
Industry (Totan <.1 0 1.0 0.6 0.6 0.6O 10.8 0.2 13.9
Golf Cours 0.3 0.3 0 1.2 1.3 0.8 3.7 3.0 10.6
Other 0.3 <.1 / <.1 0.6 0.6 0.7 6.7 1.5 10.6
Recreation (Total) 0.6 0.4 <.1 1. 1.9 1.5 10.4 4.5 21.2
Public Supply (Total) 2.3 1.3 1.7 83 20.5 0.2 61.0 17.8 122.9
.TOTAI': 26.9 .79.2 1.66.4 66.5 93.1 98.91 374.5 33.2 838.7
0 .01as U w niksm


Table 1B. Permitted ground-water use in the Southern WUCA (1989).
O p ND-WoTER USE IN THE SOUTHERN WUCA (MOD) BY
N..v I' :.PCOUNTY"' '__
T W *WAItr Ur Type ". ".el Il.lC ?g9lad HaI s 4 1liBhObi ;. IHgI0u1 b Mwnes Polk Sarmn TOTAL
Citrus 14.3 95.3 63.1 54.3 18.7 30.5 126.8 4.7 407.7
Nurary 0.4 0.3 2.2 2.4 2.7 6.8 4.3 0.4 19.5
Pasture 5.4 30.6 23.2 4.4 1.2 11.8 3.8 20.1 100.5
Sod 0.6 3.3 1.8 0.5 9.6 6.6 1.6 1.2 25.2
Vegetables 6.3 18.6 16.5 0 63.7 110.8 3.5 8.2 227.6
Strawberries 0 0 0.4 0 2.9 0.6 0.2 0 4.1
Other 0.1 1.4 1.0 0.6 3.3 1.2 1.9 0.5 10.0
Agriculture (Total 27.1 149.5 108.2 62.2 102.1 168.3 142.1 35.1 794.6
Phosphao 8.5 7.5 0 23.8 17.6 179.7 0 237. 1
Sand 0.3 0 0 <.1 0.1 0.6 7.6 0 8.7
Mining (Total) 0.3 8.5 7.5 <.1 23.9 18.2 187.3 0 245.8
Chemical 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.4 0 0.4
Food 0 0 1.4 0.5 <.1 0.4 9.9 0.1 12.4
Power 0 0 0 0 0.6 0.4 3.7 0 4.7
Other <.1 <.I 0 0.2 <.1 .1 2.0 0.1 2.7
Industry (Toal) <.1 <.1 1.4 0.7 0.8 0.9 16.0 0.2 20.2
Golf Course 0.4 0.5 / 0 1.4 2.2 1.6 5.4 4.6 16.1
Othcr 0.4 0.1 <.1 0.9 1.0 1.1 8.6 2.8 15.0
Recreation (Total) 0.8 0.6 <.1 2.3 3.2 2.7 14.0 7.4 31.1
Public Supply r(Tota 5.2 5.0 2.4 11.6 23.4 14.2 74.4 22.5 158.7
,"'r*;T'iTOTAL: "33:5 J163.7 N.1.19.6 76.9 '-15S3.4 204.3 433.8 65.2 1250.4


S1 1I II




il 111


Table 2A. Actual* ground-water use in the Southern WUCA (1990).
_' g99 ,OGROUND-WATII USEIIN THB SOUTHERN WUCA (MGD) BY COUNTY
w.iwrTryp. -, ChM D.' DeSl lC Idee Itim-ls I, la Wawrah ManWae Polk SuraW TOTAL
Citrus 9.4 61.2 48.3 52.1 18.0 18.9 89.7 1.4 293.6
Nurcry 1.1 0.9 0.9 2.8 2.8 6.6 4.9 0.7 20.7
Pasture 4.9 4.3 0.8 5.8 1.3 3.2 0.2 1.9 22.4
Sod 4.6 31.6 1.7 0.0 6.0 10.4 3.2 11.0 68.5
Vegetables 1.7 6.0 8.7 0.0 19.4 43.5 0.6 3.4 83.3
Srawberries 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.8 0.9 0.1 0.0 3.8
Other 0.2 1.4 .1.0 0.7 3.7 1.2 1.4 0.3 9.9
Agriculture (Total) 21.9 105.4 61.4 61.4 54.0 84.7 100.1 1.7 507.6
Phosphate 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 10.1 10.9 117.4 0.0 144.0
Sand_ 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 8.6 0.0 9.0
Mining (Total) 0.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 10.1 11.1 126.0 0.0 147.6
Chemical 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.2
Food 0.0 0.0 0.8 0.0 0.0 0.3 5.3 0.1 6.5
Power 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.4 3.3 0.0 4.1
Other 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 1.4 1.6 0.1 3.2
Industry (Total) 0.0 0.0 0. 0.1 0.4 2.1 10.4 0.2 14.0
GolfCourse 0.3 0.2 0.0 1.2 1.2 1.5 4.0 3.2 11.6
Other 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.60.6 0.8 6.4 1.6 10.2
Recreation (Tota 0.5 0.2 0.0 1.8 1.8 2.3 10.4 4.8 21.8
Public Supply (Total) 2.8 1.2 1.7 7.8 19.9 0.2 62.6 18.4 122.6
S47 TrOTAL '" '.25.4 .10.8 64.1 71.1 116.2 100.6 309.5 42.1 805.8









Table 2B. Permitted ground-water use in the Southern WUCA (1990).
'. ERMMT-r DO GROUND-WATER USE IN THE SOUTHERN WUCA (MGD) BY
WW.^^;W.N Y j!>. COUNTY TOTA
".WuterUTyp' .... M,'t.r:ius D':Dl* SHaJM i IGlOl lIes Hillbmrk Mas m Paolk Snamst TOTAL
Citrus 14.1 100.4 65.5 57.2 19.0 30.8 131.2 4.7 422.9
Nunrsy 0.6 0.3 2.2 2.3 2.7 6.9 4.1 0.4 19.5
Pasture 5.5 30.4 23.6 4.4 1.2 12.1 3.6 20.1 100.9
Sod 0.6 3.3 1.8 0.5 9.6 7.6 1.6 1.2 26.2
Vegetables 6.0 19.5 18.6 0.0 62.3 107.1 3.4 8.0 224.9
Strawberries 0.0 6.0 0.4 0.0 2.8 0.6 0.2 0.0 4.0
Other 0.2 1.4 1.0 0.6 3.7 1.2 1.9 0.3 10.3
Agriculture (Total) 27.0 155.3 113.1 65.0 101.3 166.3 146.0 ,34.7 808.7
Phosphate 0.0 8.5 7.5 0.0 22.6 17.7 178.8 0.0 235.1
Sand 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.6 7.6 0.0 8.6
Mining (Total) 0.3 8.5 7.5 0.0 22.7 18.3 186.4 0.0 243.7
Chemical 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.0 0.4
Food 0.0 0.0 1.4 0.5 0.0 0.4 9.9 0.1 12.3
Power 0.0 0.0' 0.0 0.0 0.6 0.4 3.7 0.0 4.7
Otlhr 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 2.3 2.0 0.1 4.6
Industry (Total) 0.0 0.0 1.4 0.7 0.6 3.1 16.0 0.2 22.0
GolfCourse 0.4 0.2 / 0.0 1.5 2.2 1.8 5.2 4.7 16.0
Other 0.4 0.2 0.0 0.9 1.0 1.1 8.5 2.8 14.9
Recreation (Tota 0.8 0.4 0.0 2.4 3.2 2.9 13.7 7.5 30.9
Public Supply (Total) 5.7 6.0 2.4 11.6 23.3 14.3 74.8 23.0 161.1
'. .S TOTAL: : 33.8 1i70.2 .-124.4 79.7 151.1 204.9 436.9 65.4 1266.4




.i ii I Hi 111


Most
Impacted
Area








0 15 JO
I I I
=k In NWl


Southern
Water Use
Caution Area


Figure 1. Location of the Most Impaced Ar (MIA) and the
South Water Use Caution Aea (SWUCA).














Northern
West-Central Florida
Ground-Water Basin



Central
West-Central Florida
Ground-Water Basin


Southern
West-Central Florida
Ground-Water Basin





030 60
wai l
oolrd^


Fiure 2. Location of Floridan aquifer ground-waer basins in the SWFWMD.




Jl i ii 111


. uj
2J


_j 8
. QI 1


tcuj 0
U.)
QCIR


-0


-500 o
z
I
-1000 ooo


- 1500


-2000


Filure 3. Northwest to Southeast hydrologic section across the SGWB.


40-


S30-


i 20


10 -


SARASOTA WELL 9


BRADENTON RAINFALL I -95
0- 85 -m
-75
*-5 65
'II

:25
i.... i* i* I. i .. I. **. II* I* I **I I* ** I
45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95
YEARS SINCE 1900


Figure 4. Hydrograph of Srasot No. 9 well and Brdenton rainfall.




I, i II


< 10 l ft .."
10 20 ft
S20- 30 ft .
30-40 ft
S40-50ft ,. ,-

Generalized delineation
of major ground-water .
basins




Figure 5. Decline in the Floridan aquifer poteniometric surface during average conditions
from 1991 to redevelopment.


0 UM oen-SbWWse
SStresed 0 Undetinmlned
Rpm & sed la ka ww" do lds R Idg At"


:: :






r


Figue 7. Scbemadi diagram of sahwater interface in the Eastern Tampa Bay area.


ROMP TR 9-31 Avon Park
-o 0
Depth 779 F., Case 764 FT.










Sarasota Deep
0 Total Depth 1500 ft.
Total Casing = 1108 ft.



78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94
Years Since 1900


Figure 8. Chloride trends from ROMPTR 9-3 and Sarasota Injtion monitor wells.


2400

2200
2000

1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0


CbJ;2i
-n




H I I






500
WCRWSA-at Sun City Center
WUP 204352, WD-004
Depth 637 FT.,
400 Case Unknown



C 300-



Cer 200 -



S100 Turner Foods Corp.
WUP 207085, WD-06
Depth 1140 FT.,
Case Unknown


76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92
Years Since 1900


I'igur 9. Sulfate concentrations (Im two water use penniued wells i te Easternm Tampa Day Arca.









Water Use Permit Hillsborough
Withdrawal Points -. Polk
with Inreasing
Trends for Chorides, Pi nell
TDS, and Sulfatesi .




S.: .ee Hardee
TDS ':. .. .Hihan
Not Increasing .) '

De Soto *. .
SSarasota .
Southern Basin 0 :....
Water Use \
Caution Area /


Figure 10. WUP wells with inreasin trends in chloride, sulfac, and total dissolved solids in he SGWB.


















r- -.r t I--

S YEASISCKiNM


.e IA. WUN. sMMWSIa.Ls

e M *u o UMKOWN
m ommu.m
On* CA **s Droy
so.















o: ~.
42
















M U M
JIM Y SAR SMS I






















S ace Water wouGround Water

























Vague 12. oistrical publc supply wat er i. the Sdt.n WUCA.
3M200"'Out
O"50 -





































0-
70 72 74 76 78 '80 '82 '84 '86 '88 '90

MSrfac Water WGround Water



Figure 12. Historical public supply water use in dec Saudocrn WUCA.


IIA I i





n


300,000

250,000

un 200,000

& 150,000

100.000

50,000


'66 '68 '70 '72 '74 '76 '78 '80 '82 '84 '86 '88 '90 '92

* Total Planted Acreage
* Estimated Irrigated Acreage


402

335

268

201 ID

134

67

0


Figure 13. historical citu acreage in the Southern WUCA.


30,000


20,000
ga-
w 15,000
10,000

5,000
0


'60 '65 '70 '75 '80 '85
YEAR

Figure 14. Historical Tomato acreage in d(l Southrn WUCA.


(40


"/acre)
89 m

74 I
59 a.



0I
a.

15
a
0


'90


I


11 ;






fl




I---

I I:

100.












~o~Line of qual
poh"WOUCIFIC s urfame
Interval 10 & Dum
is NOWD of 1929.







Fipnlg 5. Pfdcvlopmcn Floridn aquifcrpwcauometnc suface (Johnon and others1980)






L
I I







r





F~dwated
8-1.. D A` I
--10- Line of coud~


Figure 16. Floridan aquifer poenomric surface under 1989 average condidonc.






f)


Estimated
Waer Us
1.580 MOD


t-10. Lineofequal
poemato ric Surfae.
Intel is 10 ft. Dan
is NGVD of 1929.


Fiure 17. Projected 2020 FMridan aquifer potendomric surface.


I I


Cunrat looatlserfll aw*she *1w


dHaltnwlwlm unfdw


uMlsngxwatsufrwnm
*mbl swilifa awe.sn Pith pnoiEStA
2ia-gwiu*w lwnar


Fgu-r 18. Predicted movement of saltwater interface under eiin and future conditions.


IIH ,1 1. .I
















II










< 20%

S20 40%

40-60%

> 60% ---






Figure 19. Percent decline in the Flrid aquifer poteniomenic surface since predevelopment
due to pumpae outside the ETB WUCA.





The Southwest Florida Water Management District (District) does not
discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status. This
nonsciminatfon policy involve every aspect of the District's
functions, including one's access to, participation, employment, or
treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for in the American With Disabilities Act
should contact Gwen Brown, Resource Projects Department, at 904-
796-7211 or 1-800-423-1476, extension 4226; TOO ONLY 1-800-
231-6103; FAX 904-754-6885/SUNCOM 663-6885.




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