Title: Saving Wetlands in Pasco
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00002287/00001
 Material Information
Title: Saving Wetlands in Pasco
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Times
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Saving Wetlands in Pasco, Dec 9, 1994
General Note: Box 10, Folder 14 ( SF-Water Use Caution Areas-SWFWMD - 1993-1994 ), Item 2
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00002287
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text

I TIMES a FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9,
1 ~r'-^^


6 F=t -O W 5tt UA-s- CaAl-


Saving

wetlands

in Pasco

SAta meeting
Wednesday, the Swiftmud
executive director
pinpoints several advances
being made to end the
water crisis

By WES PLAIT


LAND O'LAKES The battle
to save central Pasco's damaged
wetlands, and to protect the rest,
is far from over.
But Pete Hubbell, executive di-
rector of the Southwest Florida
Water Management District, says
big strides have been made toward
that end during the past eight
months.
He spoke about the wetlands
situation at Wednesday's meeting
of the Coalition of Lake Associa-
tions at the Land O'Lakes Commu-
nity Center. Much attention has
been focused on the issue in the
past year as heavy well field pump-
ing and continued drought have
dried up Pasco wetlands, lakes and
private wells.
Hubbell noted these advances:
m A review commission is
"taking a hard look at what's being
done and how it's being done at
Swiftmud," he said.
The Florida Legislature has
new leadership on its natural re-
source committees, and Pasco
County has a voice in the Senate
committee's chairwoman, Ginny
Brown-Waite, R-Spring Hill.
The governor's office has is-
sued a draft study of state water
resources.
Closer to home, Swiftmud
has overseen the creation of the
Tampa Bay Water Coordinating
Council, a group of county and city
leaders from Hillsbbrough, Pinel-
las and Pasco counties who find
more efficient and environmentally
friendly water sources.


"Water is a high priority. It's
under a lot of scrutiny," Hubbell
told the audience of about 30 peo-
ple. "We're trying to find a way to
move forward without every an-
swer being 7 miles of pipeline in
Pasco or new groundwater
sources."
The coordinating council,
which has met four times and next
meets in January in New Port
Richey, is considering a variety of
resource options, ranging from de-
salination to treated effluent to
aggressive conservation.
The January meeting is expec-
ted to focus on proposals to run
pipelines to Hernando, Citrus and
Polk counties to supplement the
Suncoast's water supply.
"I've got real high hopes that
we're going to move away from
the status quo and look at new
ways of developing water supplies
and mitigating impact on the envi-
ronment," Hubbell said. "We can't
continue to plan for growth with-
out pinpointing where the water
resources are and how finite those
resources are."
The outcome ultimately will
rely on the cooperation of city and
county governments, Swiftmud
and the West Coast Regional Wa-
ter Supply Authority, which oper-
ates several well fields in Pasco to
supply drinking and sprinkling wa-
ter to Hillsborough and Pinellas
counties, he said.
- For example, Hubbell said, an
estimated 50-million gallons of wa-
ter a day could be saved through a
combination of higher water rates,
xeriscaping techniques and land-
scape ordinances.
SThe Swiftmud director also
talked about the concept of co-lo-
cation building a desalination
plant on the Gulf of Mexico and
putting a power plant next door.
SDuring off-peak hours, when a
power company would ordinarily
lose money on unused energy, the
desalination plant would operate.
The .power facility would do its
part by diluting troublesome brine,
a desalination by-product, with bil-
lions of gallons of outflowing cool-
ant water pumped from the power
plant into the gulf.
"All we have to do is find a
power company that wants to get
into the water business," Hubbell
said.




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