Title: The Voice of Business Speaks
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00002140/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Voice of Business Speaks
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Associated Industries of Florida
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: The Voice of Business Speaks, Feb 2, 1976, No. 76-3
General Note: Box 10, Folder 2 ( SF Taxation, ad valorem tax referendum-SWFWMD-1976 - 1976 ), Item 92
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00002140
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text


(WHE ,


VOICE OF BUSINESS


pjlVE D SPEAKS

Soe.1 (, 1976
, G'ZihCT, phone~ 9 414-7173 P. 0. Box 784 TallhIa.. Flodrl


No. 76-3


February 2, 1976


FLORIDA TO GAIN Florida's population growth predictions indicate she will gain five
CONGRESSIONAL congressional seats after the 1980 census, largest jump in the country, giving
SEATS the state 20 House members, seventh largest delegation in the nation. State
Economist Jay Yelton said Florida's population, now estimated at 8.4 million
compared to 6.8 million in the 1970 census, is projected at 9.94 million by
1980, ar in6reqse of 45 percent during the current decade. This compares with
a 10 to 15 percent growth increase estimated for the nation as a whole during
thel years ending wi3h 1980. The figures are based on two computer sfE-di's, .....
one by Wichita State University, the other by The New York Times. House seat
gains indicated for other states include two for Texas and one each for Tennes-
see, Arizona, Arkansas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, California, and Oregon.
The study shows New York will drop four seats; Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois
two each; and Michigan, Indiana, Missouri, Kansas, and South Dakota, one each.
POLICE UNION The Police Benevolent Association, first union to bargain collectively
SEEKS *MIND with the state, is asking for 25 percent pay hikes and other "mind blowing"
BLOWING" BENE- demands, chief negotiator Dean Miekle reported. The PBA represents Highway
FITS Patrol, Marine Patrol, Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission officers, beverage
agents, and state university police. Miekle said he didn't envision this group
getting more than anybody else in state government. A Senate'Ways and Means
subcommittee is considering a proposal to give all state employees a flat $360
a year increase plus a three percent salary hike.
NATIONAL UNION The American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, which
MAKING HEAVY hopes to become the major union for Florida's 90,000 state workers, has reached
PUSH IN FLORIVA tentative agreement on a collective bargaining unit for 15,000 "human services"
FOR PUBLIC workers, including prison guards. 'The union has begun a public pitch for higher
EMPLOYEES pay, cost of living adjustments, and fully paid life and health insurance. AFSCME
is making a major push in Florida, first Southern state to give public employees
collective bargaining rights, and shortly is expected to petition to represent
some 9,000 professional workers in all state agencies.
UNIONS GET HELP On the national scene, organized labor saw A major victory in U.S. District
IN SIP TO DESTROV Judge Charles Richey's ruling that the legal aid arm of the National Right to Work
"RIGHT TO WORK" Committee operates as a front for employers who are trying to weaken unions. He
COMMITTEE set February 20 for a show cause hearing on why he should not enjoin the group
from accepting contributions from interested employers.
VOTERS TO DECIDE Emerging as a strong issue in the March 9 primary is a proposed constitu-
OW WATER MANAGE- tional amendment which calls on voters to decide whether they want water manage-
MENT MILLAGE ment and if they favor property taxes to support it. Governor Reubin Askew,
Lieutenant Governor Jim Williams, Agriculture Commissioner Doyle Conner, Attorney
General Robert Shevin, and legislative environmental committee leaders favor it.
Art Marshall of Gainesville, former Chairman of the St. Johns Water Management
District and semi-retired biologist Johnny Jones, Executive Director of the Florida
Wildlife Federation, and Senator Kenneth MacKay (D-Ocala) oppose it. Jones con-
tends water management districts should be state agencies under the Department
of Natural Resources with direct appeal to the Cabinet. Marshall says users of
the water should pay for its management, not general property owners.


The proposed financial disclosure amendment, pushed hard by Governor Askew,
would take lawyers out of the Legislature, Rex Farrior, Jr., President of the
Florida Bar, told the Jacksonville Bar Association. Lawyers, once dominant in the
Legislature, now make up 22 percent of the Senate and 23 percent of the House, but
would be forced completely out by restrictions imposed in partnerships and other
aspects of legal practice by the amendment which would require top state officials,
legislators, and candidates to file copies of their income tax returns and annual
net worth statements, according to Farrior.
(more)


BAR PRESIDENT
HITS FINANCIAL
DISCLOSURE AMEND-
MENT


I I






CRIMINAL R
WILL BE CL
TO PROSPECT
EMPLOYERS




1 "-


ECORDS Schedld to become effective March lI ~regulations of the federal
OSED Law EnforcemepAssistance Administration wh close criminal rec
TIVE to all but law enforcement people. This means a gvernor could e
.backgroound.of top ,appointees, and .idividual, or company coul diiedrmine
the t inl iiqry of ~4es9V s h hdl Tf*iancial affairs, a 4i company
could1 not fin oew whether cepaira 4 e% fnto homes are con A or
child molesters. Law enforcement people oppose the requlat' b. jA ency
S-'Iafing such information would be subject to possible fines U9
fufal funds cut off. LEAA was created by the 1967 Safe S ts 0 a funding
'' geny to,.help state and local law enforcement agencies im p services. Florida
law enforcement agencies have LEAA grants this fiscal year o approximately $20.3
million. f -., .- *st


FOBEIGT OW e S
CAML .-XAXED .
BY LC'AL GOVERN-
MENTS

SEMINOLES SETTLE
ON PRICE OF LAND



GOVERNOR WANTS
GAS TAX TO
BUILD HIGHWAYS




PSC APPROVES
RATE INCREASE
FOR TRUCKERS -
DOT MAY PROTEST

ECONOMIC PROS-
PECTS INDICATE
GRADUAL RECOVERY






UNEMPLOYMENT





STATE ECONOMIST
PREDICTS --

BUOGET INCREASES
FOR ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT AND
TOURISM

MONSANTO HEAD
MAKES RECOMMEN-
DATIONS


Reversing a -rul4 iA~ffeCt for rok~-'than a-*ntury, the .s.'S:,pres '-.
Court told state-a. d Local go._ vernntsAfm.h may-. tax .imported goods .that .rem ..
in original form-or package. Tha is expected to increase costs of merchandise
imported from abroad.

Seminole Tribes of Florida voted to accept the federal government offer
of $16 million, S~0 cents an acre, for lands they claim were taken during the
Indian wars of 1823 and 1832 and by the 1840 Indian removal act. This ends a
25 year fight by the Seminoles to get pay for the 3 million acres which cover
most of Florida. They asked $47 million when they first went to court in 1950.

Governor Askew, who wants to increase the gasoline tax -- his study
committee recommended 7.5 percent at the wholesale level, equal to 2.8 percent
for consumers, -- to increase revenue and stimulate road construction, has the
backing of R. H. Sea.on, President of the Florida Building and Construction Trades
Council, but faces opposition of legislative leaders. Askew contends little if
any primary highways will be built without the gas tax hike and that some $122
million in federal matching funds would.be lost.

The Public Service Commission approved minimum rates sought by truckers
hauling dirt and rock, sending average-costs up 10 to 15 percent. The Depart-
ment of Transportation, claiming this will boost highway construction costs, may
challenge the ruling in court.

Florida has begun a gradual economic recovery, according to a consensus
of economists, financiers, and business loaders surveyed by The Miami Herald.
Drs. Robert F. Lanzillotti and R. Blaine Roberts of the University of Florida
reported to the Florida Council of 100 that tourist related sectors and manu-
facturing should experience a strong recovery in production and employment this
year. ,They predict a 13.3 percent increase in personal income in the state,
narrowed to 6.6 percent when inflation is figured in. Their unemployment rate
forecast is 8 percent compared with last year's 10 percent. They see modest
recovery in the construction industry.

The number of persons unemployed in Florida dropped from 406,100 in
November to 395,800 in December, but the state's seasonally adjusted unemployment
rate remained at 13 percent for the third consecutive month the Commerce Depart-
ment reported. The national rate for December and January was 8.3 percent. The
41,300 job increases in Florida resulted from normal December hiring by retail
stores.

State Economist Jay Yelton told the House Finance and Taxation Committee
that economic revival aftde-two years'-f recession probably will be long and slow
with a new dip possible in late 1977. -

The House Commerce Committee has called for Department of Commerce budget )
increases of $1 to $3 million for economic development and $2 to $6.5 million
for tourism development.

Clarence E. Heiserman, Pensacola Plant Manager, Monsanto Textiles Company,
appearing before the House Select Committee on Economic Development, recommended
the following state action to encourage economic development: establish areas
for industrial sites in areas of under development; encourage and assist develop-
ment of transportation in these areas; adopt a viable loan plan to aid industry
in location and expansion projects; repeal or reduce the 4 perceAt tta oan machainary
and equipment, including pollution abatement equipment; adjust downward either the
sales tax or property tax to offset the corporate income tax to provide a fair in-
dustrial tax base; repeal every environmental law that exceeds federal law; in
concert with industry encourage and purse alternative energy sources and supply
and develop land-water-property rights legislation meaningful to industrial growth
and renewal; provide tax rebates or tax credits as awards for hiring new employees,
training programs, plant expansion, plant renewal, environmental achievements; pro-
vide tax deferrals or tax increments for new plants, new industry, additions, etc.;
develop, stay with, and advertise a long. range plan for industrial development in
Florida; quit using the words "clean industry" which imply we now have dirty industry
and don't want anymore like it.


~ I_lL__




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs