Title: Summary of Interim Project
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00001575/00001
 Material Information
Title: Summary of Interim Project
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Environmental Lawmaking in Florida After NAFTA and GATT Presented at Joint Meeting of the Committee on Agriculture, Committee on Environmental Protection and the Committee on Water Resource Management on January 9, 1997.
General Note: Box 8, Folder 7 ( Vail Conference, 1997 - 1997 ), Item 53
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: WL00001575
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text





SUMMARY OF INTERIM PROJECT


ENVIRONMENTAL LAWMAKING IN FLORIDA AFTER NAFTA AND GATT
































Presented at Joint Meeting of the Committee on Agriculture, Committee on
Environmental Protection and the Committee on Water and Resource Management on
January 9, 1997.









EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


Concerns that international trade agreements will invalidate state
environmental laws or undermine state sovereignty are overstated.
While international trade agreements do place limits on state
governments, these limits are similar to the limits the United States
Constitution imposes on the ability of states to regulate interstate
commerce, and these restrictions seldom impact state environmental
laws.

International trade agreements do not prevent states from passing and
vigorously enforcing laws or from setting environmental or health
standards. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and
the Water Trade Organization (WTO) do not require United States
federal or state governments to adopt lower international food and
safety standards. Neither NAFTA or WTO panels can autonomously
change or challenge state laws. While these panels can rule on
whether states laws are consistent with the international trade
agreements, and can enforce these decisions through trade
restrictions, these rulings have no legally binding effect on state
governments. Only the United States federal government can
challenge state laws in United States courts when a state law conflicts
with NAFTA or the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT).


53.II1




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