Title: Revisiting Today's Taboos in Water Resource Management: Figure 5: Treatment Facility Within Jurisdictional Waters
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/WL00001496/00001
 Material Information
Title: Revisiting Today's Taboos in Water Resource Management: Figure 5: Treatment Facility Within Jurisdictional Waters
Physical Description: Photograph
Language: English
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
Abstract: Revisiting Today's Taboos in Water Resource Management: Figure 5: Treatment Facility Within Jurisdictional Waters
General Note: Box 8, Folder 6 ( Vail Conference, 1996 - 1996 ), Item 22
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: WL00001496
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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LAGOON


Sediments are removed to
the historic hard sand
bottom within Waters of the
State; the treatment area is
stabilized, revegitated, and
provides improved water
quality and habitat within
the lagoon.


------ WATERS OF THE STATE -- -



IEATMENT FACILITY ___ MEAN HIGH TIDE


TREATMENT FACILITY WITHIN

JURISDICTIONAL WATERS


Figure 5


CATCH


BULKHEAD
"f STIORATER


SEDIMENT REMOVED


RIP RAP


MNVC~HMC-MMCI~CCcN


cMhhhLc~-MhhMhhMMLk


g~Fl~no)ka~N~









wakes. Within this area, a number of physical and or biological treatment steps may take
place. Because the area would be stabilized, aquatic vegetation might be suitable as one of
the treatment devices. In any event, the site would be improved and water leaving the
treatment site would be of higher quality. With the land costs almost nonexistent and earth
moving a minimum, this treatment system could be constructed at a fraction of the costs
associated with an upland system offering similar benefits.

This approach to stormwater management is not advocated for all situations. There are in-
stream habitat areas that are not suited for being included into a treatment facility due to the
high quality of the instream environment In these situations, the more conventional
approach to stormwater management would be warranted. It is possible, however, that if
more economical instream approaches were used in those areas best suited for this use,
additional financial resources would be available to focus attention on the more difficult
sites.

Another possible application of the in-system approach that uses state waters for the
treatment of private stormwater discharges involves Lake Apopka. Lake Apopka, a
36,000-acre lake in central Florida, is the state's most polluted large lake (Figure 6). The
lake has a long history of abuse that includes municipal and industrial wastewater
discharges and untreated agricultural stormwater discharges from 18,000 acres of muck
farms adjacent to its shores. This lake was once a mecca for anglers seeking traditional
game fish among its native plant-dominated shores. Today this once world renown sport
fishing paradise is essentially worthless as a recreational area. At its zenith, the lake
supported approximately twenty-one thriving fish camps. These camps posted an average
annual income of about $37,000 each in the mid-1950's. Today this would be equal to $5
million of direct income in 1995 dollars. The net value attributed to fish camp activity
alone would exceed $12 million. The value of a clean Lake Apopka would greatly exceed
the fishery value when the recreation and land valuations are considered.

In 1985, the Florida legislature passed the Lake Apopka Restoration Act making $15
million available to purchase land for a marsh flow-way to help restore Lake Apopka. In
1987, the Surface Water Improvement and Management (SWIM) Act was passed by the
Florida Legislature. This act named Lake Apopka and five other waterbodies in the state
as priority waters that merit the resources of the state and the water management districts
for their restoration and protection. The St. Johns River Water Management District has
developed a plan for the restoration of Lake Apopka. A critical aspect of this restoration
plan is the control of the stormwater discharges for the 13,000 acres of remaining muck
farms. To do so, using the conventional processes of upland and on-site holding ponds,



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